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Claiborne guardian. [volume] (Homer, La.) 1877-188?, March 13, 1878, Image 1

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@,LAIBORNE tRUAIRDIAN.
iOL. 1.i HOMER, LA., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 1878. tNi. 30.
Term na K S *erlptI
eaF r ..............
metb I
S ...............100
Tas r wes4ig
One square of one inch in opace or les,
insertion, 1 00; each additional inser- D
, a ca. .
. mo. . yer.
eqtc ' S 7 t 16 00
6 9 II 16 000)
.19 14 1 94 1 00
,, 19 O s 36 50 00
lemu, s 33 50 76 00
t3 t 10 00
profeinaool and businesa eards, of ten
or lee in length, 1r, per annum; for
a taatha, Stu; or t rise months, *.- cm
ens advertisemetaof greater leatS
ll be inserted at above rates.
Legal sdvertlIee .t will W charged at
rate.. where fixed ,y law; otheorwie
special rate apnblild shoav.
gipecialonotie*e 90 eeant'per line.
uneral antieer of rlee than ten Ulee.
Fmurriage and raligiotu notcees Inairted
ill.
ob.work exented lan the neatest style,
at reano'able prices.
Aguet 99, tl71.
)haR MASOMIC FEUAL" NIrTITUTL -
FFICIE'T TEACHLs will 1 every
epa.rtmat. sepe.ast teesem gvea
a U. IC.
Board per r esat tf *sabls t . I]
Tuition, $, A Lae L NI
towed.
The tstitulties ihebhul.t
lS for C i2 l 6 u
eense, Claese pulsh,
Aug 92, 1177.
iTERPIAlCE MEETINGS. 4
elrad C Cell U. PF. of T. North La.,
I ILI, hld its next annual meeting at
1I)oi lf. c.unmeincini on Thursday,
sly leth, 1'd.
orIrtcris: -
0.1. Ilaskias. Or W P; Miss Hattie Maya,
r W A: Alm IIl Davideon, Or C Miss
heIrdis HecFarland. Or A C: Max Feule, Ii
r S: Allen Barkedale, Or A 8; John W.
rFarland. Or Tr Mis PhYiale Parhier, Or
Tr Johun A. Miller, Or Chap; - Ives,
r Seat.
Pont-Ofcee of Oraid.eribe,eYlena, La.
Aug. 22. l, 77. 1:.
Nomer C ronell Ne. 1, U. F. of T., E
oer at the Cusrt.feee k wer FMHdey NIAt. Vi
uxvrcgtab: at
S. ihgh, W P; MS. Adella Sligh, W A:
LT. T)..rmaiu, RS; MisUlda Scott, A R 5; L
II. Otts, ('ond; Miss Kate Simmons, A C;
A. Parker, Chap; R. P. Harwell, Sent:
T. Vaughn, F S; H. W. Kirkpatrick, Tr;,
A. V. Calhoun, C Dy.
Aug. tI, 1477. l:
0
soiN YOUNG,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
HOMER, LA.
ILL practice is the Courts of Clai
borne, Jackson, Bienville, Lincoln
d Uneion, and in the Sapresse Court at
Srue. Aug. 9, 177.--l:y
edge J. d. Young. Joo. A. lichardaon. d
YOUNO llCllEARlUSR,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
HOMER, LA. 1
DITA RnIRlP Itrmted to the pai6 of
I Clalrne,. Legal businesn attended to
by either partner i JIaelu, Ciies, uien
vitle smid t[4neelspiahee, and before the
e-reme Court at aoroe.
OBmArTOwN . MAYIS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
H(IMER, LA.
"IILL prctioe n the Courts of Cld
hI borne, Iieoville. Jackson, Union,
and Webster, and the Supreme Court at
Monroe.
Aug. W2. IS7. 1:y
Dn. S. B. 3ICILRDSON,
HAVING reeumed the prestite of Medi
eine offer his services to the citises
ef Claiborne pe'teb, in the vrilousbreamhe
ef his pmrofeion.
omce at the Drug Store eO Jo Shbeleon.
Aug. '9, [email protected] 1:y
3. 3. COLEMAINt
PARISH SUIIVETO,
'ILL attend peemptlr and S enatly
VT to all belne I. his line. IChargesw
ondenate. sideee 8 smi ot u stheast of
Hee*r, e Trenatm roI P. 0., Hemer.
