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The Big Stone Gap post. [volume] (Big Stone Gap, Wise County, Va.) 1892-1928, February 15, 1894, Image 1

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~^ BIG STONE GAP, WISE COUNTY, VAT THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1894. | NO~8.
[vol. ii.
I
?
1?. C,. L. *lfi??"<J.
BCHMOND& RICHMOND,
LAWYERS.
_ _ YA.
BE cn ? i
JOS. L. KELLY.
I AVERS. -
OFFICES IN AYERS BUILDING
Cis' Ston? Cap. Va. _
^VILMAM wallis,
?nRNEY-AT-LAW
AND CONVEYANCER,
B5C Stono Car. Vs.
. ?.r 1.4* SoCittJ ?I
; ... ... ? el -. : F"
h a. v/. SKEEN,
ttorney at-law,
fei^ S!:"ir> Gap, Virginia.
R, T. IRVINE, I
^TORNEY AT-LAW.
i
Ia i .. ... Seid Bnlitfinjr, We?d Ar?:,*-, j
? jr. stono Gap. Virginia.
L. TURNER MAURY,
Ittorney-at-law.
Big Stone Cap. Virginia.
(WALTER E. ADDISON,
ff tor key-at-law. j
( 31 - in Sr !.. :? Kntl <:??<*. !
;jg Stono Gap. Virginia.
:. . r.o: i ' ?? ??.. r- r ?vj, ?TIna C.H. T>
BURNS & FULTON.,
|ttorneys-at-law, j
>. - . .v. * uti'MMckftiwon i'?3n'.i*?.?Ad I
& j ? iv: ???!.. JCS. C. S.tTNCK,
JCAN. M ATH EWS & MAYNOR,
^torneys-at-law,
*ig S:o;ic Gap, Virginia.
jktt?n:i*n t?Coll' :tlons n ::<'. freaipt KcmllAnta. j
,?g**?)?!,n'iscC 'J. ? i mji.i.k;i,K?rUi
ALDCnSON & MILLER,
ttorne ys-at-law. I
pt nU?i to *l! l>?i?iBOfHM>trnsJ?il i? us. Ad- j
r?.? dtlicr **.'i*e C. M . Va., *r Norton. T*. !
-???~ ;
M. G. ELY,
ttorney at-law, j
Turkoy Cove, L*?7t Oo., V?,
J. VV. KELLY,
YSICiAN^uSURGE?N, !
00r? |n |i, ui; ?.yrr?. Bljck, !
Blci Stone (hip, V!r?!ril?.
Roopeml PVo.i.i.t ly to (;.?.!)-, R*th
?.iy ?ml Niulit. 13-if i
C. D. KUNKEL,
YSICI AN am> surgeon, i
pig Stone Gap, Virginia,
i.u: rli'lnitv.
M. H. REEVE, M. O.
PESTS DISEASES OF WOMEN
EXCLUSIVELY.
:te: Main St. Bristol, Tenn.
DR. j. C. PR UN ER,
DENTIST,
Room No. 9, Contra! Hot?L
''? '' < ? ? ? tho .'i Sf'ji.Jity in Mrh
'' ' *? " ? ? : * '?erriet*? ?he?n!d
? ??? !'t fc ,u. -. ,1.-.; dar? iuiimg
S. W. TH ACKER,
[vu engineer and
surveyor,
pig Stone Gap, Virginia.
C:U ?">1 l.-.n-l Work r, SneciaUr.
.'r>i> ?*? tlj*, V* !
r...,
*-*t? City, \'n.
[CKSON & BLANK EN SH'lP, j
ttorneys-at-law, |
Jonosviile, Virgflnia.
L*"'.' '. ' ' * - ?' ' ?-i - ? i?: -.1! 1
S. D. HURD,
RCHITECT,
B'g Stone Gap, V^.
SPECIFICATIONS
UTI, AN D ESTIMATES ;
F -T "BCUTRIi is 4 1MIOK??CH
ART1ST.'C HASSER
f"HG PALKCE,
JonesvUls, Va.,
W* COuK, PROPRIETOR.
I *'* " !^ ,,<, :>l i ot'! vf S?ulUwMt. ;
??? '"' " '.: *K?????i3fn uk\ fondecud
tr,8:., . ... ' r?\ti t? roKa|Rl- ;
K , , sal?rtU?. Karg, e4?. '
???'-L,'"'"' aiUnttaa j(i??n t?
??? tbtw co?aft?n?y?. ? i
mmnliiiin m
MARLER H?NGSED.
II? Talked for Ten Minutes on the ScaflP.?M
But Did Not Confess
Pjxeville, Ky., Teh. ia? The sheriff
read the death warrant to Marlea* at
8:3? o'clock Friday morning-, and ho
was dressed for the execution. He
slept very little during- the night and
prayed most all the morning-. The con?
demned man was allowed an hour by
Sheriff Colson, which he devoted to
talking- with his sisters and spiritual
advisers, lie was vory nervous. The
drop fell at 11:05, and Marler was dead
in tbirtooa minutes, fie talked for ten
minutes on tho scaffold, but did not
confess. Marler's is the first legal
hanging- that has ever occurrod in Bell
county.
The crime for which Bob Marler paid
the penalty was the murder of
Mrs. Mary E. Bowdon, who was
at the thee keeping- a board?
ing house for miners at tho Mingo
mines, near Middlesborough The deed
was done on' Monday, August 28, 18?3.
