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The herald. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, September 14, 1911, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064020/1911-09-14/ed-1/seq-7/

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-ANALYSIS
Pitman-Spencerian Chartier By J. M. REASER, Prin. Com'1 Department
Pitmn-Spnceran Carie ý_
The foremost novelists of the world and time was Charles
ns, a parliamentary shorthand reporter. He studied and
a system to which I sm going to devote reverential atten
Robert Fulton's steamboat it was the frst system-st least
lish speaking race.
difference is that Fulton's achievement is unquestionably
of our mighty ocean greyhounds, our battleship. our
SFulton's craft grew. The parent Pitman did not. It re
approach to the subject entirely diferent from that for the
which Sir Isaac was knighted, to attain a result whose slmplt
legibility and reading power destines It to rule the world-the
CHARTIER System o Shorthand. Remember those words
ROACH TO THE SUBJECT ENTIRELY DIFFERENT."
Copperfleld (which Is, most of the time, simply a obamrter
ens for his own autobiography) thus describes the trials and
of the weary and heart-rending time he had in learning Pit- l
himself to report Parliament-AND THERE IS NOT A cO
ATTAINS THIS PROPICIENCY IN PITMAN WHO WILL '
OU THAT HIS TRIALI HAVE BEEN JUST AS GREAT C
ME HE HAS TAKEN AR LONG. tO
an improved scheme of the noble art and MYSTERY of
iwhich cost me ten and sixpence, and plunged Into a am of
 Nat brought me. in a few weeks, to the confines of distrao
Sdasges that were rung upon dots, which. In such position,
a thing, and in such another position something else eatirely
4b wonderful vagaries that were played by cidrles; the unao
uences that resulted from marks like flies' legs; the tr- S
. of a curve in a wrong place, not only troubled my wakSing
reappeared before In my sleep. When I had groped my way
h these difficulties, and had mastered the alphabet, which
yptian temple in itself, there appeared a procession of new
llsd arbitrary characters--he most despoti characters I have C
When I had fixed these wretches in my mind, I feud that N
drives everything else out of it; then, beginning again, I forgot o
I was picking them up, I dropped the other fragments of the
short, It was almost heart-broaking."
Charles Dickens' own sacount of his struggles with what may a
-b parent system of all shorthand now in vogue.
a vivid and true picture n the struggles of the best and bright- d
who undertake, with this medium, to report so eacting and C
a hind of work as debates and speeches-with this exceptiont
R LEARN PITMAN, IN SPITE OF EFFORT. OTHERS I
-ACQUIRE A FAMILIARITY WITH WHAT THEY WRITE
To ENABLE THEM TO TRANSCRIBBE IT ACCURATmY AND s
WHY THIS IS SO-TO LAY BEF)ORE YOU WHY IT c
WITH THE WONDERFUL SPENCERIAN CHARTIER YTS. I
'RE AIM OF THESE COMPARATIVE ANALTSES. O
~ase Pitman was born In 1813. O
n a scholarly thinker.
be published what he called "Stenographic 8oundhad."
, the invention of a trained, logical and well-orderOd il I
those intellectual qualities.
trace the mental process by which Sir Isaac devised the al- I
once ruled the stenographic world.
a graduate of the British Normal College. fell back oe the I
iiu1 circle; the angle or slant of straight lines, sad finally se- 1
n_ ,osing an alphabet. Itself easily remembered, but, ued as
system, presenting difficulties it requires months ad pesm
so thoroughly as to be able to ake testimony, speehes, eta
la some instances, a havy percentage, this mastery is seer
into this, first tracing the steps of Sir Isue' pioeur e1
the analtyse why this system, having so referene to English 1
te Ingrained habit of the mind by whiob people spell and I
requires so mure study and work of the Sdet at it
e m Iaster t,
t-ek a circle and ant it up into s many par MM d , -
-S the segments or are as symbols for consonant nds
This s indicated by the points checked t I the
S Tuara we to Fugare 1
-3....
r, S . :4 =r
O m
t~ 3-cr~t:I IV
7.
