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The herald. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, June 10, 1920, Image 11

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064020/1920-06-10/ed-1/seq-11/

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pSonallsT
The Hatter
panama Hats. aeasd.
sad Resbaped al 4
BARIIIltlni
_p! d, -t itlE tIX ,r h I . i';I
t~btabIC. r it! " iL uit
- N SLATE DEALERS
fro TTE FULL NAME
IA0"' TIHT ORIGINAL
1 SllATE ROOFIU6 CO., I1e.
-g1 BRANCH YARD
f o
C Gravner 5Street
OAT BANK SOUTH
d -- War Savings
ft for Sale I":
iDtlpo Bear 4e In- II
sded enl.Annnually I
inl
SjlatsCo uat on Mprtnsc
toi annPnes n a
iiiHomestead
-UMeowa. ,M F .s Tarpme
-;.Ah l Ailteie 43e , Thura. t
trts Corner C-'
Seed & Poultry Co.
BROODERS FEEDS T
--'ILOWIRL WARM AND
gL NEW ORLEANS. LA. h
n
,nair Shoo
We pspair anything.
-do c, Ufmbrdllas. etc.
-11 Teohe St.
W FLOWERS
M + for as Occeasi o
U aa Prompt delivey r
Sm dller, Florist
SItsIe ROYTAL STREET u
ISI.
. 1E MU 3T.
. It. MWill. Ptlmbatie end
- --j laints and Otis. $1,
.~- se AIe A-. -
WALL pAPxazNG DONE
jeal i Co. Fire
Cjj.Ma Hats
ear. Wnias sraLE'r.
I smey Groceries. Corner
g- -- elias 8ta.. Algiers, Ia.
1.5. T T10UMAN
-l LS.aO ID
ten 4grder
1 ss Rampart street
.IrtAL FURNISHED
IS tebteasCs, tastaR
- r fo worl capitaL
-, te1 i~ see sand loans
,l . a New Orlean os.
S Typew'riters Bought,
- i~r. Phone Main 4180
t. eo5w Orleeas, La.
.Parlors
- , r14 Julia St.
-airdres- Y ai (Pore
dtene sOliciied.
k. L MONCRIEF.
eS rso to 12 a. m..
Main DM2. Rest
. ~-~.r street. Phone Gal
a tth. To esder the
help, and make
beoeome aermal.
lIueke. Bem l p.
Lost and Found
LOST.
i ll.," collie dog with white collar. Re
.ard if returned to 527 Itelleville St.
L.OT. Buy!
A ipo kit -book colltaloinng fourteen dol- tune
lars antd a few ferry tiackets. Finder -
Iia.:ta,. return to ;tascal I .L fuaei. 0ti) O)livier
st.. land reie, rewaord. lttf.
- - -~---- - -- ~---an
Specil Notice
SHI.
Kl'E('CIL NOTIC'I
REtNUMIEa PRACTIC(E.
.i-l,ltltela:nt Alonzo lBurke, who has been
on duty :t the Naval Station Ihere for sev- P
erail y:ears and reiaently placned on the re
tired list, will resUlmle his former prof.es
sion., "('hirolody," and has opened his OW
office for iractiea April lst. at 413 God
chaux Btuilding.
NPECIAL NOTICE.
I att ap:plying for a pardon or commu- MI1
tatiot ofl .t u tit l e. 0i .
IIEItMAN D. PAII.ET. tat
P'ECIIAL NOTICE.
Ntice is heIreby givn in ac-ordtanne with
law. that a genllerail mlltaetinl of tile stock
holdr.r of Ia iaerona-Piersou (Company. I
Ltd.. u ill h, held at the office of thei
4('uolpanya. No. 400 ('sanip Street. New Or
lie:ltus. Louisia:L. on the 24th day of June.
