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The herald. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, November 23, 1911, Image 7

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AN ALYSIS
Pitman-Spencerian Chartier J. M. REASER, Prin. Com'I Department
MONO bhe foremost novelists of the !orld and time was Charles
Dickens. a parliamentary shorthand reporter. He studied and
used a system to which I am gotnl to devote reverential atteo
tion.
- ike Robert Fulton's steambot t was the trst system-t lest
g the English speaking race.
The only difference is that Fulton's achievement is unquestionably
progenitor of our mighty ocean greyhounds, our battleships. our
tasulss. Fulton's craft grew. The parent Pitman did not. It re
an approach to the subject entirely different from that for the
of which Sir, Isaac was knighted, to attain a result whose simpl
oese, legibil:ty and reading power destines it to role the world-the
IENCERIAN CHARTIER System o Shorthand. Remember those words
"Al APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT ENTIRELY DIFFERENT."
David Copperfield (which is, most of the time, simply a character
e8 by Dickens for his own autobiography) thus describes the trials and
ton of the weary and heart-rending time he had in learning Pit
to prepare himself to report Parliament-AND THERE IS NOT A
gUp WHO ATTAINS THIS PROFICIENCY IN PITMAN WHO WILL
-o TELL YOU THAT HIS TRIALS HAVE BEEN JUST AS GREAT
THE TIME HE HAS TAKEN AS LONG.
"I bought an improved scheme of the noble art sand MYSTERY of
bssgraphy, which cost me ton and sixpence, and plunged into a sea of
- nsity that brought me, in a few weeks, to the confines of dlstrao
gus. The changes that were rang upon dots, which, in such position,
aust muck a thing, and in such another position something else entirely
urnst; the wonderful vagaries that were played by circles; the unao
gamble consequences that resulted from marks like files' legs; the tre
msas- oeffects of a curve in a wrong place, not only troubled my waking
bet reappeared before In my sleep. When I had groped my way
through these difficulties, and had mastered the alphabet, which
ns Egyptian temple in itself, there appeared a procession of new
oees salled arbitrary characters--he most despotie characters I have
ar kawn. When I had fixed these wretches in my mind, I found that
bd driven everything else out of it; then, beginning again. I forgot
S; while I was picking them up. I dropped the other fragments of the
short, it was almost heart-breaking."
-tte is Charles Dickens' own aOcount of his struggles with what may
a~gl the parent system of all shorthand now In vogue.
' Is a vivid and true picture a the struggles of the best aad bright
sb who undertake, with this medium, to report so exacting and
-Sgbg a kind of work as debates and speeches-with this exception:
10o NEVER LEARN PITMAN, IN SPITE OF EFFORT. OTHERS
rt rACQUIRE A FAMILIARITY WITH WHAT THEY WRITE
C.Y AS TO ENABLE THEM TO TRANSCRIBM IT ACCURATELY AND
Y.
TO EXAMINE WHY THIS IS 80--TO LAY BEFORE YOU WHY IT
g rMO SO WITH THE WONDERFUL SPENCERIAN CHARTIER SYS
SM 3 THE AIM OF THESE COMPARATIVE ANALYSES.
Mr Isaac Pitman was born in 1813.
Ss was a scholarly thinker.
In 1837 he published what he called "Stenographic Soundhand."
The system, the invention of a trained, logical and well-ordered b
ag, reflects those intellectual qualities.
You can trace the mental procesr by which Sir Isaac devised the ai
which ones ruled the stenographic world.
Xr Isaac, a graduate of the British Normal Collegeo fell back ea the
useful circle; the angle or slant of straight lines, and finally sue
in composing an alphabet., itself easly remembered, but, used as
*gsthaad system, presenting difficulties it requires months and years
Iglmr so thoroughly as to be able to take testimony, speeches. te.,
I. In some instances, a heavy percentage, this mastery is nver
st'r look into this, first tracing the steps oft ir Isaes pleaner
snd thea nalyse why this system, having no refereme to Mnsh
to the ingrained habit of the mind by which people spell and
is leuashad, requires so mush study and work of the student et it
he can master it
St Isss took a sirele and It t up Into as many parts o weaN in
me to use the segments or are as symbols for coasea t smtads
eafelea. This is indicated by the point•s hacked of i the
Tars we to igure 1
".
