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The herald. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1905-1953, November 09, 1922, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064020/1922-11-09/ed-1/seq-3/

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- as Herder( nee Zlta
%a, Rodney~ left on
jmited, Tuesday, Octo
slor home in Grand
after a visit of ten
the guests of her
ad Mra. W. Glepert.
Momdi of little Miss
of 7827 Spruce
gda to learn that she
ater undergoing an op
Sreoval of her ad.
ed DIen.
C
.&'G.
Cream
Mowlds
LGr os Co.
UG CANAL
g4HIN WORKS
Ns-"r s4 Bras
KING HARD. '
Y~e. dWithr~lectrii
& ch NOW
WnliA i - ON OmILY TERU
.Ou .mLight & Tractim Co. I
I
*ia,~~- Id. ~wm hIwS 151r * II
NOT WHERE
SLT WHEN?
3ayuk to AIuS mwu ws>
ir g for hiss. rkF 4 A a ernI r
bE.Woow..M heoftb dtb u
j -a t i e·eeiyhwes Domrf"
kw amS. Tt=on& It! so
ar fee de. is a Dmab Iw
~/ ~ur1 014 r ·y~ fh r
!.I
" V st Adt l . Pi to A Ill M
to L, podmi t s myh~r teal
trrfi P Dii *id Wais
I ,t KS Inc.
jwi~ I p. pmAVý 46
Nhm% ,..cF "a l rrn a I
J" ' f . ThPEI .t . } UP* so* a 10.p
lb WORKS, "tc
PhsmeAIsiin4w
~,- b*~~w~
:·JIEWS·~
·iz .c - to
01%r~~w·r~m
II 1
4/ ~ .; ····
Mrs. Julius Bodeager has returned
from a visit to relatives in Morgan
City.
Mr. F. Lecourt is improving a little.
His many frieads hope to see him
out soon.
Miss Martha McNeely entertained
at a Halloween party Tuesday at the
residence of her aunt. Mrs. W. P.
Salathe. Games of all kinds were
played, dancing was indulged in, and
refreshments served. Every one pres
ent had a most enjoyable time.
Miss Martha McNeely spent the
week end in Abita Springs, with her
parents.
Mr. Emmet Casey is slowly improv
ing..
SERVICE 18 BOOMING!
No. 801 is the first of 100 new cars
7 CAR FARE 7
7C A REALITY
bNw ieras Pic Service
S SIconPO RlTED
201 BARONNE STREET
Mr. Albert K. Goebel of Washlng
ton, D. C., is in towp for a few days
on a business trip.
The Friday Night Euchre Club met
at the home of Mrs. Partlan. The
successful players were Mrs. Fallo,
Mrs. Yuratich and Mrs. J. Collinb. The
consolation fell to the lot of Mrs. J.
A. Richards. The next meeting will
be at the home of Mrs. R. Staples.
. Mrs. E. Neussly an ddaughter, Ed
wina, spent the week end here the
guest of relatives.
Mrs. Geo. Munsterman and son,
Thomas, and Wendling Lala returned
from a visit to Buras.
Mrs. M. Ory of Lucy. La., arrived
Sunday to spend awhile as the guest
of her daughter, Mrs. Borne of Sli
dell Avenue.
EXPLAINING GRADES IN ARMY
Fanciful and Pretty Tae* of the Origin
of Insignia Which Odnote
Martial Rank.
Fanciful indeed is the tale woven
about the selection and origin of the
various marks of army insignia.
The4 begins with a two-barred I
fence, nelr a group of trees. One of s
these is a sturdy oak and another a r
silver poplar, the tree which grows t
to greatest heights in our forests.
Above this tree files an American i
eagle. It is night and the stars look t
down upon the scene. t
The first step, or first rank of a comn f
missioned officer Is climbing the first I
bar of the fence, and is denoted by j
theneo bar on a first lieutenant's a
shoulder. Another step up and the I
officer has his foot on the second bar u
of the fece-the two bars surmounted a
being indicated by the two-bar mark I
et the captain. The next stage of the I
climb upward is the branches of the
trees, and the rank of major, denoted I
by the gold oak leaf on the shoulder, I
has been reached.
In order to go higher the candidate
for higher rank must now surmount 4
the tall silver poplar, and when he has
doae so be is entitled to wear the asil 4
ve leaf of the lieutenant colonel. The 4
eagle soaring over the treetops indl
Cates the rank of colonel-the silver 1
eagle being worn by officers of that
rank. The stars are the highfst of all
amd were reserved as insignia for ge- I
als-Detrolt News
DISPUTE ORIGIN OF CAUCHE
Slentists Disagree a to How Rook
of Whioh Chile Has a Monopoly,
Came Aeut.