192'0, at 2 p. II.. for the purplose of amend
ing the chalrtaer no as to increase the ('coot
taoat staik from One lHundred Thousandi
($ll4M.M )4IOtl I ollars Iar value to Two
Ilundred Thousand ($200.O000.() IDollars
par value. lind to inctrease the total author
Ized stock from (ine Hlindred and Forty
Thlousalnd ($140.(M)0.00) Dollars par value I
to Two Ilundred and Forty Thousand
($244U.lI4I.(11I) Dollar Ipar value. and for I 'ht
suclth otlhetr pulrposes as Inay properly come
before said meeting.
Ity order of the 1oarae of Directors.
)anmeron-aPierson Co.. Ltd.
FIRANK IAAMIERON.
!President.
a;. K. I.OEAN. Saecretary.
May 13-June 17.
(AtRD OF TIHANKi.
sr. Xavier desir.es to extendl her heart- CC
felt thanks to all hier kind friends w.ho
so g.lnerously assis.tedl to mllake lher ail
ver Jubillee a metanulraable ocnasion.
Tlheir kind wi.lshaes. anld lmore thlan gen
erous gIft.s. togaether with the- dlemonstra
tion of lIoae alnd a lpprecitation rieivedl.
lhall ever le nlost fandly ctaertslthed. and
most gratefully rtaememberedl.
ipe.ial thaanks are idue to deatr Father
iLarkin and his devoted assisahtants. The
Third Olrdier of Mary,. thle .ltiar Society.
St. Mlargreta Daullhters :tl. Danhtersl of
th.abellah. .eaguetla of the Sa:ared Ilhiart.
('hiltlren of Mary. the olid boys and girls.,
her former pupils. and last but by no
tmoans least, her loving children of the
Holy Name of Mary ScHhool.
May tod reward thetie generous. friends
and benefactors a hundred fold in this
life. and crown them with eternal blian
in the life to colme. It the heaartfelt prayaer
of the griateful reciplent of their love aid
gratitude.
Civil District Court for the Parish of
Orlheans. State of I.shuinna.
No. :131tt. Division "E', Docket 5.
Enille ('urrillion vs. ('handler C'. Luzen
berg. District Attorney for the Parish of
Orl.ans.
.J'DGMENT.
This ,aause 'aname on this daly to he
heard, when the Court considering the
law and tile elidetnce to be in favor of
petitioner, entitling hint to the decree
prayed for, for the reas.ons orally assign
It is Ordered. Adjudged. and Decreed. $,.I
that there be judgoment herein in favor -
of petitioner. Enile ('arillion. authorizing
him to change his name to Emile Da
Silva, whic-h shall be the true and lawful pie
name of petitioner after this judgmen tcr
has been published as required by law. A
It Ia further ordered that all the cotaa
of this proceeding he paid by petitioner.
Judgment read and rendered in open
Court. May 26. 1924O.
Judgment read anil sitgned in open le.
Court. June at. 192. it-l
(Sig.) WYNNE G. ROGERtS. MI
Judge. -
A true copy.
T. GREISIIABER.
Deputy Clerk. it
June 10-17-24. ed
Miscellaneous For Sale -
FOR SALE. (e
Fine piano for sale. Apply 113 ()lvier St.
FOR MALE!
Hlandsome bed-room set. piano and kit
chen table. Apply 422 Seguln street.
FOI MALE.
One oak sid-taoard for sale cheap. Apply th
H. Rosier. 930 Brooklyn Ave. m
to
FOR SALE.
I'p-to-date double cottage, 5 rooms and
hath. 513-317 Peli'c n Ave. In first class St
aonlltion. Apply 319 Olivler St. yj
BI
FOL BAL.
New and second-hand tools, stores,
clothing, bought and sold. Mrs. L.
Karnofaky, 427 So. Rampart 8t.
8-i.
MISCELLANEOU FOI SALE. A
Slate, building and plumbing material A
brick. flooring, ceiling. eypreaa lamber. S
LA. DEMOLIBSHING CO.. INC..
1115 LAFAYETTE BT., M.
R E S H CRANBERRIES, NEW T]
PRUNES AND PEACHES, AUNTg
JEMIMA'S BUCKWHEAT ('
J. ALISERT GUILLOT,
e Verret St. 7
FOI MALE
-New double bungalow corner of Nelson
and DeArmas Streets. four rooms and bath
On each aida' Electric Lights. sanitary
plumbing latest model. $4i00.00 Terms
$2000 Cash, balance on monthly payments
of $25.00.