( = th: h 3<* | =t: =a
)= :-j Z 4-c=/1clc/uf
rSm'1Z~.~ r 6n d
.CHARTER
SBSTAYPINaIG & DYE
WORKS.
1e o eF ERWA, STATE
I1A.PARISA OF
Moat on this alath day of
her, n the year of our
nine hundred sad eleve,
H.B r Jr., Notr
ofýOrleans, therein t
e prenece o the witnesse
and undersigned, pe6e
Oppeared the peroU whom
o subserlibed, all above the
who severally declare that,
of the laws of the State
L ve to the formation of
have formed and opa
presents do form sad or
ltto sad coastitate a cor
.bJeets and purpoe anad
ties. hereinafter set forth
which they hereby adopt as
A CGLE I.
this corporation shall be
BTAM PING AND DID
its domicile la the city of
sad shall exist for aninety-ane
the right to reeeive, hold,
, alienate and mortgag
and personal* to barrow
give proper evl&es thereot;
med. and geeeally to easr
gadted to corporathoin b
he te.
ARTICLE II.
ether legal processee sall
pIsideat, or la the emt
mr Mablitty to act, them onp
t' trasurer.
iM1cLE III.
ml purno-e for rwuse thi
gatst se te hetan at
atrrie on by it ae has
t
dmf ýi
coflict with the objects and purposes set
forth.
ARTICLE IV.
The capital stock of this corporation Is
hereby declared to be Tea Thousand 'Dol
lars o$10o000.00) divided into one hondred
shares of One Dollars ($100.00)
eaeb, which id stock hll o e paid for in
caoh or Its equlett at tse tmre of Its sub
scrption. or said stock my be issued full
pa nldusd non-asssable for the purchase of
property, real or personal, or for servlce
rendered to said corporation. Said stock
shl be tanferble os the books of tbt
ompany, and 0o stckbolder .hall be *1
lowed to eel stock without first ofering same
to this corporation through Its Board of DI
rectors, givinl them sixty (60) dts optIor
In which to purcste al etol t Ifr ok
value, to be scertaeed by account of stock
last ta.
The captal stock of this corporation may
be Increased by a vote of the majority of
the stock issued, iafter ten doays' prior no
tice In writing thereof belnl sent to each
stockhbolder at his last known domcle.
ARTICLE V.
All the corporat powers of this corpora
tio sball be vested a Board of Directors,
The first Board of Drectors of this cor
ortion s llbe omposd of three stock
lders, to be elcted at the fiart meeting
of stockhlders aled for that pupose aft
er the signing of this charter; which said
Board of Directors shall old their rese
tyle offices mtil the third Tuesday InIJan
na . 1913, o which saido date and annoal
ARTICL.. VII.
dirctors by the stekolder.
Oach share of stock shall he entltled to
one et east by the owner. If present, or
yp-h , sad thoe eaoJrIty o the votes cas
shll eeet sd dLie all matters voted
upon
ARTICLE VL.
Ye etoekholdet shluU be held _labe or re
ponble for the eontrct ts fanlts or debts
tsa deorftlt, nor shaell any mere I
rmality Is eisatl have the ef
feet of 5eeti this charter Mull, or of
say stdkbslier to liabiliMties be
yjr t d bhaises that may be due
on hIs eiem.
ARTICLE vn.
ýiý' K the ýassist~edl
V- i -oureJ
circle of Figure 1. marked with numerals from 1 to 8. Segment ae or
carve. 1-7. he called "T"; curve, 2-S. "th"; curve, 4-6. "s"; curve. 6-7.
