OCR Interpretation


The herald. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, July 20, 1911, Image 7

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064020/1911-07-20/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 7

ANALYSIS
Pitman-Spencerian Chartier By J. M. REASER, Prin. Com'1 Department
ýný
IONO t!fP firnost novelists of the yorld and time was Charles
Dicker. a I arliamentary shorthand reporter. He studied and
aged a s£ st:n to which I am going to devote reverential atten
tion.
Like Robert Ft. it,n's steamboat it was the first system--at least
. the Engli--h ~,~'.tk!ug race.
The only difere:nce is that Fulton's achievement is unquestionably!
,progenitor of our mighty ocean greyhounds, our battleships. our
ias. Fulton'. craft grew. The parent Pitman did not. It re-i
Wired an appr(a,'h to the subject entirely different from that for the
,isag of whicih sir Isaac was knighted, to attain a result whose simpli
dt. eas. leg'bii:t eind reading power destines it to rule the world-the
Ei('CERIAN lt'.\It E It System o Shorthand. Remember those words
*.'AN APPROA'II t) TiHE SUBJECT ENTIRELY DIFFERENT.'
David Co;' ;* Id I which is, most of the time, simply a character
Wd by DickeL's for his own autobiography) thus describes the trials and
g{bulations of th . weary and heart-rending time he had in learning Pit
- to prepare hi:·;lf to report Parliament-AND THERE IS NOT A
..N WHO ATTA'NS 'rTiIS PROFICIENCY IN PITMAN WHO WILL
Tr TELL Y('1 TIIAT HIS TRIALS HAVE BEEN JUST AS GREAT
pID THE TIMVE IiE HAS TAKEN AS LONG.
* "I bought an irtroved scheme of the noble art and MYSTERY of
geographY. which c(tt tie ten and sixpence, and plunged into a sea of:
perplxity that brought nit. In a few weeks, to the confines of distrao-'
otn. The changes t.at were rung upon dots, which, in such position.
Wast such a thing, and in such another position something else entirely
uI-ret; the wonderful vagaries that were played by circles; the unao-I
sutable consequences that resulted from marks like flies' legs; the tre-1
Ils effects of a curve in a wrong place, not only troubled my waking
,ue, but rtappeared before in my sleep. When I had groped my ways
ESdly through these difficulties. and had mastered the alphabet, which
"s n Egyptian temple in itself, there appeared a procession of new`
oners called arbitrary characters-the most despotic characters I havei
-mr known. When I had fixed these wretches in my mind, I found that I
jy had driven everything else out of it; then, beginning again, I forgot'
w; while I was picking them up. I dropped the other fragments of the!
1short, it was almost heart-breaking."
This is Charles Dickens' own account of his struggles with what may
ialled the parent system of all shorthand now in vogue.
It Is a vivid and true picture a the struggles of the best and bright
t aands who undertake, with this medium, to report so exacting and
gilt a kind of work as debates and speeches-with this exception:
o- NEVER LEARN PITMAN, IN SPITE OF EFt'ORT. OTHERS
311R ACQUIRE A FAMILIARITY WITH WHAT THEY WRITE
gCH AS TO ENABLE THEM TO TRANSCRIBE IT ACCURATELY AND
ggg.UNTLY.
STO EXAMINE WHY THIS IS SO--TO LAY BEFORE YOU WHY IT
SNwOT SO WITH THE WONDERFUL SPENCERIAN CHARTIER SYS
18 IS THE AIM OF THESE COMPARATIVE ANALYSES.
Sr Isaac Pitman was born in 1813.
h. He was a scholarly thinker.
Is 1837 he published what he called "Stenographic Soundhand."
The system, the invention of a trained, logical and well-ordered In
ent, reflects those intellectual qualities.
Toe can trace the mental process by which Sir Isaac devised the l
-ow which once ruled the stenographic world.
Er Isaac, a graduate of the British Normal College. fell back on the
usetul circle; the angle or slant of straight lines, and finally suo
ti composing an alphabet, itself easily remembered, but used as
lthaad system, presenting difficulties it requires months and years
ger so thoroughly as to be able to take testimony, speehes, te..