Adams' l ats d5
132 ST. CHARLES STREET. b
FOR SALE
Double cottage 43-432
Bellevile St .Apply 713
SLouisa St. 6-17
- Fo1r Salle
Furniture of all kinds
to sell; wood stove, gas
stove and coal heater,
all in ist class condition. I
SCall at 422 Opelousas
- Ave. J. Cabibi. .
Wanted To Purchase
SWill buy stock of Algiers Lead
SCo.. Inc. Stateo price sud umber
of shares yeo have. Address .
Y. Z., care Herald office.
TYP3WWIT RS
* epaiLed. Beuagt asa iee.
Thr No S* UBderwoda sfer sle
NIW OrLUANS TKPMW3ITEN CO.
Mal. 43. U Wee.r
Adams' Hats 3
132 ST. CHARLES STREET.
WANT TO PURCHASE.
ISAACS
Buys atd sells anything. Victory Furni
ture Store, 842 Royal. Hem. 845.
WANTED TO PURCHASE.
WANTED to purchase old mahogany
and rosewood furniture. Wm. Feldman,
437 Royal. Main 4343. 5-21.
SHIP YOUR BONES. ROPE. METAL AND t(
IRON
TO M. GLASER. C(
2,33 TCIIOUPITOULAS STREET nT
It
HIGUEST PRICES PAID POR
OLD GOLD, SILVER, 4i
PLATINUM.I AND FALSE
TEETH aI
OWIN, 30 Bonrbon St. Kataz S hi
h
IEDUCATI TIONAL
MUSIC.
WINN KNOX SCHIOOIL OF POPULAR C
1MUSIC(. 2216 Esplanade Are. Phone Hem- R
10,,' 1462 .1. I' .:,i" ir Popular ntui{ J" n
taugiiht. SIp.':tiii raLtimite coars-- 'u:r:l
d
PII.%NIST TE.t'IIER and ('Ol'4)O4ER
I.e~ ons 71 ('entt4. DInices $250 1p. C
S.h,,-.t Miti.i. 15 Cents. 1I0
Si b
II %ROI.I kEYMOlR b
I a
r Phone, .%lui.-r- -. 2^"; Morgan i .
For Ient
t
IDwenIlnI anId store,i
corner Dia a and Be. e
cupancy azoout July n.
Ik. A. Tansey,
157 Delanr nde St.
t
Clean your Carets
' with IEllectric Vac
sum Sweeper. Ma
chine rented 7l day
500 Verret St.
FOR RENT.
n-2 first floor rolnoms for light holusekeep
Jing. $5~.01 per room. One sleeping roorl.
d. $ ". 0 per week.
)r
ia FOR RENT.
A two-room apartment. neatly and .onm
pletely furnished for light housekep..ing
screened. clean and comfortable. Phone
A. 50. , 428 lelaronde St.
r. FOR RENT.
Four room furn.ished house iat Long
i' lte'ah. -For renit biy month. For lpar
ticulars addrs5. Iolu 114. I.ong lieac-h.
Miss. tf
FOR RENT.
I'p-to-date apartments at The lBermuda.
k. Ilo and cold running water. l'lace screen
ed. Apply Mrs. E. Lynch. 212 BIernmuda
at reet.
e FOR RENT.
Elegantly furnished front room for rent.
Gentlemeln only, 30:l I)elaronde St.
- Mispelled Words
it- -
The word ragtime in the ad of
Winn Knox and new and bought in
1 the ad of N. O. Typewriter Co., was
misspelled in our last Issue. Those
Sto receive the Jacobs candies are
Mrs. C. W. Deming. 444 Belleville
s St.. Ethel M. Anderson. 511 Belle
ville St., and Cecelia I4ymel . 238
SBermuda St.
RULES TO GOVTRw CONTEST.