"sh": curve, 1-8, "1"; curve 3-6. "r". Having thus obtained six con
sonant signs or symbols, he doubles the use of five of these by writing
them heavy and thus giving symbols for the heavy sounds of these ive
consonant siga Thus the sign for "f," written heavy. becomes "v";
"th" (as li ' h") becomes, written heavy, "th" (as In "with"); "G"
becomes "s"; is written upward or downward, the usefulness of
this segment of the qercle is single; "r" written heavy becomes the vowel
sound. "y"! "M" and "n" are the top and bottom of the circle.
S IR ISAAC WAS STILL SHORT AT LEAST EIGHT CONSONANT
BOUNDS, and he proceeded to use all possible unconfusable radii of the
circle for these missing consonants: Radius. S-c, he called "p"; 2-c. "t";
4-c, "ch"; 1-c. "k." Observe, please, that there is not a single other seg
meat of the circle or rallus thereof which can be used without Imminent
and even hopeless danger or confusion, but he had now all necessary
CONSONANT SOUNDS and the EMBRYO of a system. HOPELESSLY
t NONFLUENT, and DESTINED ABSOLUTELY to require, for the reason
t of its CUMBERSOMENESS. a vast distionary of word-signs.
s HE HAD NOT YET A SINGLE VOWEL SIGN. Of these--in the
writing of English. these vowel signs are absolutely imperattre, at least:
rah, eh, se, aw, oh, oo, and (short) a, e, I, (short) o, a, oo.
The device by which Sir Isaac attained their expression Is hopelessly
defective, as will be shown. He made position the expression of the vowel.
I calling above the line, on the line and below the line the three positions.
"Ah," for instance, is indicated by a heavy dot above the line That
Sheavy dot on the line or in the middle of the stroke or letter becomes
I "eh" and in the last place, "ee." Written light, it becomes the short
D sound of the same vowels. Taking a short dash and writing it heavy
In these three positions, he furnished his system the second series of long
I or heavy vowel sounds. "aw," "oh." "oo"; and, writing them light, the
second series of short vowel signs. "o," "," "oo" (short). The dip
theaog are arbitrary characters, as are '"," "a."
That is the alphabet of the system for the invention of which Queen
Victoria conferred upon ir Isaacs the great honor of knighthood! With
these signs anything can be written, in some sort of a fashion, but be
.fore a man ean take testimony or speeches running from 126 to 200
words a minute, or twice as fast as a clock ticks, he has to acquire a
I- skill, to so make this system a part of him. to so WRITE BOUND (ab
stractly) that the apparent simplicity vanishes and he finds that he is
e against practically the problem which kept the immortal Dickens sleep
. less, hewing down forest after fores of difficulties even in his dreams.
a This article proposes to discuss this matter to a finality-to show
a the relative merits of the Spenosrian Chartler and Pitman.
It Is not doing so in a spirit of cavil
r It believes is the sublime dignity of the 114-foot eraft of hltos,
which made its way laboriously up the Hudson at five miles a hour.
r But it is certain it the restless progressivenes and energy of man had
Sbeen aontent with it and declared It the finest possible boat that human
d geaas could build, he would not today be crossing the ocean in a little
Sover four days on mighty leviathans which are practically safe against
all ster and whlch breast the fierest of them without a perceptible
SeremM aIn speeud
I This is the age of progress.
o Progress is impossible It we ting with blinded eyes to opinions which
we have aeoepted for their age nd by reason of no thought which we eour
selves have spet.
' Progress is possible enlo as a result of investgattla--and tnvltga
ties is the child of freedom from blas, fredom from accepted convention
atles. Fogyism bas no place to America.
With all honor to the great intellect of the student who has. in spite
of all the criticism to which his system is open, made it possible for men
to transcribe thought with the swiftness with whioh it glides from the
tongue, THIS ARTICLE ASKS THAT YOU INVESTIGATE WHAT IT IS
EMMEIMG TO PUT BFWORE YOU WITH ALL DEFERENCE AND HU
MILITY, BUT WITH A CONVICTION THAT EVERY CLAIM AND AR
GUMENT ADVANCED I8 BANE BOUND. TRUE-WORTHY OP YOUR
ATTENTION, INASMUCH AS THE DAY IB PAST ARRIVING WHEN
EVERY CHILD IN THU THIRD READER WILL BU LEARNING
SHORTHAND (SPENCERIAN GRARTIER SHORTHAND) WITH AN
EASE AND ADINSS IMPOSSIBLE IN ANY OTr0 a SYSTEm.
