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St. Landry clarion. (Opelousas, La.) 1890-1921, June 08, 1912, Image 6

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064250/1912-06-08/ed-1/seq-6/

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Business & Professional Directory'
OPELOUSAS. -- LOUISIANA.
RAILROADS:
Frisco, Southern Pacific and Ope
lousas Gulf and Northeastern.
PROFESSIONAL
COLUMN
AI.. J erler, B. B. S. EL . Bercler, . D. 3.
Bercier & Bercier
Resident Dentists
'liles fPmne 237 Residenre Phone 50-171
Dr. J. A. Shaw
DENTIST
State Bank.
Oice Phaoe 128. Residence Phone 329.
Dr. A. J. Perrault
DENTIST
Room 14 Saizan Building
Opelousas -- Louisiana
DS. Z. T. YOUNG
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON
Office: Rooms 10 & 11 Saizan Bldg
-Poesn Office 126. Residence 9l
Dr. A. J. Strange
Physician and Surgeon
Opelousas, La.
s- 31i- dise,5665 i. St. Phone 175
eflu, altam Beltidleg. Phase 16
R. M. HOLLIER
Parish Surveyor
A I'" .. 5. 131 o1 Landry St.
The Boll Weevil
Is Passing Away
and Old King Cotton is coming back.
Ginners, get ready for the return of
prosperity by putting in new outfits or
bringing your old ones up-to-date.
CONTINENTAL Ginning Machinery is what
you need in either case-it is used by
successful money-making ginners all over
the cotton world. Let us quote you prices
at once.
We want to send you our catalogue, address
Continental Gin Co.
Birmingham - Alabaman
Opeiousas Ice & Bottling Works,
- *1ANAUA4l '"IREIRt 4P
ice and Carbonated Drinks
Pron pure dicstilled Artesian water is ready to 1111 all orders in any
qouantltes desired. Prices furnished on application. Correspond
*bPEEl.i0TlAr . I.a. 4. . n ste t a. ,...
-WE OFFER FOR
, Cured Hides
In Good Condition
11 CENTS
' Meat Market
Viee.~El aePr ea to Parties Who
Large j Quantity of Hides to Sell
SfQr Prices at Any Timer
." L in:
BANKS:
St. Landry State, Peoples States,
Opelousas National, Planters Na
tional, Union Bank & Trust Co.
J. J. NAFF
Room 5 Saizan's Building
Civil Engineer and Surveyor
City Engineer Opelousas.
Phone 334. Residence Phone 235
Carlin & Hinckley
Machinists and Engineers
Machinery Repaired
Cotton Gins and Automobiles our
SPECIALTY
FOR SALE: Gasoline Engines,
Corn Shellers, Feed Grinders.
Shop W. Landry Street.
Opelousas Louisiana
JEJAN INAVI
DEALER IN
All kinds of Fruits and Vegetables.
Also Oystera. Shoemaking and
Repairing a Specialty. P. 0. Box
214, Landry St., near Bayou Tesson.
Joseph Lassalle
GROCERIES
GLASSWARE
ETC . . ....
Landry Street
Albert Clary
DEALER IN
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIES
Phone 99
T, GEORGE CHACHERE
ARCHITECT
Registered Patent Attorney. Blue
Prints Furnished at Short Notice.
MONEY to .LOAN
ON EASY TERMS
Land for sale or rent,
Addresa
Cap. V. W. Boagni
P. O. BOX 847
KANSAS CITY, MO.
CHAMP CLARK ONE OF T
BEST EDUCATED MEN .
IN. CONGRESS.
Speaker Champ Clark is one of
the best educated men in Con- t
gress. His wonderfully stored i
mind is the marvel of his col
leagues. Few men in public life
have so wide a knowledge of his
tory, literature, languages and
the sciences. The Speaker does
not parade his knowledge, but
when he talks, he can entertain
his listeners for honrs. Itmakes i
no difference what subject is
suggested, the Speaker can dis
cuss it at length. t
Champ Clark had to work for
his education. It was a hard
road he traveled to success, but t
it was sure. Like Lincoln, his
thirst for knowledge began early.
