OCR Interpretation


The herald. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, June 29, 1911, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064020/1911-06-29/ed-1/seq-7/

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-------------- ANALYSIS
Pitman-Spencerian Chartier By J. M. REASER, Prin. Com'l Department
-KONG the feremost novelists of the world and time was Charles
Dickens, . :tarliamentary shorthknd reporter. He studied and
used a ~st:e to which I am going to devote reverential atten
tion.
Like Robert'r Plton's steamboat it was the first system-at least
eg the English pleaking race.
The only dlff"r enc is that Fulton's achievement is unquestionably
progenitor ,t our mighty ocean greyhounds, our battleships, our
1tUd as. Fultuonf craft grew. The parent Pitman did not. It re
an approach to the subject entirely different from that for the
i.,g of which Sir Isaac was knighted, to attain a result whose simpll
, ese, legitiit y and reading power destines it to rule the world-the
WiBCERIAN ('I!ARTIER System o Shorthand. Remember those words
..AN APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT ENTIRELY DIFFERENT."
David Coili'erfield 1 which is, most of the time, simply a character
OWd by Dickens tor his own autobiography) thus describes the trials and
.ibalations of the weary and heart-rending time he had in learning Pit
ps to prepare himself to report Parliament-AND THERE IS NOT A
I-WHO ATT'AINS THIS PROFICIENCY IN PITMAN WHO WILL
O TELL YOI' T'IIAT Hl1s TRIALS HAVE BEEN JUST AS GREAT
AID THE TIME HE HAS TAKEN AS LONG.
t "I bought an impzroved scheme of the noble art and MYSTERY of
scgraphy, which cost me ten and sixpence, and plunged into a sea of
plexlty that brought me, in a few weeks, to the confines of distrao
. The changes that were rung upon dots, which, in such position,
esst such a thing, and in such another position something else entirely
genat; the wonderful vagaries that were played by circles; the unac
igataible consequences that resulted from marks like flies' legs; the tre
alous effects of a curve in a wrong place, not only troubled my waking
(eats, but reappeared before in my sleep. When I had groped my way
bsdly through these difficulties. and had mastered the alphabet, which
t, as Egyptian temple in itself, there appeared a procession of new
lgrers called arbitrary characters-the most despotic characters I have
get known. When I had fixed these wretches in my mind, I found that
iy had driven everything else out of it; then, beginning again. I forgot
ag; while I was picking them up, I dropped the other fragments of the
-fc---n short, it was almost heart-breaking."
This is Charles Dickens' own aoccunt of his struggles with what may
is satled the parent system of all shorthand now in vogue.
It is a vivid and true picture a the struggles of the best and bright
alads who undertake, with this medium, to report so exacting and
ehalt a kind of work as debates and speeches-with this exception:
gID NEVER LEARN PITMAN, IN SPITE OF EFFORT. OTHERS
llER ACQUIRE A FAMILIARITY WITH WHAT THEY WRITE
SCB AS TO ENABLE THEM TO TRANSCRIBE IT ACCURATELY AND
-LUENTLY.
10 EXAMINE WHY THIS IS SO-TO LAY BEFORE YOU WHY IT
SOT SO WITH THE WONDERFUL SPENCERIAN CHARTIER SYS
IS THE AIM OF THESE COMPARATIVE ANALYSES.
SSir Isaac Pitman was born in 1813. 0
H Be was a scholarly thinker.
is 1837 he published what he called "Stenographic Soundhand."
STh system, the invention of a trained, logical and well-ordered I
et, reflects those intellectual qualities.
Toe can trace the mental process by which Sir Isaac devised the al
ilt lewhich once ruled the stenographic world.
ir lsase, a graduate of the British Normal College. fell back on the
-rslly useful circle; the angle or slant of straight lines, and finally sue
i a composing an alphabet. itself easily remembered, but, used as
Aglsthsad system, presenting difficulties it requires months and years
so thoroughly as to be able to take testimony, speeches, st..
it In some instances, a havy percentage, this mastery is sever
t' looek into this, first tracng the steps of Sir Isaac's pleaser
snd then analyse why this system, having no reference to English
to the ingrained habit of the mind by which people spell anad
Is leghand, requires so much study and work of the studeat oS It
he  s master It.
