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The herald. (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, November 07, 1918, Image 3

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TIrHE HERALD
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY.
Established May 17, 1I.,
gf d at she Postoffice at New Orleans as Seond-Class Malt Matter.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
SOu Mo, in Advance. .10
i sn , Yea. iný Adv.Ce_ _.. _....... s...
C I R0-OR and Proprietor
dmss al eommun0estions to DR. C. V. KRAFT, No. B00 Verret Street, New Orleans,
giR&LID avs be sound at the followin. places:
HEEMLD (Algiers Office). 500 Verret Street.
nggpALw (City Offrce), 634-64 Carondelet Street
Store, l08 St. Charles Street.
e str faihins to gs THE HERALD regularly, will please notify the business
If0 o Verret Street.
mad communications for publication as early as possible, and not later than Tues
W n ications, such as btters from the people and news notes of balls, lawn parties,
Al S ersonal mention will be inserted in THE HERALD free of charge. No communi
Sbe received unless signed by the sender. We do not publish your name in eon
s j i the a ommunication wnless you so state, but we must Insist upon having your
as ggrantee of good faith.
. XXVI NOVEMBER 7, 1918 No. 26
TO ADVERTISE NEW ORLEANS
gayor Behrman. in a letter to the press, again advocates an extensive
adveltising campaign: a campaign that will let the world know of the
t natural advantages of the capital City of the new south. No better
ta could be selected than now, when the world war is about at its
,p and when, through the grdit reconstruction, opportunities of great
snitude will be given the cities which are ready to take advantage
the opportunities.
Is his message to advertise New Orleans. Mayor Behrman says in
Sas follows:
"New Orleans has never failed to provide sufficient
amounts to more than subscribe the different war funds.
We have, all of us, like the rest of America, regarded these
funds as an investment in the future of the United States,
and I feel that our National Advertising Campaign is just
as splendid an investment in the future of New Orleans
and the South.
Neither can we wait for the rest of the United States
to become informed, by word of mouth, about our gigantic
natural resources, our Industrial Canal, our port facilities.
warehouses, agricultural development, our vast acreage of
atrm lands, and our retail and wholesale markets, etc.
We must advertise NOW, first because we have too
much to lose if we wait until after the trade battle is on,
sad second, because after the war reconstruction and re
adjustment will give the world so much to think about.
we could not secure the attention of the reading public for
perhaps three times the cost of the campign we are now
launching.
I am convinced that the expense of this nation-wide
campaign would be more than Justified it this publicity
had no other effect than to awaken the people of the South
themselves to the advantages of their situation and stimu
late an increased pride in the South's resources and their
development.
The Campaign has been designed to appear in the
leading weekly and monthly publications of the United
States. It has been planned and will be executed on a
Ieoad, comprehensive and spectacular scale such as will
compel the interested attention of the reading public.
Every Liberty Bond purchaser, every contributor to the war funds,
y public spirited citizen should contribute something to this cam
i which means so much for our future commercial development. Every
at invested in this campaign will bring back dollars to you in the
WHY ! AND WHY NOT?
Letters set by aerial mail route, opehed between New York and Wash
wn, will require a special 24-cent stamp in addition to regular postage.
pacisco Villa has isued a manifesto that he will kill all Americans
0 lber foreigners except Germans in Mexico. Germans have been ad
nags Villa money and supplies.
kIers in some sections of the country have increased wages to
a ties twice normal levels, farm hands now getting between $75 and
MS atmeath and board, together with such extra attractions as the use
dm autmobile.
Dsaitl the receipt of a telegram from the quartermaster general of
t Usild States Army stating that production of cotton duck as mann
ib mills was vital to the Government, 1700 employees of Mount
a Wesdbery Mills, Inc., of Baltimore went on strike to enforce their
.Ila fir a losed shop and increase in pay.
he s0age Indians of Oklahoma, due to oil booms on their lands, are
-I be tihe richest class of people in the world. In 1917 the Indians
 three successtul auctions of leases netting them a total of
- ens bringing in nearly a million and a half dollars.
i M D. RockeIeller says that "what the world craves today is more
- sad less formal religion."
A Nwagaper correspondent from Mexico City says that the United
Lhas saver been more intemperately attacked and villifled by the
urems in general than a tpresent, and the papers doing so are in-'
it Geran gold.
i i States flying students are required to fly nine hours with an
bAr-- before being allowed to fly alone. One of our Allies requires
Shears' duty. There is one accident to every 2400 flying hours in
1t fields as compared with one to every 1400 for this ally.
the United States has only ten multi-millionaires with $125,
each, Great Britain has seventy-flive; where America has nine I
W18 W,4I 0 there are sixty-eight in the United Kingdom. America
S$e,000,000 to $100,000,000 class with the thirty-filve to Great
Srh e_.
