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St. Landry clarion. (Opelousas, La.) 1890-1921, January 15, 1921, Image 1

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THE ST. LANDRY CL ARioN
'" : , Hero Shall the Press the People's Rights Maintain, Unawed by influence and Unbrlbed by Gain."
LUME XXXI-NO. 13. OPELOUSAS, LA., SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1921 TWO DOLLARS PR YAR N ADVANC
TWO DOLLARS PER Y .R IN ADVANC
COLLECTIONS
G VERY WELL,
3AYS OFFICE FORCE
erty Owners Appear
nterested 'About Im
portant Matter
T OF DELINQUENTS
EXPECTED TO BE BIG
city of Cash May Ac
Ant for General Apathy
of Some People
ft and Tax-Collector Thibo
opened his books for the col
of taxes last Monday morn
but if there is any general do
.:mng the taxpayers to settle
..ithe collector *it was not appar
-p to the end of the week, and
there is a general awakening
a short time the list of de
whose property will be ad
and sold at sheriff sale will
this year than for many
past.
aewspaper man visited the col
s office Thursday morning,
was the worst day of the week,
smiling and willing force of dep
-all ready to attend to every
who came in and wanted to
:u. But there wasn't any tax
or taxpayers on hand eagerly
to shell out the cash in return
receipt. Only a few property
according to information
have been "rearing," to set
the collector and have been
t for the books to be open
tese, it might be remarked in
have already, no doubt, met
tor and paid up.
- only explanation that can be
as an excuse for this appar
thy on the part of the taxpay
- .t fact that there Is a scarcity
in the country, many cot
having not yet sold their j
fiFtst year, and so they are in I
a to pay their prorata'of the -
pvernment. They have until I
1fIn which to pay, and many i
until the last minute,
Athat the cotton market will
a_:. healthier aspect, thus per- I
them to dispose of their hold
Wi t 'serious loss or hard
for 1920 are higher than for
s year, perhaps, in the
story. All property is now
4t full one hundred per cent
the millage has been re
what over the old-time sys
not been cut down enough
he lower millage affect the
iamount of taxes paid except
elly raise the total to be
'eWch individual.
miiths and a half remain in
tarpayers can settle with the
.tand thus avoid the usual
fixed by law. An attempt
made to get the governor to
the time, but he stated to the
n that waited on him re
..this important matter that
order was beyond the pow
executive, and an opinion of
ey general's office states
existing laws such a thing
sible and that to secure the
Consent of the mem
general assembly, approv
sqa order, would not be in
with law. Only a special
f the lawmaking body had
to change the law.
S',eems to settle the ques
the tax-papyers will have to I
>ash and settle with the col- I
Ve April 1 next or the usual 1
'Wll be added to the sum total I
es.
REGISTER
ITH SLOWNESS
ICE SHOWS UP WELL
[NEARLY THOUSAND OF
H SEXES LINED UP
of St. Landry are register- t
owly, according to Deputy p
elvin. Only at Eunice have a
Smich enthusiasm in this v
there is a reason for that f
I.ipal primary of the town
d on the 15th of next
they only had twelve days 1
;t get ready to participate te
aD far as hinice is con- c
ed yesterday and will not d
'for that town until after ti
Up to Thursday morn
ers of the town had regis
number of whom were
- Green was a visitor <oJ
s last week, having ac- a
lisses Marie Meginley and he
ean to tl:,t city, bi
,earman and children left t
0a their home in Humble, h
a long stay in Opelou- th
POWER PLANT
SUFFERS AGAIN
WELDED CRANKSHAFT BREAKS
ON WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
AND OUTFIT IS CRIPPLED
Just the same old story-the Ope
lousas power plant is hobbling along
on two engines and the splendid
service of the first few days of the
present week is now just a memory
and there is no telling when there
will be a resumption.