REALTY COM
PARISH OF OR
ORIAEZAM8.
eu this, the thirtieb
r of our 'Lord
and eleven, and
S L'U ited h i tj
and thlrty-nith,
lietchinger, ~n
and qua Id
sad State aturmadd.
the resenece of tie
named and undersign
and appeared the sav
are hereunto nub
that. avalllng them
of the laws of thi
sfrmanton and orga.
they have coveant
, by these presseat,
bnd themselves, as
herefter become *A
erm themselves lat
objects and purposes.
der the stipulation
I.
of this corpnratis
RU=ALTr COMPANl,
Sname it shal have
-histence for a
sooner diasslvel, h
bI law, and the art
* and, under sal es,
have power and am
rrE and be seed, to
rate seal, the -nie
giekumre; to nmake e
~galationa for Its
 control nad o
eights, priveges and
a tocorporawn
ter.
IL
ase
~UL~~
erw,en,real estate, d t hol -
lease. .owrtap, asel, or othr*15 du'pos
thes pp lr tI im"rove sifa. er
-i
Lvderkdfol to sand froe sauc
h b sad pea . t or dor and per-to
Sa a catiito or r t
Smthe urp ,roses above specld ;
AarIcW IV.
y The caital stock of this corpoatle Is
Stwavs& - b .,, the po valu a e ume en
dred duar ($2im.*) each; said stock
onal b ued l7 tor ca or n IsPayeat
- prepartr serves sctuly receivsed b
ior reeredI tM oratoa this co
º pseatlo shall e ihebes sad be
tsss a lOe"s -s thre theu
a sad oarf a epý stock shall have
'u besa abaced Ba; th
Scall 1f 1bad1 of drcars. Baid stock
ear pibI stockwi my he a , I onyr da u
edd In to mm.' prd by th aiws of
*sad 'LSt 1. aTin
he or his daLy suthorhd'
In ts the eols o. ea
d1 m ele hie: iseI sta
19 ~ S t ab tU h ve o
up
.... ....
ea .00 -'00
-. i .q'-J 4uboiv ,uR LPW L
circle of Figure 1, marked with numerals from 1 to I. Iegment arc or
Sourve. 1-7, he called "f"; curve, 1-8, "th"; curve, 4-,6. "s"; curve. 5-7.
"sh"; curve. 1-8, "1"; curve. 3-5, "r'. Having thus obtained six con
p sonant signs or symbols, he doubles the use of five of these by writing
them heavy sad thus giving symbols for the heavy sounds of these five
consonant signs. Thus the sign for "f," writteon heavy, becomes "'';
"th" (as In "myth") becomes, written heavy "th" (a in "with"); "s"
becomes "s"; "1" Is written upward or downward, the usefulness of
this segment of the circle is single; "r" written heavy becomea the vowel a
sound, "y"! "M" and "n" are the top and bottom of the circle.
S SIR ISAAC WAS STILL SHORT AT LEAST EIGHT CONSONANT
SOUNDS, and he proceeded to use sll possible unconfusable radii of the
circle for these missing consonants: Radius. -, he called "p"; 2-c, "t";
S4-e "ch"; 1-c, "k." Observe, please, that there is not a single other seg
meat of the circle or raltus thereof which can be used without Imminent
and even hopeless danger or contfusion, but he had now all necessary
SCONSONANT 80OUND8 and the EMBRYO of a system. HOPELESSLY t
,t NONFLUENT, and DESTINED ABSOLUTELY to require, for the reason
t of Its CUMBERSOMENESS. a vast distionary of word-signs.
e HE HAD NOT YET A SINGLE VOWEL SIGN. Of theso--ln the
writing of English, these vowel signs are absolutely mperative, at least:
y sh, eh. sa, aw, oh, oo. and (short) a, e, t, (short) o, a, oo.