VISITORS.
8. Rapier, instructor
College. 8. A. T. C.
- lmr professors, Pathers
ThoYvenan. The local
gleased to have as their
eM and very dear friend,
formerly rector of
SJ. Larkin and ather
SLhad been helpng oat
dcersy during the
-- elmic were entertain
last Friday by the
- t-er. This luncheon was
,., Ir Larlka as a token
fgr peat assistance rea
e fathers during the
of the epidemic.
Soutdone inth generosity
'!F the members of the
faculty who .p
to the call of Father
th I Algiers, Fathers
J . LarkIa professors
- . .  . re~unteered
'thi priests of the rie
~i eriod, of the epi
fear or thogsht of
ItI their heavetnly-t
nhi to the spirit
wants of those who
the Spanish l ease .
blsd the that
will resume
the Holy Name
days bi
seen aeern
ti
won the esteem and affection of those
with whom they came into contact.
They return Thursday to the envied
life of studious retirement In the
classic halls of Old Jefferson.
BAPTISMS.
Mary Clarke Clara, daughter of
Wallace Lampton and Mary Clarke of
213 Pelican Avenue. Sponsors, Mr.
and Mrs. J. J. Clark; proxies. Misses
Sidonia Aucoin and Katherine Clarke.
Demnis, son of Daniel J. Barrett and
Lillian Mary Lange of 331 Bermuda
Street. Sponsors, Chas. G. Moseley
and Uda Lease.
GeormIae'lloMe, dauater of J. Al
bert eulot sand Maggia McWilliams
of Verrett sad Allx Stree St paors,
Jne. Gulllot and Adele Gulliot. .
Martin Albert, son of Albert Bige
low and Theresa Hurst of 731 Belle
ville Street. Sponsors, Chas. Sutton
and Madeline Burmaster.
Rev. C. C. Wier, Pastor, Parsonage,
236 Oliver Street, Phone, Algiers 131
Last Sunday we held services for
the first time since October 6. Con
gregatlass were good at both services.
At the morning bour, Miss Thomaselta
Harvey readered a violi solo, Junior
Choir rendered as Anthem, "God Call
lag yet: "Offertory. "Let Not Your
Heirt be Troubled." The Pastors
je:t Joy Of t
1W:1 "1 a4 tere
e "t is 1e de l they
at aae ries M as mit
naesm mis 0 t u t a,..
S. ... bS . te t • sa .
IBJZJAINEcoffee
and Good Cheer go together
likePossum and Sweet Potatoes
'BECAUSE Luzianne makes the best-tasting
cup of coffee you ever drank. It's roasted
"When It just right. The fragrance-you can't forget it.
Pours, it And the flavor is delicious.
Reignsa" Coffee-lovers know that Luzianne just hits the
spot, for it's full of punch and pep.
If you don't think that this good old Luzianne
is worth what you paid, then tell your grocer
and he'll give you back every cent.
rAýCand
|~ LItc
We should attend services from a
sense of duty and get the habit and
get it so fixed in us that it is a
positive delight to attend services. The
Psalmist had great joy in the divine
service. This does not prevent us
from private devotion and meditation
upon God. Some time since the Con
gregationalist sent out a request for
ten good reasons for attending church
and received various answers, one
contributor gave the following ten
reasons.
1. It is is wholesome to put on
clean clothes and make one's self
physically presentable.
2. The quiet of the sanctuary off
sets the rush and drive of week-day
life.
3. Diverting thoughts into higher
channels betters the body as well as
the mind.
4. Church going brings one into
personal association with good and
true men and women.
5. One hears good and often the
best English spoken in the pulpit; acid
this helps to compensate for the slang,
poor grammar, and profanity thrown
at our ears during the week days.
6. As a rule, one's musical and
aesthetic sensibilities are feasted by
what the sanctuary affords.
7, Something in the sermon will
help you. A distinguished Massa
chusetts lawyer once said: "It is a
mighty poor sermon that does not hit
* me somewhere."
8. One's presence helps to main
tain an institution without which
property would be less safe and
dangers to one's person would in
crease.
9. On'es presence in church grati
fies one's best and truest friends.
10. For his own soul's sake a man
should imitate his real Master and go
to church.