All three engines were running and
everything seemed in first-:1ass shape
when, on Wednesday afternoon, the
recently welded crankshlaft of One of
the engines broke in the same place,
thus putting that unit out of commis
sion, This shaft had been welded
twice, the first time in Alexandria,
and it broke ehortly after being in
stalled. Then it was seat to New Or
leans for repair and had only recently
been replaced. The cost for 'repairs
has been pretty steep, and the early
bre'aking of the piece puts the outfit
in bad shape once more. The super
intendent placed a prohibition on the
motors. of the city Wednesday after
noon. Lights were on that night but
turned off early Thursday morning,
and the Clarion office had to press,,
into service an automobile -battery to
furnish light for the linotype;mkchine.
Thurday evening .the superintendent
Mr. Jordan, called at the Clarion office
and stated that the break of the; weldl
ed shaft was not unexpected a~ he
never felt certain of its staying qual
ities. Thework of welding was guar
anteed, hence the city will lose nbth
dng but the express charges paid on
the shaft to New Orleanasand retlp.
Anticipating the bt aking of the
shaft, a new one was ordered from
the factory some time ago and i# due
to arrive here within a few days.' he
work of Installing it will be take.uap
promptly on its arrival, after- which
all three engines will be running With
entirely new crankshafts:. The en
gine now out of commission .is" the
big unit known as the "'pith en e" A
-the one tha toodf by the th.nt
while the other two units were out ;f
working some weeks ao
SINHALING AROMAS,
STRONG MEN SUFFER
' BY RIVER OF BOOZE
t WITH DRY AND PROTRUDING
TONGUES THEY FIGHT FOR
NECTAR
Waukegan, Ill., Jan. 11.-Wauke
Sgan's populace let regular occupation
e go unheeded today and saood pop
eyed on the principal corners of the
1 business districts to wg tch twenty
a prohibition agents who arrived with
1 the dawn, dump 130,000 quarts of
t strong drink down the gutters and in
to the storm sewers.
The arrival of the agents took the
town by surprise. Then followed one
t shock afller another.
Whenceq came the ocean of liquor.
From still and wash boiler,, from bar,
rel and bottle, from cellar andi -cave
bedroom .Lnd barn, from moonshiners
in Waukegan, North Chicago, High
wood, Gurnee, Five Points, from' the
highways and byways it was gathered
from wherever Sheriff Elmer Breen
and his deputies were able to detect
the odor of hootch.
As the sturdy axmen stood beside 1
the casks and stills and kegs and l
tanks, their goloshers tightly buckled I
to prevent the wetting of their feet, i
hundreds of thirsty souls, with dry 1
lips and protruding tongues, stood on I
the banks of the Booze River and
prayed for a hero to stop the leak in
the dike.
The blend that washed down to
ward Lake Michigan was unlilfe any- e
thing ever mixed in the artisticn sa- 1
loons that were Waukegan's boast.
in wetter days. It bubbled like d
champagne and exhaled all the deli- s
cate aroma of a ripe barrel house.
Legally reformed wine experts, c
whose nose paint has peeled but lit- s
tle since January 16, Tftight foi, d
places along the edges of the stream c
and surreptitiously attempted to sal- d
vage a few drops of the nectar as it h
flowed post. i
An hour after the sacrifice had com
menced ten of the axmen were-forced c
to turn their bung starters from the c.
casks to the crowds to -precent the ii
diverting of the stream to scores of s1
tin cans and cups that had been hur-
riedly purchased at the local 10-cent tJ
stcre.
Wise householders hurried home
and turned on both faucets in bati o
tub. confident that the hydrants1 e(
w-ouid run with highballs for m.aly Il
an hour after the crest of the -oed
should reach the lake. And hea#.v:r t
hclp 'em, the fish of Lake Michi al tr
became wall-eyed, perch fell off, i
sturgeon stuttered, carp • cavorted, so
herring- became pickled and trout a
twaddled. be
"Hopless, bopleas" muttered the i'
GOOD SISTERS TO HAVE
BIG ENTERTAINMENT
The Clarion has received a compli
mentary ticket to the entertainment to
he given by sisters of the Convent of
the Immaculate Conception on next
Tuesday, January 18, the proceeds of
which will be devoted to the repgirs
of the convent building. The enter
tainment will be in the auditorium of
the institutton ,and is deserving the
patronage of everyone in this city and
ccmmunity. Doors open at 6 p. m.