THE GREAT PITMAN'S DIFFICULTIES
Before we go say further in this analysis, and while you have the al
phabet of the Pitman system tresh before you, let me give you another
platoe i order that we may make planoer our talk.
I pick this plate at random. It is a Pitman treasuript of as utter
anes of the great showman. P. T. Barnum, and here is what he said, writ
tean i longhand:
"As far as busines is Concerned. I have a particular hobby. My
erase is that every young person, of both sexes, should learn at least
shorthand sad typewriting. Here you have mental discipline and knowl
edge together, knowledge, too, that is almost certain at some time to be
convenient and practically available. I cannot conceive that one who
knoews these two breanches thoroughly will ever need to go hungry in the
present generation, for they have a constantly widening us."
Know Pitman thoroughly! Truly P. T. Is a humorist. P. T. was
either Ignorant of his subject or joking.
Bow many there be of these craftsmemn in this city of almost 400.001
semits Count them oveor-thse who really answer P. T.'s description,
You or anyone with the allshtest sort of memory can learn that alphabel
alhh hars just been give and which, with endless use and p Jctice, c
enable ean to do that speedily, but try, knowing this alphabet, to take e
than thirty days' prior wrltten notlee sent
to each stockholder at his last known domil
In case of dissolution of this corporation,
either by limitation or otherwise, its s.alrs
shall be wound up and liquidated by the
then existing Board of Directors.
Thus done end passed, in my office in the
city of New Orleans, on the day, month and
year herein above written, in the presence
of Helen McGrath and George ScBhmtt, com
petent wtinnse who hereunto sign their
names with the id appearers and me, no
tn after due reading of the whole.
(i d) Oliver H. Van Horn, 15 shares:
W . Mae14 sares ; W. C. Marvant, 1
share ; per Wm. Magee.
Witnesses: (Signed) Helen McGrath,
George Scbmltt.
eorge. H. BYRNES, JR.,
Notary Publie.
I, the undersMgned, Recorder of Mortae
In and for the parish of Orleans, State of
Lo~ sianr , do herebfycertify that-the ove
and foregoing at of incorporation of the
SOUTHERRN STAMPING AND DIE WORrD
was this day duly recorded in my office, in
Book 1051 folio 383.
New Orleans, November 9 1911.
(Signed) EXLE LEONIARD, D. 3.
hereby eertify the shove and foregoin
to be a true and correct opy of the originalt
act on Ste and of record ii my office and
of the certibeate of the Recorder of Mort
gaes a de thereto.
Sfh whereof hereunto set my hand
and seal this thirteenth day of November,
1911.
WM. H. B4RNE , JR..
(Seal) Notary Public.
Nov. 16, 23, 30; Dee. 7, 14, 21, '11.
CHARTER
OF INTIEkIOR SETTING COMPANY.
STATE OF LOUISIAYA, CITY OF NEW
ORLEANS. I
Be t kneow That ea this eighteenth da
of October, 1911, before m, rederick De
al, a mtary ti persollw came and
app se the whees ua e are
that availng thee ives ea r theoe Ilwee
this State relative to the nes of
h~~~~n ~ ·J,-wkt~ -
such persons as may hereafter become asse
elated with them, Into a corporation for the
objects and purposes and under the agree
ment and stipulations following, to wit :
ARTICLE I.