The device by which itr Isaac attained their expression is hopelemly
b. defective, as will be shown. He made position the expremsion of the vowel,
4 calling above the line, on the line and below the Inoe the three positions.
i: "Ah," for Instance, is indicated by a heavy dot above the line. That
E heavy dot on the line or in the middle of the stroke or letter becomes
O "eh" and in the last place. "se." Written light, it becomea the short
D sound of the same vowels. Taking a short dash and writing it heavy
in these three positions, he furnished his system the second series of long
T or heavy vowel sounds, "aw," "oh,' "oo"; and, writing them light, the
. secnd series of short vowel signs. "o," "a." "oo" (short). The dip
thongs a arbitrary charaters. a are "I." "u."
) That is the alphabet of the system for the inventlon of which Queen
Victoria conferred upon Sir Isaac the great honor of knlghbtootl With
these signs anything can be written, In some sort of a fashion, but be
Sfore a m can take testimony or speeches running from 125 to 200
words a minute, or twice as fast as a clock ticks, he has to acquire a
i- skill, to so make this system a- part of him. to so WRITE SOUND (ab
stractly) that the appaent simpliity vanitshes and he finds that e Is
he against practically the problem whih kept the Immortal Dickens sleep
e- less, hewing down forest after fors of diffculties even in his drums.
as This article proposes to discuss this matter to a finality--to show
as the relative merits of the Spenoerlan Chartier and Pitman.
S It is not deon so in a spirit of arvil.
e' It baelieve i the sublime dignity of the 114-foot eraft of uhlto.
hle madeo ts way 1sboriously up the Hudson at five miles an hour.
or But Is e rtan If the restlem progressiveness and energy of man had
h been content with it and declared It the finest possible boat that human
ad ganius could build, be would not today be crossing the ocean In a little
t evr tour days on mighty leviathans whioh are practically af against
an strm and whia h breast the Serest d them withouet a perceptible
. doeerem In speedt
a This is the age of progres.
he Progress is Impossible if we ling with blinded we to pinioas which
we have acceptd for their n and by rease of no thought which we eur
eves have po ent.
Prgress is possible only as a resalt of Invetl stigation-end eti
tin is the chlid of freedom from bas, freedom from acepted onvetion
estl. Pogyism has no place In America.
With all hamor to the great intellect of the staudet who has, in spite
of all the ritclism to which his system is open, made it possible for men
to transcribe thought with the swiftness with which It glides from the
Songue. THIS ARTICLE ASKS THAT YOU INWVSTIGATE WHAT IT IS
!!OKING TO PUT BEWORE YOU WITH ALL DEFERENCE AND HU
MILITY, BUT WITH A CONVICTION THAT VERT CLAIM AND AR
GUMENT ADVANCED IS SAN,. SOUND, TRUE-WORTHY OF TOUR
ATTENTION. INASMUCH AS THE DAY IS PAST ARRIVING WHEN
EVERY CHILD IN THU THIRD READER WILL BE LEARNING
SHORTHAND (SPENOCRIAN OHARTIER SHORTHAND) WITH AN
EASE AND READINEuS IMPOSIBLa IN ANY OTHE. SYSTEM.
THE GREAT PITMAN'S DIFFICULTIES
Before we o may further Ina this analysis and while you have the al
phabet *f the Pitman system fresh before you, let mas give you another
plate In order that we may make plainer our talk.
I pick this plate at random. It r a Pitmn a rpt of an utter
ance of the great showman . T. Barnum, and here is what he sd, writ
a in Ilnghanud:
"As far busnes is eoucerned, I have a particular hobby. My
eas i that ver young paron, of both sexes, should ian at Iet
shorthand and typewriting. Here you have mental discidplino and knowl
edge togethr, knowledge, too, that is almost certain at some time to be
convenient and practically available. I cannot conceive that one who
knows these two breaches thoroughly will ever need to to hungry in the
present generation, for they have a constantly widening use."
Know Pitman thoroughlyl Truly P. T. is a humorist. P. T. waa
thr Ignorant of his smbject or Joking.'