NAVAL RECRUITING
STATION IS CLOSED
OFFICER HOPKINS AND ASSIST
ANT ORDERED TO REPORT TO
NEW ORLEANS FOR DUTY
The Opelousas naval recruiting ~ta
tion was ordered closed last Sat-ur
day and Officer Hopkins and Mis
aszistant ordered to report to t~he
New Orleans headquarters.
During his brief stay in Opelousas
Mr. Hopkins did splendid work in
the cause of recruiting young 'men!
for service aboard Uncle :Sam's fight-i
ing ships, and he regretted very much
to leave. It is generally understood
that an attempt will be made to dis
charge from the service all men un
der the age of majority. As express-i
ed by one member of congress, the
proposition is to make the navy a
"Man's navy" in fact, and that all
youngsters will be let out. In con
nection with this, a newspaper re
port reads that of the 120,000 enlist-i
id men fully 20,000 will be discharged,
thus reducing the personnel to the
eery minimum numbers.
HOUSE VOTES UP
AND DOWNLADDER
ON DRY LAW CASHi
ALLOWS SLEUTH $7,100,00 DE
t FEATING $1,000,000 AND
f - $100,000,000 PLEAS
Washington, Jan. 12.-The house
went up and down the ladder in vot
ing on approppriations for enforcement F
of the prohibition law.
First rejecting an amendment to the
pending appropriation measure, under
whicb, the Bureau of Internal Revenue
would be given $100,000,000 to break
up outlaw liquor traffic, ithe house
adopted. 86 to 48 an amendment by
Representative Volstead of Minnesota
father of the law, increasing the total
from $6,500,000 to $7,100,000. Before
this vote was taken., the house, jump
ing from one extreme to another, de
feated without count an amendment
limiting the amount to $1,000,000.
There was ,a tinge of old time pro
hibition bitterness in the half hour de
bate preceding the final clearing away
of the whole question as to how far
congress should go in making the
country "bone dry." I
Pleading for a larger sum than had
been fixed by the appropriations corn-f
mittee in framing the legislative, exe
cutive and judicial bill, Mr. Volste d
gave warning that the country would
be heard from if it was the poliy of
congress to cut down appropriationi
and make the job of enforcement a
joke. Mr. Volstead said he merely pro
posed a figure nearer that which the
attorney general had requested.
'Representative GGallivan, Democrat,
Massachusetts, gave the house its first
indication that a fight was brewing
,by proposing to make the appropria
tion $100,000000. Taking up the state- C
ment of Mr. Volstead that a good
part of the money spent would come
back in fines, he said:
"Why this mite? Let's go the limit.
Let's help the new administration by e
bringing back $100,000,000." e
Referring by name to Wayne Wheel
er, general counsel of the anti-saloon
league." Mr. Gallivan declared Mr. C
Wheelerx had said he would make it so
dry in Massacusetts "its people would
spit cotton."
"They are doing that now" he de- II
clared. "I want to say to the anti- P
saloon league that Massachusetts to- n
day is the only state in the union that d
contend that the sum I suggested is a t
drop in the bucket when you considerI
hom much is needed to enforce the law tl
in the rest of the country." t(
Representative Wood of Indiana, Ib
chairman of the sub-committee in a;
charge of the bill, strongly opposed an "
increase, asserting that not one dollar tr
should be added until the law's en-_1
forcement was placed squarely with
the Department of Justice. pl
George C. Jordan, superintendents
of the unicipal light p ant, has return- I
ed after a visit of several days to re- of
latives at his old home in Colfax, La. n(
Luthas P. Ballas of Crowley spent
the day here Wednesday betwe·sn
trains. to
scribe as he wus led from the scene
as the liquid spluttered and sputtered, it.
boiling and rolling, hurrying and scur- vi
yvie into the sewers.
IT COMMERCE BODY
HAS A ROUSING
GET TOGETHER
r Election of Directors Defer
r red Until Some Later .