Chile's chief .soure at revenue, of
which the country has virtually a
world monopoly, is obtained from the
rough rock known locally as callche.
bcestlsts disagree as to the origin of
this valuable mlneral, according to a
writer in the" Natlomal Geographle
Magaslne. Some claim (and Darwin
among them) that it had its origin In
seaweed of aa amleat period. One
savant argues that the deposit result
ed from nitroges emotatned in guano.
Others believe In Its atmospherte
igin, advancing the theory that in a
remote age electricity passi through
he moist air, by eombltim, formed
nitric acd; this 3I turn, lmpregnating
she Iod waters o Aadean streams
and coming in contact with the lime.
stem of te rock dfered nitrate o
lime; anmther step n nature's laborer
ery brought this nitrate of lime in
omtset with alphate eo so da forming
the calche ewmd tday.
Iodms preepitatd free the nitrate
sutleais the meet important bypioed
met of the caliohe reek. By agree
meat among the nitrate establishments.
is productlm is limlted to every
sixth year, that the market may not
be verstked.
Plear Used hi Making Wathes.
Twe barreis et our are ued every
Sweek nla maaing watches at a well
known dtery, which turs out froe
00 to 3,00 patches a week. Since
a baker aues abet threle pounds et
Sear to Ire loaves o bread, it follows
that for evert watch the make uss
he egalvatent at a third at a leaf. The
geor is made Ite dougb and the
dugh is sed to hend crews rivet
aeb mem i that pert a t he es.
-mas h a lump a dough always
band, -d when he mwats to examin a
aw he  a a pidee e0 dough em t.
m, tr tag it ever, he bas a good
e mse to look at with his wartch
ma-s m -erem e qeisb . Mana
at he rws a e toe minue to pieCt U
esw y wit the arsu md marny
e thoesh ar meusagh to h
ste wultd be m einvret by the
ang5e e b fomeps a to be samut
-ans sm robt.
. 'rasnures New lu. A0't.
Uhe rang t Ae iuwa go
at I' at 5t bs t aWt - a
en t enpeas sOe ta nmw **
- - g of he am a mgth
ag ume weaseq salb ler
. It. 0 ', n, 1ii n
~r ~3Tiiirg~fgo
bw
0 o
* .*$* r~i: .3
Electric Welding in Essen.
(Prepared by the Natlonal Oeographle eso
elety. Washtngton D. C.)
Once more the Ruhr valley, Ger- a
many's beehive of Industry, has come
to the fore in world interest, with the
suggestion that France may seizse this
region to force the payment of repara
tions.
Merely as a river, this Ruhr, barely at
150 miles long, is not important. Down at
the Rhine, below where Caesar bridged ft
it at Andernach, below where Yankee to
doughboys now wash their shirts In ol
its green flood and British Tommies Is
play at soccer above the bones of bish- ly
ops, the small crooked stream flows in B
from the east. But it fows through n
an4 lends its name to a tiny region -
sot equaled anywhere for Intensity of h
industry and potential political impor
tance. Cl
Viewed in the light of events since w
the war, it seems safe to predict that a
the course of life in Europe for the fi
next generation may depend on what T
Is happening now along this short, a
crooked, but busy stream. b
The Ruhr, as this famous region is t
commonly called, is not a political sub
division of Germany; it is merely an a
Industrial district, smaller in area than g
Rhode Island, but crowded with mines 1;
and factories from end to end and o
settled, in spots, with 1,800 people to ii
the square mile. t
Tiny as R is, a mere speck on the a
map, It produces in normal times over
100,000,000 tons of coal a year; it f
mines much of the iron ore its many a
mlls consume, and the steel wares of t
Solingen have been famous since the t
Middle ages i
From Rasen there is trundled out, m
month after month, a parade of fin- t
ised engines, canrs, and farm imple- I
meats, to say nothing of tools, shaft- I
ng, ship-frames, bridge steel, and f
plates, that compete In the markets
of the world from Java to Jerusalem. I
One German writer, with character
istle racial precision, figures out that
the volume of raw sad finished prod
acts handled in the Ruhr ery work
lag day would load a train of cars
80 miles long !
What the Ruhr Is Like.
To grasp quickly just what the Rubr
would look like if painted in on a
ma, take your pencil and draw a
horseshoe-shaped figure, startng north
east from Dusburg, on the Rhinae; then
curve east and southeast, so that Dort
muad stands at the toe of the dse.;
thence south at uages, southwest to
Barmen, and thenme straight on to
strike the Rhine again at a point north I
of Cologne.
Then think of the Penasylvania coal
fields packed lnto this tiny area; pour
In the combined populations of Phil
adelphia, Baltimore, Cleveland sad St.