The same of this corporation shall be the
"INTIRIOR BBTTING COMPANY," and
under such -ame it shall have sad enjoy
orporate existence and successions for a
period of ninety-nine years from the date of
this act, with tall power sad for the pur
poses of this business as herelaftter defned
to contractr-sue and to be sued, to acquire,
lease, use, bold, allemate, mortgage, pledge,
or otherwise encumber any property, mo
able or immovable, In or out of the State of
Louisiana ; to ssue its bonds, or other evi
dence of indebtedness, and to secure same
by pledge, ortage or otherwise, and
to purchse or o6tberwise acquire the
stocks and bonds of other corpora
tions; to appoint or elect such dree
tors, officers m rs, agents or oth
er emploses U the Interest or convenience
of its belmesa may require; to meake,
amend, or repeal, at pleasure, such by-laws,
rules and regulations, touching the manage
ment of the alairs or bousiness or the exer
else of the powers of this corporation, as
may be necessary or convenient, to increase
or diminlsh the capital stock; to adopt a
corporate seal, and the same to make, or
alter at will, and generally for the purposes
and objects of its busineas to exercise all
rights and powers permitted by law to cor
porations. II.
ARTICLE II.
The domicile of tais corporation shall be
In the city o, New Orleans, in this State,
and all citation or other egal processes
shall be served upon the presidet, and to
his absence the secretary-treasurer of said
corporation.
ARTICLE III.
The objects and purposes fo whiceh this
corporatlon is established and the nature
of the business to be carried on by it are
hereby declared to be:
The operation sad conducting of general
marble and stone cutting and settnlag busi
ness. the baying and selling of all kinds
of marble stone, and other building me
terial, the construction of buioangs and
other works, la whole or In part, in Lou
itan and other States, se storage of
stosM al kainds, and generally the doing
and rling of all acts Incidental or
ub s to y sad all of the objects
ART1CLZ IV.
SThe tl deek of this ieqratin f
bnet Ae t tha IGs 49thi Tsharel
Dellse to Is be assagestad IV ahns
speaker at 150 words per minute, and see how thoroughly you really
know it.
See if you don't find your penci with the same sort of fits that af
flicted that of the great Dickens.
JOKER BARUM'S WORDS IN SHORTHAND
1 =ze- f(
The above is the plate showing the transcript in shorthand of Bar
num's point of view of shorthand. It is probably written by a man who
answers Barnum's description, full of word-signs, correctly used-a per
fect specimen.
First, let us call your attention to the fact that the vowel-signs are
entirely eliminated-and believe me when you are taking a speech, youl
have no time for vowel-signs with Pitman shorthand. THE REASON
WHY IT TAKES YOU SO MUCH PRACTICE TO MAKE THIS SYSTEM
VALUABLE TO YOU IS THAT YOUR EYE, YOUR INSTINCT MUST 1E
TRAINED SO THAT YOUR EYES ALMOST SUPPLY THE INVISIBLE
AND NON-EXISTING VOWELS. In fast writing you are forced to drop,,
the vo els. We set forth here one proposition of shorthand which defles
refutation.
It is elemental:-The reading power of any system is based on the
percentage of vowel sounds you can indicate.
Here is a another truism: ITS SPEED IS BASED ON THE SPEED
WITH WHICH YOU CAN DO THIS.
From these two axioms It is impossible to get away.
Now, in this light-so clear and self-evident-let us get at the tran
script of what Joker Barnum says, as transcribed in the Pitman system.
Notice, please, that the very first three words are written as a word
sign-the very first three words. These first three words are "as far as.'
and the Pitman system writes them 'sers"! There is not a hint of a vowel
sound anywhere. In the position! Why should "as" be written in the first
position and in the last position, and each time spell "as"? The accuracy
of geometry is sadly deserted in this: "Fr," "far." Is there any possible
reason, conceding for the sake of argument that the "fr" is in the first
position, why this should not be "far," "afar," and since there is mere
position visible, why it should not be "offer?" It is, however, "far" to
the trained eye in Pitman, for the reason that that house there is a house
to your familiar vision. In "business." position pretty well indicates the
word. You have "bs" and "ns.," and require no flight of Imagination to
make it out. "Pn" is conventionally in the second position, making it
literally and meaninglessly "open" with the "o" long, as in "mode" or
"pone" (same long o) or "pain" (long al. or "pen" (short e), etc.