Aug. ft, 1807. 1:
33A5rAIWL SUWCCESS.
The luccee th leading literr Pr
olf the West, TRs CHllCraoo llo , trIly
remarkable. Sineo ito inotrdetiout the
Wrkhe'wbd easee to me paperefthe
kind in tie country. Ie ecirelatoen Ie
hstinnal, and has been obtaind throlugh
the efforts of it. pebIhers to produce a
paper of high mrtal charctar, and at the
ane tie si it p le oa;ateet t with
the preent hard Mtim. That they have
ee eded. a weall, te, the thoemb of
aederse of Tm Laom asaettesed a
Maine to Teas and hem Olges tO FIodt
wnllearieetUmay. Tu Cusca.eo ua
wkiea onteais etores both
'ihe substitption uRietsoe La
iht etmre she ed m
li r eel to TsU Lioes, ChiCic ,.
81
DANIEL T. HEAD, THI
TRENTON, LA., Oh,
aUCIIVINO, IoWARn)DIN AND I0ol
COU HISSION MERCHANT. T
DALsa t T I
tY 000DS, CLOTHING, BOOTS, ad
IBOES, RATS, WARDWARU, IUOI, Do
CASTINGS, BAOGING, TIES, Sed
WAGONS, CARTS, BUGGIES,
ROCKAWAYS, COOKING Wit
STOVES, FURNI- And
TURE AND
Said
Plaittlon uppliles of all aids. ,
Liberal advances made on Cotton, la Re
ih sad supplie. Wh
Aug. 99, tR77. 1:7 as
Tot
ISAACSON * 8118, In
Wholesale Dealers in yse
unin and F1
SaPnwta in 7u/p/ieA, L
AND And
OOM*IBsIOS MJRCBANTS, c
B Canal and 67 Common sta., F
New Orleans, La.
March 6, 1878. 9:.3m
sum, . o P. TK"TNSL, N . .No
I. . RN & CO., m*
W eol nd Retail Dealers in
1, 106 sid 10 Dugenm Street, t
Mewees Ptd amd Perdido Ste., Thi
NEW OWLEANS. Em
New e' k dOSe 44 Hudson Street.
Uts., SS. Elf
S. W. AWLINS, Chi
Loo
(Sessimor to Rawla·tA rurrell,) ) Sh
n a~cadoL and AO
4f2nmmdnaian ~reaeani, Iet
IN. to Uslom btreet, ,
NEW ORLEANS. Er.
Nov. 9, 1477. 15:ly O'e
Rim
Z. J. MART A CO., Pre
--porters aud Wholemale ,
DRUGGISTS, As
)rocers and Commission
Merchants.
Lorce 73, 75. 77 and 79 Tchonpitoulas st.
arehourse 9:1, 9., 97 and 99 Tchoupitonlan
reet, New Orleans.
Aug. I. 157. 1:y
C. Jurey, M. Gillis. 301
UBIEV OGILLIS, tel
'TOIOON FACTORS AND GENERAL Pit
J COMMISSION MERCHANTS, ru
ISce................ 194 oG ser Street, ti,
.V RW OEBLAYi,, LA,
Aug. 99, la77. - I:y
tba
ohn Cha'e, Win. H. Chae,o
Christopher Chasf, Jr.
JOHN CHAIFE O SONs, ha
iOTTON FACTORS AND GENERAL to
J COMMISSION MERCHANTS, SO
ee.......... ......No. 5t Union Street, go
NENW ORLEANB,X LA. so
Aug. 98, 147. 1:y aiC
SPage. P. Mera. at
IPA E i M03AN, so
-IN
BOOTS, 8HOE8 sad BROGANS, on
alltU Cape and Treaks,
o. 1o.................. .Magaino Sttret,
.%'EW ORLE.ENS, LA. PI
Aug. Hi, 1577. 1:y IL
JOHN IHENY? CO.,
Wholesale Doalen in
Boots, Shoes, Brogans and at
HATS, A
Nos. 191, 193 and 15..... Common Street, i
YB W OBLASY, LI.