Date
FUNDS ARE NEEDED
TO CONTINUE WORK
Secretary's Report Indicates
Amount of Good So Far -
Accomplished
The tnnual meeting of the sub
scribing members of the Opelouqas
chamber of commerce was held at the
Elk home in this city, the office of
the body being too small to accommo
date the large attendance expected.
Col. Campbell, chef of the Elks home,
was very much in evidence, as he
furnished the eats for the occasion,
and as his skill in that 'particular line
Sis great, the attending members en
1 joyed themselves greatly.
A review of the siuatton revealed
the fact that the chamber of commerce
has accomplished much for th. bus!
ness men and other interests of Ope
lousas, as well as of the interests of
the parish. More good perhaps could
have been accomplished if there had
always been a hearty unison of pur
pose and with a future all-get-,togeth
er movement the ':hamber of commerce
can and will benefit the city and 'par
ish to an almost incalculable degree.
The crying need at present is for
more funds with which to prosecute
the work. To that end a committee
has been appointed to visit all delin
quent members and persuade them to
come 'across and keep in good stand
ing, s-o that their interests as well as
that of everyone in the community
will be conserved.
Trade day, in vogue for some months
and established by the chamber, has!
proved of incalculable benefit, though
it has not accomplished everything
its original promoters intenrs 'Peo- 1
pie residing in the country have taken
advantage of it to the extent of be- E
ing on hand to receive the prizes of.I
fered. They fhve not altogether re
sponded to the ideas of the originat-i
ors in that they have not brought ;to
market their surplus produ, e. This
may be accounted for by the fact that
the season was bad for the growingi
of a large surplus and the farmers
had to keep everything at home forj
personal consumption.
SThe election of directors, scheduled
for this meeting, was deferred until
some later date, while the comnittee
appointed to visit the delinquent
members and request they settle the4i
dues reports to another session of thl.
body. But it was the determination
of the gathering to keep the good
work going and make every effort 'o
place the organization on a firm basis.
The commitie eappointed to visit these
delinquents is composed of Messrs.
John Deblieux, J. A. Dejean and H.
F. Richard. The committee on ar
rangements concsists of Messrs. L. H.
Mornhinveg, J. G. Lawler, J. F. De
mauche, M. Winsberg, L. E. Littell and
John P. Desmarais.
The report an exhaustive one, sub
mitted by Secretary J. A. Deyo, reads.
as follows:
Opelpusas, La., Jan. 10, 1921.
To the Members of the Opelousas
Chamber of Commerce:
Gentlemen:-Previous to June 15,
1920, it is impossible for the wriitr to
report upon the. work done by this'
chamber but he will endeavor ot out
line for you in a general way what has
been wacomplished since that time
Trade Day.
Probably the most appre :l..ted
things which has been done is the
establishment of a monthly "Trade
Day." The first of these days was
(Continued on page 2)
CITY COUNCIL RAISES TAXES
ONE MORE MILL ON DOLLAR
The city council held a special meet
ing this week adopted a budget of ex
penses of the year 1921, and raised
municipal taxes to eight mills on the
dollar, or an increase of one mill over
the levy for 1920.
At the same meeting the report of
the three arbitrators in the fee of At
torney P. R. Sandoz for handling the
bond matter was received. The fee
agreed on by the arbitrators wtas
$1875, and as both parties to the con
troversy had agreed to be bound by
the decision, this settles the matter.
Messrs. H. E. Estorge, A. Leon Du
pre and Chas. F. Boagni composed
the board of arbitration.
Game Commisrioner Henry Landlry
of Eunice was in Opelousas last 'Wed
nesCuy afternoon.
J. Morgan Sandoz, postal inspector,
of .New Orleans was here this week
to attend the funeral of his father-in.
law, Pierre Mistric.
Rene L. Deronen, banker and cap
italist of Ville Platte, was a recent
visitor to Opelousas. 1i
MISS NATHALIE HAAS TENDERS
GUEST ELABORATE BALL
One of the most delightful and ela
borate social affairs of the post holl
i day season was given by Miss Nathalie
Haas at Barrilleaux's hall on last
Tuesday night in honor of her :,harm
ing guest and cousin, Miss NaupiE
Haas, of Alexandria.