It. In some instances, a heavy percentage, this mastery is mever
et's look into this, first tracing the steps of Sir Isase's pioneer
ai then analyse why this system, having no reference to English
to the ingrained habit of the mind by which people spell and
Is longhand, requlres so much study and work of the stadent .t It
- 'san master It.
ir Isaac took a circle and cut it up into as many parts as would m
m to to s the segments or arcs as symbols for consonant sounds
Emt seoaissn. This is indicated by the points checked of In the
Turn we to Figure 1
f iyure . z n
3
I'
2-C
• I
)=s:') 4-c=/Z =c*/ f
4 m =':IzJ 1 /-f-c=--=w:mw,
u 7
-6w~ .22 :%.v 7~9
Ci1· i
r6
CHARTER
_OTHJBRN MISSISSIPPI OIL
A ND DEVEILUPMENT
COMPANY.
at America, State of Low
Parish of Orleans.
That on this nineteenth
of June, in the year of
hundred and eleven, be
Kenton Bailey, a notary
tmdisioned and qualiied ls
parsh of Orleans, therein re
a the presence of witnesses
- O d and undersigned, person
ar ppeared the several persons
are hereunto subscribed, who
ft4 that, availing themselves
of the laws of this state
the organisatlon of corpora
have covenanted and agreed
these presents covenant and
h themselves, as well as all
Who may hereafter become as
thnem. to form and constitute
and body politie In law, for
a4d purposes and under the
pt tLlations hereinafter set
: WRTICLE I.
and title of thslt corporation
southern Mi-selsippi 1O and
t Company. and by that
have and enioy corporate ex
beession for a. period of twen
lars from date hereof with
Ih prosecutlon of and for the
it businees as hereinafter set
--t and be s ed: to acquire
real and personal. by pur
, * otherwle. and the same to
-Witte, pledge, hypothecate or
ý55e of ; to appoint or elect
ecers. managers or other
as I.s business may re
and use a corporate seal,
to alter at pleasure: and in
all things necessary aad
by law to corporations
AMCLE II.
0 this corporation shall be
Res Orleans, state of oan
diatioes aad other legal
procesa shall be eerved upon the president,
or In his absence upon the vice president.
or in the absence of. both, upon the secre
tary-treasurer.
'ARTICLE III.
The objects and purposes for whlch this
corporation is organised and the business
to be carried on by it, are hereby declared
to be: To explore, mine and operate lor
oil, ias. salt, 'sulphuor and other mtnerals
to purchase, bold and Improve and sell
real estate. oil, gas and other develop
ments; erect, own and operate oil refineries
and manufacturlng plants, market the
products of name and to conduct a general
business of developing the corporate hold
lngs.
ARTICLE IV.
The capital stock of this corporation is
hereby fixed at the sum of fifty thousand
~5..000,p dollars. divided Into and repre
sented by five hundred snares o the par
value of one hundred t$i10.0-1 tdollars
each, which stock shall be paid for In cash,
or may be issued in payment of or for serv
ices rendered, rights or property actually
received by the said corporation.
ARTICLE V.
All the corporate powers of this corpor
ation shall be vested in and exercised by
a board of three (31 directors, a majority
of whom shall constitute a quorum for the
transaction of business.
Said directors shall be elected at a gen
eral meeting of the stockholders to be
held on the second Tuesday In January of
each year.
Notice of such meeting-. and of all other
meetings not otherwise provided for by law,
shall be given in writing to each stockhold
er. by mailing arme to such stockholder's
last known address, ten days before each
meeting.
At the first meeting of the board of di
rectoirs after its election It shall elect from
among Its own number a presialdent. vice
presildent and a "retary-treasurer ; and all
vaatnciek occurring hall be filled by the
remaining directors, fot the unexpird
term. in January.
Until the second Tuesday in Januar.
1912. the following shall constitute the
first board of directors, namely: P. Charles
Cevaroc, Henry Wirth and Oiver HI. de La
morton with the maid P. Charles Cavaro
as president, the said O. A. de Lamorton as
vlce prlsnt. t bhs a Wirth an
nasl1 thst asesa are elected.