Aug. 99, 1877. 17 :
STAUFFBPR, MeNBmalr CO. L
Impoeter and Dealern in
Hardware f a AgricultWr
Implements,
No. 71..................... Canal St t,
YEW ORLEA.VS, LA.
Aug. 99, lt. 17
A. UALDWI - & dR*.,,
(accessor to Slooomb, Balldwn Co.,) C
Dealer In i
--mdware, 31eed, teun sdh aSdr.ed
CATLEXCU ,TURAL I
No.74 Caeul, sad 9,95 ad 0-Ceoms SM.
.ZW OGLMANS, tL .
Aug. 9115DI. 1.7
iprte ansd Jobbers, in
Eardware, Catlery, GOwns
. ud Pihtse ,.
NqeB01,3 and er...North Main Stroeet,
IT. LO&S, MO.
oTT YOUr JOB WORK
SOUNDS IF Ti A$g ATN SLLU . halt
no, there I no SalOng bell aim
the Universalist bell; be
k up to hea"o this holy day,
. th churk and le the way; his
are as frei so fiends to blight
ope within heart that' righ t;
iso hell! no hell! no hell! lal
I the Ualvesalns bell.
well! do well! do well! do well!
the Unitarias bell;
a erm sad east aid y load, to
work your way alog the road,
b faith inOd and fath in man, net
bop in Christ where hope began; he
ei! do well! d. well! do well!
the Unitarian belL pOn
1i! swell! swell! swell! ye waters,swell, be
lamed ia peets the lplt bell;
le faith in Christ alon eo save,
net be plunged beneath the wave gre
,ow the world unftsering hith d
rbst the sacred Seripture saith;
Il! swell! swell! sw ll ye water swell, w
Wlamed, in peasl the Bptist bell
swell! frewell! been world, farewell!
d ot the Presbyterita bell;
is a boon to mortal given, an
there is nothing true but heaven;
sot provoke the avenging ~rd-- 9
w here and earn the will of God; by
swellf fasswell!'bes world, farewell!
d out the Presbyterisa bell. thi
tell the truth! we tell! we tell! are
uted the Methodistie bell; an
Lord has made salvation free,
Sneed he lest on land or sea; Ph
eat, believe, have ho , and then, 1
Iad, anld prais the l -Am-ena
truth we tell! we tell! we tell! "w
ated the Methodistic bell.
el! excel! in love excel!
med the Episcopalan bell;
is the church-not built on sands- the
blem of one not built with hands:
Iurma sad rles and rights revere r*0
worhip here--come worship here; b
eI in tfit and works, excel.
med the Episcopalian bell.
I down, ye sants, in heaven that dwell, ma
uted the Roman Catholie bell; hal
a o'er the battlements of bliss,
I deign to bless a world like this; wa
mortals kneel before this shrine, ba
a is the water, here the wine:
k down, ye saints, in heaven that dwell, I t
laimed the Roman Catholic bell.
r city's streets or hilleide dell
g on, each beavenasanring bell!
s forward, pilgrim to the shrine ate
'alvary and Palestine;
as path that lead throgb earthly dross, an,
meet at last beneath the C'rss;
Christian does not fear the knell
sgels toll the funeral bell. fee
(Ohio State Journal.
wi'
[For the GuDtnix. fa
MY IDEAL WOMAN. of
'ome with me to this long, low, th
Rlghted beach this sunshiny at.
noon, I want to show you a pretty I I
!tore. It is woOderfully beeuti.
,this long stretch of ooean.water hig
sted by the setting sun, but you thb
old forget it all after one look at bii
a face of the woman who is seated do
quietly in the shadow of an over lie
aging rock. 1 hardly know bow fol
describe this woman's face, it is I1o
wonderfully "aulceptlble"--I it
n'I think df a better word-has ed
h an infinite variety of eZprj- th
us. You would know'in a mln- a
a when she was glad, gay, or on
rry. Perhaps the charm lie more pe
this than in the dark, grey eyes hi
d daintily curved lips, which, it
ming to analyze be tLace, are the fo
ply perfect features she possesses. J
hat orious eeomblatioons of temn- .
rament we fad in the same person. gi
ok at the delioate otlines of her m
!al face; she is gentle, spiritual, III
aued. Look at her fall, red lipsi
Ith the upper one slightly shorter; t,
he is luxurlous, passionate, wilful.