p Isaem took a circle and cut It up Into as many parts as would -
as to use the segments or arcs as symbols for consonant sound
senousle . This is indicted by tahe points checked of Is the
Turn we to fIgure 1
youre z.. r-i rrzr
3
% s
S/I
8=( =ms:( ti 3-c' I = / =r d
-6ý= s: Z 4-c =/ =c: : j
- ) =h:J ? /-c= .= ':-=I
CHARTER
~IlFERN FILM EXCHANGE
OF AMERICA. STATI
A. CITY OF NEW OR
PARISH OF ORLEANS.
that on this twelfth (12th)
of May. Ia the year of our
nine hundred and eleven
tnthe Independence of the Unit
Aerica, the one hundred and
th), before me. Henry Leon
Public, duly commissioned
- i and for the Parish of Or
SLouisilana. and in the pre
Witeasses hereinafter named and
ily came and appeared:
John Alblon Saxton and
Walmsley, Jr., all rest
City of New Orleans. State of
SA of the full age of majority
that, salling themselves of
of the general laws of the
relative to the formation
but especially of the Act
g General Assembly of the State
Ot the year 1904. they have
51 agreed, and they do by
Covenant, agree. bind and ob
as well as such other per
Shereafter become associated
to Constitute sad form them
" earporation and body politlc in
Pmposes and objects and under
a3d stipulations following, to
ARTICLE I.
md title of this corporaties
the "SOUTHERN FILM &X
S bad b that corporate name it
dl enoy quccession for a period
(I9) years: it shall have the
raet., sue and be sued: to eake
te seal: to assue beads: to
Neal money secured by mortgage
3 to have and employ such man
oieers, agents and other
the interests of the said or.
reqaire : to make and estab
ws, rules and regulations for
and control of the satsir
as my be necessary, and
lUSee all the powers plnted
I thli state to do all thingas
proer to eahs7 eut thqeS.
the which this corDese
ARTICLE II.
The domicile of this corporation shall be
In the City of New Orleans, and all citations
and otbcr legal proces shall be served on
the president, or, in his ahbsenc', on the
vice-president, and. in the absence of both,
on the secretary-treasurer.
ARTICLE III.
The objects and purposes for which this
corporation is formed, and the nature of
the business to be carried on by it are here
b declared to be: to manufacture, pur
chase, sell, lease, and to deal generally in I
all kinds of Sims and plcture machines for
the exhibition or reproduction of moving I
plctures on screens or otherwise for ts aown
account or as agents for'others, In the Staten
of Louisiana and elsewhere; to build, pur
chase, own. lease and operate theatres for
the exhibition or reproduction of moving
pictures on screensu or otherwise; to buy"
and sell, as well as lease, patents and pat- I
ent rights in connection with the objects s
and purposes for which thbls corporation Is c
formed; and In general to do all things
necesary, incidental and proper to carry
out the objects and purposes of said cor
poratlon.
ARTICLE IV,
The capital stock of this corporation is 1
fixed at the sum of ten thousand dollars
($10,000.00), to be dlided into and repre
sented by one hundred (100) shares of the
par value of one hundred dollars ($e '.4
each; and said stock shall e ai4 for -in
cash, or its equivalent, as called for by the
Board of Dliretors.
This corporation shall commence doing
business and become a going concern as
soon as three thousand dollars ($3.00t0.4,, t
of its capital stock shall have been sub 1
scribed to. No sale or transfer of stock
shal l valid or blnding on this corporatinf
ualem made en the books of the corpoa
tion.
Should any stockholder deilre to sell his
stock be shall frt offer the same to the
stockheolders of this corpnoration through
its Board ol Directors, and any stockholder
shall have the right to purchae the same
at Its book value, at the time of offering, or
within seventy-two (T2) hoars thereafter:
but upon the failure of the stockholders to
purchase said stock within that time, seuh
stock may be sald to say one desring to
purchase lbme.
No stockholder shall ever be hel liable for
the contracts, debts o faults ef said cor
IoratIo- n aor sha a ruere n.ality In
ps as ta e *have the seck of reader.
lag this charter null, or i eubeelnj any
- bamnea S on the sine uusd t hae
Figure k
,oe .OO . -0
V= . A = out= 4 o = L= L
ircle of Figure 1, marked with numerals from 1 to S. Segment. arc or
:urve, 1-7, he called "f"; curve, 2-8, "th"; curve, 4-6. "a"; curve. 5-7.