As the early train on the Middlesbor?
ough Belt railroad was going from the
town to the Minjfo mines, and when
about one-half the distance had been
made, the few passengers In the one
coach of the train were startled by a
report of a gun. a crash of a window
pane and a cr}* from the lady passen?
ger. It whs found that a bullet tired
by some one on the outside had passod
through the window within a few
inches of the head of the conductor, j
John Chapman, and had struck
Mrs. Bowdon, who was seated on tho j
opposite side of the car. The wound j
was mortal, the unfortunate woman j
living only about twenty-four hours I
after it was inflicted The train was
Stopped, but nothing could be seen of
the murderous miscreant who had fired !
the deadly shot. A clew, which after?
ward proved important, was, however,
discovered. Rain had fallen tho night
before and the ground was consequent?
ly soft Near an old stump alongside
the railroad tracks were found as of J
one man who had worn shoes which |
were not mates. Tho shoe on the one !
foot made a plain track, while that on j
the other showed that it was sledded
with hob-nails. The track was fol?
lowed to near tho home of George Mar?
ler. With that clew for a start, the
officers brought to light a murderous
plot in which the Marler brothers,
Ucorge and Fob, were the principals.
The Mailers had a quarrel with Mr.
John F. Long, a lumberman, over a
settlement, hong was supposed to be
on the train, and Bob Marler, when he
fired the shot, mistook tho conductor
for him. The Marlers were tried and
Bob found guilty aud sentenced to
death, his brother being given a life
sentence An attempt was made to
lynch tho condemned man, but the
militia was called out aud the mob re?
pulsed.
MR. BLAND
e4;itort Over tho Succcns of His Silver
Ho Decline* Now to illako Any Modifica?
tions or ConcesHloua.
Washington, Feb. 10.?Representa?
tive Bland is so elated over the support
which Iiis bill has received that he de?
clines now to make any of the modifi?
cations or concessions which Thursday
he volunteered as a compromise. The
bill, therafore, objectionable as it is,
Will pass the house probably Monday, j
Tho only purpose of the opposition j
made by eastern democrats is to con- j
vince, as they say, the business inter?
ests of tho country that the eastern
democracy still remains pledged to
sound money, and that the silver heresy
is advocated only by tho democracy of
the south and west This, they says,
is the only reason why the3' keep up
their opposition. The administration
has failed to eomo to their rescue, and
there aro not enough republicans who
will vote with the anti-silver men on i
Monday to defeat the bilL
Mr. Bailey, author of the resolution
doolarlng it the sense of tho house that
Secretary Carlisle has no right to use
the money obtained by the bond salo
for tho purpose of meeting tho expend- j
itures of the government, said Friday j
afternoon that the passage of the Bland
bill would make unnecessary at this
time the adoption of the resolution.
There are various reasons for Mr.
Bailey's sudden change of plan. One is
the announcement that the elections j
committee is anxious to call up one of .
the contested election cases, and since
it, unlike the judiciary committee, is j
privileged, Mr. Bailey would probably
find it ditiieult to bring- his resolution J
before the house. Again, Secretary !
Carlisle's tacit acquie&conce in the
Bland bill, so far as the first section is
concerned, makes it nocessary for tho
house to pass tho Bnile3r resolution, os- i
pecially as thero is a probability that \
the son ate may adopt a similar roaolu- |
lion, offered by Senator Quay.
A Parson Polioenian.
Bahboubsville, Ky., Feb. 10. ? R?v. J.
H. liioks, pastor of tho First Baptist 1
church, of this city, has been appointed j
by the city council as policeman in tho
Third ward, to succeed James Bow- j
man, indicted for killing William Reed?
er. This is the first ease on record of
a minister, engaged in active church
work, accepting a position of this char- ,
acter. His church may take action in i
tho matter.
Pension Swindler Sontrnced.
Springfield, 111., Feb. io.?Wm. W. ;
Woods, of DeSoto, who claimed to have
served through the Mexican war in
place of his uncle, Isaac Burke, in the
Fourth Tennessee regiment, Friday
entered a plea of guilty to making
false pension claims, and was sen?
tenced to one year in the penitontiary. j
I.lbby Prison Anniversary.
Chicago, Feh 10.?-Union ex-priaoners '
of war took Libby prison, on Wabasli
avenue, by storm Friday. It is the
thirtieth anniversary of the historical
tunnel escape from that prison, and in
commemorating- the day and evont the
veterans held an ail-day reunion and ;
reception. One hundred and nine ofii: ,
eers made their escape, but since the
close of the war death has reaped quite
a harvest in their ranks. There are
only a few living, and only a small part
of that number were in attendance.
They spent most of tho day in looking
over the thousand relics of war times.
A Ebzsavu in Kansas.
EiiroEJA,Kau,; Feb. 1^? The worst
blizaard and snow storm experienced
I hero for years prevailed ail thiy Sun
>d<ty. The snow i.s twelve to fourteou
inches deep, with no appearance dt
abating.
FOREIGN NOTES.
The Russo-G-erman Treaty Is Not*
a Foot.
A Big Pari? Bauk In tho Liquidator's
Ilandii-Bnmorvd Death of Kin* Lo
bongrnltt-The Gruad Old Mau In
Pari?, Cblpper and Sprightly.
Berlin, Fob. 12.? Tho Russo-Gorman
treaty has been signed for both coun?
tries.
Paris. Feb. 12.?On the demand of
the Bank of Franco the Banque
D'Escompte has been placed in the
hands of a liquidator.