woman with a face like that is al
re to bare something tragle I tl
Br lift. The soft, golden October
Low, furoisbes a kind of mental,
tozlestion for her this evening. 4
coking at the fresh coloring of he
aitless mouth, you would hardly h
rink she was thirty, that dreadful
ge, more terrible to most women
ban sixty. Looking at the happy
ght is the lovely dark eyes turned
eaward, you would hardly think
bat ten yeats before tbhis woman
ailed herslf broken.bearted. I~t
a leek over her shoklder a she1
o"Just ten years ago this October I
naeo Philip Trnham desearted me.
hs boerl to a woman's pride to
=ave people my she hu been Jilted.
Fea yers o eiones Philip and I
walked together along this bnah
ad he wed essemal devaslo to
e Apart from my love alr hi I
believe he was the very bandaomesnt
-- I oer 5ow. Ah, HReeves for.
givehmra Ihbll Ileedlm with
n other hope ar tb ght the a
Peslishesholl 1 o L kb e
known he was te. I elvlre lair.
ad people are al so. Howband- the
Sbe looked that evening as be ha
t is bead to m and told me of wo
love, and our poverty, which fee
to make sno difernee, only bet
' uas the freer to live for each fall
ir instead of the world.
Fell, be left next day I remember,
begone several months, and I
r saw him again. I don't think He
iesut to beblae to me. I sp- tal
a the money tempted him, and ri
was so weak.
ci.
was teaching shobool thea-that to
it resource ot the orphaned and we
alate-in this same little sea- ins
bed town. The flood-tide of m3
user visitors had left stranded th
Mrs. Dent, a famous gossip, of
myself. What ~crel meesen.- w
Sfate eaeds her keenest stabe
Mrs. Dent always beard say
ig Irat, and'abe came tome one ad
ning with commiserating tones eil
I well-bred satire, to tell me of he
ilip Trenham's marriage in some of
there city to a lovely blonde et,
ith a mint of money." I listened a
itely, and I remember when she to
shad I bent my head to inhale mi
fragrance of a bunch of tube- In
e I held. To this day 1 cannot b3
ir the odor of tube roses.
think I was mad when that wo- wI
n finally left me in peace. I I
re an indistinct recollection of r
Iking rapidly down to the beach
*-beaded, saying to myself that te
roold end my worthless life there w
ce Philip wanted me no longer.
d mercifully arrested my foot- tt
pa before I reached the water,
II suppose I fainted. be
rhe next thing I remember was
ling the cold treacherous ripples ti
the incoming tide playing softly ti
th my hair, and the salt spray R
Iog on my face. A great horror bi
death, that was more instinct t
in anything else, seized me, and Ut
led to the hotel more rapidly than
cad come.
Scan forgive Philip Trenham for of
s treachery to me, and even, after o1
a lapse of so many years, thank
a for the lesson of worldly wia tc
-i he has taught; but, if I should a
e through ages, I could never
get the night of misery that fol
red the knowledge of his deser- t
e. What a grim mockery seem. Id
that legacy left me by an uncle b,
it I didn't know I had. Thous
de of useless dollars showered y,
me by fate, as if that would eom p
asate for the loss of love and
ppiness. I was only grateful for t
beooause it kept me from teachbing,
rl always bated that. I had g
t faith enough in God's goodness,
id remembrance of my mother's 1
'tln teachings left me, to keep a
e from making a high comedy of 0
b with my money.
I have heard of Philip often since d
en as a daring and successful I
eculator in Yew York. Oneeoold t
most laugh at the incongruity of
e ide. A man with a head like t
Oreek Apollo specutating in stocks I
ad bonds among the "bulls and
mare" of Wall Street!