'sh"; curve, 1-S., "1"; curve. 3-5, "r". Having thus obtained six con
sonant signs or symbols, he doubles the use of five of these by writing
them heavy and thus giving symbols for the heavy sounds of these five
:onsonant signs. Thus the sign for "f," written heavy, becomes "v";
'th" (as in "myth") becomes, written heavy, "th" (as in "with"); "s"
becomes "z"; "1" is written upward or downward, the usefulness of I
this segment of the circle is single; "r" written heavy becomes the vowel s
round, "y"! "M" and "n" are the top and bottom of the circle.
SIR ISAAC WAS STILL SHORT AT LEAST EIGHT CONSONANT
SOUNDS, and he proceeded to use all possible unconfusable radii of the
circle for these missing consonants: Radius. 2-c, he called "p"; 3-c. "t";
i-c, "ch"; 1-c. "k." Observe, please, that there is not a single other seg
ment of the circle or ralius thereof which can be used without imminent
nd even hopeless danger or confusion, but he had now all necessary
CONSONANT SOUNDS and the EMBRYO of a system, HOPELESSLY
NONFLUENT, and DESTINED ABSOLUTELY to require, for the reason
.f its CUMBERSOMENESS. a vast distionary of word-signs.
HE HAD NOT YET A SINGLE VOWEL SIGN. Of these---in the
writing of English. :hese vowel signs are absolutely imperative, at least:
ah, eh. ee. aw, oh, oo, and (short) a, e, I. (short) o, u. oo.
The device by which Sir Isaac attained their expression is hopelessly
defective, as will be shown. He made position the expression of the vowel,
calling above the line, on the line and below the line the three positions.
"Ah," for instance, is indicated by a heavy dot above the line. That
heavy dot on the line or in the middle of the stroke or letter becomes
"eh" and in the last place, "ee." Written light, it becomes the short
sound of the same vowels. Taking a short dash and writing it heavy
in these three positions, he furnished his system the second series of long
or heavy vowel sounds., "aw," "oh." "oo": and, writing them light, the
seoond series of short vowel signs. "o," "u," "oo" (short). The dip
thongs are arbitrary characters, as are "i," "."
That is the alphabet of the system for the invention of which Queen
Victoria conferred upon Sir Isaac the great honor of knighthood! With
thepe signs anything can be written, in some sort of a fashion, but be
fore a man can take testimony or speeches running from 125 to 200
words a minute, or twice as fast as a clock ticks, he has to acquire a
skill, to so make this system a part of him, to so WRITE SOUND (ab
stractly) that the apparent simplicity vanishes and he fnds that he is
against practically the problem which kept the immortal Dickens sleep
less, hewing down forest after fores of difficulties even in his dreams.
This article proposes to discuss this matter to a finality-to show
the relative merits of the Spencerian Chartier and Pitman.
It is not doing so in a spirit of caviL
It believes in the sublime dignity of the 114-foot craft of Fulton,
which made its way laboriously up the Hudson at five miles an hour.
But it is certain if the restlies progressiveness and energy of man had
been content with it and declared it the finest possible boat that human
genius could build, he would not to-day be crossing the ocean in a little
over fear days on mighty leviathans which are practically safe against
an storm and which breast the Seroest of them without a perceptible
deerease in speed
This is the age of progress.
Progress is impossible if we cling with blinded eyes to opinions which
we have accepted for their age and by reason of no thought which we our
selves have spent.
Progress is possible only as a result of Investigation--and Investiga
tion is the child of freedom from bias, freedom from accepted convention
alties. Fogyism has no place in America.
With all honor to the great intellect of the student who has. in spite
of all the criticism to which his system is open, made it possibe for men
to transcribe thought with the swittane with which It glides from the
tongue, THIS ARTICLE ASKS THAT YOU INVESTIGATE WHAT IT IB
SEEKING TO PUT BEFORE YOU WITH ALL DEFERENCE AND HU
MILITY. BUT WITH A CONVICTION THAT EVERY CLAIM AND AR
GUMENT ADVANCED IB SANE, SOUND. TRUE--WORTHY OF YOUR
ATTENTION, INASMUCH AS THE DAY IS FAST ARRIVING WHEN
EVERY CHILD IN THE THIRD READER WILL BE LEARNING
SHORTHAND (SPENCERIAN CHARTIER SHORTHAND) WITH AN
BASE AND READINESS IMPOSSIBLE IN ANY OTH~n bSYSTEM.