As already cabled to the Associated
Press. Baron Soubeyran, ex-depnty
and a director of the Banque D*Ee
compte, wtvs arrested on charges con?
nected with the management of tho
bank, and the directors resigned on
the Bank of Franco demanding a'judi
cial liquidation.
Paris, Feb. 12.?Mr. Gladstone and
his party arrived hero Saturday morn*
inpT from Hiarritz and wore Tvelcomod
by numbers of people who had gath?
ered on the platform. The British
premier was in oxcolitat spirits and
left at 10:30 r- m. for London.
Cat?10*7}!. Feb. 12.?It is rumored j
here that. King Lobengula i? dead.
Lcxi>ow, Fob. 12.?A dispatch to the
Daily News from Vienna says: An oftl
cer of the general stai? has been ar?
rested charged with the grave crime of j
forging checks to the amount of 20,000 j
f/orins. Tho officr belongs to a hi^rh |
family, but he was a persistent gam- j
bier and is also alleged to have had a j
liaison with an actrcaa.
A KENTUCKY FARMER
Murdered Near Klktoa?Tha Coroner's
Jnry rinds Two Ifien Guilty.
Elkton, fKy., l ob. 12?Tho dead
body of John Koyd, a young farmor
living a few miles north of this place,
in Todd county, was found near the
home of Mrs. IlarriH, a widow. The
coroner's inquest adduced evidenco as
follows:
John Boyd, tho murdered man, was
seen in company with "Dandy" Gibson,
known also as "Dandy" Grower, and
James (iibson, who is alao known as
James Jones. Tboy had been to Ed j
Stokes' distillery and oil tilled up on ?
whisky and then went, to tho home of
the widow iiarri:-.
Tho mo.-it Important witness before
the coroner's jury was a man named
Harris, son of the widow, tie stated I
that when the three men started to I
leave the house thoy were all very
drunk, and when thoy had gone only a j
short distance a quarrel ensued, which !
resulted iu Jonas pelting Boyd with
rocks.
After the fight the three re tum od to
tho house for a short time and again
left together.
This was the last seen of Boyd until
his dead body was found lu the woods
by J. M. HIghtowor whllo out rabbit
hunting.
The body was stiff, and had ovidont
ly been dead several hour.?. It was
taken to a oabin near by. Over tho
left oyo was a largo black bruise that
had evidently been reads by an instru?
ment that had a smooth surface.
Tho noso had bled profusely. A sim?
ilar blow had been rcce ived on the I
right cheek. The absence of tho two
young men. Brewer and Jones, was
conspicuous at the trhil and in tho
neighborhood, and it is generally be?
lieved thoy hare fled the country.
All the evidence indicated their guilt,
and the jury rendered a verdict recom?
mending thoir immediate arrest end
an investigation by the grand jury.
FOURTH MURDER,
Huxrmn Lifo Con till tins to Ho Cheap Around
Uirru'nghsim.
Birmingham, Ah:., Feb. 13.?Paul Lo?
casio, ou agod Greek merchant, is in
jail for the murder of his wife. Shortly
after dark Sunday night residents in
the neighborhood of where Locasio
lived heard piercing screams, and rush?
ing out saw Locasio dragging the pros?
trate form of his wife across the street
When he saw the people coming ho
fled, pursued by a large crowd, who
caught him. The police arrived in time
to hurry Locasio to jaiL
The woman had a wound threo
inches deep in hor head. Beside her
lay a heavy spade, which was covered
with blood. i>ho died shortly after- <
ward. Tho only cause known for tho j
murder is that it resulted from a j
domestie quarrel. Locasio acknowl- j
edges the crime but r?fuae3 to talk
further. This is the fourth murder in
and around Birmingham within two
days.
-o. ??
Francs May Lobs the Panama Canal, j
Panama, Feb. 12.?If no satisfactory i
arrangement be reached before October
the Panama canal will pnsn definitely
from the hands of Frenchmen, is a fact
not to be disputed. The Columbian
government is disgusted, and will ou no
consideration whatever renew tho
franchise if it be again allowed to
lapse.
Child Snrnsd to Death.
HopcrNSTiLLE, Ky., Feb. 13.? While
playing with a party of children at hor
home, east of this city, Lizzie Turner,
the uino-yoar-old daughter of James
Turner, accidentally ?et fire to her
clothing at the grate, and was so ter?
ribly burned before the flames could
be extinguished that she died In a few
hours.
Ths Straw Caught Flra.
Mahtissvili.e, lud., Feb. 12.? Mrs.
Shircmuu started to town with hot
bricks in the loose straw to keep her
feet warm. The straw blazed up unex?
pectedly and her olothing caught fire,
burning her frightfully before help ar?
rived. Her recovery is doubtful
Two Coal Boats Bunfc.
Bellairk. O., Feb. 12.? The steamer
Josh Cook, of Pittsburgh, ran into a
Baltimore & Ohio railroad bridgo pier
here Sunday afternoon, and sank twq
coal boats and one barge, containingp
about 75,000 bushels of ooaL &o lives
were loafc.
"Wotstar In Clay. ?
Concokp, If. EL, Fob. 12.?Carl Con?
rads, tho Now York sculptor, has ju;i?t
completed the clay model of Webster
from which tho new mar bio statue or*
dercd by tho last legislature will bo
made. Competent judges pronounce it
?no of the fiite.it works of art ever seen
in the state. _
FIFTY-THIRD^ CONG?ES?.
Beoond 5*e*>?2on.