The spacious hall was comfortably
crowded with over one hmndred and
twenty-five invited guests, among
whom were many social leaders from
i Lafayette Crowley, Rayne and Alex
Sandria. The celebrated Toots John
con's band furnished music for the
ocqqsion and, delicious refreshments
Siztspersed the dancing.
A lovely and attractive feature of
the affair' was *the grand march led
. by Miss Nannie Haas, the guest of
honor, and her partner. Many beauti
ful figures characterized the march
and elaborate programs were dietri
. buted at its termination. Another ex
quisite fcu~ure of the ball were the
, beautiful gowns worn by the young
e ladies, and were It not for a lack of
spate, we should be pleased to de
scribe these lovely creations in de
taii. The event also marked a mile
stone, in Miss Nathalie Haas' life, and
many were the expressions of good
wishes for the future happiness of
Sthis beautiful, charming and deserv
edly popular youpg lady.
SURGEONS WARN
OF CANCER PERIL
1PUBLIC MEETING OVERFLOWS
GRUNEWALD THEATRE; SEE
DOCTOR WHEN DISEASE IS
IN EARLY STAGES
With the warning againt the ray
'ages of the cancer the keynote of al
most every member who addressed
the large audience in the Little Thea
tre of the Grunewald. The first pub
lic meeting of the clinical congress
of the American college of surgeons,
was held Monday night. That the
New Orleans public is vitally inter
ested in the' causes of cancer, its pre
vention and cure was demonstrated j
by the. interest of the crowd that fill
ed the main floor and flowed into the
balconies.
The fetature of the program was
the address on "Cancer and What the
Public Can Do for It," by Dr. Thomas
Stephen Cullen, of Johns Hopkins
UaYiversity, nationally known expert
on the afflicition. In a way that was
understood by all, Dr. Hopkins pre
sented the subject.
Quoting Dr. F. W. Parham of New
Orleans, Dr. Cullen said: "OCncer is
undoubtedly a blot on -sugery be
cause so large a majority of the suf
ferers seek relief when the disease is
a ofar advanced that a radical cure
,cannot be promised. At some time
in its growth every osncer is curable
by operation and it' is the object of
the ,prfoession to bring these cases
to the surgeon when an 'operation
can be performed successfully. Taken
early enough all diseases can be cured.
Should Know Symptoms
"P.he public should know how to
recognize the symptoms and when to
seek medical advice. Cancer. may ap
pear first as an innocent looking
growth resembling a mole or wart.
Sending its roots in a wider area as
it becomes larger, the cancer growth
in malignant character suddenly ap
pears ,and spreads among the tissue
until it has spread too far for ,the
knife to follow.
."Cancer of the lip is a common
form; usually amsking its first ap-,
pearance in a small white patch on
the -lip or tongue. The claympipe
was a promoter of cancer of the lip,
and since it is disappearing, the di
sease ratio is lowered. Cancer of
the breast appearing first as a small
lump, can be cured in the early stages
by a simple operation. If the can
cer is internal the symptoms are more
difficult for a layman to appreciate.
I would give this advice however
watch the right side just below the
ribs. If there is a pain consult your
physician:"
Better Hospital Urged
Other widely known speakers were
on the program, including Father C.
B. Mouliner, president of the Catholic
Hospital Assocaition, who spoke on
"Better Hospitals," urging the people
to demand the best even if unable to
pay for it. "The medical profession
stands before the world as a profes
sion, offering service regardless of
compensation," declared Father Mou
liner. "The most ffriendless pauper
'has the right to demand consultations
'by-the foremost physicians of the city
and every effort to save his life, how
ever costly, from the modern hospi
taL",
He strongly supported the hospital
declaring it is the place where the
attention of all from the head surgeon
to the orderly, is centered on the pa
tient, thus giving medical aid that the
tamily physician cannot supply.