In short, the "pn" in the second position spells "upon", because it is con
ventionally so accepted. "Concerned" has a little bit of dot before the in
itial circle-s for "con," an "r" cut half its length, thus adding "d and a
little "n"-hook--still the "d," created by the shortening of the "r" Is
read after the "n"-hook. Here, then, are the consonant signs guiding
the experienced eye in reading "concerned"-"consrnd." "I" is the
"tick" on top of the "v," and "v" is a word-sign for "have." "Iv," in other
words, is "I have." "A" is the dot in the first position. "Particular" Is
I "p" shortened to half length to show that there is a "t" or "d" sound
somewhere concealed about its person, and the "p" is begun with an "r"
hook, although the "r" is read after the "p." Literally, we have "rpt (or
d)" spelling "particular." Another word-sight: "lib" (vowel sounds to
be guessed) "hobby." In a sentence of eleven words. thus, we have
seven word-signs.
6' What now is really a word-sign? It is something that has to ne
learned and stored away in the memory. When the first eleven words
of the man who says that his hobby is that every young person should
learn shorthand "thoroughly," are found to contain seven words that
have absolutely to be remembered, it is to be seen at a glance that he is
either ignorant of what he is talking about, or has a large and expansive
sense of humor. This system cannot be taken on and carried as a side
line. One who learns it has to dedicate himself to it as did Dickens. An
other thing, this system cannot be mastered and allowed to rust. Speed,
acuaracy, a working order of the possession is maintained by constant
practice and that alone.
There are sixty-eight words in the rest of what P. T. Barnum here
sail. There are over forty word-signs in this number. Capacious mem
ory at this gait, don't you think, to know this language of lines and arcs
Sand ireles thoroughly-a big word-sign store-house necessary; and you
cannot pause, you know, when you are writing 150 words a minute to re
call how "I have been," "as far as" "that" "particular," eta, are writ
ten. Pitman is almost impossible with night students.
It $ strange, almost remarkable, that an analytical genis suach as
must have been the mind that invented and evolved Pitman system did
- not reflect that the two greatest impediments in his system were Inflict
s' ed unabated on all the men and women who studied and the esmpara
tively few who mastered his system:
A lack of vowel power.
SA diminution of speed proportioned to the number a revwel signs
used.
y Net result-ae absolute necessity of an enormous dietiouary of word
it signs.
I- A difficulty of mastery increased by every word-sign.
* A MULTIPLICATION, IN THE CASE OF EXPERTS, OI WORD
o SIGNS 80 GREAT AS TO MAKE THE WRITING OF EACK W RPIPRT A
e SYSTEM OF HIS OWN, BASED ON PITMAN, BUT PECULIAR TO THE
WRITER AND ABSOLUTELY UNDhCIPHERABLE BY ANY ONE
a ELSE.
As a matter of my own knowledge I know that Spenrlan Chartler
0 shorthand can be learned with one-fifth the study requitred for Pltmat;
. It can be written faster than PitmaW-t makes fewer strokes in writing
at any given matter--and it can be read with an ease never clahmed for Pit
a man. In fact, people knowing the system, correspond in it and read eael
a other's writing as though it were longhand or Roma prtant
of the per value of One Hundred Dollars
each. whibch capital stock may be Increased
by a vote of the majority of the stockhbld
ers at any meetlng called for that purpose,
payments or said stock shall be made In
cash or equivalent. as may be prescribed by
the Board of Directors, who may have pow
er to Issue fulllpald stock in payment for
property, real or personal, transferred to
said corporation or for labor or service ren
dered.
No stockholder may sell, assIgn, or trans
fer his stock in this corporation, unless
Thirty (30) days' previous notice, n writ
Ing, of such Intention to se.., assign or
transfer any stock to be given to the com
pan'- to such sale, assignment or transfer.
and upon such notice the board of directors
shall uave right to purchase the otock at its
value by reference to the balance sheet of
the last fiscal year. Upon failure of the
board to pass resolution beiore the ex
plratlon of ..-rty (30) days to purchase
the stoea at its book value, said stock may
be sold In open market.