. JfMiumntoW, Fob. c?S?m.*ra?The fetferal
rieottona repeal bill occtr>Jod the entire ses?
sion of the senate Monday. 3eoi>t0f Chandlot |
; concluded his speech, which was extended j
t through the pMt ttro or three weeks, and was j
iollowed by Senator Palmer, wha argued that '
the law having entirely failed oi its purpose,
and being generally obnoxioua, should be re.
pealed. An animated controversy of the fran?
chise qualifications of tho stato constitutions
of Mississippi and Massachusetts took place
between Senators Prye aad Ho*r on one side
and Senators Gray and Bate on the other.
HotfSK?The speeches on tho MoCreary Ha?
waiian resolutions Monday were rather pep?
pery. Gens. Oates and Whseler, of Alabama,
were warm in plaodlts of the president's
Hawaiian policy. Johnson, of Indiana, with a
magnificent pair of lungs and eoathhcg a emo?
tives, sailed into tho qcestien as if out for a
scalp. Patterson, of Tennessee, exhertad a
'little in the president's faTor, and th*n Bou
'telle let loose. Ho punctured the president's
policy in aooentuated end salted adjectives.
Tho finale of the speech was rathe* bUier, and'
showed that degree of warmth which was'
bound 10 effervesce aft*r having been re?
strained.
Washivotos, Feb. 7.?Senats.?The senet*
finance committee, Tuesday, deelded not to
hear orally any of the interest* eJTeoted by the
Wilson tariff bilL The OaIo wool men were on
hand ready with their tale of woo, but bad only
trouble for '.heir pains." Senator Pettigrew in?
troduced an amendisont intended to bo offered
by him to the Wilson tariff Bill, providing for
the appointment of a cemmissioc of nro per?
sons, to be known as the easterns commission.
It is to be thu duty of the proposed commission
to cather data concerning tariff rates and their
ciTeoi on industries In this and other countries
and report iheir findings to congress.
Houss?Tho republicans wero determined
Tuesday that tho MoCrcaT rc6clutica endorsr
ing the president's Hawaiian policy should not
pass unleas there was a quorum of the demo?
crats present, and therefore, after the Blair
resolution declaring fer.nnnexttticin, the resolu?
tion of the republican minority of tho foreign
I affaira committee, arraigning tho president for
his courae in the HiTrniian matter, and Mr.
Weed's motion to recommit tho McCreary.reso
lutioue, with instructors to Investigate the
subjcot, had been voted down, the republicans
refrained from voting on the MeCreary refla?
tions, and as but 100 democrats showed up for
the resolutions, and one against it, that was
eighteen lees than a quorum.
Washington, Ftfb. 3.?Sd-catb.? The senate
Wednesday by a vote of 39 yons to 2? nays pass?
ed the bill to repeal the fodcraj oloctionlaw^Tho
88negative votes wero oast by the republican*.
The 33 affirmative vote1; wero cast by S6 domo?
crats, by Senator Stewart, of Nevada, and tho
throe populirtf, Kyle, Alloc and FerTer. The
nill Ls precisely in terms and letter tho measure,
heretoforo passed by ibo lower house. AH that
ig now required to give it forco of law is the
president's signature, whioh w!Il bo promptly
forthcoming. The senate at C: 15 o'clock, after
a short executive session, adjourned until
Thursday.
Hols." ?McCreary's resolution favoring
President Cleveland's Hawaiian policy passed
the house Wednesday. The roto was on party
linen, with tire exemptions?Mosers. Oarnmmga
and .vickles, of Now Yofh. who voted with the
republloans. Otherwise tho democrats voted
for the resolution and the republicans agair.at
it. The populists were divided, Messrs. Bell,
Boen, Davia, L??v!a, Harris, Pence- and Simpson
voting with the republicans, and Messrs. Baker
(Khk), Cannon (CaL), und Kern (Neb.), with
tho domocrale. Tho Bland bill was then called
up by Mr. Wand, and he moved to go into com?
mittee of the whole for its consideration. There
was no quorum present aud the hcime adjourned
until Thursday.
Washington, Feb. o.-SusATE-Thi? right
of the secretary of the treasury to lesua U. 9.
bends at this time was again up Thursday. Sen?
ator Stewart's resolution came up under the
rules and a motion made by Senator Butler, cf
South Carolina, to refer it to the committee <vj
judiciary, proved tho only opposition. Senator
Quay took a decided stand in favor of disposing
of the matter In open senate instead of referring
it to a committee from which it world never
emerge, and intimated chat Senator Sherman
gave to ttio country an apparent justification of
Secretary Carlisle's action, when the Ohio sen?
ator clearly know it to be Illegal. Adjourned
until Monday.
Eo?SB?The deadlock on Mr. Blend's silver
seiqniorago bill was broken n'ter four hourj of
continuous filibustering. Thursday, wheu, by a
voto of i'fl to 4, the h:?u.-ie carried Mr. Bland'3
motion of going into the committee of the whole
for consideration of his bin The eastern doui
oorats and the mass of the repubil ana made a
determined Opposition, but Mr. Blr.ndwasatl
last vl.tori.ius. On the final vote 26 republicans
and all the populists voted with, him, wuiie 22
democrats who were present joined with the re?
mainder of the republicans in refusing to voto.
Washington. Feb. 10.- Sknatx-Noi in ees
sicn. ?