How many the be of then caftsmen In this city of almost 400.00,
sois? Count them over-thos4 who really answer P. T.'s daescriptlon
To or anyone with the slightest sort of memory can learn tbhat alphabel
w eh has jst been tiren and which, with endless use and practice, ca
eable one to do that speedily, but try, knowing this alphabet, to take u
firt Instance. In ase any said tock so
ofered srIll be purchasd bl- a nr e sid r
agets It 11ll, at the d5screln of the
board of directors, be sold to whoever the r
board of directors wishes, or it shall be pro
rated among the other shareholders In pro- I
portlsa to the numler of bares owner by
each, If they desire to take snd pay for I
the srne at cost price ; otherwise, the agent
makig the rhas may retain the stock
for his own account.
ATICIE V.
All the powers of this eorporatlo shallr
be sted n and be eercised b a beerd I
of six dlrectors, to be elected each year I
h the stockholders at the annual meetin.
The aid directors shall be boe de stock- 1
holder, ad the first oard hal·l cont of:
John 0. O'Kelley J. B. Simes, J. A.
wtho t seirblng eofcers:
Jh 0. O'Kelley, who shall e President
and Treasurer.
J. 3. llmmos, who shal be First Vice
C. Freach, who shalU b Second Vice
A. . glandu who shell be Tlhird Vie
iF. C. M.Ices, who ham l be 'eret.
. s the fleet U -'~ 3 , 3m 1
Isall lct am.ssa h d alieetO for the sa
SaW year, theb rid aeadnstalled to
r elected and quallet
The beard of direetors so eletted ein
!selet erom t ,heir nmher, simet as
l the TL Vi Pridest ae a1.. he
Stae heart r t e t ho osee
I Use. e ie em soall bse h
e am Tw sess ; a Leat, beemd
7 Ir Tim Pr d .R ad a t ar.
aryt *hll be ngpa tsi b beV a
Tiedelo *55hie
1i llt ae toi we
Sb. rrr r ha
any vacancy occurring In their number, or d
any vaca occurrig among the officers
of the corprtion, a majority of the d
rectors Voting at any one time, In person, or
by proxy, shall be requred to pass any reso
lution, or adopt any by-arws, and which,
when so adopted, shall become valid corpor
te acts.
ate RTICIJD VI.
Notice of all meetings of stockholders,
for electing directors, or for am7 othr pur-a
poe exeept as my be herelalter dtrct
h be gien in writing by the eretarry,
to be deposited It the mall at least ten ars
before such meeting, directed to each stoc
holder, at his last known address, appear
Ing Upon the books of the corporation, n- 1
lees said notice waved, in writing, by
all the stockholders appearing as such pon
ART[CIC~ VIL
This acotof Ineorptortiou lay be modi
led, added ot, chaned or amended, or th
corporation may be dissolved by ad with
the assent of the bholders of three-fourths
In amount of Its then otstading stock,
gives at a general meatag of the
ers, to be convened after ten dos' prior
notie, to be iven In one of tie dolly
ewap--- -s published in the City of New
Orens, in addition to the peronal notice
to each stockholdr, as proided in Aric
VI of this charte; n suek ch ua
may be made, in referenMe to an Increase
1 ee de * sehaLl botai Heaates:
rd e the capta st sa ll re
iesis by law requirld.d..
, ther b su rvl ors t cwºr
S L eeeurt s st he t pont
wae Ak e tin oEfIce util the a
to .
las I ha *sM any
,ahesh
speaker at 150 words per minute, and see how thoroughly you really
know it.
See if you don't find your penci with the same sort of fits that af
flicted that of the great Dickens.
JOKER BARUM'S WORDS IN SHORTHAND
The above is the plate showing the transcript in shorthand of Bar
nun's point of view of shorthand. It is probably written by a man who
anawers Barnum's description, full of word-signs, correctly used-a per
fect specimen.