No stock of the company can be bought
iby any pledge, except upon the above
conditions, and provided the Board of Direc
tors do not resolve to purchase the same
at Its book value within the period named.
No stock can be transferred under any con
ditions unless the transfer be made upon
the books of the company at its office, In
the city of New Orleans, LouIsiana.
This corporation shall be authorlred to
commence business as soon as One Thou
ssnd Dollars ($1,000.00) of the capital
stock shall have been subscribed for.
ARTICLE V.
The corporate powers of this corporation
shall be vested In and exercised by Board
of Directors of three or more directors, com
posed of stockholders, a majority of whom
shall constitute a qaorum in the transac
tion of business, which said directors shall
be elected at a general meeting of the stock
holders of this corporation, to be held on
the Third Satlrday of Jausry In each year.
beginning with the year 1912, and notice
of said election shell he given by mailing to
the stockholders, at their last known place
of business, a call for said meeting Five (5)
days previous thereto.
Bad board, at its first meeting after each
election, shall elect from its own members
a president and secretaryy-treasurer.
ailling from say cause to elect directors
on the day submitted shall not dissolve the
corporation, but the officers and directors
then In office shall hold over until their
successors shall have been duly elected and
qalfled.
At all elections say meetings of stock
hseming, ach eteckhlds? shall be intltled
isto e vate far ach share of seck sand
I ag lI his nsm and may rvte is pareo or
by ate.
In case of the resignation or death of a
director his place shall be filled as soon as
practicable by calling a meeting of the di
rectors to elect his successor, who must be
a stockholder.
The Board of Directors shall appoint such
agents, employes, servants and clerks as
may be necessary for conducting the bust
ness of this corporation and shall fix their
compensation and have the right to dismiss
at pleasure.
ARTICLE VI.
This act of incorporation may be changed,
modified or amended, and this corporation
may be dissolved with the assent of two
thirds of the capital stock'-represented at a
general meeting of stockholders called for
that purpose after a ,yve (3) days' notice
in daily newspaper in the English language
in the City of New Orleans, Louisiana.
Any changes proposed or made with refer
ence to the increase or reduction of the cap
Ital stock shall be made in accordance with
the laws of the State of Louisiana, with
reference to the alteration of the capital
stock of corporations.
Notice of all stockholders' meetings, not
herein or by law otherwise provided for,
shall be given to each stockholder by letter
addressed to his last known place of resi
dence or business, and d.*posited in the
mails at least five (5) days prior to the date
of said meeting.
In case of dissolution or terminating of
this corporation, either by limitation of this
charter or for any other cause, Its affalrs
shall he liquidated by three (3) commission
ers selected by its stockholders at a general
meeting held as above set forth; and said
commissioners shall remain in office until
the affairs of this corporation have been
fully liquidated. In case. of death or Inca
pacity of one or more of said commissioners,
the survivor or surviors shall continue to
act until such vacancy or vacancles shall
have been filled by a general meeting of
the stockholders, as above set forth.
ARTICLE VII.
No stockholder shall be liable or respon
sible for the contracts of this corporation,
or its faults, in any further sum than the
unpaid balance due the company op the
shares of stock subscrib.d for or owned by
him, nor shall any informality In organiza
tion have the effect of rendering this char
ter null or exposing any stockholder to any
liability beyond the unpaid halance, If any,
due on his stock.
Thu. done and passed, at my office. in
this city, the day, month ad year first
above written, In the preams of Messrs.
Joseph L. Dahmer and '. R.Watts, compe
tent witnesses, residing in this city, who
have hereunto signed their names with said
aerers and me, notary, after reading of
te whole.
Sunset
Limited
New Orleans. Los ,\nge
les, San Francisco
via
S SUNSET
ROUTE
Twice Weekly, Com
mencing Dec. 4, 1911
I. - \"
" rte. ,, " 1 ;,"-'.,- _ ,'! - , ,I· ,
i.. r ll n tt rn 1a, i11, for t xrlth:r
,.a rl- N; . , s rlean+. I 'lw Main
4027. TillH1 TI Ir\..\
l ity '1-\ lnlr al- .ii d l ; I ,k t.
