OCR Interpretation


The Big Stone Gap post. [volume] (Big Stone Gap, Wise County, Va.) 1892-1928, December 06, 1916, Image 2

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88061179/1916-12-06/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

rUK BIG STONE GAP POST..
WEDNESDAY, DEO. 0, DJ1G
Pubhshi-d Kror/ Wednesday by the
WISE PRINTING COMPANY.
Iticor|.or?t?t<l.
GILBERT N. KNirjHT. - Editor.
L1NDSEY J. HORTON. Aas't Editor
Ono Yoa.r.
Six Months,
Throo Months.
$)0O
.BO
.20
Kntcred accordion to postal regulations
?t U'o post-offico st Big Stono (Jap us sw
und-clsss nisttcr.
SUBSCRIBERS uro earnestly re
quested to observe the dato
printed on tlioir address slips,
which will koep thorn ot all
timos postod as to tho datel
of tho expiration of their eub-i
Boription. Prompt antl timely
attention to this request will
save all parties a great deal of
iinnovauco.
The Pay of Preachers.
When Bishop Lawrence stat?
ed lust evening that t lie average
salary of an Episcopal minister
at about $1,200 per annum, he
was citing the statistics of a
church whose clergymen, ns it
whole, probably receive a more
reasonable return for their
labors than those of most
denominations. Even at that,
the bishop's figures are a
sad commentary on the sup?
posed generosity of tho Ameri?
can people.
It goes without the saying
(bat nine in ten of the men
who enter the ministry dp so
without any though! of liberal
monetary reward. If it wore
not so, most of the pulpits of
the country would be vacant
and their former occupants
would be out in the world mak?
ing a living ? a decent living.
But even at this, the minister
must live iih other men, u*vd, in
most communities, must set a
standard for his church. It is
I well enough, for instance, to
talk of the humility of the
ministry, but if a preacher
dresses in the "seedy" gar?
ments of humility, he will soon
bl criticized for his cureless ap
pearatice. If his wife and chil?
dren, eking out a small
salary, do any remunerative
work, the wife will ijo blamed
for not "helping her hus?
band" in his ministry, and
the children will be patron
i/.ed and pitied for their hard
lot in life. If, again, tho min?
ister's wife dresses modestly, it
will bo whispered that she is a
"disgrace to the church." and
if she dresses well, she will be
called extravagant. Then, too,
the minister is expected to set
an example in giving, not
merely to the expenses of the
church but to every charity,
every philanthropy, every work
of his denomination, and, in ad?
dition; to every beggar who
comes with a plaint. Yet if
I he minister so much as hints
that living is costly, and that
an increase in salary is de?
sirable lie will be called mer?
cenary. If he leaves one church
to go to another that pays a
larger salary, the uncharitable
will say In; is seeking the
"loaves and lisln-s," and if he
Conducts any outside Jmsiness,
he is quickly reprimanded for
dellling the temple of the Lord.
Finally, if the pressing neces?
sities of his household occasion?
ally leud him into unwise and
hazardous investments, these
ure never forgotten or forgiv?
en!
Wo have often observed in
some churches an unyielding
opposition to paying the minis?
ter a liberal salary, und, upon
analyzing the reasons we have
found that it rests upon such
nonsense as this: "The preacher
gets as much money as any
man in the church; I am
uguinst paying him better than
those who employ him." Yet
these men never seem i> ask
themselves if the minister's
time and talents are not worth
more than those of "any man
in tbo church." Tho clergy?
man is the ofliciul head of a
groat spiritual enterprise which
represents, among other things,
tho iuvestmont of heavy capital.
Iu business parlance, he is the
active manager of a concern
thnt has from three Hundred to
five hundred or eveu a thou?
sand co-operating members.
He cannot manage that busi?
ness?to view it simply as a
question of efficiency, for tho
moment?unless ho has been
thoroughly equipped. This, in
turn, involves an outlay on Iiis
part of time and money. Why
should he not be regarded, iu
those respects, as on tiie same
footing with any other trained
man who handles n like amount
of capital and lids to deal with
the same number of people? At
the very least, why should he
not have the opportunity of pro?
viding for Iiis old ago of lion
productivity)
This is the evil. It is obi, it
is aggravated, and it is com?
plex it grows with every in?
crease in the cost of living,
and it has never received a lithe
of the attention it deserves. In
tlie cities i! is worse, if pos
sible, than in the country, for
the rural minister has at least a
chance to dig a part of his liv?
ing from the ground while the
city minister must purchase
practically all lie consumes. A
few of those who haye large
city charges are adequately paid
and occasionally one may per?
haps be receiving more than he
could earn at any other calling
?that is the case with practi?
cally ever specialist. Hut the
average city minister lias to
cut corners very closely to keep
out of debt, even when His chil?
dren are small When their
education becomes expensive,
about the time tlie powers of
tlie father begin to wane, the
situation is deplorable. Many
of those wlio sneer at the
preacher's lack of business
sense would lie am heed if they
knew the domestic economies of
liimsolf, ami, more frequently,
of his wife.