His biography in the Congres
sional Directory said he was edu
cated in the common schools, the
Kentucky University, Bethany 2
College and the Cincinnati Law
School. In 1873-74 Mr. Clark t
was President of Marshall Col
lege, West Virginia, and for
twenty-two years held the record I
for being the youngest college
President in the United States. I
His first college experience was I
in his home State, at the Ken
tucky University. He had to
work his way through that col
lege by doing janitor work and
performing .other duties. He
had no money to spend and what
books he read, outside of the
college text books were loaned
him. With an insatiate desire
to get knowledge, he longed to
possess some books of his own
selection. Toward the end of his
first term at the Kentucky Uni
versity, Champ received the first
remittance from his Father. It
was $5, and the elder Clark in
formed his boy that he sent it to
pay the boy's stage fare home.
$5 was a whole lot of money to
the young man. He would have
liked to do what other boys did,
and ride to his home, but his
love of books was so strong that
he decided he would walk home,
si'ty miles, and spend his $5 for
ten volumes of poems. So with
the books under his arms, Champ
set out on his journey home. It
took him two days to cover the
sixty miles. When he got to his
father's house, he had to get to
work, but he found time to read
the ten volumes of poems. This
was the beginning of his educa
tion.
IWHAT ABOUT OUR
RURAL SCHOOLS?
Exclusive of the city of New
Orleans, seventy-five percent of
the children of the State enrolled
in, any school at all attend rural
schools.
While conditions are good in
some of them, :and;~ considerably
improved ingmany more, yet, as
compared with 'town and city
schools:
1st-The buildings average less
than half as good;
2nd-The teachers are approx
imately only two-thirds
as well qualified;
3rd-The furniture, apparatus
and equipment are hardly
one-third as adequate;
4th-The term is but three
fourth as long;
5th-There is no time, equip
ment or special ability
among the teachers to in
struct in industrial sub
jects valuable to rural
children; and
6th-0 ne teacher attempts
(attempts only) to teach
four times as much sub
ject matter.
Besides, these schools are
handicapped by. many other
things from which the town and
city schools are free.
.Remember that these state
ments are based upon the best
available statistics, and that thq
conditions apply to three-fourths
of the.children of Louisiana,
with the exception noted. ,
SThe, future wealth and pros
perity of this state depend upon
the development of our wonder-l
ful agricultural and commercial
osshidites; these, in turn, de-i
iaprd epon the increased intelli
country, town and city alike de
pend upon efficient rural educa
tion. These are facts which we
must admit.
The improvement of rural
schools requires more m o n e y
(items 1-2-3-4-5,) and upon their
re-organization (item 6.) We
must have better buildings, bet
ter trained teachers, more and
better equipment, longer terms
and industrial work that will
awaken children to the unde
veloped resources about them.
We must have these things with
out waiting until town and city
schools get eveything they may
need. We mnst develop trained
intelligence in the field where it
comes in direct contact with the
undeveloped wealth and poten
tial prosperity which we may all
enjoy. It is no longer a senti
ment; it is a business proposi
tion.
Further, we must discontinue
a practice which no business man
or farmer would tolerate: that of
permitting small rural schools to
attempt to teach the entire cur
riculum for which the high school
demands seven highly trained
teachers, laboratories, and ex
pensive equipment; we must
operate these schools on business
principles.
School authorities and country
people are waking up from a
long, painless sleep over these
matters. A stimulative fund of
one hundred thousand dollars dis
tributed in a way to affect the
organization of rural schools
would' result in half a million
dollars worth of improvement.
Rural people would gladly raise
several dollars themselves for
every one received from another
source; perhaps no other expendi
ture would bring so great re
turns.
Do we believe rural school coii
ditions are right because they
have existed thus for so long?
Does the wealth, prosperity and
general welfare of the whole
state depend pirimarily upon the
intelligence of our rural people?
These are questions involved in
a consideration of the rural
school. Such schools provide
the only educational means for
most of our 'youth, they are
stunted in development, deficient
in every important element con
tributing to efficienicy, yet funda
mentally the most necessary and
important type of school in the
state, generating or retarding
the factors essential to state
wide prosperity And greatness.
C. J. BROWN,
State Supervisor of Rural Schools,
Natchitoches, La.
Triplet Girl Babies.