I have traveled *easelealy till e
itely and have been very content,
at never quite happy until I pick
a up that pictresqae little beggar
ir l I Naples. Au orpbha, home
~s and friendless, she has all the
,arm, dark beauty of her any
lime If she had been bladmue
aired aud blae-eyed I'm afaid my
ermt would never have wymed to
er fee I've notioed it through
lfe that fir wome get all the hap
adoesta this world. How happy I1
nean to make her, ead I shall
pasu4 her, O eassedessly, rtom
nitake sad unbapplues. Miae
a not been a very mesfl ift, bet
p-uae God, the Anale shall, io so
l- mI able, make ame d for
Ihe begialang
IA en wateh er en she walks
a.w ome, with mmr a levis,
gPentg weve Ae t a he
daiety peeeof*er dark bead and
a sweep of her grey dress; she
i just the graeful step that one
old expect from looking at her
e. Goid bless her, and being to og
rsuch happiness as sometimes emi
Is to such as her, even nla this life. ltb
The Work et Werms. o
tra
& German gentleman, Herr yon tae
nsen, bhas lately put on record de Yep
is of the interesting results ois fair
lee of obeervations-conduotedal
lb the patient perseverance char. car
teristic of his race-la refetrence 20
the habits of the common earth. bed
rm, showiag "the important part cot
s-anatly performed in the esuno san
of nature by these humble ers- tee
re ain the elaboration of soils and fri
eir adaptation to the requirements a
plant-life" The field of study _i
isa garden having a surface of A
)old overlying a yellow diluvial his
od. haa
Vou Ilensen discribes bow the all
alt Worms come to the surface at be
ght, and with their tals in their ha
le, calmly surrey the conntry in
and before they sally forth in quest ec
food, to the shape ofleave, twigs, be
c. These they beep up round the il
trances, the leaves being rolled ow
separately and partly drawn In- tic
the boles, where they soon beumn di
cerated and partly decomposed,
which state they are swallowed lel
the worms. The worm-tobes bi
ere not easily traced in thegarden- as
ould, but in the sandy subsoil they tb
ere clearly distinguishable, and be
are found to desoend to a depth of hi
om three to six feet. The tubes be
are found to be lined with stones na
bout the size of a pin -bead, brought or
om the surface; asd l mlt.kernels r
erealsofoud in them. Their walls di
o, contained little black masses of fe
aractertistic shape, the exerets of
ue worms. t
Besides these freshly-inhabted gi
oles were others which bave ben as
baudoned, and the cavities of of
'ieb were flled p witb black earth, ca
is black matter being diffused into as
s surrounding sand, and these a. a
in passing insensibly into mere a
lack streaks of mould penetrating pa
to sandy subsoil. In about half in
to uninhabited tubes were found ao
be roots of plants growing on the m
arfce, and these followed exactly of
Ie corse of the tabes, putting out al
heir fibres through the black walls of
fthe tbes. An extended seriesof fa
bservstoons led to the conclusion
tt, as a rule, the roots of animal
lants can only find their way down
the moister subsol through chao
els thus prepared for them by the w
irthlworms Chemical and micro- fr
opic analyses of the contests of th
he intestitles and of the "ecats' of di
he worms showed them to be nearly at
lentical in composition with ordainsa 8
F "leaf-mould," such as is obtained ye
y mixing falle leaves and sned, dl
and leaving them for a couple of at
ears until decompositioa is com- ti
lete. M
To ascertain the precise part play- If
4 by the earth-worm in the prodane
iooof theerdinary regetable-mould, cd
'on Henson placed two worms ina ih
lass vessel filled with sand, the tI
urfaoe of which was strewed from a
ime to time with fallen leaves. b
rte worms set to work at once, and a
t the entd of six weeks the surface n
if the sand was covered with a layer a
if mould half an inch thick, while v
ome of the leaves had been erried a
lown to a depth of three inebe be I1
ow it. The worm-tubes permeated a
he soil in all direetions; some were
lite fresh, others bad walls of or
ganie matter one-eigth of an inch 3
laiek, while others, aga, werequit a
ailed up with mould. In short, the t
no was perfectly prepared for the
growth of plants.