We have never thought of
but one way in which the poor?
ly-paid city minister could be
bettor rewarded, ami we are
net sure of that. We refer to a
possible reupportionmeut of tin'
membership of the churches. It
often happens, as we have pre?
viously pointed out that some
churches have an excess of
capable members, ami, some?
times, a potential excess of
fluids. It more frequently Imp
pens that a large church will
have in it no men of means
ami few real loaders. Perhaps
if mo.I the members of the
"rich" church could lie trans?
ferred to tin- "poot" church,the
situation of tlie latter would be
greatly improved financially
ami that of tlie former would
not lie appreciably injured. The
better pay of ministers would
naturally follow Richmond
News Leader.
Enjoyable Party.
Misses Mary ami Bertie Whilt
entertained a number of their
young friends at their home
near the Southern depot last
Thursday (Thanksgiving) night
from 7:lto t,> U?U0 o'clock. A
number of games were played,
after which refreshments were
served.
Those present were: Misses
Kara Wright, Ottie Johnson
ami Lillian Williams, of Hast
Stone (iap: Mae Williams,
Naomi (loll, (Jlossie M?llins
ami ICthel Colo. The boys were:
Kirby Lyttle and Leonard WH?
hums, of East Stouo Gap: Doyle
Raker, Prank Allman, Howard
?lessee, William Cole nnd Harry
Wallace.
Miss Muttio Holten arrived in
the Oap Tuesday morning from
Atlanta, Ua.j and she and her
brother, A. L. Holten, have
gone to housekeeping in the
Connor residence on [m bod en
Hill while Mr. und Mrs. Connor
uro in Sun Antonio, Texas, and
Miss Mary Connor is with her
sister, Mrs. J. 11. Piorpoint.
Mrs. Ohus. F. (.'amp returned
to the (luii Monday night nf'er
a neveral weeks visit to rela?
tives and friends in Cincinnati
and Huntington.
Coal Land Sold
Whitesburg, Ky., Nov. 30.?
One of the most important coal
und timber land deals made in
Eastern Kentucky within
twelve months was closed yes
terday when R, D. Bukor, Win?
chester; II. O. Keums, J. L.
Keinmerer and others of New
York city sold to tho St.iggCoal
Corporation, a Virginia con?
cern with offices in Roanoke,
oight thousand acres of desir?
able coal and timber lands ly?
ing along the Carr's fork,
Troublesome creek and Lull's
creek tributaries of the North
Fork of the Kentucky river be?
low hero near tho Leteher- Fer?
ry border. A large part of the
property lies on the Louisville
& Nashville main line and ac
cording to an announcement
the development of.the proper?
ty on a large scale is to be
started within the next thirty
or sixty days.
While some of the properties
are not touched by the L. <fc N.
and in order that they can he
developed it will be possible for
thy building of two or three im?
portant short line branches.
CALOMEL SALIVATES AND
MAKES YOU SICK.
Acts Like Dynamite On a
Sluggish Liver and You
Lose a Day's Work.
There's no reason why a per?
son should take sickening, sali?
vating calomel when BO cents
buys a large hot tie of Hudson's
Liver 'Tone a perfect substitute
tor calomel.
It is a pleasant, vegetable
liquid which will start your
live:-just as surely as calomel,
but it doesn't make you sick
and can net salivate.
Children ami grown folks can
take Dodson's Liver Tone, be?
cause it is perfectly harmless.
Calomel is a dangerous drug,
it is mercury ami attacks your
bones. Take u dose of nasty
calomel today and you will feel
weak, sick and nauseated to?
morrow Don't lose a day's
work. Take a spoonful of Dod?
son's Liver Tone instead and
you will wake up feeling great.
No more biliousness, constipa?
tion, sluggishness, headache,
coaled tongue or sour stomach.
Your druggist, says if you don't
lind Dodson's Liver Tone acts
better than horrible calomel
your money is waiting for you.
?adv.
Retter keep your auto under
a strong lock. One or two
were stolen in Wise county
first of the week. There ap?
pears to be a gang of car tlieiveS
working this section. Th.v
Use foreign license numbers
and repaint the body of the
car in another color in a few
hours time.?Cumberland (lap
News.