House? After 3orec unimportant routine
business Friday ?ho .':~'is? wen: intocommittee
of the TYh:>ie for tlu consideration of the sMrjr.
ioraue bill. TH>: entire day in tbD house wos
consumed rn debate eu tho Bland silver seiga
iorago, the speakers bein^ Messrs. Blaud, C
W. Stono (Pa.). McKolghaa, Harter and Kil
gore. It to expected that a vote on the bill will
be reached by Tuesday, at the furthest, and
Mr. Blur.d is confident that it will pasa This
opinion is generally soared by the leaders on
both sides, although there probabiy will be
somt modifications of the bill.
WAsnTy?ioN, Feb. 12.?Srkatb?Not 1ns?
sior..
House?Tho house adjourned Saturday
mornlr.e out of respect lo the memorv* cf Ju?tf-n
Bock. It.-foro the Adjournment Mr. Onthwaite,
as dean of the Ohio delegation, presented to
tho hoesr; tits reaolttti >ns of ropret on the
death of Judge Hottk, which h>\d been adopted
by the delegation at a meeting in Speaker
Crisp's rcorr, j;?st before th? meeting of the
houso ihe ?=poaher announced the appoint?
ment of '.ba fo'Io?\ in< opmmitteo, to take, order
for the KUpori?Uefldoncy of the fitn^rjl, and to
os.'ort the remains of the deceased to their
place Of burial, Dayton, O , in accordance ni:h
tho terms of the resolution: Mesyr?. Hare,
Spriniror, Bryan, Huiick, McKa4^, ISitia (Ore.)
and Ritchie._
BIG BLAZE
At H?cdor*.-!n, Ky. Tvro I.arsc Tobacco
Warehouses Unro.
?SNBKfiSQN, Ky.. Feb. 12.?A most
destructive conflagration of incendiary
origin broke out on Main street between
Fourth aar Fifth streets, in tI;c- large
tobacco Btemmery of Barre tt & Ran kin,
wh'ioh rapidly ??rnintinteated with the
Scoper stenunery, corner or! Fifth, also
consuming the brick residence cf .\Ir3.
Priest and Messrs. Lumber, Withers
and Steve Sruith, involving' a total loss
of about 8135,000.
The flumes spread with o;ro.it rn
pidity, aod over 100,000 pounds of re?
cently purchased laaJ tobacco was de
stro^'ed.
Fortunately most cf this valuable
property was insured na foilows: IV.r
rett ? Rankin. SS2,300* Socpar,
003; Lambert, if5.000; Withers, jhoOOj
Mrs, Priest, ?1,3J0, aud Steve Sinith.
51,500.
a Priest's Siv.cc'a Lnw-ut.
?03&kf-k, N; J., Feb. It).-?An eld will |
has been found in the invc father Cor- J
rignn's papers. It was made seven
years a$;o and glytjs ui! htspi; pertjr,
unconditionally, to Ids oanrch. Ps'ther
Gorritjran's "lunr, will, mr.de on .iiinuary
5, iour days before his death, i? now
being- contested by a n-see. on the
ground of undue influenc*. It is disr
cussed whether the old Trtii shall re-?
place the new ono. if t;::-:t is set aside, j
\ hclora Kotcpnears i*-. V. -rinw, !
WAJtSAW; Fob. iO.?TiK-rc has been a!
recrudesct-no-j oi ol^oleru h^ro, and!
many deaths have occurred,
low? -^.?y Vo'o ci: V?exnau Snfiru^o. j
Dn?Moie'RS, Ic-, Fob 9.?The senate j
suffrage eomrutttae Thursday reported ;
favorably on a bill jfriiitinfr tCcroon |
the ri^ht to vote in sch-vd eleciiohs, i
and also pi-ovidh;.? a rC*>ustiUitional j
aoioudineat allovdng' avorueu to vuto in '
j all elections. Tho bill was made a!
special order for next Tuesday,
SILVER BILL
Mr. Dlar.ci's Measure is Taken Up in
the House.
Thie Calntiire of Tf>? Sefirateraffe Serma to
Ii? Qcite a Papular Iti^ Among Con
Crcs?Ki?n, and It Is TKoa^bt Tiiat
It Will J??raJj lib Ordtrsd.
WasmifOTox, rob. f.?The free sil?
ver men of the kou*e Thursday wou
the first victory of their campaign for
the coinage of silver, as proposed in
the Bl?nd seigniorage p.ct, by muster?
ing a quorum. Speaker Crisp hud his
named caiied and voted with Mr.
Blanch His vote was unnecessary, as
the recnlt of the vote war, ITT in rnvor
of taking up the Bland bill and four
against ifc, showing the pi-cseacc of two
more votes than was necessary to make
a quorum. The speaker's actiou indi?
cated that he is friendly to siiver, and
that Mr. Bland can depend upon tna
committee on rules {or a cloture reso?
lution if tho filibustering of tho anti
silver opposition becomes dangerous.
The new pornt,.-; for argument that
come up under the bill ore discussions
of the legality of the proposed coining
of the so-called seignoirage. aud the
condition of the treasury with respect
to the issue of bonds for the restoration
of the gold reserve.
An objeccionnblc feature of the bill
is the ccaipuliory clause which direct*
the :-ocretary of the treasury to ir hV.o at
once the entire amount of certificates
against the sei^n?..irage. This objec?
tion was met by Mr. Bland Thursday
with a fctateracnt that it would not be
necessary to issue the entire amount at
once, aud that he was willing to make
the issue of certificates proportionate
to tho capacity of the mints.
