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The Big Stone Gap post. [volume] (Big Stone Gap, Wise County, Va.) 1892-1928, October 25, 1894, Image 1

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88061179/1894-10-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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r n-cssional District Committee t? the Voten
; the oth Congressio nal District.
_.???o??
UP. \U v w v
Irl tWu?fflL IM.
iiiionaires who will
pay so ine of it.
l< voiving upon them (hey
... i summon to the aid of the party every true and
demonstrates thai crises occur in the history
: ( i'J f. ? and demand the active and faithful services of ev
tv iv3 i sincerely believes in tin* correctness of its
- : ol it ril for the Democratic party; not by
'. i : any omursion of duty on its part to the couti?
ll ad to si r the blunders, the extravagance, the
robbery, the demonetization of silver, the de-!
- rvi . the en >rmons, corrupt and dishonest pension
trges that past and present financial condi
ibutabh to the Democratic party. This charge is
i us. There is not a single element of truth in it.
.u rated President of the United Staler, on the
: : thai high office by an overwhelming vote of Hie
that vote, that tariff taxation should be reformed:
no ?li mid he levied by the govern men t. Faithful
< a: ci die partr to the people, President Cleve i
- ? in ( xtra s< ssn n, and tongrcFs at once entered
: " I tin - that the people had charged them with,
ohgress is at all times'necessarili' slow . and the
? tariff reform, in the interest of the people and
ess ? injury i.i American industries and labor,
: division and differences in its own rani:-; and the
the I? publican party, a tarill hill, .which, while it is not
arty d< >ired, is the best that could he had, and is
i*cr i nacted in the history of oureountry. I
11 THE DEMOCRATIC CONGRESS DID.
harzes ihat the Democratic party has redeemed
s to : :? : that i; has done nothing to relieve the
thing to lift from the shoulders of the people the
?a ?Iura. We present for your consideration
.i Democratic Congress has done f?r the relief of
rd sn iws conclusively that the charges of the Re
u:d demonstrates that Congress has done cvery
' ? ? under the circumstances.
?iiver Law, which required the government to
? 1 tnces of sih*er and pay for the same in gold
:- tli en lit of the government, and imperiling
I, manufacturing and financial interests.
' s the I i iral Election Law. the most odious
- * ? ? na< ted, and thereby restored to the people
i complete control ever their elections, free
:.->:- and deputy marshals, whose scle duties,
? iiad hei n to intimidate, arrest and imprison
Sit ?res of the government below those of the last
? a more tl at $i8,0t 0.0< 0, thereby relieving the peo
i immense sum into the F?deral Treasury to
? - in the various departments, and by the aid of the
' -cd irirh useless positions, tliCrebv reducing the
?
: tii is? ilj-formcd and oppressive measure
- ibstitut ?d in its stead a measure of revenue
! r ee r i l y. j
? mt ol iii? public funds in the treasury,
i-d from thw pcQpl ?. millions of dollars annually in |
... individuals in the prosecution of their
? 1 ith :,. i y states, connties and municipalities of!
ii; i : taxable values which had heretofore not j
. 1 at had enabled unscrupulous persons, by j
from their just share of the burdens of do- ;
l
.:s the most drastic measures agains j
??? mop dies engaged in foreign commerce ever en J
Tax upon the.wealth of the country, thereby !
d- rich a due share of the burdens of govern-;
y oflab?r by providing by law a National Iloli- !
ipon \. i.i.di tho working people may cease j
c ebration of their achievements and tri-j
? hundred laws forlbe benefit of the people in
i
? cstion that has been at issue between the ,
it form, upon which itrover Cleveland was
11 ; i the people ^o reform the tariffou the j
Democratic party denies and combats the !