ALL ANSWERS MUST BE 5ENT IN NO
- LATER TIIAN FRIDAY EVENING. YOUR
ANSWER MUST BE ON A CARD OR
PIECE OF PAPER NOT LARGER THAN
. AN ORDINARY POST CARD AND YOU
er. SHOULD WRITE ON THE CARD AS
FOLLOWS ONLY:
FIRST YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS.
SECOND, TIlE MISSPELLED WORD.
STHIRD, THE NAME OF THE ADVER.
TLSEMENT IN WHICH IT APPEARED.
NT THE MISSPELLED WORD OONTEST
APPLIES ONLY TO OUR CLASSIFIED
(COLUMNS AT PRESENT (IN PAGE 11
ITHE PRIZES WILL 4E AWARDED EACH
WEEK TO THREE SUCCESSFUL cON
TESTANTS.
"Hall, Columbia!"
t "flail, Columbia," was written by
ry Joseph Hopkinson, April, 29. 1798,
mi when the United States was thseat
a ened with a war with France. It wab
- composed to the air of the "Prest
dent's March," for a young actor and
ulager in the Philadelphia theater, and
became at once highly popular.
AUTOS
Louis F. Martin, Jr.
Expert Automobilist
519-521 Burgundy Street
Phone Main 1467
FARMERS'
Truck Bodies and Trailers
Also Lumber Trailers
Built to Spsecifiatis
SCHAYER & SONS, Inc.,
Frmsrly O'CONNOR & CO.
Waoss Ely. sad Repaira
Gesral Black Smith Work
518-534 Jals St. Phases .3657-3602
TIRES? TIRES?
Bargains in New, used, and recon
structed tires at all times in stock.
Dry Cure retreading and geoneral
vulcanising. See us before buying
your nmet tires, it will pay you.
Dealers in Goodrich, isk ad Plre
stone, Guaranteed tires. Phone or
call for particulars.
RECONSTRUCTED TIRE CO., OF
LA., INC.
6S0 Baromoe St. Phboe kain 5624.
DOCTOR OF HEARTS
By BETTY M'INTYRE.
(t 121. by McClure Newspaper Syndicate)
Phyllis was a talented, well-educat
ed, handsome but unspoiled child of
wealth. The male portion of Kings
town openly adored her, while the
contrary sex secretly copied her man
nert, gowns and her style In hair-dress
nlag.
She was a horn matchmaker and
quarrel-patcher, and when any of the
girls of the town were heartbroken
over some John Henry, she was sought,
and although she was only twenty-two,
her advice was sage. In this way she
had earned the name that the boys
had given her, "doctor of hearts."
When her friends wrote to her they
always placed D. O. H. after her name,
and with smiling good-nature she ac
cepted their fun, and no one ever
guessed that the doctor's own heart
needed mending.
Many of her admirers proposed to
her, but she refused them all, for she
did not love them, and she was a firm
believer In whole-hearted love or none
at all. She very tactfully found some
charming girl for ehch of the disap
pointed swains.
One beautiful morning the doctor,
feeling rather lazy, took an Interesting
book and some red-cheeked apples that
vied with her own cheeks for rosiness,
and settled herself in the couch ham
mock to wait in comfort for the mall
man. When he arrived she smiled as
she read the D. O. H. placed after her
name on four of her letters. She
smilingly opened one of them and read
a long letter from one of her "pa
tients" who had found happiness. One
letter bore a foreign postmark, but the
usual D. O. II. was there, and she was
puzzled, for as far as she knew, none
of her friends were abroad, and the
address being typewritten, gave her
no Information. She slit the envelope -
and read:
"Dear Phyllis-At last I have found
where you live. Until tonight I have
been unable to find you, although I
have searched for the past three years.
After I returned to Camden and found
you gone, I ran down every possible
clew to find you, but all in vain. Last
week I came here from London, for I
knew of your fondness for Egypt, but
I could find nothing here until to
night, when I dropped into the English
club, and here I met a chap named
Clark, who knew you. When he told
me that you were not married, I made
up my mind to see you at once, and
beg your forgiveness, if I can, for my
foolishness. So I am coming to you as
fast as I can, with the hope in my
heart that you still love me a little. *
"Yours forever,
"TOM BEVERLY."