At night there were several mem
bers of the choir missing on account
of sickness, but the music was good.
We hope to have everybody in the
choir next Sunday. The Pastors Text
was Revelations 21:4, "and God shall
wipe away all tears from their eyes;
and there shall be no more death,
I neither sorrow, nor crying, neither
shall there be any more pain: for the
former things are passed away."
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
Services next Sunday at 11 a. m.,
and 7:30 p. m.
Prayer meeting tonight at 7:30
o'clock.
Kindly continue to let your guest
know about our services.
Come yourself when you can.
PERSONALS.
Eldred Drum and Tisdale Daniels
and Miss Thelma Cayard were missed
from their respective windows in the
Commercial Bank. This was on ac
count of prevailing sickness.
Lieutenant Wallace H. Hebert of
Camp Pike has gone to California to
recuperate after his severe spell of
sickness.
Raymond Glaser has gone to Camp
Hancock to enter the Officers Train.
ing Camp.
Mrs. B. H. Blakeman was absent
from the choir last Sunday on account
of the Flu.
During Mrs. Bell's absence in Mont
gomery, Ala. Miss Roberta Hafkesbring
will have charge of the Junior Choir.
Last Saturday the Boy Scouts of
Troop No. 18 finished digging their
sweet potatoes, Roland Cayard and
Charles Burgis were both missed in
the field on account of sickness.
Miss Florence Burgle has signed
for Government duty and will go to
France within the next few weeks.
Mrs. John M. Caffery has as her
guest her mother, Mrs. Lula Frere of
Franklin.
Dr. King's report as treasurer of
the new church fund shows that we
have in available cash for the new
church $8,039.00. This is quite an in
crease in our building fund, but we
have not yet reached our $10,000 mark.
We hope that in the near future we
may have this $10,000 and that as soon
as possible we will be permitted to
begin work on the new church. From
present indications this will be after
peace is declared. Let us get our
funds together as soones as yposible
that we will have no embaressment
after we start on the building.
News comes that Walter Harvey
has reached Prance. He is very much
delighted at being Over There.
The Pastor has recently received a
nice letter from Struby Drum of U. 8.
Naval Academy at Indianapolls. He
sends his greetings and best wishes
to friends In Algiers.
SUNDAY SCHOOL.
The superintendent called Sunday
Sheool, Sunmday, to be held at the usal
hour, not knowing that the Board of
Health had asked to disband children's
services. After learning of this re
quest, it was too late to notify the
school; bat he did not bold the regu
lar service. The Sunday School songs
were saung, prayers eered and d
mi~io sM tin coneirt. As the speeal
yFl Day service was not held, we
ws hl t It Sunday I t ear d
ad lesah pdmIts. s watch the
paiwrs; nd, If we eas hold mrvlee,
come ana hi yewr gaUy Day ofe
is. sea mmbes "heght their
aes iag st Sndy; tis waMs taUk
wn tb el'a L sees m nw
hint euob the , ehag
at tma b w e ha
Remember the contest. Do you
want to be a corporal, sergeant, or
lieutenant? Well bring your new
members, get your rating, and see
who get's to Berlin first.
KNIGHTS OF (')LI'MBI'S HU'T,
AIlERS NAVAL STATION.
At last the ban has been removed
and the social meetings will be allowed
at the Y. M. C. C. and K. of C's Huts.
The K. of C. building is now complete
and looks spink and spank. When the
lights are turned on it looks like a
real home and the boys have not been
slow to realize this fact.
Mass was said there for the first
time last Sunday. All connected with
the Station are invited to assist at
these services. Masses for the present
will be at 7 and 9:30 a. m. Yeowomen
especially are invited. Some were
present Sunday and more are expected
this coming Sunday. Mr. Eagan from
)etroit, Michigan, is the new secretary.
He is at present busily engaged putting
on the finishing touches to the build
ing, and also preparing a series of
entertainments that will be sure to
please the boys.
Mr. Frank Duffy past grand knight
of Santa Maria Council Algiers, has
appointed a committee to act in con
Junction with the secretary in order
to make the evenings most attractive
for the boys. And let it be said here.
though it may shock the modesty of
one of Algiers best citizens, Frank
Duffy deserves a world of credit for
his great work in securing and build
ing the Hut he is so proud of. He has
been untiring in his efforts and he has
handled the situation with such tact
and good judgment, that he has made
a reputation for himself with all the
officials with whom he came in con
tact. His work however, is only be
ginning. Watch for more results. At
tention again Attention.
Books, Magazines, Music Rolls.