The second section provides that
when treasury coin notes are presented
for redemption, they shall lie redeemed
in silver in case the silver coir, in the
treasury exceeds the amount of gold
coin. This feature of the bill i? strong?
ly opposed by eastern democrats; and'
from the remarks of Mr. ?ailey and
other silver men, it Is mere thin prob?
able that some modification of this sec?
tion will be made, the nature cf wiiich
will bo to protect existing treasury
notes from enforced redemption in sil?
ver.
Opposition to 1 Hr entire project of
the coining of seigniorage that will be
made on the floor of the house is based
on the argument of certain bankers
who point out that nearly all ths 5150,
003,oao of treasury notes issued by tho
government ere held by national banks
as a portion of their legal reserve
Against these 5150,CCD,000 of treasury
notes the entire amount o'.' silver now
in the treasury* is pledged. To
reduce this by issuing certificates
against $55,000,000 of it as alleged
seignorago is to reduce the value of tho
collateral that much. The immediate
result will be, they threaten, that ev?
ery bank wiil at once proceed to re?
deem its treasurj' notes in gold, and
the ? old reserve, which Secretary Car?
lisle has, after infinite tabor, succeeded
in restoring to its normal condition,
must be again invaded, this time even
more disastrously than before.
The outlook for tho pffosagc of the
Bland bill, modified by its friends,
seems excellent. It was nottceablo
Thursday that many of the democrats
who had been forced by President
Cleveland into supporting tho bill for,
the unconditional ropcal of the pur- j
chasing clause of tho Shorn?an act I
Thursday supported Mr. Bland. Of tho
fourteen democrats in the Ohio delega
tion fire, Messrs. Donovan, Hare, Ilioh
ards, Pearson and Ritchie, who had:
been unconditional repealers, voted for
Mr. Bland's bill. Similar defections
tro noticeable in other delegations.
SOUTHERN TORNADO. I
Tiro People Known to Have Been Killed |
and Sfaah Property Destroyed.
Memphis, Tenn., Fob. 0.?A tornado
swept over ths northwestern portion of j
Mississippi late Thursday afternoon, I
and laid waste everything tn its path, j
Plantations wcro devastated, farm- j
rouses were wrecked, and the debris
scattered ovor the country for miles J
around.
On tho plantation, of Col. tV. L. Nu?
gent, four miles northeast of Green
viUe, Miss., Win, Brady and wife, col-j
orcd, were in their cabin,-which was
blown down, killing the womao in-j
stantly. Her husband was blown .sev?
eral hundred feet, and received serious
if not fatal injuries. Tire cyclone
passed through Washington end ilolJ
var counties, thickly populated with
prosperous farmers, and it is feared the
death list will be swelled when tha de?
tails are known. 1
Port Hudson, La., Fob. 0.?A torna?
do passed through this locality at 7i
o'clock.Thursday, und left death and
destruction in it*? won?. The liest place
it struck was on Mrs. Lambers' planta?
tion, formerly owned by (Ion. Uuea
ton, about two miles northwest of
here. A Negro child whs killed, and
two barns, thivc cabins and the >.-in
house were blown down and wrecked;
Another Nogro child was seriously
hurt and five other Negroes were more
or loss injured. Tha damage on this
place amounts to about ?5.000.
The cyclone .struck the Chambers
place, and destroyed five cabins. A
Negro girl was seriously wounded in
the head, and four or ?ve slightly in?
jured. The damage ou this place
amounts to about $1,000. 1 he track of
the cyclone was svboct three hundred
feet wide. and it leveled everything;in
its path._
The Tarnor-n<?ir.ard Feud.
MtDDT/rsboro, Ky.', Feu 0. ? fhecite
ment runs high in Boil au,i Larlan
counties over the killing of John :.nd
Will Turner by Doc Nclin at H irlin C.
H., as it is feared that the Hoivard
Turner feud will break out again in all
its fury.
Tho feeling between the factious has
only slept, and, since the execution of
Wils Howard in Missouri it h is been
intensified, tho Koivard&beliVviWg Wils
to have been innocent and that he was
hounded to death b} the Turners.
AsexprcsspJ by h Rowr.rd: "Wils
was innocent, and wv = mart . red to sat?
isfy the Turners, and will be avenged.''
fco:*? ?o;r?la>tc.?
Bikmixgsiam, Feb. ft-rTUe populists
and disgruntled democrats succeeded
In nominating Koib. The republicans
kicked out of the harness. They will
nominate a republican state ticket A
small fraction, of the populists bolted,
VAILLANT.
I -
Hi* Parisfan Ccrfrersa Load Hl? Tomb
With Flowers,
Aed Lsnd Ttla? as a H?rtyr-A Parla So?
cialist Fcper A*aort? That There Aro
ilorc Anirchint* in Th it (. icy 4 o
D.ay Ibau JLver Beforu KjioWu.
London, Feb. 12.?The decisive end
of Anarchist Vaillant'e career by the
guillotine prcces.h on M< ::i ay waa not
so effective in stifling the activity oi
hir, living" confreres as the French gov?
ernment hoped it would be. The exe?
cution of the v?\tifre?onie enemy of
society-seems to have .stirred up the
"reds" all ever E:>ropo, and hero in
London as well. They hr.ve not fur?
nished any forcible manifestation of
their displeavjre at tho comm^cdtble
precipitancy cf the government in cut?
ting- off 11 Vdillaint** head, it is true,
but they have not permitted the
authorities to imagine for an instant
that they have given up their unequal
warfare nsralnftt social oviio. as they |
view thein. I
The Parisian confreres of VaHJaht
evidenced their belief in his cived by i
loading his touib with flowersaud hold?
ing- meeting-1, at which the most ex?
travagant forms of praise and adula?
tion of Vaillaut were conspicuous feat?
ures. Vaillant waslai^dcd as a martyr, j
and tho pet-t bourgeoisie, or citizens of
the reputable r.nd prosperous middle
class who have become the particular
proy of anarchists, were denounced in
scathing" terms as being1 responsible for i
all laws and institutions.