-. ....--, - ... .--- --.1
PRe oo -00
V= .r A=out -4=o ,r1=i L=u'L
circle of Figure 1, marked with numerals from 1 to 8. Segment arc or
curve, 1-7, he called "f"; curve, 2-8, "th"; curve, 4-6, "s"; curve, 5-7,
"sh"; curve, 1-3, "1"; curve, 3-5, "r". Having thus obtained six con
sonant signs or symbols, he doubles the use of five of these by writing
them heavy and thus giving symbols for the heavy sounds of these five
consonant signs. Thus the sign for "f," written heavy, becomes 'v";
"th" (as in "myth") becomes, written heavy, "th" (as in "with"); "a"
becomes "z"; "1" is written upward or downward, the usefulness of
this segment of the circle is single; "r" written heavy becomes the vowel
sound, "y"! "31" and "n" are the top and bottom of the circle.
SIR ISAAC WAS STILL SHORT AT LEAST EIGHT CONSONANTI
SOUNDS, and he proceeded to use all possible unconfusable radii of the
circle for these missing consonants: Radius, 2-c. he called "p"; 3-c, "t";
4-c, "ch"; 1-c, "k." Observe, please, that there is not a single other seg
ment of the circle or ralius thereof which can be used without imminent
and even hopeless danger or confusion, but he had now all necessary
CONSONANT SOUNDS and the EMBRYO of a system, HOPELESSLY
NONFLUENT. and DESTINIED) ABSOLUTELY to require, for the reason
of its CU1MBERSOMENESS. a vast diDtlonary of word-signs.
HE HAD NOT YET A SINGLE VOWEL SIGN. Of these-in the
writing of English, these vowel signs are absolutely imperative at least:
ah, eh. ee, aw, oh, oo, and (short) a, e, I, (short) o, U, oo.
The device by which Sir Isaac attained their expression is hopelessly
defective, as will be shown. He made position the expression of the vowel,
calling above the line, on the line and below the line the three positions.
"Ah," for instance, is indicated by a heavy dot above the line. That
heavy dot on the line or in the middle of the stroke or letter becomes
"eh" and in the last place. "ee." Written light, it becomes the short
sound of the same vowels. Taking a short dash and writing it heavy
in these three positions, he furnished his system the second series of long
or heavy vowel sounds, "aw," "oh," "oo": and, writing them light, the
second series of short vowel signs. "o, ," " oo" (short). The dip
thongs are arbitrary characters, as are "1," "u."
That is the alphabet of the system for the invention of which Queen
Victoria conferred upon Sir Isaac the great honor of knighthood! With
these signs anything can be written, in some sort of a fashion, but be
fore a man can take testimony or speeches running from 125 to 200
words a minute, or twice as fast as a clock ticks, he has to acquire a
skill, to so make this system a part of him, to so WRITE SOUND (ab
stractly) that the apparent simplicity vanishes and he finds that he is
against practically the problem which kept the immortal Dickens sleep
les, hewing down forest after fores of difficulties even in his dreams.
This article proposes to discuss this matter to a finality-to show
the relative merits of the Spenaerlan Chartier and Pitman.
It is not doing so in a spirit of cavil.
It believes in the sublime dignity of the 1144oot craft of Fulton,
which made Its way laboriously up the Hudson at five miles an hour.
But it is certain it the restless progressiveness and energy of man had
been content with it and declared it the finest possible boat that human
genius could build, he would not to-day be crossing the ocean in a little
over four days on mighty leviathans which are practically safe against
all storm and which breast the fieroest of them without a perceptible
derease in speed!
This is the age of progress.
Progress is impossible itf we cling with blinded eyes to opinions which
we have accepted for their age and by reason of no thought which we our
selves have spent.
Progress is possible only as a result of investigation-and investiga
tlon is the child of freedom from bias. freedom from accepted convention
alities. Fogyism has no place in America.
With all honor to the great Intellect of the student who has. in spite
of all the criticism to which his system is open, made it possible for men
to transcribe thought with the swiftness with which it glides from the
tongue, THIS ARTICLE ASKS THAT YOU INVESTIGATE WHAT IT IS
SEEKING TO PUT BEFORE YOU WITH ALL DEFERENCE AND HU
MILITY, BUT WITH A CONVICTION THAT EVERY CLAIM AND AR
GUMENT ADVANCED I8 SANE, SOUND, TRUE-WORTHY OF YOUR
ATTENTION, INASMUCH AB THE DAY IS FAST ARRIVING WHEN
EVERY CHILD IN THE THIRD READER WILL BE LEARNING
SHORTHAND (BPENCERIAN CHARTIER SHORTHAND) WITH AN
EASE AND READINESS IMPOSSIBLE IN ANY OTHZL, SYSTEM.
