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The herald. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, January 03, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064020/1918-01-03/ed-1/seq-5/

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grapng n the mountalns at the wet end oI their line. 2-First photograph of the Ame
" Arsk-It line trenches In France; the men are watching an ,irplune. 3---'arrier pigeons, much useei-n
Stl west front, being placed in a receptacle in the trench to protect them from gas.
BELGIUM'S COLONIALS REBUILDING IN MOTHERLAND
t'V.
10
~·~-4
~ellam's colonial possessions at work !n recovered section of Belgiun rebuilding the war-swept terri
was taken at one of the subdepots for supplies of all kinds which are forwarded to polat where
work Is in progress.
0 FOOD WASTE ALLOWED HERE
a·,:·........ ....... - .i. " ..... ..
.. . .
of food at cantonment camps have been hotly resented by
Ce1 of garbage disposal at the various camps. This plcture
at garbage at the central depot at Camp Meade. The
iam beaches underneath the windows of each mess hall.
tot various sorts of refuse so that bones. cans, paper, etc.,
~S ptacles. 'he camp's conservation ofmcer notes the con
. s they are dumped into motortrucks for sale to contractors.
UaS who fails to scrape a bone properly is in for a stlff call.
YOU GROW FAT
Osly a Spledid
o" Cheaper
fW food products
sirr ~ In price, as
0mmercial-Appeal.
r pounds of rice
a earter's worth of
Is farther than 50
bIe A quarter's
aEnr you as far as
food. Fashion
f the greatest food
it to be pol
IA be a law for
t Sor and pol
¥ ts law should be
pabi should be
har mistress, "I
iak. a hag of salt,
a lost of bread,
Do you think
Ma all? Or shall
Sa rememaber one
I have bread I
* +4a when I have
paper and salt."
Isn't be too long."
i;sthe was back
ground Into Sour. People would have
better teeth and better digestion.
But this article is about cheap food
and not about the business of keeping
healthy.
Rice is the chief diet of about a third
of the population of the world. The
rice-eating Jap whipped the filling out
of the tallow and flour-eating Russian.
A man can go farther on a rice diet
than on any other single article of food
that is grown.
So, if you do not want to spend all
your money for food, buy rice.
If you want to have a variety In your
diet, and that cheaply, buy sweet po
tatoes. And If you want a dessert buy
some molasses. Rice, sweet potatoes
and molasses are the only food prod
ucts we know of that are not high.
Tat rice, It is healthful; and eat rice,
it is cheap.
"Why. where is the dinner basket?"
"I couldn't remember one of them,
ma'am."
"Why. I thought you could remaem
ber each article by the one before it."
"Faith, ma'am, I had notring to
remember the first one by."
Paradox.
'There is only one way that people
can live happily-that's together."
"Yes, and there is only one way that
people can live at peace-and that's
apart."-Judge.
STORKS UNMOVED BY WAR
Storks In their nesting place in the
old bell tower of Demlrli. France, have
not yet been driven away by the shells
of the Germans.
Time-Savlng Hoist.
Most of the labor and time usmally
consumed in lifting paper stock to the
top of a flat press in a printing estab.
lishment are saved through the use of
an elevating mechanism that Is now
being adopted. A steel framework,
carrying a motor and hoisting outfit,
is attached at the feeding end of a
press. The paper is moved beneath it
on a small truck. Cables are then at
tached to the latter and power applied.
When the !.p of the stack reaches
the desired height, the hoist stops. As
the feeder removes the paper the re
mainder Is raised automatically so that
the stack is maintained at the proper
elevation until exhausted.-Popular
Mechanics Magazine.
Poetry Without Rhyme.
Poetry without rhyme consists oa
Iambic pentameters, is the most ele
vated of all measures, and the most
difficult to conapose. It Is produced
entirely by a musical disposition of the
poetical feet, frequent inversions, and
the introduction of those peculiarities
by which poetry is distinguished from
prose. A correct ear, a delicate taste,
and true poetical genius are essential
to success in blank verse. Milton has
made a more effective use of, blank
verse than any other poet in Englisb
Slteratre.
EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING OF WOMEN
FOR VARIOUS BRANCHES OF RAILWAYS
Women have made a splendid start
in various branches of railroad work to
make up war-time deficiencies of men.
according to reports of the New York
Central railroad, where President Al
fred H. Smith has ordered the em
ployment and training of feminine
workers wherever possible in all de
partments.
A gang of 30 women, under direction
of a woman bookkeeper, is employed
by the New York Central at Collin
wood, 0., in sorting 3,000 tons of scrap,
nuts. steel plates, spikes, bolts, brake
shoes-practically every part of a su
perannuated engine or a broken-down
car. These women examine and sort
every piece of scrap; they do the work
as well as men and appear to like it.