lawfully enact a tariff law for protective pur
' advocates a tariff for revenue alone, with ;
? ach a t.-irift* affords, and such a tariff Mrhrds |
*' -: d honest purposes. I
1 - in and advocates a tariff for protection,
? t legislation is on this line. In 1800, the
?'?>"? law known as the McKinley DHh The
?' aventlo'ii in Inj* denounced this McKinley
? n careful examination of tbi? bill will demon
It is the can-sheaf of a long continued and
manufacturers and other monopolists to
; ?' y bill, for reckless and audacious legis
' ' ' any ci niizeu < ountrv,
? two parties wa? submitted to tho people,
Clevi land in I~.,->. a large majority of the peo
?i of tariff reform and the repeal of the
l '--:>yy DUTIES JS A TAX
? the McKinle? bill, la Ic iea upojj &l)nfit$t
'? ?'>>??' iii.ia-.p^iaiCo. Thai" iaiih tax is paid by
: woman who buys the imported goods. The
that a tttrjfl is a tax, and that the tax is paid
-"hi bill enacted duting the last session of
.Gonsrcss io road just and ri
unjust, iwir.eeessarv :
form tbia taxati
on, so as to relieve the people
V0UC att0:ilion t0 a com r.g g b? ?? did, and ?o now ,
hvicKiolo hill We rnn Democratic tariff measure ritn M
i details of either bill R'lV * C,1?ractcc efttcr ?* ?*?to t<
! U e:,flb,c rou to deicVmi . ' IS! u? ?S:U:' M> a"d matters' fallJ e"?&
!'*? :?akiu;Mhi,c ^?ch bill ,3 in the interests of th? n?L. J
"ests oi' the neonle. on
comparison, we will refer to thn ri;r . . .
fhc per cent., of rax imnc ? 1 1 , dificrenJ schedules and ?h
^ritttax?B-, v., ?in ' ? ?U !ltay m0r? rcadi,'v ^dcratand ti
imoorls hv the ?idval r ' ?* ' - poscd h-v ' acl' of the tariff bills <
^Portedftahihg ^00.001^^^^ ^f"2 * the ^ of t5jc Scot
*,UU? a* }hc basis oi comparison.
SCHEDULE OP THE TARIFF BILLS
..?i;K,l-,I:A.--C!lcrHi,;,l,.(,ils;iI;ilrainl,_.
'^^^^V^ ?n ^ *m i:i -lee under the
under the Democratic taVin
. ,t"-,,iat??<l n?dor the Democratic tariff bill
of., :,t::;;;;u"'!,;;nU'7''r,.1 d't-?- & >???we, ,?icl
--..raced .',"S^rv1^^^^ "tt
Oaruphor..
Inks of all kinds and iiik piwdbV
Castor oil. ' ''
Mclv'ly Bill Dcm.Biil
Fl00 Iii valno $100in valu
. $12.20
. . . . 30.
IG0.35
Calomel and ot|,cr mercurial preimraii'onV
TO ... schedule B, earths, earthenwara and Klassirare -(
unt^1Scra,ltCr,,nfi;,"t,l'-Vt,,C
?1".
35.
$10.
X.'.?.
43.81
20.
)n each $100 of
$51.20
.as,Iere^;n_nuorofthepeoplcof$U.7!)o? each ?io?"in'vaiue
aciiBiiuin C.-Mctals and manufacturers cf
tax,,; td,:;i;i<^.^;;: tr;.!^^^ *,ou 1 i?M 9',cclficd *?*
under (he Democratic Uli 5 " ***** VIcJCi"1^ ^--;!:;
' " illustrate: The followin
seh< dule:
o shows some of the charges made in thi;
uiii raits punched?iron or
VIcK'ly 13ill Dem.Biil
$100 in value :?l(v* iri
?9.09
;".'.>.>
33.99
! I
00
35.00
liars or rails for rail-.vn
Ued
1 rails nnd other railway )>.
Stool or in part steel.
|in Tlates: (a) Sheers or piates of irotror steei,'or ta^ars1
^r*.0rrsrfel COft,cd "i<h tin or lead, or with a mixture of
"hie . oi these metals arc a component part,bv the dipping
or any ptner proccss.and c?mihorciailv known'n (in platc??
lerne plates and taggers' tin,..
Tin, manufactures of: All manufactures ot' not spccifical
:.v provided for, . '
When you consider that many millions of dollars worth of rails, for rail
roadi, iron and steel, is aitnually imported into our countrv vou will readilv
comprehend the enormous tarili lr.x imposed on the people*. ' Ko wonder that
Carnegie has made many millions of dollars in the: hist ten years by the
manufacture of rails, &c, whiie the men who did the labor "necessary to
manufacture them had to live oa starvation wages, and riot und blood-'shed
! wes the result.