THE GREAT PITMAN'S DIFFICULTIES
Before we go any further in this analysis, and while you have the al
phabet of the Pitman system fresh before you, let me give you another
plate In order that we may make plainer our talk.
I pick this plate at random. It is a Pitman transcript of an utter
ance of the great showman, P. T. Barnum, and here is what he said, writ
ten in longhand:
"As far as business is concerned, I have a particular hobby. My
crase is that every young person, of both sexes, should learn at least
shorthand and typewriting. Here you have mental discipline and knowl
edge together, knowledge, too, that is almost certain at some time to be
convenient and practically available. I cannot conceive that one who
knows these two branches thoroughly will ever need to go hungry in the
present generation, for they have a constantly widening use."
Know Pitman thoroughly! Truly P. T. is a humorist. P. T. was
either Ignorant of his subject or joking.
How many there be of these craftsmen in this city of almost 400.000
rsauls? Count them over-those who really answer P. T.'s description.
You or anyone with the slightest sort of memory can learn that alphabet
which has just been given and which, with endless use and practice, can
enable one to do that speedily, but tr, knowing th's alphabet, to take a
ARTICLE V.
The corporate powers of this company
shall be vested in and exercised by a Board
of Directors of three (3) directors, each of
whom shall own at least one (1) share of
stock in his own name, a majority of the
board shall constitute a quorum to transact
business. They shall elect from their num
her a president, a vice-president, and a sec
retary-treasurer.
The directors shall be elected annually,
by ballot, by the stockholders, at the ol-ce
of the company, on the third Thursday of
May of each year, beginning with the year
1912. Each stockholder shall be entitled,
either in person or by proxy, to one vote
for every share of stock held by him, and
said election shall be held under such rules
as may be prescribed by the Board of DI
rectors, and a majority of the votes cast at'
such meeting sha ll elect. Henry W. Lamb,
John Albion Saxton and Sylvester Pierce
Walmsley, Jr., are declared to be the first
Board of Directors of said corporation to
serve until the third Thursday of May, 1912,
or until their successors shall have been
elected and qualified, with Henry W. Lamb,
as president, John Albion Saxton. as vice
president, and Sylvester Pierce Walmsley,
Jr., as secretary-treasurer.
Any vacancies occurring on said board
shall be filled by the remaining directors for
the unexpired term from among the stock
holders; and directors may vote by proxy
or In person.
The Board of Directors shall make and
establish, as well as alter and amend, any
and all by-laws, rules and regulations for
the government of said corporation; and
authority is given the said board to do and
perform, and to embody in such by-laws
rules and regulatons all the rights and
powers granted to such corporations by
the laws of this state, and not repugnant to
these articles of Incorporation.
SRTICLE Vl.
This charter may be modified, changed or
altered, or said corporation may be dis
solved with the assent f three-fourths (3-4
of the stock represented at a general meet
ing of the stockholdees called for that pur
e after ten days' previous notice shall
have been given to each toholder maled
to his last known residence as it appears
on the books of the corporation.
ARTICLE VIL
Whenever this corporatlon may be disd
solved, either by limitation or by any other
cause, its atairs shall be liquidated by three
(3) stoeboldms wh shall be ppetotl as
Meeth e the he be nveOWe
for such purpose after ten days' previous
notice shall have been given by mail to
each stockholder and mailed to his last
known place of residence as it appears on
the books of the company; said commis
sioners shall remain in omce until after the
affairs of the corporation shall have been
fully settled and liquidated. In case of
death of one or more of said commissioners,
the vacancy shall be filled by the surviving
commissioners.
Thus done and passed, at my ofce, in
this city, the day, month, and year first
above written, in the presence of Messieurs
Joseph IM. Gore, Jr., and Ambrose G. La
Pice, competent witnesses, residing in this
city, who have hereunto signed their names
with appearers and me, notary, after due
reading of the whole.
Original stied : H. W. Lamb. 45 shares;
John Albion Saxton, one share; 8. P. Walms
ley, Jr., one share.
Witnesses: A. G. LaPice and J. I. Gore,
Jr. HENRY L 8ARI'Y, Not. Pub.
I, the undersigned Recorder of Mortgages
in and for the Parish of Orleans, 8tnte of
Loulsiana, do hereby certify that the above
and foregoing act of incorporation of the
"Southern Film Exchange" has been this
day duly recorded in my ofce, In mortgage
book 1018, folio -.
New Orleans, La., My 12, 1911.