THE GREAT PITMAN'S DIFFICULTIES
Before we go any further in this analysis, and while you have the al
phabet of the Pitman system fresh before you, let me give you another
plate in order that we may make plainer our talk.
I pick this plate at random. It is a Pitman transcript of an utter
ance of the great showman, P. T. Barnum, and here is what he said, writ
ten In longhand:
"As far as business is concerned, I have a particular hobby. My
crase is that every young person, of both sexes, should learn at least
shorthand and typewriting. Here you have mental discipline and knowl
edge together, knowledge, too, that is almost certain at some time to be
convenient and practically available. I cannot conceive that one who
knows these two branches thoroughly will ever need to go hungry in the
present generation, for they have a constantly widening use."
Know Pitman thoroughly! Truly P. T. is a humorist. P. T. was
either ignorant of his subject or joking.
How many there be of these craftsmen in this city of almost 400.000
souls? Count them over-those who really answer P. T.'s description.
Tou or anyone with the slightest sort of memory can learn that alphabet
whlch has just been given and which, with endless use and practice, can
enable one to do that speedily, but try, knowing thi alphabet, to take a
At all meetings of the stockholders each
stockholder shall be entitled to one vote
for each share of stock owned by him and
such shares may be voted in person or
by proxy. ARTICLE VI.
This act of Incorporation may be amend
ed, or this corporation dissolved by and
with the consent of two-thirds of the en
tire capital stock represented in person or
by proxy, at a general meeting called for
the purpose after written notice as provid
ed for by law.
In case of the dissolution of the corpora
tion. its affairs shall be liquidated by two
commissioners elected from among the
stockholders at a meeting called for that
purpose, or at the meeting at which the dis
solution ~s voted, and they shall serve until
the afsairs of the corporation are liquidated.
Should.either of the commissioners, for any
reason. he unable to act, the remaining
commissioner shall fill the vacancy.
ARTICLE VII.
No stockholder of this corporation shall
be held liable for the contracts or fadlts of
this corporation beyond the unpaid ful
ance due on the stock subscriled for by
him: nor shall any informality in organi
nation have the effect of rendering this
charter null, or of exposing any stock
holder to any liability beyond the unpaid
balance due on his stock.
Thus done and passed before me. notary.
at the city of New Orleans. on the day,
month and year tirst herethibovre written in
the presence of Albert J. "Taper and Flor
ence Flynn. competent witnesses. who have
hereunto signed together with said appear
ers and me, notary, after due reading of
the whole.
Original Signed: Prof. O. II. de La-nor
ton. one share: P. C. ('avaroc. two hundred
and thirty-eight shares; Henry Wirth. one
share. Albert J. Taper. Florence Flynn.
(Seal) J. KENTON BAILEY.
Notary i'ublic.
I. the undersigned. Recorder of Mort
gages. in and for the parish of Orleans.
State of Louisiana. do hereby certify that
the above and foregoing act of incorpora
tlon of the So. Mia. Oil and Land lDevel.
Co. was this day duly recorded in my office
in Book 1015. folio 744.
New Orleans. June 20. 1911.
(Slgned) EMILE LEONARD, D. R.
A true copy of the original act of ncor
poration extant and on file in my olce.
(Seal) J. KENTON AILiEY.
Notary Pnblie.
J2uUuls-l--2ag '11
When the Cat Was sacred.
In the mklidle ages brute animals
formed as prominent a part in the de
votional ceremonies of the time as
they had in the old religion of Egypt.
The cat Aelurus was embalmed after
death and burled in the city of Bubas
tis because, according to Herodotus.
Diana Bubastis. the chief deity of the
place, was said to have transformed
herself into a cat when the gods fled
into Egypt.
French Family Life.
It is a threadbare criticism by Eng
Ilshmen that the French bare no
word for "home." They have "foyer,"
which answers nearly enough. but
even if that be thought to stand for
something different the obligations of
family are strong and generaL The
respect and affection of English sons
for their mothers do not compare with
those of French sons, and in France
family ties extend to relations whom
we in England should regard as hav
ing no claim upon our consideration.
The frothy gayety and the solidity of
the French character exist side by side
in permanent dualism-mobility for
the visitor to see at a glance, solidity
for him to discover it he takes the
trouble.-London Spectator.