First, let us call your attention to the fact that the vowel-signs are
entirely eliminated-and believe me when you are taking a speech, you
have no time for vowel-signs with Pitman shorthand. THE REASON
WHY IT TAKES YOU SO MUCH PRACTICE TO MAKE THIS SYSTEMI
VALUABLE TO YOU IS THAT YOUR EYE. YOUR INSTINCT MUST lRE
TRAINED SO THAT YOUR EYES ALMOST SUPPLY THE INVISIBLE
AND NON-EXISTING VOWELS. In fpst writing you are forced to drop
the vowels. We set forth here one proposition of shorthand which defies
refutation.
It is elemental:-The reading power of any system is based on the
percentage of vowel sounds you can indicate.
Here is a another truism: ITS SPEED IS BASED ON THE SPEED
WITH WHICH YOU CAN DO THIS.
I From these two axioms it is impossible to get away.
* Now, in this light--so clear and self-evident-let us get at the tran
L script of what Joker Barnum says, as transcribed in the Pitman system.
t Notice, please, that the very first three words are written as a word
s sig--the very frst three words. These first three words are "as far as.,
t and the Pitman system writes them 'sfrs"! There is not a hint of a vowel
y sound anywhere. In the position! Why should "as" be written In the first
I position and in the last position, and each time spell "as"? The accuracy
e of geometry is sadly deserted in this: "Fr," "far." Is there any possible
reason, conceding for the sake of argument that the "fr" is in the first
position, why this should not be "far." "afar." and since there Is mere
n position visible, why it should not be "offer?" It is, however, "far" to
the trained eye in Pitman, for the reason that that house there is a house
to your familiar vision. In "business." position pretty well indicates the
word. You have "bs" and "ns." and require no flight of imagination to
a make it out. "Pa" Is conventionally in the second position, making it
literally and meaninglessly "open" with the "o" long. as in "mode" or
i "pone" (same long o) or "pain" (long a), or "pen" (short e), etc.
" In short, the "pn" In the second position spells "upon", because it is con
ventionally so accepted. "Concerned" has a little bit of dot before the in
itial elrcle--s for "con," an "r" cut half its length, thus adding "d and a
little "n"-hook--still the "d," created by the shortening of the "r" is
read after the "n"-hook. Here, then, are the consonant signs guiding
1 the experteneed eye in reading "eoncerned"-"consrnd." "I" is the
r, "tick" on top of the "v," and "v" is a word-sign for "have." "Iv," in other
º4 words, is "I have." "A" is the dot in the first position. "Particular" is
m "p" shortened to half length to show that there is a "t" or "d" sound
I somewhere concealed about its person, and the "p" is begun with an "r"
hook, although the "r" is read after the "p." Literally, we have "rpt (or
Ie d)" spelling "particular." Another word-sign: "lib" (vowel sounds to
be guessed) "hobby." In a sentence of eleven words. thus, we have
seven word-signs.
What now is really a word-sign? It is something that has to fe
learned and stored away in the memory. When the first eleven words
of the man who says. that his hobby is that every young person should
slearn shorthand "thoroughly," are found to contain seven words that
a- have absolutely to be remembered, it is to be seen at a glance that he Is
feeither ignorant of what be is talking about, or has a large and expansive
msense of humor. This system cannot be taken on and carried as a side
e line. One who learns it has to dedicate himself to it as did Dickens. An
-e other thtng, this system cannot be mastered and allowed to rust. Speed.
IS accuracy, a working order of the possession is maintained by constant
Spractice and that alone,
There are sixty-eight words In the rest of what P. T. Barnum here
satld. There are over forty word-signs in this number. Capacious mem
Gory at this gait, don't you think, to know this language of lines and area
1 and circles thoroughly-a big word-sign store-house necessary; and you
eannot pause, you know, when you are writing 150 words a minute to re
call how "I have been," "as far as" "that" "particular," eta., are writ
ten. Pitman is almost impossible with night students.