Louis. Then take a fock of the big
gest American steel mills and railroad
shops you can think of and set them
dow aleong the Ruhr. !1l1 in the re
maiing smaller aps with paper, silk 1
and cotton aills, lass factories, tan
series, dye, chemical and salt works.
Now put every man, woman and child
tfrm the cities named hard at work
diggiat coal, firng bofler rsmng
aes or rolling steel rails, and you
will get a graphic, aeeccurate metal
plcture of what this roerin, rubbing
Sauhr really Ias
Geogap~leai , thbRabr distret
es chiefly In the province oe Wet
Sphala, bounded e the west b ththe
Rhine. A small section of its area,
however, inlauding the city ot semn,
fsws over iato the Rhine province.
SPysically, It farms a part of the great
sandy pain of northwst ermany,
merging with what geologists cal the
SGOulf Calogde." ts climate is mildi
S oceal, with the heaestl rainfall
PHuange summddely te this teeming
industrial field ea the tam ride from
1 tue to Beris, and pastlg through
SDuosefr where 10 trains a day
pIrnn asn out. you are amesd at as
s ell proesa to bue towms, at the
almst endless forest o chimms, ad
the palB eo member smke that heang
s la thiM mall but highly mlaeralised
I. reglom, whore nen have dug cdal for
a UN0 years. over 460 eacerns mow op.
Soate ale er lenId cwwessiims for
I* ther epruoltatto. LA! flhu Iti li-
agus a age as meni tr q ag
.5t~~~ (i~r
dustrial region It even larger than '
the mining area, for It overflows to the
southwest and includes the famous
factory towns of Barmen, Elberfeld
sad Solingen.
Esgen's Sudden Rise.
"Boom" towns of mushroom growth dp
are not peculiar to America, as the 1
startling rise of Essen proves. Though My
founded away back In the Ninth cen- MN
tury, it slumbered along for hundreds thi
of years, an obscure, unimportant ham
Iet. *Even as late as 1850 It had hard- BI
ly more than 10,000 people. Then the
Krupp boom-the rise of the greatest
machine shop the world has ever seen
-struck it, and today the city houses
half a million.
Set In the heart of the coal fields,
crowded with endless Industrial plants
whose tall chimneys belch eternal
smoke and fumes, the great workshop
fairly throbs with power and energy.
The roar and rattle of ceaseless wheels
and the din of giant hammers pound
Ing on metal seem to keep the whole
town atremble.
Here every form of Iron and steel
article is made, from boys' skates to
giant marne'engine shafts. Curious
ly enough, even some of the smoke,
or the fumes from the smokestacks,
Is caught and converted into a gas
that furnishes more power to ran the
mills!
More than a hundred years ago the
first Krupp set up his small, crude
shop and began to make by hand the
tools, the drills and chisels, used by
tanners, blacksmiths and carpenters
along the Ruhr and the Rhine. He al
so mi dies for use In the mint of
the eat. Within 80 years, due
to the old ambltion for expanslmO,
Krupp tools were known and used as
far away as Greece and India.
Then came the great era of mass
production In steam engines, hammers, -
steel tires for railway cars, cast-steel
shafts for river and ocean steamers,
and finally that astonlshing output of
guns and armor plate which brought
the militaristle nations of the world
The daily roar of artillery at the
proving grounds, where each new gun,
was tested, added to the din of
whistles, rushing trains, and rattling
gears, made pre-war Ruhr probably
the noisest place on earth. It a noisy
eogh new, but the great guns are
silent; Krupp makes them no more.
The big lathes that ane made gums
for every nation, from Chile to Chinba
now turn out shaftting for marine and
ether engines. Box ears for Belgium.
car wheels for South America, sad
whole tram-line system for the Dutch
East Indles were some of the orders
being filled a few months ao.
Everybody is a Worker.
This Bohr is pre-eminently th babi
tat of labor. Everybody works, and
nearly everybody works with his hands.
An army of chemists, enginees and
technleal men is employed, of course;
but they form merely a small elemenat
of the grimy, dusty, sweaty populk
tion that keeps the coal moving, the
furnaces rearing, and the big lathes
turning,
The population, varously estimated
at froe three ad me-half to four NM
lies, is not easy to determine, be
cause thousands come and go as the
tide of trade rises and falls; and so
wher is the world-wide house short
age more keenly felt than In this
of the mines the government has set
up temporary barracks where thao
sands of mlaers are housed,
In the more picturesque and les
crowded spots of the Ruhr the overe
lorss of Indstry have reared their
villas ad speelous homes; but a dis
iaetive leisure class, an idle rich, like
the groups conspleauou o Charlettea
berg, Dresdn or Wiesden, is not
tome.& aerre re sa re who lave
rses, bt they are the ased anad
pastimed woMre, dosg comfort
ably n the clean. casy celnles belt
for them in cttis Ike sem.