Investigations hy the police have re- j
vealed the presence in Paris of a great j
many enthusiasts of the rattle-brained j
type of which Vaillant was au excel- !
lent example and an attempt to emu
j late his desperate daed would not be
I surprising. The police are extremely !
I active in their efforts to destroy ev- !
! ery possible opportunity for them to j
j do so, but they have a herculean task '
I before them, rus they are learning1 in at- i
j tempting to suppress tho dangerous 1
I hordo of bomb^throwers and dynamit- j
I ors. A socialist newspaper asserts that
thero are more anarchists in Parte to- ;
day than there have ever boon in it.-?
history, and declares thev are thor- !
oughly organized to wage a persistent
and systematic. wai;fare upon society.
In contrast to this statement in a re
j port from Rome that Orispi's soldiers in
Sicily have eifoctualiy stamped mit the
uprising: among1 the aery Sioiiiaus,
which was started and fomented by the !
anarchists. Many of the anarchist:-! j
have sought refuge in flight. Several.
I hundred of them aro said to have taken ]
I passage to the United States arid South i
j America. Jn London the police think !
they havo evidence of the plotting*
I of anarchists toencouragean-uprising
among the unemployed,
i At a meeting of several thousand Idle
i men at Tower Hill early in the week
j tho speeches were of pronounced au-1
archistic flavor, and the police wvre
I threatened with extermination if they 1
interfered with proposed meeting oi
the unemployed^
Half a dozen professional anarchist
agitators directed the meeting, and
I jrave it its lawless aspect Since than !
; the police have wen t xtru:r/ie:y
active in trying tu ferret out the lead
? ers, and it is probable that a number of !
them will be arrested in few days, j
i The police are amazed at the number
of anarchists in the city, but sre confi?
dent of their ability to 'drive them
away from tho city, as much, for the
protection of the misguided unem?
ployed as the preventibr of a repe?
tition of the dospcrate outbreaks that
have ocourrcd on tho continent.
I _
BUTTER WO FiTri'S SPEECHES.
The Democrats Wilt Refuse to Make Ap?
propriation', ro Print Tlr in.
Wa 3hingt0n, Feb. 12.?L?.::nocralic
members of the house committee or. ap?
propriations declare that they will re?
fuse to make appropriations for or to
permit the work of printing .\iaj. i'en
linttorworth's World's fair speeches
under appropriations already made, j
The report from New York that the |
Cincinnati ex-congressman was revising
the speeches which he made in con nee-'
tion with the YVoild's fair with a view !
to having them printed at public ex- j
penae hois brought out an authorized
announcement that if the speeches!
come to congress in any form whatever j
they will net he printed.
It is stated that Mai Butterworth,
acting under the impression that all oi
the speeches made at public gatherings
[ in connection with the World's fair
were to be published as public decu
i ments by the government, Is complet?
ing the manuscripts of tho revision and
expects them to make quite a book.
; Most of the speeohes were delivered at j
banquets, congresses and business
meetings in connection with tho World's
fair. _
The Rebels Win n Fl^ht.
Washington, Feb. 1:2.?The navy de?
partment Saturday received the follow?
ing cable:
,4Eio, Feb. 9.?This morning there
was a sharp engagement at A rein
Point, resulting in some insurgent suc?
cess. Ue.m: v\>."
Are'.a Point is .? projection oi l^r-ri
not far from Ni:'.. ruy, which is In the
?aaie part of the \lzy of Rio de Janeiro.
Apparently Areiu Point would be ?'?
good place for laud operations againat
Kietheroy.
t'le.-Wor F?< ei 9;>:cch.
EayOit", Mich., Feb. PA?Waiter Sirr.*,
the A. P. A. lecturer who was arrested
in Appleton, Vfis,, on February ?h is?
sued an opon loiter bit Saturday to Gov.
Peck demanding protection by that of?
ficial and demanding that the right of
free speech be protected. Sims informs
the governor that he intends to deliver
a lecture at Kaukauna, Wis , where his
address was interrupted last month,
that between one and two thousand
m^n will go with him, and that if they
are not given protection by thd author?
ities thi-y will project ?tehiselye?. A
full ir. vest krat Jon of the Kaukauna and
Appleton aiiair>. is al^o demanded.
The Dublin cotton compress, at Dub?
lin, Toot, valued at $150,000, has Peon
burned. The property has been the
subject of litigation for some time be?
tween local parties and a consolidated
com nan v.
a Bravo r<<sni?D, oo ?u Errand of Sovlnja
Lives. Foiled by Bullets.
Houston, Tex., Feb. 10.? Thursday
night at the high bridge over. White
Oak Bayou, train-wreckers removed the
rails and fish-plates on the Missouri.
Kansas and Texas railroad. Whon tea
passenger train came along, th'j engiu<s
passed safely over, but the baggage
and mail coaches jumped the track and
rolled dowu the bank, followed by ti.e
pmoker, which landed on top or thoin.