CHARTER
OF TIE MENDOLA BROS., INC.
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,. STATE
OF LOUISIANA, CITY OF NEW OR
LEANS.
Be it known, that on this fourteenth day
of June, is the year one thousand nine hun
dred and eleven, before me, John Wagner, a
motary public, duly comamssioned and sworn
In, for the Parish of Orleans and City of
New Orleas, therea ressldia, sad in the
speaker at 150 words per minute, an see how thoroughly you rea'iy
know it.
See if you don't find your jl..Ii with the same sort of fits that af
flicted that of the great l1, ken.
JOKER BARUM'S WORDS IN SHORTHAND
The above is the plate showing the transcrtilt in shor'tnad of Par
num as point of view of -shor: hand It is proally written !l a n.:n aho
answers Barnumn's description. full ot word-signs, correc: iy u(nd a l.,r
fect specimen.
First, let us call your at!e tion t( l:", fact that the vo el ,-s:.T,. are
entirely eliminated--a- t 1i heve :o;.e ' lten 1 (i aM:e taik ing a spe'cht. ll
have no time for vowel-signs with liti,:n shorthand. T"ilE It AE.StN'
WHY IT TAKES YOU sao M?('lI it'"l' i(E '(TO MAKE Tills SYS l':'t
VALUABLE TO YOU IS THAT Y'1t' i:1 E-. Y 'lit IN'TlINT('I N ST l'$':L
tTRAINEI) SO THAT Yt t EYE'< \Lt.1' ,T SI'Il'LY TIlE INVISII:lI.i
AND NON-EXISTING VtVIWEI.S n writing '('l are forced to t r,
the vowels. We set forth here one proposition of shorthand which dift.
refutation.
It is elemental: The reading power of any system is based on the
percentage of vowel sounds )ou can indicate.
Here Is a another truism: ITS SPEED IS BASED ON TIlE Si'l:.: I
WITH WHI('Ci YOl (' CAN DO TIIS.
From these two axioms it is irn ,-.ible to get away.
Now, in this light- so clear and ., If-evident - let us get at the tran
script of what Joker Itarnum says. as transcribed in the Pitman s.st'"n.
Notice. please, that the very tirst three words are written as a acrd-i
sign-the very first three words. Threse first three words are "as far as."
and the Pitman system writes thema 'sfrs"' 'Trhre is not a hint of a vowe"l
sound anywhere. In the position' Why should "as" to written in the first
position and in the last position, and each time spell "as"? The accuracy
of geometry is sadly deserted in this: "Fr," "far." Is there any posi'ible
reason, conceding for the sake of argument that the "fr" is in tl.e first
position, why this should not be "far." "afar." and since there is mere
position visible, why it should not be "offer"?" It is, however, "far" to
the trained eye in Pitman. for the reason that that house there is a house
to your familiar vision. In "business." position , retty well indicates the
word. You have "bs" and "ns." and require no flight of imagination to
make it out. "Pn" is conventionally in the second position, making it
literally and meaninglessly "open" with the "o" long, as in "mode" or
'I "pqne" (same long o or "pain" long a , or "pen" (short e), etc.
In short, the "pn" in the second position spells "upon", because it is con
ventionally so accepted. "Concerned" has a little bit of dot before the in
itial circle- for "con," an "r" cut half its length, thus adding "d and a
little "n"-hook--still the "d," created by the shortening of the "r" Is
read after the "n"-hook. Here, then, are the consonant signs guiding
the experienced eye in reading "concerned"--"consrnd." "1" is the
"tick" on top of the "v." and "v" is a word-sign for "have." "Iv." in other
words, is "I have." "A" is the dot in the first position. "Particular" is:
p" shortened to half length to show that there is a "t" or "d" so'lni
tsomewhere concealed about its person. and the "p" is begun with an "r"-
hook, although the "r" is read after the "p " Lit' rally, we have "rpt for
ad)" spelling "particular." Another word-sign: "lib" (vowel sounds to
be guessed) "hobby." In a sentence of eleven words, thus, we have
seven word-signs.
What now is really a word-sign? It is something that has to te
learned and stored away in the memory. When the first eleven words
of the man who says that his hobby is that every young person should
learn shorthand "thoroughly." are found to contain seven words that
have absolutely to be remembered, it is to be seen at a glance that he is
either ignorant of what he is talking about, or has a large and expansive
sense of humor. This system cannot be taken on and carried as a side
Sline. One who learns it has to dedticate himself to it as did Dickens. An
other thing, this system cannot be mastered and allowed to rust. Speed,
accuracy, a working order of the possession is maintained by constant
practice and that alone.