Dr. Franklin I. Martin secretary
general of the American College of
Surgeons, gave an interesting address
urging the publice to undergo a com.n
L ONE BIG ENGINE
LEAVES FACTORY
it MAYOR NOTIFIED THAT UNIT WAS
1- SHIPPED IN TWO CARS
e THURSDAY,'FRIDAY
y Mayor Loeb received a wire
d yesterday, stating that one of the
g big Deised engines ordered for the
n power plant was shipped in two
c- separate cars Thursday and Fri
- day, routed over the Cotton Belt,
e Kansas City Southern and Gulf °
Coast Lines and without mishap
should arrive here six days after
f shipment. It will require per
I haps two weeks to erect. Wheth
i er the electric generator was
shipped with the engine is not
I stated. The second engine will be
shipped on January 29,
TWO BOOTLEGGERS
CAUGHT NEAR EUNICE
1LARGE STOCK OF REAL OLD
STUFF CONFISCATED WHEN
ARREST IS MADE
'Sheriff Thibodeaux and Special
Agent Bush of the federal department
arrested Thursday two white men,
Willie Reed and Dorestas Ardoia, at
the latter's home, about four miles
west of Eunice, on Bayou de Cannes.
The ýcharge .against them
is bootlegging, and they were paroled
and ordered to appear in Opelousas
yesterday (Friday) before the United
States commissioner and furnish bond
for their appearance before the Uni
ted States court.
A large quantity of the real Qld
time stuff was unearthe dat Ardoin's
home valued at fully two thousand dol
lars. The lot contained such almost
forgotten things as rock-and-rye, ohe 1
barrel; half-barrel of anisette; trunk
full of mixed case goods; one large
box of cordials, such as 'cartreuse,
benedictine, creme-de-menthe, etc. The
seized wet goods were taken to Eu
nice. and stored in the ,postoffice in a
that town. The officers have been
working on the 'case some time.
CHIEF RECOVERS .
STOLEN CLOTHES
POICE HEAD 'ARRESTS YiUNG C
COLORED WOMAN ON CHARGE r
OF GRAND LARCENY r
y rt P. .. LI. Ft'. T
Last October a white woman. liv
ing in the north end of the city re
;ported to the police that during her
s absence from home some party had
e entered the house and abstracted
0 therefrom all her 'lothing. There
e were n;o startling developments in
f the investigatton until this week
s when Chief of Police Prud'homme got
1 a line on it and promptly arrested a
young colored woman named Bertha
Bob, charged with the theft. Practi
cally all the clothing was recovered.
The clothing stolen is estimated to
be worth considerably over one hun
-dred dollars, and consisted, among
other things, of several silk dresses,
.iinerweir and articles too numerous
to be recalled.
While' investigating the case ac e
officer also got a -line on another
case in "which the young negress was
itmplicated several years ago-the
stealing of a lot of chickens-for
l which. she was' Jailed ,and later re
leased oil bond. The .acse has not
been called up. For stealinug. the
clothing she was placed in jail on
the charge of grand larceny .and up
to Wednesday had not furnished
bond.
plete examination by a physician at
least once a year as a 1peventative
of sickness and disease. Dr. Martin
advocated vivisection, stating it
should be practiced on animals prop
erly anaesthetized.
Stephens Speaks
The standardization of hospital was
urged in an address by Harold M.
Stephens, director of hospital eitivi
ties, American College of Surgeons.
The AmeriCan College of Surgeons
is composed of 5,000 of the 146,000
members of the profession ip 'the
,United States. It is making a strong
stand to keep up the standards of
surgery, eliminating unnecessary sur
gery, improving hospitals,'at teach
=ing the public to make use of science.
In behalf of Governor Parker, the
medical mnen were welcomed to the
state by Esmond Phelps, who recalled
that the governor had done niuch for
the medical world in obtaining $3,000.
000 from the state for asylums and
hospitals.
The meeting was presided over by!
Dr. P: W. Parham, chairman of the
Louisiana executive cominiftee of the!
American College of Surgeons.