Graphaphone records are needed at
the K. of C. Hut. Save them up and
bring them to Fahther Petit at the
Rectory, or at the H. N. G. C. Theatre
as soon as it opens. Even Victrolas
would be accepted for they can be
used in the wards at the hospital.
Optimistic Thought
A good judge will decide according
to justice and right In preference to
strict law.
America now has a respectable army
in PFrance-and it is ommanding and
raslving respect.
o- T the time being the world's bul
ness is winning the war. No side in.
mes are good now.
Twice happy is the war gardener who
has learned to distinguish between a
weed and a vegetable.
Despite night shIfts of bees working
by artifieal light, the supply of honey
does not equal the demand.
Paper trousers are being wran In
Berlin. It's a safe bet Fritz strikes
bhis matches on the box nowadays.
The latest on the list of nonessen
tlals is a good loafing place.
The best soldier is the one who has
just received a letter from home.
As for the Yanks, the longer they
are in this scrap the harder they fight.
The man who is looking for work
now finds "Welcome" on every dooes
mat
There are worse things than being
caught in a slacker raid, providing you
are not a slacker.
Too many a war garden was raised
to give the bugs a fat feed. Fight
of the Huns, men.
People who begin the use of gas
bombs should know which way the
wind blows.
A huge corn crop is shortly to be
harvested, making impossible a short
age ef mush.
Are you studyilg French o as to be
able to talk with the boys whenm they
oen batck?
A mail bo~ wald comeler te
hoarding of sap as not omt ly pates
elte but extremely foolish.
During the a( war "conaetloam
bJeurV got away with k-It
5PO 1 U dGUA tAJ[GA I.
Ke a liale VmherDelmn is tyear me,
it is .maimpi ead ktlls Iermss e, L
harmles a use, isasrmlly, e e y.
.. ... . .i e s
35 ·Iesssv is~ Yhee or eesImi
teeless
PHONE MAIN D IX IE A,(PAITI.!.
786
Greatest Homestead South
You Have the Opportunity
BUY A HOME
e \\ill lend vou the money to buy a home andl
allow you to pay for the same, as you pay yotur Indt
lord rent.
W\e are the ,Inly homesteadn' l in I ouisiana that lends
money at less than 7; interest and no bonus.
Come in and talk it over
Dixie Homestead Ass'n
WILLIAM J. SONNESIANN
502-503 Macheca Bldg. 830 Canal St.
AIRBOAT PILOTS
BATTLE SHARKS
Navy Flyers Flail at Jaws Until
Vessel Rescues Them
at Sea.
CRAFT IS HELPLESS
Engine Goes Dead and Seaplane Ia at
Mercy of Waveo-Sohool of
Sharks Hungry for
Their Prey.
New York.-The crew and passen
gers of a steamship which arrived re
cently saw two seaplanes in the sky
200 miles from port. Everybody was
on deck to watch their maneuvers.
Suddenly one of the planes dipped out
oQ the sky, and, landing on the crest of
a wave, was toased from one billow to
another.
The vessel captain ordered all speed
ahead in their direction. Meanwhile
the pilot and observer had donned
their life preservers. The engine had
gone dead on them and they were
helpless.
Shark's Snout Appears.
Then from out of the choppy water
appeared the snout of a shark. An.
other and another followed and the
sea seemed full of fins. The sea wolves
hungered for their prey, for they turned
on their backs and bit at the pon
toons as if they knew the weak spots
which separated them from their meaL
The men were horror stricken, real
sing that the wreck of the pontoons
would throw them into the water,
where their life preservers would form
little protection from the rr enous
Jaws.
Strike at Man Eaters.
They succeeded In wrenching loose
two uprights from their airboat and
with them walloped every snout that
protruded from the water, keeping the
sharks away from the pontoons. They
beat the waves lustily and yelled at
the attacking man eaters. Thus
they saved the pontoons until the
The Sea Semed Full of Fine.
steamship hove to. near by and steered
their drifting craft to the compeanes
ladder.
A beat was lowered from the steam
ship and the sailors beat the dutarks
and water with their oars, the chood
hangng ea to the hydroplane. Fnlally
both pilot and obeerle were hauled
up the ompeanloay out of the rough
sea, nd with the aid o those In the
boat the machlne, teeo, was lifted to
the deck. It was o a badly damaged
condltlom, but not byoend repair.
ni sensrtm-iun~ the patrleod. a
boy an muster to wear besther's cu.
down dothes.
Cooks might almoast qually as non
essentials these days. They have not
a great deal to do.