? Bul tu comment on all Phy schedules, would occupy too much space, and
I wo now present you with one more, the crowning act of rteoublican wron'%
j extortion and*robbery, as embodied in i?ehcdule K. V?rcolcn (!<i(ni.
S'<:::::''. :.!. K.? W oolex ?
Average tax imposed on each SI00 in value of goods imported under I
I this scheduie by the McKinley bill. $;)8.G2
I Imposed under the Democratic bill. -!S
j a difference of $49.80 on each 00.
This schedule embraces nearly every article of clotliinj, or (lie materials
j that enter into clothing, worn by men, women and children.
Thai you may see and know the extent of tariff robbery we submit the
following, showing the tax imposed upon each if-100 in value of goods import- 1
j cd under this schedule by the McKinley bill and by the Democratic bill,
to-v.it; I
j IdcK'ly Bill Dem. Bill j
! SCKEUULI: lv.? WoCLEX (i>;<)|->?
?tlanal'aeturcs composed wholly <>r in part of wool, worsted, the hair of
tii.- camel, goat, alpaca, or other animals:
?S noddy.". $52.50
Yarns, woolen aud worsted?valued at not more than
cents per pound.?. 27S.fiu"
Valued :i' more than :.i:*i no! more 10 cents per pound ll.^.lii
Vaiucu at more ti:;,.i! 40 cents per pound. 105.42
Cloths, woolen <ir worsted: Valued at no! more than
30 cents per pound. lb'3.09
Valued at more than 30 and not more than 40 cents per
und . . iI4.S(]
Valued above 40 cents per pound. 99.50
Shr.wls, woolen or worsted: \ alucd at no; more than
."/() cvnts per pound. -
Valued at more than 30 and not more than '.'<) cunts per
pound. 150.30
Valued above 4:> cents per pound. SS.60
K;:it fabrics, and all fabrics made on knitting m;i
cuines or frames; Valued a.t not more than cents per
ponnt'
Valued at more than ?'?'' and not more than !() cents per
pom
13G.00
i Valued at above 40 ccnls per pound.?. 82.25
i All knit wearing apparel..V.'./. . !'4.<!:l
All other nianufaclurcsi, nol specially provided for;
Valued at not move than30 cents per pound,. 142.00
! Valtti d a', more thanSOand not more lban4FJ cents per pound, S7.03
Blankets: Valued at notmorcthanllO cents per pound, Sb\22
y. j ,,.,| ,{?( niore ?hau 30 cents and not more than 40 cents
i nor iiouird.:. 100.00
i Valued at more than 40 aud more than ;.u cents per
pound..-. 103.90
Valued at more than 50ccnts pcr pound. c0.33
Hats of wool: Valued at no; more than 30 cents per
i ? ... . 86.00
pound.,.?.
Vi'lucd at more thnn 39 and not more fcuan 40 cent.- per
i .. 10G.33
pound,..
Valued at more than 40 and not more than oO cents per
pound.'. . ,
Valued at more than 50 cents per pound. .
Flannel for underwear: \ al ted x\i wtpre than cents
'b'7.2?
84.90
P'T pound. .
Valued at more than 30 cents and not more than 40 cents
tier bound.
Valued at moro-than40 and nol more thand ;;0 cents.per
pound.;.
Weighing over I ounces per square yard.
Dress ^r"?His women's and children's coat lining?, ttal
i in clothes?and goods o^similardascription: Of whic is tu?
vvarp consists w hol I v of cotton or oilier vegbtabre inaccrtal^
.with the rcmaihd.erof.the fab.ric wholly or in part
?f wool wors{< d; thG^aif of Lno camel, goat, alpaca, or oth?
er animals; Valued at uot exceeding lo cents per square ^
3aUSKEDKr.E K?Woolen good-: Valued al above 12 cents
per squa-re yard.
Weighing over 4 ounces per square yard.
$15.00
30.00
30.00
40.00
40.0(1
40.00
50.00
e?.Oa
35.00
40.00
35.00 ?
jt5.00 j
40.00
40.00 I
to.oo
?iii.da
r.'?.Dii
30.00 I
35.011
35.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
35.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
50.00
93.93
SO. 00
103.S0
Compos"d wholly or in part of wool, worsted, the hair ol
wool, listed, the hair of the camel, goat, alpaca or othe?- _
animals: Weighing over 4 ounccs^cr square yar^ .. ti.^
Othc?r chuhin^'readv-u^: , aV&Voi'of 'wearing appar
rel (except knit soots), mud, up or m a mil.vet u red wholly oi ^
in p.?,r?.? ?.
f:Felts, hot woven.