A tiny speck on the map Is this
heated, emokiug, Robr. but big, like
Sa lder. In the wsid's e.y- ,ms
that COesar klw. a hib spot to
reio etold in hstory.
Te! sigb S ve m =e-.
i lsts a thig whaic uho hae
n uwL fstlr the. Meet girls als
am e am ama a sers nhd. sto
b shoat en -s . -are a
1o atea dlint he ws end
abt s t  w .ets
IT HAD TO COME OUT
"Tell me, Mrs. Jones, what do you
really think of Mrs. Smithl?"
Mrs. Jones (very confldentally)
Why, you know, Mrs. Brown. I never
tAlk about anybody, but I really feel
sorry for her husband.
SOMETHING TO REMEMBER
4;
Mr. Sunnyface--Come, come Cheer
ip and forget your trouble.
Mr. Blubody-Don't dare forget It.
My trouble's a note that falls due next
Monday and if I forget It there'd be
the devil and all to pay.
BETWEEN THOSE TWO SUMS
Nearbroke-Budness Is In an awful
state. I've Just lost between one and
two hundred thousand dollars.
Doubtmore-Between one and two
hundred thousand dollars l It seems
Impossible. Just how much have you
to lose?
Nearbrok-About a dollar and a
CHAS. D. STONER. J. C. LEDDICK
STONER'S GARAGE & FILLING STATION
AT V1UaUAA AE i53MaA AIYNluS
Wheae Aisleks x0.
SCHLUTER'S JEWELRY STORE
aSIe*=d optm rlete
yes Tested Glasses Fittd
4318 Magazne St. Near Napoleon Am.
We have a number of satomobiles sesed by a eOrtain bank In th
city"whoh we are offering at remarkably low prices. Satsfactory terms
can be arranged. Pilot. upg-Mobile, Aien. Winston Six, Chalmers Ree
Stevens, Fords Studebaker. Velle aynes, Chandler. Baby Grand Chere
t, Stuts and may otetO pick from.
ws AssO I .Aa aIUIe Ass wares 3 sems - ees - I
BONIFIDE SALES CO.
isse oaaSm AU ow Aavl ". am U. ue
SPECIAL NOTICE
This Is to notify the public that the partnership of John P. Sullvm
and Ralelgh J. Williams, former owners of the SUBURBAN DRUG
STORE has been dissolved, the business having been taken ever
by the undersigned rind will be conducted as the SUBURBAN DRUG
STORE
Signed
Phone Algiers 91$ JOHN F. SULLIVAN.
New OeLems Leading Tallers
CHEHARDY & MILKIE
TO 3 TcODDULLT EuI To0 ma gOEa 5s00
us rOesm St. 56. Chedrlee ed Mg. l:eas Mi
MEYER'S JEWELRY STORE
13M DECATUR STREET
Out of tie High Rent District
PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW
M-O-N-O-G-R-A-M-S
Hand Made and Engranved
GOLD and SILVER
A Genuine LEATHER BELT FREE
lt Oaddse s.. .----- up e Cu Stt .........-------
d.Rin ----- U------------ - p
Ss . ... . Barr .P -------------SuM
lsk PiMe U------------ W
OUR a YEARS OF SERVICE SPEAKS FOR ITSELF
TRY US AND BE CONVINCED
Meyer's Jewelry Store
_1s DECATUR STREET
I Z- -IN l .TI .. HEISALD
WITH
THE
FUNNY
MEN
ACCOMMODATED
"AMr. Grablcin," said the brisk young
man, "1 am a (ol'lege graduate."
"Glad to hear it," replied that self
made millionaire, somel hat grimly.
"1 came in to give you the refusal of
my services in some executive capac
Ity."
"Much obliged. Good-mornlng."
"Eh, sir?"
"I am merely accepting your kind of
fer. Again, good-mnirnlzig."
A Pleasure and a Profit.
Mar:wIch--l oes *.our sister like
reading?
Jones--Yes ; slthe considers reading a
pleasure, but it usually takes her
longer than anybody else to read a
book, because she always forgets where
she stopped reading the last time and
has to start at the beginning agrln to
be on the safe side.-London Answers.
Individual instructions day or night
the year round in
GREGG SHORTHAND
Touch Tyepwriting, English Arith
metic a n d Bookkeeping
Write for data
AUGUSTIN BUSINESS
COLLEGE
346 CARONDELET STREET
New Orleans, La.

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