A single earth-worm weighs, on a
an average, 38 grains, sad is esti I
mated to produce 8 grains of excre 1
meut in fifty-four hours. Allowing
34,000 worms to an acre, weighing I
altogether 200 pounds, this would
give 37 pounds of vegetable mould
in the finest state of comsnutloon,
passed through their bodies, every
twenty-tour bontf, over and above
thbe work done In Temoving vegetla
ble refbas ftr theamhwseaad work
- sand opaning up passuige is the
- thu faniliting tme admie
of air and moistre, and the peau
sawte of the moedelatestod aborb
ant portions of the roots of vegeta
tion
The fhamos Centennial en, which
weighed 4,00 poeuds ad has been
kept on exhiblitln, bs al ast futd
hie wra lat the etbe astlls,
The bde weiglhd ire irded
pnads, t Is Mtted, whe hea wu
- e- bt ba that ssmbpset
ae.It ws a feies ever tea
r mt of his groi w ag
its. ~ b
rn l e ane ol FAm.
ly experioeea has bee that the
ster part of the failores iu hrm.
comes from negleetlng the
tiler matters or in arring at
details. What would
aght of a merhant whbo weMld
m another in the se mebhlaes
utredoe a notldty that was ast
ative and remunerative and did
immediately procure the sae!
we see the spme thing amon
sts every day. One basbreed
bogb, jdiou4y aected, that
be made to wetl (ePaflel pls)
to 250 poundut ten montb old,
ulne-tenths of his neighbors ag
tent if they winter their fall
I make them that weight nate_.
n months. One raises pork at
Scents per poped and the other
rwbhere fom ten to wftese ats
f muk cor is fed to winter.
other, by good eroem, has got
cows to give a rich milk, and
i abundance of good butter to sell
the time, but moot of the anidgh
rhood stick to the old fashioned
t-fed fence jumpers, who go dry
October nd keep so util thy
re in May, and give milk wlbes
Steriseempearatively ehesp At 4
the comparatively nampertaat
lete of poultry the e Iarefl sel
a of kinds sal feed make all tbh
lerence.
I remember eslling so a frted
it winter, and seeing him fLedi
bhena quite freely with ears,
hed him if it paid. He told me
at be kept an easet soount of his
as, and that they were paylag
Sconsiderably over a dollr a
sbel for bs eaor, besides the ma
rs. His bes were averaging him
er twenoteggs to the hen ia eb.
ary, and lune set fve-and the
Beree was in the bkhed ad
ed.
Another great leak In Larmts Is
e want of plpety of truit ad a
god vegetae garden. Met hra.
Sare content so they have plenty
bread and mwe-the two mosk
atly articles of Hood that can be
ad. With a very little setra labor
d manure, a well kept vegetable.
ules of one aure can be made to
oduee more food than Are asses
grai, as by judicious pladig
d forethought every of landiso
sy be maude to produce two oroope
vegetables, and keep up a supply
Ithe year rouad. These are seo
the little losem too common with
rmers.-Amoridss Fsrm r.
DIsarieable HIib.
Nearly iall the dslagreeable habits
hlh people take up, tome at frst
m mere accident or want of
ought. They might be easily
opped, but they are pelrsisted to
til the become second nature.
op and think befe yon allow
wmrelf to tfrm them. 'Them e
eas eeable habits of body, ik
owling, twisting the mouth, bid
ie nails, contiilaly picking at
-etbing, twirling a key or fhab
ag at a chain, drumming with the
igers, swrewing and twistin a
air, or whatever you ao Isy
nad on. Don't do say of to
ings. Ioere to alt quietly, mhke
-gentleman, I was gin to say,
of I am afraid even girls fall lute
ch tricks spmellem. Thee are
tauh worse habits then these, to be
are hut we are only speaking et
try little things that are only as.
oying when they are persisted ins.
In re are habits of speel h also, seb
Sbteginnoing every spreeh wLish
yoq set," or, "you know, " now4,'
I dou't care," "tell ye what," "tel
e now," Indistinet utterance, sharp
se tooes, a alow drawi aveld
betal, Stop and think what yo
rish to say, and theo lot ever wor
Iep from your lips Just as smooth
ad perfect as a new siver ola
tave a case about your ways of drt
ing, standing and walksig. sIbre
rou know it, you will nd your boab
to have hardened Into a ast of
mail that you glet get rid of
without a terriblesser.--L4Ie (r
The New York HRersU,.,Maq
knows a young mna who bhas jr
to bet tbhat he e walk a mlmini
boars without eleap, if hir wdVA
rely walk with him. When that
a8 man, two years after UlM
age, goe bhome at idnigh weme ,
Lisgraefllyi iteuieted beas
the oker and buedl bi .
theateng meaer, be Ill dte e -
asif was uen o owal a millu
msie an hear wiaeet hercompaW.
(neth 1*.tb

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