Piuslies and other pile fabrics
!);:.<?!>
|05;09
Cloaks,dolmans, jackets, talmas, ulsters, or othct out;
side garments for ladies'and cluidren's ^nol^o^
of similar description, or used for like ?sm?. y
' vvcbbiiigi gorings. suVnenders, braces, beiHags, bind
50.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
?0.00
50.00
45:00
isO.Ol)
50 'AO
0.?'?
linir, braids; galloons ir:r.{:c-, ginfps, onus. ?:o?v> ?H?.
BcfsVurcss trlaimiAgB, ^ and ^ro.ipic*, Head nc-is,
, b,UJ.,, blai4- ! O?floas oi other forflin for Ussels ororna
wrought by hand, or braided by machinery, which ^
arc elastic or non-elastic.;. -
Can any man look upon this euoraious, outrageous taxation W not
blush for American manhuodV
"BY TUE FEI7IT Vu ?iiAi.b .U'lME V?H TftBE."
^i>,V;y im?o. u> the ?i'.d^mrMcs.. and audacious claas legislation of
the 4]h.biican part; aad bchbTd the result. ,
1? ISO!) j here was but one millionaire in the 1 mtcd btatea-A. r. Stew -
ari of New York. Under thirty years ol Republican rule the number lias
I:::;!:: into niany thousands. ? n the Xew York W**d? the IUI. instant
>u a iUt of the aien aud woiaeii living in New York O.tj aud brooklvn,
is gm
: wir!? their estimated worth and annual income, which is
MILLIONAIRES WHO WILL PAY
JohD 1). Rockfcller.
William Waldorf AM or.
Jay Gould est ate.
Russell Sa^e...
Cornelius Vanderbuilt.
I William K. Vanderbuilt. .:.
I Henry SL Flagler.
William R?ckfeiler.
John .Ir.cJ) As tor.
Moses Taylor estate.
Fredrick W. Vanderbuilt.*.
George W\ Vanderbuilt.
Percy R. Pyne and Mrs. Pyne.
Henry 0. Hart raeyer^and^Mrs.^HavemeTer
M. Singar estate.*
J. Pierpont Morgan.
Robert Goclet.
Sehcrtncrborti estate.
Ogden Gael et.
Coilis F. Huntington.
David Dows estate.
Elbridge T. Gerry and Mrs. Gerry.
Jabez A. :> -.'tv.iclc estate.
Theodore A. Havemeyer.
VV. Sloan estate .
Kenr ' Hilton.?.
Andrei); Carnegie.
Amos R. Erio.
William C. Whitney.
Williani P Furncss estate....
I). 0. Mills.
It. Victor Jscwcomb.
Auson Phelps Stokes".
Austin Corhin.
Eugene Higgiris.
James 51. Constable.
Dr. William Seward Wehl?.
Hicks Arnold.,t
Sidney Dillon estate.
Samuel 1). Dabceck.
Eugene Kelly.
George Bliss.
bevi P. Horton-;!-!\\! *.'.!!!'!'!-**?! ! M'H
Henry Har!.!!!...
George F. Fiaker.
James K. Kcenc.
William E. Dodge.
Adrien Is.eiiu. Jr.
.
Corn elicits N. Biisa.
it. .
.
Orlando Bi Potter estate.
Eraanucl Lehman
Mayer Lehman..
.
Marcellus Hart lev.
. ' ? .
Rev. Charles F. Hoffman.
Per. Eugene F. Hoffman.
. :? i.
ludward Cooper .
FrankS. Wither bee and Mrs. Withorbce
.
.
Js mes
Willi.im E. I)<.,; Stokes.
.....
.
.
? .
H.v.,vv c::>. .
Edward S. Jafirey estate.
Augustus i>. Juiliard.
William E. fsciin.
.
Frederick Brouson.
.
Blasius M. Cheschrougli.
Charles A. Cheschrougli.
.lohn Winthrop Chanter estate,.
Chancoy M. ! >epe\v.
Richard Mortimer.