William Russell has gained
his wide reputation among pic?
ture followers through the
forceful enactment of roles de
mantling tho rare combination
of an attractive and magnetic
personality, screen technique
and dominant poise. These
qualities stund forth preemi?
nent in the varsatile actor's
next appearance of the screen
as Oliver Strong, about whom
the action centers in the second
of the William Russell Series of
Mutual Star Productions, "The
Highest Hid". Admirers of
Mr. Russell will have an op?
portunity to see him in his
latest success at the AinUZU
Theatre on Thursday (tomor
row) where this live part so.
cioty drama will head the list
of attractions on the program.
We don't charge for smiles
at this office, They are free
every time you hand us a dol?
lar.
How's This?
Wo oiler One Hundred Foliar:
Reward for any case of Catarrh
that cannot bo cured by Hall's
Catarrh Cure.
P. J. CIIKNKT A CO.. Tottdo. O.
Wr, the undersigned, h&vo known K. J.
Chen?y for the last IS y.-ar?, und bellcv?
him perfectly lionorablo In alt business
Iransactloni and financially ?Wf to carry
out any nbllrntloiu inado by hla firm.
NATIONAL 51ANK OK O?MMKRCS.
Toledo. O.
Hall's Catarrh Cur? I? taken Internally,
acting directly upon tho blood and mu?
cous surface* of tho system. Testimonials
?<-nt fr?e. Price 'i cents per bottle. Bold
by all Uiurgtste.
Tak* Ilall'i ramlly !>m* for coas'.tpalloa.
Damage Suit Settled by Mu?
tual Agreement.
By mutual agreement of all
parties concerned the damage!
suit of Mrs. Rosetta G. Doweil'
versus the V. & S. W. railway
was disposed in the Bristol,Va.,
CorporatiouUourt yesterday af?
ternoon when the special jury
returned a verdict against the
railway for$7,MX). Mrs. Doweil,
who appeared as plaintiff,
suit against the railway as ad
ministratix of the esttfte of her
husband, John A. Doweil, do
coasod.
Mr. Doweil lost his life March
'J*J, when acting ill his capacity
us engineer on the V. iSr. 8. W.
It is alleged that his locomotive
overturned with him. The ac
cident occured in Hawkins
county, Tennessee,
In rendering their verdict I lie
jury decided that one half of
the recovery should he paid to
.Mrs. Doweil and the remainder
dividetl equally among her
seven children, till of whom ore
minors. Mrs. Doweil was ap?
pointed guardian of the chil?
dren j
In presenting the case to the
court Mrs. Powell was repre?
sented by Judge John W. Price
and the railway by Attorney
H. H. Sholton.?Bristol Herald
Courier.
Miws Beverly Bay tie Taylor,
of While Gute, spent Saturday
ami .Sunday in tlio (.lap with
Miss Florence McCormick, en
route to Norton where she has
accepted a position in the
school.
FincastleLady
PraisesTanlac.
Feels It Her Duty to Recom?
mend the National Tonic
Which Helped Her
So Much.
"1 Buffered from indigestion,
gall, liver and kidney trouble
ami was so nervous 1 could not
Bloep",said Mrs. John L. Crush,
of Fincastle, Va., and in ex?
plaining her case saitl:
"Acute pains in my stomach,
right side, and back after eat?
ing as much as two crackers, 1
would feel so full of gas I could
hardly git my breath. My
tongue and IllOUtll was so sore
1 could hardly talk. Since tak?
ing six bottles of Tanlnc 1 have
gained thirty pounds, can sleep
line, can eat most anything I
want, am not nervous and 1
just feel fine. Money could hot
buy the good Tanlnc has done
for me. it lias done me so
much good I feel it my duty to
recommend it, and 1 feel sure,
it will held anyone suffering as
1 have. 1 cannot say enough
for Tanlao."
Mrs. Crush received remark?
able results from the use of the
new remedy, but she is oup,
another of the thousands who
have received the same and
surely if it has helped thou
sands it should help you if so
troubled.
Tanlao oan be secured boreal
the Mutual Drug Coinpauy,
adv.
An ex-client way to get ri'tj
of a grouch is to forget that
yon have one.
The man who poses as a
model citizen is usually the big?
gest fake in town.
Make it a war on the high
|c.ort of living arid you have our
unqualified apqroval.
AT
Arnim Theatre
TOMORROW
(THURSDAY i
William Russell
in
THE
HIGHEST
BID
[ A beautiful spectacular
production of the power?
ful society drama by Ar?
thur Hi Cooden.
I America's Electrical Week
December 2nd to 9th
S HELP US CELEBRATE
1 - I
Electric Transmission Co, of Va,
I i
How to Borrow Money
Through a Federal Farm
Loan Association.
!. Ton or morn farmers'
wanting loans must organize
the association.
'J. No man fanget a loan for
more than ?10,000 or less than
$ 100, or for less than live or
more than forty years.
3. Borrower must be, < r
about to become, the owner of
the html offered as security,and
engaged, or about to become
engaged, in its cultivation.