It is strange, almost remarkable, that an analytical genius such as
must have been the mind that invented and evolved Pitman system did
Il- not refect that the two greatest impediments in his system were inflict
er ed unabated on all the men and women who studied and the compara
tively few who mastered his system:
sr- A lack of vowel power.
it- A diminution of speed proportioned to the number of vowel signs
used.
fy Net result---a absolute necessity of an enormous dictionary of word
met signs.
wl- A difficulty of mastery increased by every word-sign.
be A MULTIPLICATION, IN THE CASE OF EXPERTS, OF WORD
rho SIGNS SO GREAT AS TO MAKE THE WRITING OF EACH EXPERT A
the SYSTEM OF HIS OWN, BASED ON PITMAN. BUT PECULIAR TO THE
WRITER AND ABSOLUTELY UNDECIPHERABLE BY ANY ONE
as ELSE.
r As a matter of my own knowledge I know that Speseerlan Chartier
)00 shorthand can be learned with one-fifth .the study requilred for Pitman;
on. it can be written faster than Pitman-It makes fewer strokes in writing
bet any given matter-and it can be read with an ease never claimed for Pit
Ean man. In fact, people knowing the system, correspond In it and read eaEt
ea other's writing as though it were longhand or Roman print.
. . .. . .. ,., .ra =-  .. .=-- '0" " = •• •
due reading of the wbole.
(Names of Subscribers Omitted.)
Witnowes :
BURT W. HENRY,
E. . R)GFtn.
CHAS. F. FLETCHINOGIR,
Notary Public.
1, the underslged, Recorder of 3Mort
Sfor the Parish of Orleans, State of
suisa do hereby certify that the above
and foreoling act of inaorporation of Saint
Joseph Realty Company was this day duly
recorded In my oflfe, in Book 1061, lio
New Orleans, La.. August 0. 1911.
, the undersigned, notary public, do ere
by certify that the above and foregoing Is
a tue and correct copy of the act of in
Scorporation of "Sant Joseph Realty Cor
g er with the cticate of the
Mi YorigdeM threto atpende d
minaus the aS of the ortlginal subcib
ers and t several emounts by them sub,
s scribed. as the Whole now appears on Ale
b in my office.
S'Witness my band and notaral seal this,
. the thirtieth dayotfT , 19ll,
I- C •N F. Notry l,.
r (Seal) Nota P i
y Aug. 31, Sept. 7,1421,28; Oct. 5
CHARTER
r or HOWAD A. SEoiAV , INC.
t. UITC STATES OF AMERICA, STATE
I OF LOUISU PARISH OF OR
id LEANS, CITY OF NNW ORlEANS.
e It known , thet en tis 23rd Lay y n
re te math Of Asgt In the year of thoUs
asi a h nded and evns, and of the
&mmdof tkehedUe States of Amer
a a aned a thlrtyfsIth, hbefe
mse, Seelt 3. Ue. a notary public is and
be 3 au54anq . *an l o the ,eeenesO
ahewitne borr inlt nmed 4ad owdr
- and - the
-~Ie S 3 iae and
ARTICLE I.
The name of this corporation shall be
"HOWARD A. SEGIAVE, INC.," by which
name the said corporation shall have and
enjoy corporate existence and succession for
the term of ninety-nine years from and af
ter the date hereof, unless sooner dissolved
according to law. Its domicile shall be In
the city of New Orleans, state of Louiaana.
It shall have power to contract, sn sand be
sued: to make and use a corporate seal.
and the same to break or alter at will: to
hold, receive, lease, purchase, sell, convey,
as well as to mortgage and hypothecate, un
der its corporate name, property real per
sonal and mixed; to borrow and lend money,
and to give and recetve all manner of se
curities therefor; to name and appoint such
managers, directors, olcers and agents and
employees as the interests and convenience
of the corporation may require, and to make
and establish such by-laws, rules and regu
lations for the managemet of this corpora
tion as may be necessary and proper, and
the same to alter and smend at pleasure.
ARTICLE II.
All cltations and other legal process shall
be served upon the president of this corpo
ration, and in case of his absence, or Ina
bility to be found, upon the vice-president
or secretary-treasurer thereof.