Stanley Mortimer.,.
William Yates Mortimer.
Ne.wbold Morris .
Charles A. Baudouinc.
D. Willi, .lames..
Isaac [ckelheimcr.
Morris K. Jcsun.
Alfred S. Heidi bach.
Richard 1 rwin. . ...
Kra/.m .1. Jerzmanowski.
Oliver K. Jennings.
John Grecnough.
Col. Delanccy Kane.
Christopher C. Baldwin.
Francis ii. Leggett.
Hiram Iii teh cook estate.
George .'ones estate.
Mason Rcoskaw .Jones.
(diver Livingston Jones.
John L. .Jones.
Frederick Pi. Jones.
Caleb S. Green.
John V. Ellis.!.
Rev. David Stuart Dodge..
Charles C. Dodge.
WOMEN W BO WI1
Mi . Green .
Mrs. Elliott P. Shepard.r.
Mis. W. I>. Sloane.
Mrs. H. McK. Twomblcy.
Mrs. William Seward Webb.
Mrs. Bradley Martin.
Mrs, Robert Winthrop.
Mrs. A.:son Phelps siekes. .......'...
Miss Clementina Kurniss,.
Mis ? Sophia II. Furniss.
Cbuntei5S Francisa Serafino De Roda.. ..
Estate ? Mrs. Mary Rogers Rhinelander
.. .
Mrs. Hanir! A. Garner.
Ducliess of Marl borough.:.
Mrs. Georg tana Fargo.
Mrs. Mary Mason Jones/-estate.
Miss Helen C. Butler;.
Mrs. Raehael M. tdUey..... .'.
Mrs. Catherine Winthrop.
Mrs. Annie M ? Hoes.
Mrs Charles .!. Folsom.
Mrs. Laura Had Jennings.
Marv S. Joncs-'s estate.
Marv Mason 'Jones's estate.
Ducliess i'ecav.es .
Lady Gordon-Cumming.
M rs*. Abrain S. Hewitt...._
Mrs. Roswcll P. plowor.-.v.
Estimated
rrorth.
$125,000,000
12n.coo,ooo
100,-009,000
90,o?o,ooo
SO, 000,000
<5,ooo,ooo
6; '.000.000
),000
50, i .0,000
50,000,000
35,ooc,ooo
30'j000,000
30,ooo,ooo
30,ooo,ooo
39,000,000
-?"?.000.000
'-'?".000.000
25, ooc, ooo
50,000,000
50,000,000
?0,000,000
50,000,000
50,ooo,ooo
'-.'().000.000
20, ooo, ooo
50,ooo,ooo
50,000,000
?-,f,o.?o.ooo
50.ooo.ooo
50,ooo.ooo
i20.ooo.ooo
15,ooo,ooo
I 0,000,000
i 0,000.000
10,000.000
10,000,000
10,OOOjOOO
i 0,000,000
10,Ooo,ooo
10,000,000
10,000,000
10;opo:ooo
10,000,000
10,000,000
10.000,000
> .000,000
i . ".(.('.OOO
(?,000,000
O.ooo.oob
'i. 100,000
o,55o,ooo
5,ooo,ooo
e.MOw.OOO
5.000,000
5,ooo,ooo
5,ooo,ooo
5,ooo,noo
0,000,000
5,o id,coo
'.),000,000
5,000,000
5,000,000
5,ooo,ooo
5,ooo,ooo
5,000,000
5,ooo,obo
5,000.000
0,000,ooo
0,000,000
? ;. 100,000
5,uoo,ooo
a,ooo,ooo
0.000,000
3,000,000
3,ooo,ooo
3,000,000
3,oco,ooo
3,ooo,ooo
5,5oo,ooo
5,5oo,ooQ
5,5oo,ooo
2,000,000
2,5oo,ooo
5,5oo,ooo
5,000,000
2,5o 0,000
5,000,000
5,5oo,ooo
5 .1 10,000
5;5oo,ooo
5,5oo,ooo
'''.I'.wml
2,000,0? M >
5,?oo,ooo
5,aoo,ooo
5,000,000
".'.ini.;.www
-'.000,000
5,000,000
2,000,000
5,000,000
5,ooo,ooo
5,ooo,oou
1,500 000
l,500,ooo
I ,500,oqo
1 ,G00,ooo
1,500,000
1,500,ooo
1,000,000
1,000,000
L PAY.