(Signed) EXILE LONA D, D. R.
I, the undersigned Notary, do hereby cer.
titfy that the above and foregoing ip a true
and correct copy of the original alt of is
corporation of the "Southern Film Ex
change" of record to my ofice.
In faith whereof, I have hereunto set m
hand and have affixed the impress of my on
cial seal, on this twelfth (12th) day of the
month of May, A. D. 1911.
HEN.RY L SARPT, Not. Pub.
May 25 June 1 8 15 22 29 1911
" CHARTER
OF THE MENDOLA BROS., INC.
UNITED BTATES OF AMERICA. STATE
OF I)UISIANA, CITY OF NEW OR
LEANS.
Be it known, that on this fourteenth day
of June, is the year one thousand nine hun
dred and eleven, before me. John Wagner, a
notary public, duly commissioned and swor
In , for the ral Of OraM and City r 9
New Orleans, therein esiding and in th
speaker at 1f0 words per minute, and see how thoroughly you rea!ly
know it.
See if you don't find your iPtend with the saute sort of fits that af
flicted that of the great Dictkens
JOKER BARUM'S WORDS IN SHORTHAND
The above is the plate showing the transcript in shorthand of nar
f num's point of view of shorthand. It is probably written by a man ,w ho
1 answers Barnum's description. full of word-signs, correctly used-- a lpr
fect specimen.
First, let us call your attention to the fact that the vowel-sign' arte
entirely eliminated-and believe me whe in .ou are taking a slee'lh. e.nt
. have no time for vowel-signs with l'ittuan shorthand. TilE ItEAStN
WHY IT TAKES YOU SO .MI'Cli PRA('TICE TO MAKE THIS SYSTI`:\l
VALUABLE TO YOU IS THAT YOI'R EYE. YOUR INST'IN('T MI1ST 1'1.:
TRAINED SO THAT YOUR EYES A,lOST S'1'PLY THiE INVISliti.:
AND NON-EXISTING 'OlVEI.S. In fast writing ytou are forced to dr(,:
the vowels. We set forth here oneeproposition of shorthand which detit.,
refutation.
It is elemental:- -The reading power of any system is based on the
percentage of vowel sounds you can indicate.
Here is a another truism: ITS SPEED IS BASED ON THE SI'EE:I,
WITH WHICH YOU CAN DO TrillS.
From these two axioms it is impossible to get away.
Now, in this light--so clear and self-evident--let us get at the tran
script of what Joker Barnum says. as transcribed in the Pitman systerm.
Notice, please, that the very first three words are written as a word
sign-the very first three words. These first three words are "as far as."
and the Pitman system writes them 'sfrs"! There is not a hint of a vow'el
s sound anywhere. In the position! Why should "as" be written in the first
position and in the last posiltion, and each time spell "as"? The accuracy
of geometry is sadly deserted in this: "Fr," "far." Is there any possible
reason, conceding for the sake of argument that the "fr" is in the first
position, why this should not he "far." "afar," and since there is mere
h position visible, why it should not be "offer?" It is. however, "far" to
the trained eye in Pitman, for the reason that that house there is a house
to your familiar vision. In "business." position pretty well indicates the
word. You have "bs" and "ns." and require no flight of imagination to
make it out. "Pn" is conventionally in the second position, making it
literally and meaninglessly "open" with the "o" long, as in "mode" or
is"pone" (same long o) or "pain" (long a), or "pen" (short e), etc.
In short, the "pn" in the second position spells "upon", because it is con
ventionally so accepted. "Concerned" has a little bit of dot before the in
itial circle-s for "con," an "r" cut half its length, thus adding "d' and a
little "n"-hook---still the "d," created by the shortening of the "r" Is
read after the "n"-hook. Here, then, are the consonant signs guiding
the experienced eye in reading "concerned"-"consrnd." "I" is the
r. "tick" on top of the "v," and "v" is a word-sign for "have." "Iv," in other
'words is "I have." "A" is the dot In the first position. "Particular" is
n "p" shortened to half length to show that there is a "t" or "d" sound
somewhere concealed about its person, and the "p" is begun with an "r"
hook. although the "r" is read after the "p." Literally, we have "rpt (or
Sd)" spelling "particular." Another word-sign: "lib" (vowel sounds to
be guessed) "hobby." In a sentence of eleven words, thus, we have
seven word-signs. p
h What now is really a word-sign? It is something that has to be
learned and stored away in the memory. When the first eleven words
of the man who says that his hobby is that every young person should
learn shorthand "thoroughly." are found to contain seven words that
- have absolutely to be remembered, it is to be seen at a glance that he is
either ignorant of what he is talking about, or has a large and expansive
sense of humor. This system cannot be taken on and carried as a side
A line. One who learns it has to dedicate himself to it as did Dickens. An
other thing, this system cannot be mastered and allowed to rust. Speed,
accuracy, a working order of the possession is maintained by constant
Spractice and that alone.