The wreck presented a frighnfal ap?
pearance.
Joe Elliott, a braket^en. w;?s neni
back to flag a freight train which won
Boon due. He had not proceeded a
hundred yards when a volley from am?
bush was tired upon him. Four bullets
took effect in ins b<~dy.
The crew iu the meantime, aided by
passengers, wore at work extricating
the men buried in the wrecked cars,
and feared to go to the flagmen's res?
cue. He, however, crawled, bleeding
and wounded, back to the train, and
Bow lies dying.
In the mail car was Lou Morris, the
agent, badly bruised and with several
bones broken. His first th?u&itt was
of his mail, and he requested tho re?
porter to go by the post office and not?
ify them that he had a big run of reg?
ister*.
H. Ration, the express messenger,
was found m his cor with hh ribs
broken and in a critical condition.
J. YV. Carter, bagjgagemasterj was In?
jured about the head and internally.
A relief train wan made up hern und
sent to the scene'. The wounded were
brought in aud are iu the hospital
Posses are on the scone and ^re-'.ex?
citement prevails.
FARMER DUNN
Cancel* n Vvbt by Killing P. Br.-nir?
?ar HloKInnoy, Ky.
McKnrx'by, Kv., Feb. 10.?Another
bloody nmrdor was Friday morning
added to the criminal records of Lin?
coln county. A. C. Dunn, a farmer
living In the suburbs of this place, shot
and killed J. V. Brown, who was a
tenant on his farm.
Brown had rented a portion of Dunn's
farm, but had become dissatisfied w'ih
his bargain and sold back to Dunn his
contract for 8100, which was to have
been paid Pome days ago.
Thursday Dunn told Brown to como
to his house Friday morning, and ho
would acttlo the debt. Brown went
and received the contents of a double
barreled shotgun iu his head just bo
fore he entered Dunn's .yard.
Brown's real name is Todd, hut he
has lived hero for many years under his
assumed name. Ho was a hard laborer,
but loaves a large family in a destitute
condition. Dunn g..vc himself up and
was lodged in jail at Stanford.
INCENDIARISM. ' '1
Eight Blazes Kti Porn, JTwo of Thorn
Occurring Friday,
Peru, Ind., Feb. 10.? The epidemic
of incendiary fires which has prevailed
in this city for tho past two weeks still
continues. Early Friday morning two
more were added to the list, making a
total of eight The first Mrc was lha
large warehouse of the Indiana .Y.an
ufacturlng Co., which was totally
consumed, entailing a loss of
$S,000. Mo insurance. A drenching
rain at the tino alone saved the water
works plant and prevented a goueral
conflagration. The second tire was a
wagon shop, which was also totally de?
stroyed. Loss, $1,oc?; no insurance. It
is thought to bo the work of tramps,
and tho motive robbery. Vigorous
action is being taken to discover tho
author.
RUSH FOR GOLD.
a Crotit Find Boported h\ t!io Jialnr La>e
t>i*lrtci, In Minnesota.
DULUTH, Minn., Fob. to.? There is a
great rush Croat all parts of Minnesota
and from Canadian border towns to
the gold <ifcf.i,trlet of Rainy Lake,
along the international boundary.
People are flocking to the district by
slod, dog trains, and on foot from all
directions.
All the buildings In the now town of
Rainy Lake City aro overcrowded, and
hundreds of people are sleeping in
tents, with the tcmperaturo frequently
reaching twenty to thirty degrees be?
low zero. Rainy Lake City ie the cen?
ter of the gold discovery on Minneso?
ta coil, but the richest Oelde uro be
\ lieved to be in Canada, north of the
lake.
?-?. -
Gen. 2aylor Dead.
SA5 Antonio. Tex., Feb. 10.? Oen.
! John W. Baylor i6 dead at his ranch iu
J Uvalde county, of paralysis, at the age
i of seventy-two! He raised a regiment
for1 the confederacy and captured Ari?
zona from the federals, being appointed
military governor of that territory an
dor tho confederacy. He also served in
the confederate congress from Texas,
residing at that time at Lavaea. After
the war he './as prominent in politics in
western Texas.
Vegto Soy's i^itsl 35mt
Jackson, Tcnn., Feb. 10.?What vws
Intended for a playful prank, resulted
in a fatal one Friday afternoon to ivd
Benson, a 16-year-old Negro bo)-, n ho
was playing on Highland avenue with
a little S-year-old white boy. A chain
fastened to a telephone po?:t \\f\ used
to hitch horses to was seized by Ben?
son and swung around his nee?? ho
saying to his youthful friend in a jok?
ing way that he was going to hon?
himself. Hcarcely had ho uttered tu ?
words when his feet slipped from tit;
curbstone and hisl>cdy hung but ovc
tho gutter. Before assistance a: ri c*?
bo was strangled to death.
filiut Have Oar !T1 'nr.
Washington, Feb. 0.?George ?.
Parker, consul at Birmingham, hau
sent to the state department an .ex?
haustive report on the American wheat
and flour trade in English midlands
He estimates the increase in amount of
flour received from the United States
ia four years at 79.1 per cent ile sa v;,;
"Nothing. seems more completely ea
tablished than tho dependence of tho
?eoplo of Great Britain upon Ihe
Tnited States for a considerable supply
of breadstuff*, and this dependence is
far more likely to increase than dimin?
ish."
?Handel became blind ia his old
ago, but the fact did not prevent his
continuing the series of oratorioa th&t
Uk&tlti him Uvtuwui

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