10.000,000
50,00l),coo
50,000,ooo 1
50,C00,ooo
5?,0??,boo. 1
[0,CO?A,oqo
10,00?,ooo
10,0()0,ooo
I0,000,ooo
I0,o00,ooo
10,000, 10
I0,000,oop
5,000.000,
.">.,((! 1.0 joq
?1,000,000
4,000,000
3,?o'',ooo
2,1")'";, 000
5,500,ooo
5,5GO,ooo
5,500,000
5,500,000
2,500. >oo
5,000,ooo
.' i\00u
5T,0C0,ooo
5^000,000
2,000,000
2.000,000
Annnal Ate
tncems. p*r
$7,611,250 $1
b'.OoO,000 I'
4,o4o,ooo
?t .?oo.ooo
-t.o4s.ooo
3,795,000
3,000,000
3.000.000
5. ."?00.000
5,5oo,ooo
?r?5o,ooo
J.000,000
I ..')oo.000
I,500.ooo
1,500,ooo
L,250,ooo
i .?i?o.ooo
1,250,000
1,000,000
1,009,000
1 ,00C;000
1.000.000
i .000,000
1.000,000
1,000.000
1,000,000
1.000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
'oOjOoo
?r?oo.ooo
?"?".?.000
?'"0,000
?oo.ooo
5oo,ooo
5oo,ooo
5oo,ooo
000.000
506,000
000,000
??00.000
?>oo,ooo
?"500,000
I ".'??,000
''" .):,ooO
?300,000
3 10,000
OOO.Oi'O
?00,000
".'?'0.000
25o,ooo
55o,ooo
55o,ooo
J5o,ooo
'.'.'".000
55o,ooo
55n,ooo
'.'5;f.or>w
550,ooo
'.'.".?.'.wwo
550,ooo
550,000
2;j0,ooo
550,000
'?''' ',000
'.000
5.>0,ooo
.000
550,000
'.woo
www
i 50,000
I .m),000
I ?>'?'.000
! 50,000
150,000
? .'?'?0
i ".'-I,www
I '^"?,000
1 53,000
I -'."?.000
i 55,000
i 55,ooo
! ~o,ooo
155,ooo
? 25,ooo
1251000
I '.'.> .www
! 55,ooo
125,ooo
! '.'"..www
I 55,00c
I '.'??.000
i iili.wow
i'i'!. :>.,.?.
KIO.000
100,000
100,000
i Ott,oOo
I00,ooo
100,000
75,000
75,000
75,ooo
1 a,ooo
/"'.www
/ 0,000
.Ml,www
20,000
1,000,000
,000,000
."*"i.wOO.
,?O?,ooo
,000,000
500,ooo
500,000
500,ooo
500tooo
500,000
500,000
250,000.
3 5?>,ooo
550,000
2? 0,ooo
500,000
I '15,ooo
155,000
155,000
155,000
125,ooo
! 55,000
125^0,0.6
HfO,ooo
100,000
I00,ooo
lOO.ooo
100,000
lOO.ooo
j ? "
I the government; than there were no millionaires nor suffering poor. But at
the close of thirty years of Republican misrule and extortion more than half
of the property of the couutry in value has passed from the many into the
hands of the plutocrats. Daring the last summer the tramp of the unem
j ployed, seeking bread and employment, was be -.rd from Main.? to California,
I and scenes'of riot, blood-shad aud destruction of, property occurred, tht
I like of which was never before witnesses in the history of our country:
THE INCOME TAX.
The Democratic tariff bill taxes the surplus wealth of the couutry, pro?
riding Sot a tax on all annual incomes of over $4,C00, audit is estimated
that the miili maires whose names are given above, will hare to pay into tht
treasury of the United States the sura of about one million, nine hundred
and eighty-fivethousand, three hundred and eighty-fivo dallars. It is esti?
mated that the income tax will reach the sum of thirty millions of dollars
annually, and to that extent lifts from tiie shoulders of the common people
Ihi* burden of taxation.