The rest of the mail was forgotten,
and her dancing heart made her eyes
glow with a wonderful light. Tom was
coming to her after three long years,
and he had searched until he had
e found her; the silly thing they had
quarreled over was forgotten. For the
next three days she lived in a fever of
Sexpectancy, and each day found her
dressed in some wonderful dress, for
she was anxious to look well when he
- came. For a week she watched for
him at train time, but he did not come.
One morning in her plain gingham
a dress she curled up in the hammock
to rest and sleep and dream of his '
coming. She woke to And Tom lean
t. ing over her, and with a glad cry her
arm encircled his neck and in the kiss
that followed all the pain of the years I
was forgotten.
Suddenly she became conscious of
I her plain dress, and asked him to ex
n euase her until she changed it.
is "Why change It, sweetheart? TYou
yare wonderful In that dress, and silk
a or satin could not Improve you any."
le And then, In the approved fashion, he
e- told her just how wonderful she was
8 to him. With a happy sigh the little
doctor of hearts dropped her head on
his shoulder. A shrill whistle and the
postman entered the yard with several
letters, all with the D. O. H. after her
Sname Tom, picking up one from
I where she threw them Into the ham
N mock, kissed the D. O. H. as he said,
Swith his arm around her, "Doctor of
hearts is a good name for you, my
darling, for you sure can fix sick
R hearts, but after the way you have
fixed mine, I'll tell the world that to
n me D. O. H. means delight of heaven."
PONT'CHARTRAIN RAILROAD.
Week Day SLchedule:
Leave Milneburg, 6.00 a. m., 7.00,
y 3.25, 9.50, 10.50, 11.50 a. m., 12.50
p. m., 1.50, 3.15, 4.30, 6.30, 4.30,
t 7.30, 8.30, 9.30, 10.30 p. m.
Leave Pontchartrain Juanction,
5.30 a. m., 6.30, 7.40, 9.10, 10.02.
d 11.20 a. m., 12.20 p. m., 1.20, 2.40,
id 4.00, 5.00, 6.00, 7.00, 8.00, 0.00,
1Q.00 i. m.
or don 1Pare
service Co.
Cord Tires Guaranteed
10,000 miles
Fabric Tires Guaran
teed 6,000 miles
859 St. Chariles St.
A UTO DMLIVIRT SODIS
Made to order. Repairing and
painting done promptly and at low
er prices than elsewhere. Wagon
manufacturers.
J. W. O'CONWOR
DI VUI ussa, bet. Dsess am Dassas
SICr sUlZIC3
Q Geeal blaebr eiad., u iss
ma esuaar t. suiet & Pak
Adams' HaIIts
i2t ST. CII3r S STaET.
R I p
Tea Gown of Flame Colored Chiffon Velvet Faced With Old Blue Crepe
Elizabeth; Trimmed With Silver, Lace and White Fur. A Long
Sleeved Tea Gown of Embroidered Silk.
ADOPT TEA GOWN I
FOR HOME WEAR:
in
Difficult to Distinguish Garment ta
From Informal or Formal T
Evening Attire.
LOIS DRAPED LINES FAVORED
Moeel Usually Cut in One Piece, at
With Lower Portion of Skirt ti
Much Narrower Than at of
the Hips.
Women are adopting the handsome iV
tea gown as a dinner dress for home m
wear. So very beautiful are these tea
gowns that in some cases It is dif- h
ficult to distinguish them not only o
from informal evening dresses but O
from formal ones as well, writes a
fashion correspondent. s
There was a time, not far distant, .