There are sixty-eight words in the rest of what P. T. Barnum here
Ssaid. There are over forty word-signs in this number. Capacious mem
ory at this gait, don't you think, to know this language of lines and arcs
and circles thoroughly-a big word-sign store-house necessary; and you
cannot pause, you know, when you are writing 150 words a minute to re
call how "I have been." "as far as" "that" "particular," etc., are writ
ten. Pitman is almost impossible with night students.
It is strange, almost remarkable, that an analytical genius such as
must have been the mind that invented and evolved Pitman system did
I- not reflect that the two greatest Impediments in his system were Inflict
r ed unabated on all the men and women who studied and the compara
tively few who mastered his system:
- A lack of vowel power.
- A diminution of speed proportioned to the number of vowel signs
eusd.
y Net result--an absolute necessity of an enormous dtetionary of word
it signs.
I- A difficulty of mastery increased by every word-sign.
e A MULTIPLICATION, IN THE CASE OF EXPERTS, O WORD
0 SIGNS SO GREAT AS TO MAKE THE WRITING OF EACH IXPERT A
e I SYSTEM OF HIS OWN. BASED ON PITMAN. BUT PECULIAR TO THE
WRITER AND ABSOLUTELY UNDECIPHERABLE BY ANY ONE
s ELSE.
0 As a matter of my own knowledge I know that Spencerian Charttier
0 shorthand can be learned with one-fifth the study required for Pitman;
s. It can be written faster than Pitman-it makes fewer strokes in writing
it any given matter-and It can be read with an ease never claimed for Pit
n man. In fact, people knowing the system, correspond in it and read eaEds
a other's writing as though it were longhand or Roman print.
presence of the witnesses hereInafter named
and undersigned, personally appeared: the
sevieral pwrsons whose names are hereunto
subscribed, who declared that availing them
selves of the laws of Louisiana, relative to
the organiatloion of corporatlons. do by
these presents covenant, agree and stlpulate,
to form themselves, their heirs and assigns
into a corporation and body politic for the
objects and purposes and tnder the follow
ing stipulations, which they hereby adopt
as their charter, to-wit :
ARTICLE I.
The name and title of this corporation
shall he "MENDOI BROS.. IN('.," and its
domicile shall be In the City of New Or
leans. Louisiana, and under said name it
shall have and enjoy a corpcrate existence
for a period of ninety-nine years from this
date: to sue and he sued: to make and use
a corporate seal, the same to break or alter
at pleasure: to purchase, hold, own. lease.
acquire, sell. alienate, mortgage pledge prop- !
erty. oth real and personal: to borrow
money and give or receive securities; to
own stock In any other corporation: to eon
duct and carry on the business hereinafter
stipulated: to elect and appoint directors
and such ofcers, agents and employees as
may be necessary in Its business and to do
all things necessary to carry on such busl
ARTIC.E II.
The domicile of this corporation shall lbe
in the City of New Orleans. IA., and all
citation and other legal proc.*ss shall bei
served an the president, or In his atsence or
disability on the vice-president.
ARTICLE Ill.
The objects and purposes for which this
corporation is organized and the nature of
the business to be carried on by it are here
by declared to be to manqfacture from wood,
paper, press board, tag boards, card board.
straw, manllla and news board and from
other like substance-s. different kinds of
boxes. cartoons and like receptacles and to;
print on and label same; to do printing. em
bossing. steel engraving and lithographine
of a general nature, and book and pamphlet
hindinr. etc.. and to undertake any other
enterprise or business which may ti ger
mane or which may grow out of the object*s
and purposes above enumerated, and gener
ally to do a general pri, ting business and to
deal in stationery. offce furniture and sup
plies. It being optional to carry out any or
all of the objects above named from time to
time witbhout the necessity of engaging in
al of sal dIlsmt *jeeta.
ARTICLD IV.
The capital stock of this corporation is
hereby fixed at three thousand dollars, di
vided Into three hundred shares of the par
value of ten dollars each, which said stock
shall be paid for In cash, or In property.
goods or merchandise, or In services or labor
performed for the corporation; all stock
shall be full paid and non-assnesable. No
shares of stock shall he transferred except
on the books of the company and until the
certificate of stock shall be delivered to the
company and cancelled.