There are sixty-eight words in the rest of what P. T. Barnum here
R said. There are over forty word-signs in this number. Capacious mem
ory at this gait, don't you think, to know this language of lines and arcs
and circles thoroughly-a big word-sign store-house necessary; and you
cannot pause. you know, when you are writing 150 words a minute to re
call how "I have been," "as far as" "that" "particular," etc., are writ
ten. Pitman is almost impossible with night students.
It is strange, almost remarkable, that an analytical genius such as
must have been the mind that invented and evolved Pitman system did
J- not reflect that the two greatest impediments in his system were infiet
ar ed unabated on all the men and women who studied and the compara
tively few who mastered his system:
r- A lack of vowel power.
t- A diminution of speed proportioned to the number of vowel signs
used.
[y Net result-an absolute necessity of an enormous dictionary of word
st signs.
1- A difficulty of mastery increased by every word-sign.
)e A MULTIPLICATION, IN THE CASE OF EXPERTS, OF WORD
to SIGNS SO GREAT AS TO MAKE THE WRITING OF EACH EXPERT A
Ie SYSTEM OF HIS OWN, BASED ON PITMAN. BUT PECULIAR TO THE
WRITER AND ABSOLUTELY UNDECIPHERABLE BY ANY ONE
as ELSE.
& As a matter of my own knowledge I know that Spencerlan Chartler
)0 shorthand can be learned with one-fifth the study required for Pitman;
n. it can be written faster than Pitman-It makes fewer strokes In writing
et any given matter--and it can be read with an ease never claimed for Pit
n man. In fact, people knowing the system, correspond In It and read each
a other's writing as though it were longhand or Roman print.
presence of the witnesses hereinafter named
and undersigned, personally appeared: the
several persons whose names are hereunto
subscribed, who declared that availing them- hi
selves of the laws of Louisiana, relative to vi
the organisation of corporations, do by vi
these presents covenant, agree and stipulate at
to form themselves, their heirs and assigns ga
into a corporation and body politic for the p4
objects and purposes and under the follow- st
log stipulations, which they hereby adopt at
as their charter, to-wit: 01
ARTICLE I. c(
The name and title of this corporation
shall be "MENDOLA BROS., IN('.," and its
domicile shall be in the ('ity of New Or
leans, Louislana, and under said name it ti
shall have and enjoy a corporate existence hi
for a period of ninety-nine years from this n
date: to sue and be sued: to make and use al
a corporate seal, the same to break or alter at
at pleasure: to purchase, hold, own. lease, cl
acquire. sell, alienate, mortgage pledge prop- ft
erty, both real and personal; to borrow ti
money and give or receive securities; to On
own stock in any other corporation: to con- ai
duct and carry on the business hereinafter a'
stipulated: to elect and appoint directors ti
and such oMeers, agents and employees as b;
may be necessary in its business and to do ci
all things necessary to carry on such bust- it
ness. d
ARTICLE II. p
ti
The domicile of this corporation shall be A
In the City of New Orleans. T., and all
citation and other legal process shall be
served on the president, or in his absence or k
disability on the vice-preldent. e
ARTICLE III. a
11
The objects and purposes for which this t
corporation is organised and the nature of e
the business to be carried on by It are here
by declared to be to manufacture from wood. s
paper, press board, tag boards, card board. c
straw, manilla and news board and from a
other like substances, different kinds of a
boxes, cartoons and like receptacles and to a
rint on and label same; to do printing, em
Ing, steel engravng and lithographing r
of a general nature, and book and pamphlet t
binding. etc., and to undertake any other I
enterprise or business which nay be ger- i
mane or which may grow out of the objects c
and purposes above enumerated, and gener- I
ally to do a general priataing busilness and to •
deal in stationery, office furnitre and sup- a
ples. It being optional to carry out any or e
all of the objects above named fron time to
time wIttbout the necessity of egagiug In I
all of said diferent objct _ .