when we considered a negligee as a ls
delicate affair always in pale color
ings, which made it impractical to tl
wear anywhere but in one's own room. b
Now most of the models, except those 0
for very intimate wear, are in the I c
rich, dark colorings of the Orient, in
gay, colorful tones of beautiful bro
cades and velvets such as those that
are used in the most dignified gowns a
and evening wraps. t
Made Into Evening Dresses. d
Many women buy these wonderful d
tea gowns, and with a few changes i
here and there convert them into eve
ning dresses. They are not quite as 1
expensive as the former and may be a
a little more individual. This type t
of garment takes its inspiration from c
the dress of women in Eastern lands; I
most of them are from the costumes I
of Japan or those of Egypt. Our in
formal robes, which make no pretense
of being dresses, are plair of Jup
anese origin. They are ereected for
their usefulness, at the same time I
endeavoring to get as much of beauty I
as possible along with utility. The I
handsome ones, even of these plain
robes, are very expensive, and the
best thing to do is to make them your
self. Don't be afraid to practice on
a really beautiful fabric; there is little
chance of failing, because they are so
very simple.
A pretty one which I saw was of
a heavy pink silk. It was lined with
thin white wash silk and there was
an interlining of lightweight flannel.
The garment was perfectly straight
and quite ungirdled, the only trim
ming being a large rounding collar of
fur.
Preference for Long Draped Lines.
There appears to be a preference
for long draped lines, the garment
usually being cut in one piece, with
the lower portion of the skirt much
narrower than at the hips. In many
cases the draping swathes the ankles
rather tightly. Even the sleeves, cut
In kimono style, are gradually shaped
so that they bt the arm snugly below
the elbow and are long; some of them
coming almost to the tips of the
nasers.
One new model which I have Just
msee has sleeves about four feet long.
Such long sleeves seem very remark
able for any garment. You will won
der how the wearer got her arms
through them. The sleeve was sewed
up the full length just like any narrow
sleeve, but it was slit at the elbow, al
A lowing the arm to come through the
- seam. The rest of this queer long
Ssleeve hung like a streamer. This
SKindhearted Farmr.
- One day a city cousin came to the
farm and when she saw the windmill
Samid: "Oh, see how good the farmers
Sare to the pigs; they have electric
asns to keep them cooL"
S Hew About the Listenerst
- To hang on the organ; motto fer
the averagem choral soety: "Lord
have mercq on us miserable sinarsl"
S-4util.I
it,
tea gown was of blask chiffon ve',irt ii
and \was quite untrimnueld, but the e"
long, straight draping was mos,t ef- 81
fective. at
Another model of the long draed
type Is of crushed velvet, dyed in ti
coral and orange--a remarkably strik- 11
log combination. The effect Is ob- st
talned In this way: a water dye and tl
an oil dye are put Into one vessel. al
The fabric is then dipped into this,
and as the water and oil will not a,
mix, the cloth comes out in two tones. a,
The sleeves, which are long and tight, di
wrinkling on the arm from the elbow cp
to the wrist, are made in three sec- I
tions connected by cording, which goes n
in rows about the arm. Weights start i.
at the bottom of the sleeve and con- y
tinue all the way up it and down the a
side seams of the gown to hold the p
drapery of the sleeve in place. II
Elaborate Trimming Used. b
The negligee is one article of dress y
In which we may allow ourselves cl
much latitude in the matter of orna- e
mentatlon, for while some of these
handsome gowns have no trimming. II
others are very elaborately trimmed. s
One of velvet, made on exactly the It
same lines as the one just described,
is lavishly covered with Chinese sten- t
cil work. Another is trimmed with t
large eyelets carrying out a design. a
These, instead of being worked with a
threads like the English eyelet em- a
broidery, are bound with different col- a
ored silks. Still another, of black o
chiffon velvet, has batik work in gold. y
All of these robes slip on over the f
head.
In no dress can art be expressed
in quite the same manner as In the a
tea gown, and women are continually
demanding not only greater beauty of I
design, but of colorings In them. This
has brought about some very interest
ing methods of hand dyeing to obtain t
unusual color effects. Both velvets
and silks are dyed by dipping a por
tion of the material Into the desired
color and wringing it tightly with the
hands. The next section of the cloth
is then dipped into another shade and
wrung in the same manner, and so
on to the end of the piece. The fabric
is then hung up so that the dyes run
into each other, making wonderful
shades that vie with the colors of the
rainbow. The efforts of those who do
this work are centered on obtaining
uncommon colors. This they do
through the study of lovely old pot
teries and other pieces of art, espe
cially Persian and Indlan things.