I. Borrower to use money
for the following purposes ami
none oilier: (a) To purchase
laud for agricultural uses;(b)to
purchase equipment, fertilizers
and livestock mvcssa.-y for the
proper ami reasonable operation
of the mortgaged farm, (o) to
provide buildings and improve
tlie mortgaged land; (d) to
liquidate indebtedness of the
owner.
5. A board of five directors
must be elected by the members
of the association, and these
directors must elect a president,
vice-president, secretary-treas?
urer, and a loan committee of
three members.
0. The loan committee must
appraise the lauds of all mem?
bers, ami the reports of tiiese
appraisers, together witli other
necessary information, must bo
forwarded by the secretary to
the district Federal land bank.
7. [f the district land bank
and the Federal Farm Board,
upon examination, find that all
requirements have been com?
plied witli a charter will ho
issued and the loans grunted.?
The Progressive Farmer.
Turkey buv'ora have been ac?
tive in Tazewell county,
and it is said thai farmers are
being paid 1?; to IX C0I11B per
pound ^ross for turkeys, ami
that the shipments from this
county to eastern markets for
Thuuksviving reached a Intal
of eight thousand turkeys.
Many thousand will be shipped
this reason from the Clinch Vat
ley section.? (Jraham Banner.
AN SCO
CAMERAS C Sl'EF.DEX FILM
serve the joys of Christ
nuts in picture form
throughout the year.
The Ansco Vest
Pocket Cameras are
light, compact, ami al?
ways ready for action.
Prices, $7 up. Other
Ansco models,$2 toS55.
For Sfilo By
SNAP" i lie happy
holiday events with
an Ansco and you pre
G. D. Jenkins
Dealer in
Photo Supplies
Big Stone Gap, Vs.
flail Stones, Cancers ami IMccrs of the
Stomach and Intestines, Auto-lntoxlca
Iton, Yellow Jaundice, Appendicitis ?n<l
other fatal ailments result Irom Stomach
Troublo. Thousands of Stomach Suffer?
ers owe tlu-lr complete recovery to Mayr's
Wonderful lteraedy. Unlike any other
lor Stomaoh Ailments, For sale by drug?
gists everywliore.
FOR
XMAS GIFTS
A Large and Varied
Assortment
-1 nut received a large as
Borlment of hooks especially
appropriate for holiday gifts,
We have spared no pains in
trying to supply your wants
in this line and therefore ear?
nestly solicit your patronage,
11..n't wait until a few .la vs
before Xmas hut come how
and got the pick.
For the Children:
Bllllc Whiskers Series.
Pinkey und Toodlc*.
(It Hooks.
Mother Goose Scries.
Mother's Foplslool Stories,
lied 1 Ime Stories.
Rainy Day Stories.
Acorn Series.
Children's Linen Hooks.
A It C Hooks.
Drawing Hunk'-.
Hoy Seouls.
Girl's Blue Ribbon Series.
For the Grown-Ups:
Teachers Red Letter, Leather
Bound Bibles, $1.25 to $2.51).
Select Poem Gift Honks in (lore
Leather.
Toast Honks
Smoke and Bubbles.
The Rubolyal.
When Ruses Bloom.
The lloily and the Plr.
Mowers ol friendship.
When All Is Sun Within.
I'm (ilad I Mel You.
Lei Us Smile.
Hie Vampire.
My Rosary, and others.
Wise Printing Oo.
BIG STONE OaP, VA.
What to Do When
Backache Comes On
"Fotey Kidney 1-ill.l havo .lone n???
more good Horn ll&U.OO worth of other
medicine," Chas. N. Fox. llimrod,
N. V.
"When backache comes on and It
seems as If you can't aland the pain
find pressure across Iho small of your
hack, hurry to your druggist and set
relief through a box of Foluy Kidney
Tills. They wilt stop the cause of
that pain very nulckly, spur the sluB
t;lsh kidneys to regular action, en?
able them to throw the poisons out of
?ho blood. They will K?t rid of pain
end rheumatism for you. quiet your
nerves, slop your backache, and lltn
bor up your stiff Joints and aoro mus?
cles.
Krank W. Sherman. Lacona, N. Y.m
writes: "I siirrered with kidney trou?
ble, had a tired feellnK In my back,
did not have any ambition and felt,
all tired out. 1 used Fuley Kidney"
Pills and in a few days be?an to feet
heller, and now 1 liavo entirely re?
covered."
Mutual Drug Company
Big Stone Cap, Va.
December Classes i
Now Forming
Smith Bros. Shorthand School
and Business College
Special Rates to Scholars En?
rolling before January 1st,
when tuition will be raised.
I.- Kirk Smith, Urltt P. Smith.
Principal. Business Mgr.

xml | txt