Them this is not the frst terist sea
son when there have been a mallio
Americas in iurope.
The unomelal opiionl in eney ranks
Is that it is net an "Amerlecan meotem
at an, but an American bussaw.
Puttin coal n yea basement mow
wm help elear the tracks fur that
aAmerles army f 800m000 men
tle wek r aght rder souM tlt
aI e e n lose ia e - ae
i .= - -- ==m-
MAN IS "LOST IN WOODS"
Could Hear Street Cars and Sound of
Water, but Couldn't Get
Out.
St. Paul, Minn.-With water only a
few feet away, so close he could hear
its trickle, and with leaves he raked
up around him for his only coveridg.
A. L. Smith, aged forty-three, was "lost
in the woods" for three days and
nights and lay in a clump of bushes
suffering with paralysis and without
food or water until found by a patrol
man.
Smith's story combined the hard
ships of the man lost in the woods and
the aimless wanderer In the desert,
and all the time within a few blocks
street cars were passing and hundreds
of persons were coming and going, un
conscious that almost in hailing dis
tance a man was struggling desper
ately for his life.
Smith wandered away from a grad
Ing camp where he was employed and
lost his way In the woods. He said
he thought it a joke at first, until he
passed nearly all one day trying to find
a small creek he knew ran through
the woods toward the grading camp.
He believes he walked in circles until
dark, finding neither the creek nor an
opening from the woods.
Dreams of Fire; Jumps.
Redding, Cal.-Dreamlng that the
hotel was burning. Thomas Qulnlan
jumped out of his third-story window
and landel on a brick pile. He suf
fered three broken ribs and Iontrnal
injuries.
The Fourth of July next year will
be almost a world holiday. That is
the way events are trending.
An addition to the list of dead lan
guages would seem to be one of the
possibilities of the near future.
Now and then a true patriot fur.
nishes evidence of the fact by refus
Ing to try to sing the national air.
Marshal Jofre says that victory is
near. It is not yet near enough, how
ever, to loose our grip on any weapon.
The boys in France miss at least
two things: The pies like mother used
to bake and the cgars like father used
to smoke.
Lung power has its element of value
ia a national crisis. lust now a good
bugler is more in demand than a soap
box orator.
Many a man whose ambition used to
be a private yacht will next winter be
wishing for a private canal boat load
ed with coal.
Shortage of raw materials is stime
hitlng standardisation. Take dgars
for instance-today one brand is as
bad as another.
One of our airmen ran away from a
thunder storm and soon we may az
poet to hear that they are able to
dodge lightning.
German newspapers are disappoint
ed with German-Americhs. And
German-Americans are satisfied to
have them remain so.
Besides teaching the advantages and
resomrees of cornmeal the war is rap.
Idly educating the world as to the
merits and versatility et rice.
The sale of a Holstein calf for $10S.
000 points the way for young men of
limited means who want to bagage ia
business to tackle dairying.
Lieutenant miane says the Turk is a
dean fighter compared to the Prussian,
which leavers the Turk about where he
stood before in dvlised esteem.
Some mean will probably indulg, Ia
the unholy thought that higher passen
ger rates oa the rallreeds will man
fewer risits tfrom the wifeW lks.
"A splendidly writtm editorial" is
the editorial that expresses yoaur
views. "A stupid editorial" is the edl
torlal that expresesm the other fellow's
views.
BSuggestive indeed wuas the remark of
a prisoner taken by the Eglish in the
paurse of the present German drive in
Picardy: "We need all the land we
gat to bury our dead."
The femnlae part of our natlealI
cidtienry have been asked to wear sik
bthroughout to save cotton. Under this
terrible blow the ladies are bearing up
wlth admirable tortitde.
"*lere mst mt be" sam WIs wa
t, "h shortae adt eber la te fee.
Sor on the trm." To put tt dt.f
-m , ererybet mst eithe pr
baen a blp ih S bag.
Remember, tlrdntllyt that the
prm reaeires atteatis - hot watl
r as wel am e l Ral or Hm, hot
er esld, the weeds t right ao e
NOW CALLED NICKEL-SILVER
Well-Known Metal Has Been Relieved
From the Obliquity of Bearing
a German Name.