ARTICLE V.
All the corporate powers of this corpora
tion and the management and control of its
business. including the power to buy. sell.
mortgage, pledge, or In anywise acquire or
alienate or encumler the property, tooth real
and personal, shall be vested In and ezer
cised by a board of directors comsnosed of
five directors, three of whom shall c,,nntl
Stute a quorum for the transaction of bc u l
rwss. The board of directors shall bte e.leted
annually on the first Monday of January
at a meeting of the stockholders call.edl fir
that piurpose. All such .lertons shall IIl
by ballot and conduct,.d at the fict of to ih,.
calmpany under the s.ilMrviin if tw , 'om
misilnners to ie appoint,.d ,y the Ion.l. ,Ir
directori. Each stockholder shall i, .-.ntl
I tlnd to one vote on each share of sti'kn hill
by him as shown (n ti nSonts of tie com
Ipany. to is cast in person oir by proxy. andl
the majority onf the vnoles r'i cant shall n-lec.
A ten d;,ys" notice of such ,lectlon shall tie
giren Iy the Sn,(.re.:try.Treasurer to each
tokholder In gperson or toy maill to his last
known address aq shown on the tbooks or the
comnpany. The dlre.tors thuls eleiteId thanl!
cmntinnne In ,mr.i- for on, year and until t!t'r
succ-nressors shall hare Is-en elected and silua
find. t,bt a failure to elect d ,ire'trns tin
the datle desinat*.d shaFl nolt dils-.iel th,
corporatilon, unit the dlrrctnrS then in , mi
shall remain in office until theIlr tc.,i s- ,,r
shall ba elected anti qualified, and shall
canse an electlon as soon thereafter na pus
sitle, after ntis-e shall han ,been glign ,i5
above speclfIel. Any vaceanry o'-' rriln"
iamong the dlir-ctors n' death. rn"snnai'i,, r..
otherwise shall i' filled by tihe rmaini ttilt !
i rectors. The eoard of tlircirs 'nhne t
tIfhr first metling after thlelr ele,-tl ,n, nlen,,
ifrom Its n"-.mlr ita prePidnt. a vIe- iresPi
Sdent and a scretary-trean r,'r. Sanl.I ,,!rI
of rni'titr ,uitall hive the richt in appn
an"o ' schirgC shuch clerks, agentsoanit ern
plov.e. as may twn ne.e"SarY. t'.rtttl'atis ,n.
stock shall bear the sitlrnattre of the prom;
,dent and the secretary-treasurr.e Anyifr
 the directors shall have the right by wrIt
I"ten instrument to depute all powers it'
.etsed by hin or theb as such directors to
,i,
Lazard. in
SW e .' 1.
Get
You
Yet
Rates
ATTRACT THOUSANDS TO
Cali orniA
Every Summer
Tickets on Sale Daily. June 1 to
Sept. 30, 1911. Limit, October
31, 1911.
Especially
Als Very Low o w
RatesLow Rates
Tickets on Salnd 6, June 11 to 22 and
JunSept. 30 , 1911. Limit, October
Limit Sept. 15, i911.
TWO TRAINS DAILY VIA
Southern
niiie cPacific
Also Very Low Summer rates to
COLORADO and YELLOW
STONE NATIONAL PARK.
Excellent Servi'e Afforded by
the Southern 'Pacitic and Con
nections. For full particulars,
('all on or write
CITY TICKET AGENT,
225-227 St. Charles Street, New
Orleans. Phone Main 4027.
Beautifully Illustrated Litera
ture Furnished on Request.
rclh plerson or persons .au they may deslg
mint,', hlie parth,.a howvtr', fniai-t tai- act'ept
able to the Ihird. All l,'e'tllls tof slocik
holders. wh'ethi"r agenral or ate'al'. shatl
I.e ihel only aflter the let dayt, aove re
qilired shaill he glvn ans at, n, Iarovhidd for.