A. T. Hardin, senior vice president
in charge of operation of the New
York Central, who promulgated an or
der to all officers to "begin the em
ployment and training of women for
the various branches of the service
which they can perform, beginning at
first with the least laborious work," is
quoted by the Railway Employe as
saying, concerning progress of the
movement:
Receive Same Pay.
'The first rule we laid down about
the increased employment of women
made necessary by the war was this:
The woman who does the same work
as a man will get the same pay as a
man. Those women who are sorting
scrap get an average of $2.50 a day
just what a man would receive for
similar work.
"We have increased greatly the num
ber of women employed in our audit
ing department. We have women in our
car department to keep track of the
movements of 240,000 cars. They keep
a record where each car goes and what
it does every day. We have put women
4 ,."'*'4. '.44
WOME RELC MNI AIRA ARSOS
LOCOMOTIVE BUILT ON COAST
Liberty Engine of Pacific Type, Just
Completed, is First in Twenty.
Five Years.
The first locomotive constructed on
the Pacific coast in a quarter of a cen
tury has just bad its maiden trip over
the Southern Pacific lines, having
hauled part of the draft contingent
from Sacramento to Oakland and
thence to Roseburg, Ore. In its first 72
hours' services the new engine covered
1,040 passenger miles, which is consid
ered an exceptionally fine showing.
The locomotive was constructed in the
Soathern Pacific shop In Sacramento
and is of the Pacific type. 81x consoll
dation engines for freight service and
three ten-wheelers are also being built
in Sacramento, the ten costing $300,
000, and constituting part of the South
ern Pacific's order for 65 new engines.
The "Liberty engine," as it has been
nlcknamed, has a traction pull of 45.
470 pounds.
FLIWER IS ENTIRE RAILWAY
Rolling Stock of Louisiana Road Con
sists Entirely of a Small
Automobile.
Most of the rolling stock of the
Christie & Eastern railway between
Christie and Peasen. La., two towns
In Sabine Parish, consists of a small
automobile which is operated a a full
fledged railway traln-locomotive, ex
press car, passenger coach and alL It
runs on regular time table schedule
and does a thriving business In both
passenger and express traie. The
auto has been made through a truck
attachment and special body Into quite
a railroad coach.
PUT PERISCOPES ON TRAINS
Optical Devices Arrainnd to ahble
Driver to Obtain Indirect View of
Train or Track.
Among the latest articles patented
In South Africa are periscopes for
engine drivers. They consist of two
mirrors or equlvalent optical devices
arranged one below the other and
placed on the roof or sides of a loco
motive or railway vehicle, to enable
the driver or guard to obtain an in
direct view of the track or train, and
to enable the guard by means of a
lamp to flash signals or colored lights
to a reflector on the engine.
Loyalty of Conductors.
A resolution expressing "their com
mon, unswerving and continued loy
alty to the war aims of Canada and
the United States" was adopted by
representatives of 200,000 American
and Canadian railroad conductors now
in convention at Ottawa. The resolu
tlon was forwarded to Sir Robert Bor
den, prime minister of Canada.
Railroads in British Empire.
There are 100,000 miles of railroads
In the British empire.
to work in our purchasing departments.
We are training women to sell tickets,
to act as watchmen at railroad cross
ings. In our shops women are learning
to run lathes, drills and other sma:ll
tools, and we expect to employ women
as assistants in stations.
Heavy Work Barred.
"There is no work (lone on railroads
which a woman cannot do, except the
heaviest manual labor requiring phys
ical strength. Women could not lay
railway ties. They should not he called
upon to do work which would overtax
their strength. We are not used to
the idea of the performance of manual
labor by women in this country. We
don't like to see women do hard work.
But there Is nothing about railroad
work requiring skill or accuracy which
wnmen cannot do. We have had one
woman watcher at a railroad crossing
up the state for the last ten years.
War Gives Opportunity.
"Our present work is centered large
ly in the organization and training of
women for employment by the rail
roads. We cannot tell how long the
war will last or how many men *we
may lose by the draft. We want to be
ready. The women we are training are
in many instances relatives of our em
ployees. They have taken up railroad
work eagerly and energetically. Their
contribution to the Industrial welfare
of the country will be of tremendous
benefit to women. Many women have
extraordinary energy and power for
constructive work which has never
been put to practical use. The war
gives them an opportunity to serve
their country and themselves.
"In Europe women have proved their
capacity to do the work of men and
American women are demonstrating
equal efficiency In every field they have
entered."
HANDCAR FOR RAILROAD USES
Devieo Shown in Illustration, Built of
Strong Oak, Mounted on Axle,
Is Convenient.
For use In repair work on tracks
and other railroad equipment the
handcar shown in the illustration was
-.
Handcar for Repair Work.
round convenient, writes Roy H. Post.
on of Flat River, Mo., In Popular Me
chanics. It is strongly built of oak
and mounted on an axle fitted to a set
of flange wheels. The frame Is sup
ported on the axle by lasns of two
bearings of strap Iron, formed as
shown in the detail, and bolted to the
frame.