One of the largest metal-handling
concerns in this country has recently
chalned the name of the alloy here
tofore known us G(erman silver, and is
now marketing this commodity as
nickel-silver, and a publication devoted
to the metal Industry suggests that
the word silver be eliminated entirely,
as there is no silver In the combina
tlon. This publication says: "If the
nickel is taken from an IS per cent
German silver alloy only a 'two and
one' brass will remain. Why not then
call the complound 'nhckel-brass,' or, it
commercial objections are too strong
to be overcome at once', why not call it
nickel alloy? The various contents of
nickel may be designated by utilizing
the different percentages that the al.
loy contains. Thus, 4, 6, 8. 10, 12, 15,
18 per cent, etc., nickel-alloy. It Is a
fact that some manufacturers are al
ready deslgnating the material now
being sohl as '$heNlield plate,' as 'sill.
ver-plate on a nickel base.' We see
no reason why the same argunment
does not apply to the alloy being culled
nickel-silver."
WHEN LIFE SEEMED GOOD
All Trials and Troubles Trivial to
True American Under Such
Glorious Circumstances.
I got up In the morning feeling out
of sorts.
I was blue and depressed and had
many troubles.
I was short of funds and long on
obligations.
The coming cares of the day
seemed to be too much for me and I
dreaded meeting them.
I was in ill humor as I dressed.
Then I went to the front door and
picked up the morning paper and I
read:
"Yanks take twenty towns I"
"Yanks capture many guns and pris
oners I"
"Yanks drive back the Hans I"
And I forgot all my troubles.
And I gave one loud, American
cheer.
For life looked mighty good to me,
-Indlanapolls Star.
Perfect Evening Spelled.
"Isn't It glorious here?" she ex
claimed when the waiter had taken
their orders.
"Do you think so?" he replied.
"It's perfectly lovely. Everything Is
in such beautiful harmony-the foun
tain, the trees, the swaying lanterns,
the music-everything is Ideal. It's
like Fairyland."
"I'm glad you like it."
"rm simply enchanted. Doesn't It
make you feel as if you had stepped
out of the everyday world into some
thing strange and new?"
"Not a bit."
"What's the matter? You don't seem
to be enjoying yourself."
"My boas is sitting at the third ta
ble over there to your left, and I can
tell by his looks that he's wondering
how I can afford to blow myself at a
place llke this."-Dayton News.
Air Raid Stories.
In a booklet recently published the
Bishop of Stepney tells some amusing
stories of the behavior of poor people
in the East end of London during the
raids.
One woman dwelling in a big block
of model dwellings (writes the au
thor) said to me, "You see, we're quite
safe, because all here are contrite"
a fine frame of mind, only she meant
concrete.
Another woman, a riverside dweller,
who caught slght of a Zeppelin when
she was out in her beck yard In one
of the earliest raids, said: "So I ras
Into me kitchen, and In a mlnute or
two I looks out at the front door, and
blest if It wasn't waiting for me there.
I don't call it naturat"-Penrson's
Weekly.
Law on PullIng Down Trousrs Leg.
It is hard to believe that a man who
was sober would spend half a minute,
or seven seconds, in polling down one
leg of a pair of trousers. But we an
not say as matter of law that if he
was sober he did not do so. What wV
do say, however, is that when a att
has at least the whole highway, Indcld
ing a sidewalk devoted to foot pmena
gers alone, to choose from, It is not the
act of a prudent man who wants to
pull down one leg of his trousers to
select a street rallway track eight se
onds aread ad away trom a corner
from which an electric car my emerge
at any moment, and to stoop over to
paull down his trouaers without agala
looklng up antil be is run over.-Sae
Jordan vs. Old Colony St B. o 0., 188
Masp. 124.-Law Notes.
The Situatilon.
Though a prophbet rose fares the
dead, he never could have persuaded
the third George of England that un
der the fifth George the nation e
George Washington would save Hg
land from destructlon at the hands of
the third George's kln. As old John
Phoenix used to say, "trath ts often
more a strager tha fiction."-
Topeka Capital
Longe for a Pslstratto
Pldstratus, the Arst lawgiver e
Athens, when asked why he had mad.
death the penalty for every iaractien
- his statutes, replied that it was
none too mueh for the least crime and
he knew nothing more severe for the
greater. Ah, if Plslstrats were ly ab
heAre to judge the Huns at the nal
casnt-Seattle Poest-lntellige~er.
"Consemdentions objecto uses seveg
yRlables where plaia "slacker" woeald
_Seas
Do yea suppose Olte sounds the same
a It looks or is pronounced Ike a reg
uar weore
Thery sa the kaiser is aging rapid
y. But think of tem astul experense
he Is eesawlatag i
the mmule w a S ry is a*t lot
a realy. But thur at rmrt mse

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