ArTICLES III.
The purposes for which this corporation is
established and the nature of the business
to e by it carried on, are hereb7 declared
to be to carry on in the clty of .ew Or
leans and elsewhere the business of buying
and selling lumber and logs and all forest
products; and of exportlng the same, and
it f dneral, ealin In all forest products in
ca necessMry and proper to accomplish tbhe
objects herenabove stated, and which may
be itcidental thereto.
ARTICLE IV.
The capital stock of this cororation is
h ereby flied at ten thousand dollars ($10
S00), to be repreentd by one hundred
(100) shares of steck, of the par value of
i one hundred delllrs (10000) a share,
f w hch iapit stoek may be Incresed or re
' deced ise- plinee with the laws of the
I state of Louisiana in such cases made and
iau06ts 51d at seb times and after such
nties to the subscribers as may Ue ied
b bead i ees p me to issue
stash ef r No thin e epry tl , at Met
kr labee actu
- thi
Colonist
One-way Fares
CaliforniA
IN'It l'POIN r" Il rflR\I:I IITll
VI
Southern
Pacific
$32
From New Orleans
TI'KIETS ON .SAI
September 15 to
October 15, 1911
Two trains dally tlirourh to i'a ci-e
(' ost withouit 'chani t'.
Touirist Excursion ieepers (one.
halt ratet : nil-linriinu Inromotive.;
E ' trie Ittll.k S inal-; Chaitr 4 iar
and ill u t'4i l iining 4Car t Servite
tilest in thie worlt i.
IBefore deciding on yrour route, see
SOI'THElRN I'Ai'lIh.' Il:I'ItE:RE:NT
ATIV+:
City Ticket (,.,, "2 27 .St. Charles
Street, New Orlh.ans.
Plhoune Main 40"27
Beautifully lly llustrated literature fur
utll'tbh on reqilest.
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shidratin.ns, as the eard of directors mtay
ideem tit anId proper.
Transfers of stock of this corporation
shall lie made only iu the loiohs of this
.corporation, subject to the regulations antd
fornmalities as the ,oard may prescribe
therefor.
Eac'h and every stockholder sha:ll have a
vote for every slhare of stoi k standilng in
his tnu, on tihe iooks iof this corporatrion.
Eachlli atoclkh ler matliy gitvt any o ther stock
holder lit itroxy. In writing, to relpresent
hii at any and all nlmeetings of the stock
hliders of this corporation.
This chaiirter shall te in faill foirce and
effect and tllhs corporation shall bie a golig
c(.nterll as sootn as the sum of three thou
mlnd dollahir I$:It'10 4.0i)t of its capital stock
shall have been subscrll.wd for.
ARTItLE V.
All the corliorate lpowers iof thi corpora
lion shall I. vested tIn and executed by
the board of directors to be composed of
tlree stockholders of this corporation, and
two of whom shall eonstltute a quorum for
the transaction of the buslness of this cor
poration. The first board of directors shall
is. named in this charter, and every sulbse
quent board of directors shall be elected
annually on the first Monday of October.
All directors shall hold office until their suc.
ressors are dlly elected and qualified. All
such elections shall iws by ballot and shall
to conducted at the office of this corpora.
tlon tinder the supervision of three commis
sioners to be appointed by the board of di
rectors. Notice of every such election shall
ie given to the stockholders ten days prior
to the said election by a letter directed to
each and every stockholder addressed to him
as per the address given on the books of
this corporation. The board of directors
shall hold office for the term of one year.
and any vacancy occurring during the term
shall tie filled by election among the remain
ing directors. A failure to elect directors
on the date specified shall "nt dissolve this
corporation, but the directors then In ofce
shall hold office until their successors are
duly elected and quallifed. Each director
shall own at-least one share of stock. The
hoard of directors shall have the power to
make and establish by-laws. rules and relgu
lations for the management of this corpo
ration: to regulate the transfer of stock,
and to appoint and discharge all clerks,
agemnts and employees, as well as to fix their
compensation. FJach director shall havre
the power to appoint a proxy in writing to
represent him at all meetlngs of the board
of directors, and said power or proxy may
be given to one not a stockholder in this
corporation.
mThe board of directors shall elect from
its number a president, a vice-president and
a secretary-trea surer.