RAILROAD MAN IS ARTISTIC
Tewerman at Pomona, Cal., Not Satis
Bed to Have His Plae Re.
garded as Eyesore.
The towerman of the Southern P.
else railroad at Pomona, al., Is an ex
ception to most men in his line of
business. He is not satisfed to have
his tower looked upon by the villatge
and traveling publie as an eyesore;
says a writer in Boy's World. Conse
quently he planted vines around it
and trained them into designs, so as
to conceal the unsightly outlines of
his "nest." He trained some of the
vines to grow Into the shape of the let
ters "8" and "P," the lantlals of the
road for which he works. He also
made a neat border around his yard
with whitewashed stones, and planted
a variety of flowers, and even vege
tables. In the yard he built a tiny
house to add variety to the landscape.
He raises enough vegetables in this
unique garpen for the use of his fam
Ily.
---- ----- ---------"'
Gasoline Locomotives.
Gasoline locomotives up to 160 horse
power are being bullt for handling
freight cars about railroad and fac
tory yards.
Women on Scottish Roads.
Employment of women on the Scot
tish railroads has doubled since the
war began.
Carmen's Union in Canada.
Brotherhood of Rallway Carmen
have 90 Canadian local unions.
HIGH ADE
ES
MA T16T
Sup me n uri ,
dai ine and fre n
Nors-Whass the use of 6aishing'
th ad srce.everybody .nows the
quakty of~ Can.os. and shbe.
Ireshness and the purity.
LIGGETT'S
DRUG STORE
Canal Street Agents
T. A. POLLOCK, Jr.
Contraotor and ulilder
See me for an etima e oa that building
Phone Alsiers 267 440 Valette Street
U Kiade-Place Your Order
00with U-.1 nlas I.-.id
Rubber--V Crimp Corrugated
B. V. REDMOND & SON
309-311-313 Decatur Street.
FOR
TORNADO, FIRE, AUTOMOBILE
INSURANCE
SEE
R. A. TANSEY
157 Delaronde St. Phone Algiers 9126
Rents Collected
Model Sheet Metal Works
FRANK BRAAI, Prop.
Repair Work. Gutter Spouting, Steam and Gas Fitting,
Sheet Metal Work of All Description. Gas
Stove Repairing Our Specialty.
PHONE ALGIERS 377 319 NEWTON STREET
The Johnson Iron Works, Ltd.
NW ORLEBANS, LA.
as et Prse me Petre,. shape a. Peurl,
shar I sw allls wml RQ.le $a s s sd wml Wees. v lI
Be1sr, Toak am Pipe Sheps.
MORGAN, PATIRSON AND SBoUIN STRiSt
P.O. Draws 241 ALGaBRS, STA. Telephmee Aiwer 40$
Mall, Repair a Pa~l
Anything e 'Yroi
Automsbllg
O'CONNOR & Co., Ltd.
108 JULIA STIIIT
DUIDAR-DUKATE GO.
nMw Odlah I&
Impd rash a..W aM d
ag-c./ade Ca.se. ..ed., Oylrs
Shrimp Ohks sd Fig.L
M. Abascal & Bras., Ltd.
Dealers IS
GROCERIES
And WESTERN PRODUCE.
Imported 8psalh Sherry WI..,
h botles sad Ir balk; 1ie a
Gat Ia balk.
PELICAN AVE. Ces Vewret .
ALGIERS, LA.
Agent AMERICAN LAUNDRY
Zelon Dry Cleaning and Dyers
Phons Algi.rs 250 *one, Call or Wl*t. 626 Elmira Avmeu
ml NN __ __ • _
WE SELL ONLY
Choice Western Meat
Free Ispected Cattle of the
Western Prairie Lads
John Couget
St. John Market
Are You a Slave to Your Car?
Stop Piding on Wind
NIn your tires is a guar
l0 0 antee against Punc
tures, Blowouts and
Tire Troubles. Lasts for years.
Standard Roller and Filler Co.
745 St. Charles St.
f ,
II
Our Customers
y !
I
Launde I
American I
I Id
I *
. soo nd that our Lau.dr
Swork ha reached a degree of a
e lrlctuoa that few over ttain.
i We
i Launder I
I
L Laundry, --JIm
!'I
&mmmmmm-m
I Hor-Madie Cakes
enrman Coffee Cake
Ic crmnc, Ice GOm
Con..
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
Candes, Brd, Brd, Milk
IR AUllL in m re
m iame w am. im
Mrs. F. Goebel
Smoke
Portina Cigars
WE SELL LOTS OF 'EM
U. Koen & Co. Oistribtrs
NEW ORLEANS
Printing- Book Binding
Algiers. Gretna and vicinity orders
given particular attention and
delivered promptly. Call us up.
EUGENE JOUBERT
"First Class Work Only'
300 Chatres Ma.in S

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