ARTICLE IV.
The capital stock of this corporatlion i
hereby fixed at three thousand dollars, dlI
vided into three hundred shares of the par
value of ten dollars each, which said stock
shall be paid for In cash, or in property,
a goods or merchandise, or in services or labor |
performed for the corporation: all st'ck a
Sshall be full paid and non-assaesseable. No
shares of stock shall be transferred except ,t
on the books of the company and until the
certificate of stock shall Ia: dellivered to thet
company and canealled.
ARTICLE V.
All the corporate powers of this corpora t
tion and the management and control of ts t
business. including the power to buy. sell.
a mortgage, pledge. or In anywise acquire or I
alienate or encumber the property, both real
and personal, shall be vested ton and exer
clsed ly a board of directors composed of a
five directors, three of whom shall aenat l
toute a quorum for the transaction of taal
n.saa. The board of directors shall bae elected:
annually on the first Monday of January
r at a meeting of the stockholders called fr t
that purpose. All such elections shall ic
by ballot and conducted at the offic of thea
company under the supervision of tw com
missioners to be appointed by the Iaaard of
directors. Each stockholder shall is cull
tied to one vote on each share of stck heldl
by him as shown on the books of the caa
pany. to be cast in person or by prosy, and
the majority of the votes so cast shall lert.
SA ten days' notice of such election shall be
I given by the Secretary-Treasurer to each
stockholder In person or by mall to his last
r known address as shown on the hooks of the
company. The directors tha electel bthall
continue In fse for one year and until th.lt
succesuor shall have been elected andl ttal
flied. but a failure to elect directors on
s the date designated shall not dissoalvel the
f corporation. but the directors then in am..e
shall remain In office until their stca'assors
i, shall be elected and qualified, and shall
L cause an election as soon thereafter as pos
e sible, after notice shall have been given as
f above specified. Any vacancy occurring
0 among the directort by death, resignatia or
I- i otherwise shall he filled ly the remaining dl
g rectors. The hoard of directors shall at
t their first meeting after their election. leat
r from its number a president. a vice-pressl
r- I dent and a secretary-tresatlrer. Saild baaaral
SI of directors shall have the right to appoint
r- and discharge such clerks, agents and em
p- stock shall bear the signature of the prel
ar dent and the sr;rtar"tireaurer. Any of
to the director snhall have the right by writ
In ten Isrutrment to depute all powers pos
eased by him or them as such directora to
Lazardf's
We'll
Get
iYou
Yet
' t1 or 1
lh . , t , 1 t,1 S Y.
IiY 1r t Ca\ A|. ,. I , V t
ý" .I t _" ; I . - 7.t , , 11 ,
f ,l I . o . t i 0, . VT 1, il
\\~r6, e w. l,, i apJ pI}
li : '1 1 1" " fh t , l " tO
I'ý1ll t 'P llAtI I ,'P I.
-- ol:t It, nlerle t , yo1.
Very Low
SRates
ATTRACT THOUSANDS TO
CaliforniA
Every Summer
Tickets on Sale Daily, June 1 to
Sept. 30, 1911. Limit, October
31, 1911.
Especially;
Low Rates
June 5 and 6, June 11 to 22 and
June 27 to July 5, 1911. Return
Limit Sept. 15, 1911.
TWO TRAINS DAILY VIA
Southern
Pacific
Also Very Low Summer rates to
COLORADO and YELLOW
STONE NATIONAL PARK.
Excellent Service Afforded by
the Southern Pacific and Con
nections. For full particulars,
Call on or write
CITY TICKET AGENT,
225-227 St. Charles Street, New
Orleans. Phone Main 4027.
Beautifully Illustrated Litera
tyre lFurnished on Request.
such person or persons as they may desig
nate. the iparties, however, mlust ihe accept
able to the board. All meetings of itouck
holders. whetIelr general or sLpcial, shall
be Ilel only alfter tlhe ten dais above re
qulrei shall Ie given acs plov Ijrovlded fir.
The tirst ,board of dlrectors of the- company
Is herel,y dlc(lared to I. nomiposd of Ioule
i;. Metndola. Simon Meadols..l James Wllle
rnel. IagudaIIlllIn Il;ovannl aIId Ezllda $8
Scordote Mendila, of whom Luts l ;. Mendola
shall Ite president, Simon Mlendola vierpres
ildent. .Jamnes WIllelmet secretlary- reasurer,
lwhe shall hold olee ulntil tIl tlrat Monday
of Januaryrv. 1lt12, and ntivil their au(cessors
shtll Initt Ise l'aen electedl atdl quali fied.