The McKinley biil imposed a duty of j.Vts per ton on coal and iron oros
imported: the Democratic bill, Wets per ton. All, or nearly all, the coal
mined in Virginia and West Virginia, is mined upon'a royalty of ten cents
per ton. A vein of coal eight feet thick yields, upon such a royalty, about
one thousand dollars per acre. Under the McKinley bill tho protection af?
forded the owner of an eight foot seam of coal is about seven thousand, five
hundred dollars per acre; under the Democratic bill about four thousand
dollars per acre; surely* that is protection enough, and yet they want and
clamor for more.
REDUCTION IN TARIFF TAXATION BY THE DEMOCRATIC TARIFF
BILL.
It i> estimated that the Democratic tariff bill will reduce tue cost of
goods many millions of dollars aunually, not alone reducing the amount of
! tariff duties, I ut by a corresponding reduction ot goods manufactured in tho
! United States, competiou forcing our own manufacturers to sell their goodi
at reasonable prices. ..
l\ i* believed that theroduction in tariiTdutics made by tho Democratic
tariff in goods designated in the woolen schedule, will relieve the people
of about one hundred and cightv-three millions of dollars annually.
The new tariff bill is just going into oporati >n and iti beneficial effects
arc"already felt. The prices of many products have advanced; American
wool has gone up (unwashed wool has bcori sold as huh as- 23 cents per
pound.', while foreign wool has e me dov. n. .'orn. wheat, pork, and many
other agricultural products have advanced in prices, r.ud the bueiuoss out?
look generali)', has greatly improved since the ne w tariff bill became a law.
Fellow Democrats, do not be alarmed; the cry and howl ;l:.\i is heard
all over the land against the Democratic party is the 3ry <?{' tho plutocrat,
and i i the r<rsul'l of the efforts of our party !?> lo >se and break th* grip of tha
plutocrats, capitalists, trusts, ?yndicates, and unholy combinations upon tbt
throats of, the paoplc. The new tariff indicts no wrong upon any great in?
dustry, but relieves the people from unjust and unnecessary taxation.
Democrats, for the fi'rsi time in thirty yearn our parly is in control of all
the departments of government. Will you give it a chance to redeem its
pledges and promises to the people or will you, by apathy and indifference,
suffer the Republicans to obtain control of the house of representatives, and
Lhus render our party helpless to carry on tho great reform it lot-' inaugur?
ated in each and all of the departments of the govcrumerat. Should the
Republicans succeed in ihoir efforts, ii will enable them t > prevent the pas
sage <if any bill they do not approve; and the will of the people, as expressed
in tin presidential clout ion.-,: defeated.
[f th< Democratic i arty is continued in power in all the departments of
the government, reform, retrenchment and economy will !>'? carried on and
out; the tariff reformed, the pension list purged of fraudulent pensions; tho
oxoenditures of the government lessened, and i! i receipts increased; the
ports of the world will be opened to our commerce, and mark sta found tor
our agricultural product*; tho cost of living wjll be choaponcd,Hnd thu moans
of living greatly increased; the cry of the hungry will cease, and liiu tramp
? ii the unemployed be heard no mors.
Restoration of the Republican party to power means the re-enactment
of the odious and infamous McKinley tariff bill; the building of .1 Chinese
wall around our country, preventing an exchange if our surplus products for
the -; trplus products of other nation-, and the destructi >n of our commerce;
the placing of American labor, bound and helpless, at the feel of plutocracy:
tho rc-cnaclincni of the force bill (repealed by the Democrats; or some oth?
er with more drastic";features, placing a bayonet behind each ballot; sur
rouuding the polls with United States marshals, their deputies and soldiers;
thus destroying the power of the states to ?01 r ~! tho (dee, ions as they
hare done since the foundation of the government. An increase of
the pension roll, now requiring more than one hundred and fifty millions of
dollars annually for its payment; an increase '?1 tho expenditures of thu gor
crnment, and a decrease in the revenues; the rule of Plutocracy and thoir
increased wealth, and the increased poverty and distress of the people.
Th? Democratic partj of this District, in convention assomblcd, nomi?
nal) d for Congress Judge 11. S. K. Morison, a man of, and. lor the people; a
puro,upright and Christian gentleman.
It was charged that his nomination was obtained by unfair moans. He
promotl'y refused to accept a nomination tainted with a wrong. The con?
vention re-assembled nnd by acclamation h< was ngain nominated, and he
accept <?d.