Tueday will mark the last day ,of
the convention, with clinics at hospi-}
tals during the morning. During the
afternoon, Dr. Martin and Dr. Cullen
wIll deliver addresses at a scientifie c
ieu*-Nhw Oxleais S
1REPORT OF MILLS
1 INDICATE SLUMP
AS IN PINE DEMAND
Of 125 Reported Concerns
18 Are Shut Down
Altogether o
ONLY SIXTEEN ARE
RUNNING FULL TIME
Fifty of Total Number Filed
no Statement With
Association
Production of pine lumber by mills
belonging to the Southern Pine, asso
ciation has been materially curtailed
as the demand for their product has
decreased.
This fact is patent by the last re- -
port issued by the association, under
date of January 7, which shows that
of 125 mills belonging to the assogln
tion fifty did not report any running
.D time, while eighteen reported as be
ing closed down altogether; one ope
rated one day; none operate two days
thirteen operated three days; six ran
al four days; twenty-one ran five days,
it and only sixteen ran full time.
n, In the matter of production the
it number of feet per mill for the time
:s covered by the report is 318,101, the
a. normal production being 676,397 ftee .
n for each milSl thus showing a decline
d in production of more than fifty per
Ls cent below normal-51.54 per cent, to
d be more accurate. This report cov
d ers a week's opetation, and clearly
I- shows that the demand for pine lunl
ber for building purposes has declined
I- materially.
's Lumber dealers announced, some
'- time ago, that prices for pine had
t dropped considerably owing to a de
cierease in demand. Some mills, inde
k pendent of the association perhaps,
e announced cut in pridbs of from thirty"
a, to fifty per cent, depending on. the
e gji'e of the lumber. vveun tiith thls
1- edauction in cost the demand has noa,
n arisen to stimulate the plants 'run
n ning full time, or anything near it.
Prices for both rough and dressed cy
press show little or no decline, evem.
}though the demand for this' klintof 0
lumber has fallen off too.
Readjustment of existing, oonditiop~q
is considered the reason for the slump
in the lumber market, prospeetve,
builders awaiting further outs ·ra
prices of material and, labor ,befe~
£xtarting construction work" activei";
Lumber dealers, contractors ' oar-n
penters, however, expect that there
will be a resumption of building, per-,
haps on a large scale, withbi, a tew
months at longest. The nur of
I dwellings needed to houser the peoIe
throughout the country is enormois,
but owing to high costs no move was
made to aupply the deficlency, t.ir
lng the war period the governmn t
used ' a large percentage of umiber
produced, pyaing top prices for it,'
and, private parties desiring to build
could not compete with the govet
ment and had to drop out of the game
altogether. Mills ran over-time in or
der to supply the unprecedented de
mand and the railroads were also ina
the n.rket for large quantities, while
shipbuilding requlred much more. Th s
unusual condition practically drove he
small customer out of the market and
he had to :await his time wheirnh e
could buy at living prices. The, time
appears near .now.
CHECKING ACCOUNTS OF
S . EUNICE'S CLOSED BANK.
The American Bank and Trust com
pany at Eunice, which closed its doors
two weeks ago just preceding the
suicide of its cashier, J. Leer -.
combe, is in the hands of the state
banlk examiner who is checking ep
the accounts of the institution. It 's
not known at the present time the fi
nancial condition of the bank or
whether it will be reorganized and
continue to operate later on.
PERRAULT-MARTIN
Hon. L. L. Perrault of the local bar
and member-elect to the constitutional
convention from St. Landry, and Miss
Agnes Martin of Lafayette were quiet
ly married at the Catholic church in
that city last Saturday afternoon,
Very Rev. Father Tuerlings officiat
ing. Only the immediate relatives of
the contracting parties were present.
The groom is so well known in Ope
lousas and St. Landry as to need no
introduction. He is the eldest son
of the late District Judge and Mrs.
W. C: 'Perrault, while the bride is a
daughter of the late Hon. Andre Mar
tin, former assessor and representa
tive in the legislature from Lafayette
parish; she is a sister of Mrs. C. W.
Roy of near this city. The ziewly weds
will' make their home in Opelousas.
The Clarion. exteads its congratula
tions.
W, P. Baldridge of Bayou Boeo.
was a business visitor to Opeleusas
:. ednt day,.

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