The first loard of directors shall hi the
fllowlng: C('has. D. Frost. presitlent; Ennds
A. itegrave. vlce-president;: Hloward A. Ie
grave, secretary-treasurer.
ARTICLE VI.
Whenever this corporation shall be dtis
smlvedt. either by limitation or otherwim., its
affairs shall he llquidateui by two commli
sloners to be sppolntetl from among the
stockholders to bep convened In general meet
Ing for such pllrpose, of which meeCtling, no
tire shall le given in the manner and time
prersrtehd liy the next article of this char
ter. and a majorlty In amount of the ecpl
tal stock of this corporation represented at
the said general meeting shall be requisite
to elect. And th-e sati commissioners shallt
remain In offlce uintll the affalrs oif the cor
poration shall have tben fully liquldated.
ARTICLE VII.
S This act of Incorporation may be changed,
Saltered or modlle-d or amended, or this cor
fo pration andt the charter thereof, may be
af- tilsolved, with the assent of three-quarters
of toie capital stock represented at a general
n meetng of the stockholders convened for
that pllrpose, and after nolie of such meet
a. ing shall have leeIngiven i ont or more
newspapers of Ihi- city of New Orlians, IA.,
once a week for four weeks preceding the
to amid meeting ,antd biy a written notice to
'oy -ach and every stockhiohlor as iter the hooks
un- of this corporation, malled to him thirty
per- days priror to the dlati- of the said meeting,.
tey, at the post ofli.e addtlress designated by him
uch n writing.
and ARTICLE VIII.
c No stockholder shall ever be held liable
a for the contracts or faults of this corpora
rg- tion In any further sum than the unpaid
ra- balance due this corporation on the shares
and of stunk ownled biy him, nor shall any Infor
mality in the organization of this corpora
tion have the cfe,-t of rendering this charter
null or of exposing the slockholiiers to any
hall further Ilhll lly than the unpaid amnount re
rp malnlntl due on his stick sulbtcrltitLon.
* The list of sultscrll~ters hrlllriirllt nnexed
lent shall serve as the original subtisrlptlon list
of this corporation.
Thus done and passed In this city olf New
Orlhans, on the day, month antd yar afore
n is ald. in the presence of Meuus. Shlnty Eck
ness erle and T. A. Rchliber. clnlpeteilt witnesses,
ared who have herellnto tlgnetd theiir names, to
Or- gether with the said alppeari-rs andt me. no
ylng tary. after a diue readling of the whole.
treat (Original signed) : ('has. I Frost, 10
and shares, $1.000; andl othi.ts. 4Witneslses) :
a in Bldney Eckerle. T. A. Ichltier.
very SoTrv E. RBczI, Not. Pub.
the (Seal)
may I, the undersigned record'-r of mortgages
In and for the parish of Orleans, state of
loulsiansna. do hereby cerltfy that the above
and foregolng act of Incorporation of the
a is "Howard A. itegrave, Inc. was this day
$10,- duly recorded in my olece in tuok 1051,
Idred follo 147.
ie of New Orleans, Aug. 24th. t1911.
hare, (llgned) EMILL LiNuan, D.R.
r e State of Lounislana,
the Parish of Orleans.
and This is to certify that the shve and fore
s ch lag is a true and correct copy of the ortg
such laI act of incorporation of the "llowarrd
lied A. Legrave, Inc.." together with the certlif
esid cate of the recorder of mortglages for the
lmes perish of Orleans. except the names of the
int subscrlbers thereto.
ato- In flt whereof, I have hereto signed my
e- name and alzed my smeat, this 24th dy of
* August, 111.
e4lm i s1 14 21 S leetl 111

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