.l ,'lii ifuIlI i, l ,l . Itratid !lb r' fi
nihed on re8.h i .t.
. 1. \11- rty. t . A. uare . I,. L Ii.:-..
1. the indmrign.dl. Ieorder of M; t:,sp
in antfor th Ii,' ar h Iof rit u. Itate of
in l for;,'I ot i t of it'jlni.Irat 'io . of the
I '-T:Ill'. :ITT1.1; t'1i ll' T I. iIa" thi
d iy duly reorl:.l In my offi'.., in Bo.ok
I'.ll, folio :144.
New 11rleanil. 44torl tt . r 111l.
I Sili.ni' 1o E I .ll ei i tNAe . D. It.
1'11 4Re ImEII IEL. N,,t. 'lPub.
nov l ;, 23, ,4,; Ic.14. 7, 14. 21.
Then She Kissed Him.
"Youo have not kissed me," she pout
ed, "for fliteen minutes."
"I know it." bhe said. "I have a very
sensitive tooth, which is liable to ache
If I do."
"What do you mean, sir?'
"Why, you're so sweet, you knowl"
A Fit fe the Blues.
It is a hard saying. but the blues"
may generally be traced to one or both
ef two horrid qualities-greed and lazi
ness. Nine times out of ten the low
spirited person is suffering from auto
toxicatlon-from too much food taken
into the body and too little attention
paid to elimination or to proper exer
cise. The human mechanism can take
care of only a certain amount of food.
After that point has been passed it
seems to turn sullen in Its efforts to
ignore what it cannot help, and, al
though it is a wonderfully conducted
chemical laboratory up to the limit of
its own needs, it is not at all amiable
about working overtime. The result Is
that all superfluous products sent to it
,are permitted to lie round.and become
ipolsonous. This poison is promptly
taken up by the blood and carried to
all parts of the body. Including the
brain. The brain, which needs a plen
tifutl supply of clean blood to enable
it to do its thinking. Is naturally in
dignaut at finding poor and impaure
blood supplied to it, and, although not
actually going on strike, it refuses to
be either pleeasant or reasonabls.
Youth's Companion.
How They Did Hate Wagwne.
Wagner's music was at one time vio
lently opposed in England, and Ford
Madox Huetffer. whose father was
musical critic of the London Times,
gives in his "Ancient Lights" some
curious instances of the lengths to
which the campaign was carried. "The
compositions of Wagner were denounc
ed as being athelatic, sexually im
moral and tending to further soalism
and the throwing of bombs. Wagner
ites were threatened with assassina
tion, and assaults between critics of
the rival schools were things not un
known in the foyer of the opera. I
have In my possession three letters
from three different members of the
public addressmed to my father. The
writers stated that unless Dr. Hueffer
abstained from upholding the blas
phemous musie of the futuore-and l
each case the writer used the wte ed tword
blasphemous-bhe would be respective.
ly stabbed, ducked in a horsepond and
beaten to death by hired rougha."
SWonder What Tennyson Said.
sIn his volume of reminiscences Pio
Sfessmor E. B. Poulton writes of a visit
Ito Boston, where he met several nots
bles.
Holmes spoke of Emerson stamping
his foot with rage when he could not
remember a name. lHe mentined the
1 Corbett-Mltchell prizefight, which had
just taken place, and said. "I own to a
lurking sympathy with prizefightlnt .
perhaps because I am so unfitted fir
the ring myself." He told Proftssor
Poulton he would never repeit 1o
any one what Tennyson sa.w to him
when he entered his house. William
J ames pressed him to do so with the
assurance. "There are no reporters
here." But Dr. Holmes replied with
t emphasis: "I have said that I will nev
er tell any on . It was not a thlng
o that I should have supp.sed any man
Swould say to a guest he had invited 1
his hma"

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