"Yesterday morning a colored
woman hailing from Vermilion
parish, created considerable in
terest in front of the court house
door, where she was showing a
triple of girl babies born of the
I woman in whose charge they
were," says the New Iberia En
terprise. "The most interesting
feature of the triplets was the
fact that two of the children
were perfectly white, while one
bore the semblance of a dark
mulatto. The children were in
telligent looking and seem to be
in perfect health, all using the
-bottle." .
Kissed By First Lady of the
State.
From an article appearing in
the New Orleans' States of the
.inauguration of Governor Hall
we clip the following paragraph:
Immediately after the cere
.monies on the capital lawn, the
governor was embraced by Mrs.
I Hall, who planted an affectionate
kiss on his cheek in full view of
rthe crowd. As the governor was
released from the arms of the
chief lady of the State, he was
quickly embraced by his pretty
young daughter, Clara, who
following the example of Mrs.
Hall, gave her father a loving
hug which brought forth cheers
from the crowd.
S NOTIC~E.
Public notice is hereby given.
thaitappltcation will 'be made at
the next session of the Louisiana
General Assembly for a new
charter for the Cityof Opelousas,
apI6 E.L I LOEB.
MIRRORS.---Get your old- iir
.rors resilvered by A. Moory, 424
jW. Landry St. may 18-4t
I R b-My-Tiem will cure yog. :
-.4i
JACOBS
News Depot
COMPANY
SELLS
Watermans
FOUNTAIN PENS
Whitings
Writing Paper
1. G. SMITH 1 BROS.
Type Writers
Websters
Ribbons & Carbons
GOODYEAR
RUBBER BANDS
SHAW-WALKER.
SECTIONETTES
DICK
Safe Cabinets
SPALDINGS
BATS and BALLS
DENISONS
Tags and Tickets
Lundstorm Book Cases
Moons Offcle DeSks
Wernicke Letter Files
STAFFORDS
.Inks and Paste
BULL DOO
Playing Cards
B and P
Loose Leaf
and
Blank Books
Con-Hocking
Sale Checks
We Also Carry A
Big Line of
POST CARDS
STATIONARY
Office Supplies
and
can furnish any
ADVERTISING
you may need
Send For Our Cata
log And Prices On
Your Wants
We ell to
"M ER CHANTS-
Small Quantities
Wholesale Prices
WI WILL SllOW YOU
SHIRTS
SUM-R-SHIRTS SUM-R-NOT'I
WE HAVE THE KIND THAT R
Made up in negligee, laundered
collars attached and detached.
Other Shirts with collars to match
in Pongee, Madras and Percals.
Prices 50c to $1.00
MAN HATTAN:
The Shirt of all Shirts-Complete line in all styles. i
Price Only $1.50 to $2.00
Men and Boys, buy your shirts from
M. Winsberg
"THE RELIABLE CLOTHIER"
Opelousas Louisiana:'
Do it Now
Screen Your Home
Hotel, Soda Water Stand, Confectionary
Stores, Baker and Barber Shops.
AND
Buy Your Screens or Galvanized Screen Wires
FROM
Saint Landry Lumber Company Lnihsi
Opelousas - Louisiana
FANS! FANS!! FANS!!
We Fix Your Old .One
Or Sell You A New One
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR
or ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
IVANS BROS.
(C. H. EVANS, Manager.)
Corner Northand court Street. :'Ph& No7
A. C. SKILE
LUMBER! LUMBER! :i
ALL
Building Material
PHONE 286. -- OPELOUSAS,
Ladies! Ladies?
FOR
Toilet Articles
AND
Necessary Household Articles
Such as French Perfumes;
Tooth Powders, Toilet Soaps ,
GO TO :
Shute's Drug Storew:
"THE REXALL STORE"
Opelousas I Louisiana
A1\TN+- I'TeLLS.
X(t'be sp aril K ,tni.(' . .f. ,r n -I,,-,k. . .
* When The Doctor Sea
ii bring a prescription to t .;b
-- nmariay he knois that hieefo ~~
not be thwarted either b-i
drugs ,r inaccurate cw
We have a reputation samotl
'iiian ftor perfect
work. You can take their
aJ authoritative and b
pre.criptiofs here to b
I There's a reaon..
Phone 1i6/ -

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