Democrats, he is a man entitled to respect, confidence and support, and
call upon you to rally around him and give him the .-.id of your atrong,
stalwart arms.
REPUBLICAN NOMINEE FOR CONGRESS.
Gen iral James A. Walker is tho Republican nominee, why he is such, is
hari to explain. He was a Democrat ail of his life up to about trie year
IS35, when he became disgruntled and sulked iu his tent until 1892, "then
In cast anchor in the Republican camp, mounted its platform, which plat?
form advocated the infamous forco Id!!, ii...- unjust and oppressive protective
tariff, and other iniquitiuos Republican polities.
In times past and for manv years the Democrats'of this district and
state honored Gi n. Walker with their confidence; elected him to important
office*, bestowing upon him th? second highest office in their power?that of
Lieutenant Governor of this state. For twenty years be wa3 a bold, d<-nant,
aggressive Democrat; he carried :i.e. war into Africa, neither asking nor giv?
ing quarter. For bold, agg?;ssivc and fierce attacks upon Republican prin?
ciples, policies and leaders, he had no equal i:i the Democratic party. It was
his bitter a.-sr.uks upon Republicans and readjusters that-caused the Demo?
cratic convention of 1885 to refuse to nominate him for attorney-goneral.
The Democratic party at that time was seeking to conciliate and bring
home its wandering readjuster brethren, and could not afford to nominate a
man who had bitterly denounced thcia, and via;, therefore, under th.e neces?
sity of committing the unpardouattle political sin of nominating Ueu. Avers
instead of Gen. Walker,
If al! that Gen. Vvatkor has said about the Rtpublican party, its leaders
and its principle-.*, between 1865 anij 1885, is. true, then ii deserves tu be
wiped frosii the face of the earth, and its principles and policies should be
..... .* in an unmarked, unhonored and unknown /rave, [f His charges were
not true, then, indeed, he stands on "ragged edge of despair/' and be
should apologize to his Republican brethren and "step down and cut," other?
wise lie may ^liarc the fate of the lamented Actaeon.
Democrats, tue ^Republicans nominated Gen. Walker because (her hoped
many u 1" you would vote for him; hoping for this, they kiss the hand that in
the p,aae smote them hip and thigh. It' you arc true to yourselves, to your
forth and convictions* y&a will surely disappoint these Republican expecta?
tions. The Democratic party of this District owes political duty to Gen.
Walker; tl%at duty you can and should perform \>i. tue Gill C iy of Xovembor,
l^'.i'i. \i\ digging his political grave and ploobig thoroin Lipolitical Lope*
land aspirations, and cover them bo d<.'cr with your ballots as to end forever
all hopes of their resurrection.
Fellow Democrats, as yrau teprefreatativea and in the discharge of tho
duties you have imposed, UpAU us, we call upon you to buckle on your Demo?
cratic armour, Uvy; ^{devour apathv, and v^^^^ incessant warfare upon Re
pu'oiica !.(?'.?..!. ^0 principles for Which you contend ur* eternal, and will
oc/.'.M ?., DO,en, and. parties. Our government is founded upon these immutable
'j principled, and will exist so long a* the people are Criio to themselves.
't he Democratic party has Outlived and iriuinphcd o\crall o'.h'jr political
parties of the past, and will continue, to triumph.
id-lection and desertion arc. ordinary incidents in the history of nil polit?
ical parlies: the Democratic* party \a no exception, and often auch defection
and desertion work- fojc ?'-' good of the parly, thus ridUing itself of political
sore-heads and o.b.fouic ofiico seekers.
DeMucn.ii* cannot ad'ord to vote formen who t?av2 abandoned their party
und !&ugr.i reii'nge within the lines of the common political enemy.
&2mocrata, be not alarmed or disturbed: ?he Democratic party .will eon
[tlnue to live and triumph long after Arno? H?ge and nil the brigadier gen?
erals of tho past and present arc forgotten dust, lour duty is clear sad
plain?stand lirmly by your oavJy: vote for its nominee; go early to the polls
and stay tliere until overv &ecaocratic voto is polled. Du tliifl, and you will
win a great victory aud. eend u representative man to Congress; hut todothis,
you must orgaui^aud work, late and early.
By order of the Committee.
i AfTEST: T. A. LYNCH, Chairman.
J. C. 31AYN0R, Secretary.

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