Bronze shades are among the fa
vorites, and some lovely velvets are
done In this tone.
Velvet Makes Stately Tea Gown.
A stately type of tea gown is of old
blue velvet, combined with chiffon. It I
is very much embroidered, the chiffon
being practically covered with a won
derful design of flowers, ducks and
dragons. Many mellow colors of silk I
blend in this embroidery, although at
first glance gold and silver appear to
predominate. The embroidery around
the neck and sleeves is a cross-stitch
of gold and silver threads. The meth
od of putting this garment together
is rather intricate, although the lines
* appear simple.
t In contrast to these stately robes
I there Is the pajama negligee emanat
Sing from the dress In which the women
o a China drink tea. China, however.
s furnishes only the basic Idea for these
dresses.
t The pajama negligee is made of
1. bright colored velvets and silks, the
trousers tying about the ankles with
. ribbons of silver and gold. While the
a splendid tea gowns previously de
Sscribed are topped by a headdress.
r these gay little Chinese costumes are
. accompanied by jaunty naps aad .lip
e pers that mutch the:n. Mtmy .If tfi
g caps are smll;t, runlld afallirs w..
is :datng'in. -iive.r tasala.
Pesimistlc.
"It Is all over but the shouting," I
Isaid the polltician to his friend the
lnight before election, "and, between
c you and me, our side won't have to I
attend to that."--Boston Transcript.
Plenty of Serriflg.
A fishrman says that a shoal of
Shrring is sometlmet fve or si Ui
leg and two or th1e miles breed.
THROUGH THE
YEARS
By GEORGE E. COBB
(('op'yright. I._,. W·'*:. rn \ .. -; ,.i-r It n.un )
thie \\ (a1s r t ,' 5 II, . 1 i. u ,l"" f r eti, .
ani it l:as a blirihdil:y p:iti gl.il iin
h nll r of : i , :li l1 ,f 1 t, 1t t iof ithli
attenrl ih tlle f1:.l ,'1,,": ~ ' ,re al ,, t, ori
tundrlr ltht ta,. lii llie ~iSands andi
Bert rani M.. rri~ Ihth ,nt 'red fully in
to the spi riit l 'Iof fhl lhi . a'q .
The l inli y dhul, :.ii it ' : t, he i l i '.l -ton
hail distribulll a I ,,, a t i, f;l.hihne l
f. tlu dy l,,z, i;, *. .u 1;" t, tille shihl
isll heart. .l , , I1;- iil t .'ll- - ( tlns
spelnl id ittut :- th + L , tilrll ant
plrinted ili glarit I' pt, 'he wahite
surfes. Viry tin i. i -:. rtr In pr.
.i-cit.e lt tle i Etllie r,:ll r : "W\ ill
. ut.t Ibe ii ft i,. ,." :,,li Lt+h... .he ., ted
for a rieply t thne . ,, , tt.nlttl .- nts -
Iieint, "I like .iour . ,u.I., ntI}.
The party (a- ireak ting ul, tihe:
Bertramn carie aro.,, ltie in i cenr
tuined nliche. and t ihlaI dl termtined
to give explri-ioLtn tli th. inr iptings.
of Is i r J nllt hleart lef, re th,y sepa
rated.
"W\ill iit kis- ne' rea.d the. hIart
shiiaped in fetioin ilth w\hi,'h he pre
sented her, usul I:tli, thi-hrd aro : uir
ereil al li-iaied her i*si ety cheek
toiwarsll hin. her i-ye- .trklhin, bright.
Just tlhen her ia lnue %a  , m lil iout and
two girl frieilnd . eeti it, her. brllke in
upoin thelia e'ii-oi of the inhei. Ef
ie, .startled, Irew haci k fr-ii the, rapt.
eagerly exieitiant fae of her youthfuil
suitor anli advanced to leeit the oth
ers. tihe., rhoei r, directed ita wift
glance ovier her ishonllhr at ltertram
intensely elpresive of iiiiappiointment.