ARTICLE VI.
Nit stockhohler shall ever Ie responsible
for thei clnduclt or failure- of saali corpora
tili In any fllrthher snum than tlhe unpaid Iasl
;ince, that may Il due by him to said corpor
IllDoln on the- unplaid amount on the shares
,,f s~tock owned by him, nor shall any ltoer
malllty In organlsation shall lhave the effect
if renlelrlng this charter nllll or .xlntlng
th. slwtcckhiditer Ilaliable for anly further
amoui't than the unpahl Ialance due by
them oii their stoc.k ubhcrlptlon.
ARTICL'LE VII.
S Thlis act of i'orleoratlon ully 1it amended,
altercle or modtleuld, or thils cerpieratlon may
J e dlinaolve.d by a vote of 1thrreefourths of
the caIaltlI steck pre.sent r rprlresented at
a meeting of the stockholhelrs called foir that
elirpose, after tihe ten day.s utice as pre
t icrIlsd el hrove.
.fRTI('lo VIII.
Whenever this corloratlln Ia diianlved.
iltlher Icy lImltatlion or otherwe-rt. Its alfftrs
shall a- liqulidaled undler the tulservhllon of
a- thirer lilatiors. to ie app l tcliltd froli among
15 the tfockh,I.lerie at a mi.eela o tf hIe stock
II. Iollera calleid for that leilrioie after the
ier lieli " v ie ti lie reqsilre, l al ,vie. Said liqeti
it lntir, shall remailn In ,ttlc.. until the affairs
r-of the. i-.ompany are fully liluildated. and
cu any vacncy eccurrlnr In therir ntumler shall
U- I filld by the remaining lululdatora , who
I shall "onltinlei to art durling sal l vacancy.
u aid Is llilulator. shall hare tile p,we·r to sell
y and dil 0llse ef tlhe prol..rty anil assets ot
r tIte corleoraln. either at pIrv;itie or public
e -tale for sucllh pric' and on sucel terms and
i. endlltleon as tihey dete.nl Is-il. andl to accept
r andl sign all acts. des-t i :itlnd ciler Instrl
it Inelnt nnecessary In tihe prrelises. In Illul
1- dating the affairs of tltc etutmpanfy said Ii
-lI quildaltrt o shall di-trlhllti ' thI . ri*'ldlle. after
In payn'nt of dbts anl llltilitlies, among the
ni utlekholder piro rntalttl nst-,it-cig to the
t nilmler of shares held by thunm.
be rThus clme anod i,;assetl In ray tle,. 317
.he 'arndelett streetl. or tlte ..;a, teueth and
It year herein first alv, wrrlttln. In the Ipre.
be noe ol ,leu ile u illrlu VIII cn turl nn ihr t and
tI .Ihn .I. Met 'loikiv. ,c .ii.t.l, nt witnesses,.
It lflot tt-retiti * elltl ig he.ir ln:illlle.L, with said
at- aptscarers aniltl tim nictlrl. caflur iltee readIng
o, fI tile while, . oand the lb al ,lit.areri leclar
le ing tlhat they placed afllcr Ihiir d'niatuire
1th* numler of shre5 of stck sulerllled by
re thn, whhich the-yhereby adloplt as the,.lr orig
alt l s ttck utec.rilptl on list
itirlrin.cl sign.-.. Namcr , omittled.
lWitnesses: William ('hrlitlanson. Jihn J.
SMu c'oskeky. JN.o. WA.Ni.U. Nit. Pub.
dl- I. the undersligned. ..e..relr r ,t t urtgages.
at In and for the parlah uof 0,ecltanil. State of
t-t Itllansi . cn hereby wrtlte v Ithat the abolve
sI- and foregcing act of Iniccrlpr:lletti oif the
rd MNnhdula Bros.. Inc. iwaC I! clay dullly re
nt torded In rny edee. In Iiw k l1hi. flio 727.
l NSIgne I-:MII, 1 I .N il, II. R.
of A to ,c c,,cpy from the origlina! on file nla
nt- my olli, '
t " J'(). WAGNER. Not. PIb.
te June 22 2,) Juy I 13 20 27 11

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