The first board of dilrectoas ,f tlhe company'
Ii herelay du.'lar'ed to ia' a'aiuplaa"0''' of lloili
l;. \l,,ndola. Slion Mfndlal. J.ame Wlllk
let, Magldalena I lhrannl anal Ezlldi ar
aicrdote Mendloin. of whlli l.astl. (;4. Mendlol
'haill w pirehllent. iminon Mendlola vl'e-.pre
dld.nt. J.a1llsi Wl tlleiotr sa'ir'.l t ry-treaslur er,
wiho shall hohl office .intil thi tlrat Monday
of .hlimiuary. 1]112. anld atiIN! thleir ,suae''aorl
al all have It le. *·c ted ndi qlualified.
ARlTICLE VI.
No stockhlnider shall rver ie reasponslble
for the cl.nduc|lt or falulr. of salil cor-por
tion in any further siim than the unpald hal.
anc. that may i.e dlue by himn to said corpor
atloil tn the unpaltil anmlolnt on the ahlares
of stock owned by him. nor ishall tany Lnfo
maaliy in orKanizalon shall have the elect
or rendering thins charter null or exposlg
thie stoclkholders liable fur any further
amount than the unpald b:alance due by
themn on their stock slubscrlption.
ARTICLE VII.
This act of corporatlin may ie amended,
altered or modilied, or thils .,,riporatlon may
be dlsalvewd by a vote of tlhr.e-fourths of
the captali itock present or r"prea.ented at
a meeting of the at.c'kbold-r'. .alled for that
ipirpiui.. aflter the ten day'. nttle as pre
scribed almuve.
AR'TICIE V'III.
WhenevePr ti1is corlpraai',n is dilsaoved,
either ly limitation or otherwi'se, its afairs
shall Ie thilidailt'd under thlr ae miervlion of
three li]quidators to ie aipoint'd from amon
tht stoc. khollel'ir. at a nli.''t lnlg of the stock
hohaers a enlid for that arpi"se after the
tin dat',' totice resaiurel alav.". Sa. iiqui
datiora .hall retnan In ilffiac until the affalrs
of the company are fullly illanidated. and
any vacancy ocr.urring in thlIr nilmlir shali
I,. il".id ly the rematnlng lialhiiaitorw, who
,ihall co'ntlInue to m at ilt';ir r ;n iid vacancy.
Mait ]hltluidator'. ihall hl vi tii," piw,.r to aell
and dispose l f thef pri,,trla , m .1 ass.iets of
tih, cerporatiln, e'ita'h r ;It ; ,'l, ate or publle
<ale for such prla. ana1 'aa -, a ta'rma and
a.andltions a thai'' l', iu l -t. ,lroi toa aa'e'pt
and sign atll ad.ct, ,laai . a. 'l ,ather IDnstrai
almaients rt.esaa-ary In tlh..' preain a.. In hdIi
datIng the affair". of Ith' ar.;lngy sai tll
quliidatcor shall dl-ta'ria,' 'I, reshlalie. anftir
aaymt..'na of d.iti afit,[ a 'V.:>-, aiottni.' the
.st.ckhaalder' , ro r" i .n,. a : . ,,raling i t the
nanailer oa ahatria'" Ii.>l '"','aalla
0'ar,, n,l .tr. ·I. Eff*r,, . ,,t110 1, , i m, f t: l ,IDl I
'Il1. w+Pr'i tiran t . "inti ' ,w: ". . 8. In 1 pr,.11 -
a n,+,. ,nf e .--il' a '' ' a' . . m .rtin, n ani
Joir ri ii. , a'hn . .., ' .*aa. ra ! ai tait r1'-,
wha , h'' l ria ntt sia r tha ' - lr na a.-. with i.atil
I pearil sI and | e. n 1 e ' :" , n,' r+. ling
a af a!..' msta''. anda a'.. - t .a .a an'''- ia,.,:l
ini that thsy ;'lai a a:f. - . -, i a,~nari
aa ' nthea .r af ,tai,'' ,?f -',k - ,, ,ae iv
SI,..i - , hichn thl, h 'ea!,v ' . ' ' : r or' lii ' i
lin'ii'a In I. ia',. a : a ! . a:l'ra l ;'-.
I. thil und.ataritt l I ....1 aa....' 1", t'.-a .
'C ign ,,a 1:L% I . I. ; \ Itt , D . R .
f A truaa co,,y from the arl..nal on file in
SJNii. W.\,;NEIlt. Not. Pub.
Jo Jne. 22 219 JUyt 13 20 27 11

xml | txt