Then, coling ti a pa use befor tihe
two girls. she put one, lisilxd. halnd
behind her.
The daiinty inenliber describedi an
unmnitakable signal to her luckless
swain. lIertram was keen to construe
it. lie glided directly ilhtloil her. Her
l fingers unclosed. rivetling i lozenge
Sevidently treasured for the occasion.
Sh- S slipped it Into Bertram's hand
and then went away.
I "I love you." It read, and Bertram,
t the boy, felt a sudden surging of de
licious emotion within his being that
-stayed with him for days, and after
I that was a memory, sweet, Innocent.
Sabiding for years.
1. Bertram's father and mother moved
t away from Rockton within a month
and he saw Effie only once or twice
during that period, and then in the
Scompany of others upon the street.
He felt lonesome and homesick amid
s new scenes until he became interested
t in resumed school duties. It was two
years later, when he graduated into
e a higher educational phase. The im
e pulse came upon him to write to his
little friend of old, proudly telling of
being awarded recognition as the
s youngest and most proficient of his
s class. The smoldering fire of his
- early love was fanned into vivid flame,
e when he received a pretty girlish note
I, in reply, full of little nothings, but
I. showing that Eme had not forgotten
ie him.
It became a great pleasure to Ber
- tram to thus begin a correspondence
i that alleviated the tedium of the four
. succeeding years. The mutual mis
h elves never went beyond the bounds
- of friendship, but it was a fond mem.
1- ory for Bertram to picture the idol
k of his boyhood dreams grown into a
d young lady, and when she sent him
0 her photograph he treasured a second
prized memento of his only love ex
d perience, the first being the lozenge.
1e so surreptitiously, but consolingly
y passed to him that memorable evening
in the long ago.
is The day that Bertram Morris ob
tamed his diploma as a member of
the legal bar, thus equipped to meet
the mature responsibilitiea of life, he
Sreceived a letter from Emle glowing
with pride and pleasure over her own
le graduation at the seminary at Rock
Ston. She told of a party that was to
be given in her honor. "And what do
Syou think?" she wrote vrivaciously, "It
is to be at the home of Eleanor Dwy
n or, don't you remember, Bertram,
where we last met and where we were
e the same good friends that we are
Snow? Of course you can't come all
that way just to see me, but Eleanor
ioflsists she shall send you an invitsa
tion, anyway."
The same arrived. A legacy from
an aunt had given Bertram a favorable
income, and there was no question of
sparing the money for the trip he at
once meditated. He voted it a favor
d of fate that was reassuring, a at the
tparty during the evening he and Efe
on I found themselves in the same retired
Sniche where their early mutual likting
hd bad found its birth. Their eye. met
lk in mutual comprehension of the situa
at t ion.
to "Is it not strange " spoke Ee. "It
d was six years ago that you and I--"
ch "Were boy and girl, Itn this smi
th. spot?' added Bertram, leaning closer
er towards her. "I wish to bshow yeou
es something, Ee.," and from an inner
pocket, wrapped in a fragment of silk,
She drew forth and revealed the "I
at- love you" lozenge he had preserved
en throughi the years.
er Efe blushed and fluttered as hbe
ee aesught he hand in his own. "I askedo
you a question then," whispered Be,
of tram. "Do you remember, dearest?"
the be pressed. "I ask it again now."
Ith "The answer then is the answer
the now," whispered Effie, her fair face
de- half averted because of confesslia
ass. And emotion.
are. And the long deferred kiss was
ip given and taken, a sure presage of the
tir union of two loving hearts in the Ir
ruture.
Great Value of Redwood.
Redwood lember is largely usd ed
the Pacific coast, as it has great nat
ural resistance to rot and fire. Heart
redwood when placed in eetact with
the ground will remain in good condi
tioa for 25 years or more, whereas a
great many other species rot out in a
9mw years. The redwood heartwood
I of is also able to repel the attacks of do.
muse eay-producing fungi. because of the
d. presence of tannin, oils and resias ob
noxious to fungi.

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