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St. Landry clarion. (Opelousas, La.) 1890-1921, February 19, 1921, Image 1

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THIE ST. LANDRY CLARION
"Here Shar the Pres the People's Rights Maintain. Unaw*. by ltfumnMee and Unbribed by Gain.
XXXI-NO. 18. OPELOUSAS, LA., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1921 TWO DOLLARS PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
AND MATE
BIG SWEEP
I EUNICE RACE
Their Competitors for
Mayor and Marshal
Easily
GE VOTE CAST IN
MUNICIPAL PRIMARY
Board of Aldermen
Chosen in Tuesday's
"" Election
Sprimary election for the sel
of nominees for mayor, chief of
and a board of aldermen in Eu
Tuesday attracted much at
in that town and also in Ope
and other points in St. Landry.
an exciting race and the cam
was full of sensations and a
le amount of mud-slinging
fely indulged in by candidates
:ryor and chief of police.
laus Wyble, who served as
for several terms and who was
two years ago by Dudley Ber
staged a truly remarkable come
defeating A. B. Picou (by a large
the vote being: Picou 260,
45, a clear 'majority of 205
for -Wyble.
C. Matt, who defeated Henry
for chief of police two years
as re-elctted over George Stagg
Sfolowing vote: Matt 504, Stagg
- majority of 283 for Matt.
were eleven candidates for
Ve positions on the board of al
: O. K. Brunson, E. A. Bush
,Tbos. A. Dubourg, Theogene
R. T. Gill, A. L. Pat Guillory,
Jeansonne, Jno. F. Launey, J.
tt, A. F. MoGee and Lennle
and of these Brunson, Gill,
Launey and Liggett were
but the total vote receiv
then was not obtainable in time
f.ubllcation. -
lect Wyble is a former Ope
but moved to Eunice many
ago. He served as chief exe
e of the thriving town for a num
df terms and only went down in
two years ago when the "re
4 wave struck Eunice. His re
to office signifies that he holds
~ g place with the people of
He was charged, during the
, with many gross irregular
while he was mayor before, but
tly the "thunder" fell on deaf
for his ercord-breaking majority
j tht fact.
`Matt was also the target for
on his administration of the
of chief of police. He was ac
:n the public prints with many
-but, as in the case of Mr.
the voters took no stock in
hbargea, for his majority is a con
o.e.
than seven hundred votes
asut in the Eunice primary,
uamber included the newly en
women of Eunice. It is
that fupy fifty per cent of the
-were cdst by the women, and a
Sman who, visited Opelousas
. tek stated that a majority ofl
Wmen voted for both Wyble and
riww rEmb
NG OF CITY
8 BEING ERECTED AND
APIDATED WIRES REPLAC
S.ED WITH NEW ONES
'electric power plant force ti
aIpidly with the replacing of
with new creosoted ones and
the wires from their present
ge. Poles have been erected
M., ket street and as fast as
pl Position the wires are swap
. the old cross arms to the
8.s.
dilaeldated wires where the in-'
is either badly frayed and
-in tatters or absolutely gone
irg removed and new wires sul
in their stead. It is a slow
the force of men on the work
g along and within a shorti
Sthe entire work will be coin
Uekpower house proper the old
are working smoothly and the
has been uniform and satis
Street lights are on night
there is no further cause for
t on the service to residences
Ces of business. The new en
being rapidly gotton into
,and the addition to the building
t completed.
*.Pole realize that to obtaini
Wer to most prayers, requires
al co-opAration with God.
are the piping times 'of
at and the shipping board evi
thought it had to pay th*a pip
/%.
PERSHING WAY ASSOCIATION
TO MEET AT RUSTON MARCH 21
Much interest is manifested in
the meeting of the Pershing Way asso
ciation which is scheduled for March
21 at Riston, Lincoln parish, La. The
main idea of the association's get-to
gether is to aid in starting a move
ment for the completion of all links
of the big road within the state and
to boost for the sociability run over
the highway next summer, which run
was scheduled for last summer but
abandoned because of poor roads at
that time.
DEPUTY ASSESSORS
ARE RUSHING WORK
iTAKING ASSESSMENT FOR 1921
THROUGHOUT PARISH IS PROG
RESSING FAST
Assessor Rene C. Fontenot stated
Thursday that his deputies through
out the parish were progressing rap
idly with the listing of the 1921 assess
ment. In a few cases the work will
be completed within the next ten days
especially in the first police jury ward.
Other wards are not progressing as
rapidly as is the work in the first.
The old custom of sending deputies
through the parish, one for each lo
cality, was abandoned some years ago
and was only re-established when.the
present assessor assumed office on
January 1. He maintains that this
system aids materially in the early
completion and submitting to the
board of state affairs of the tax rolls
for the current year, and during the
campaign preceding his election to
office he promised the people of the
parish that if elected he would rein
state the old plan.
ASSESSOR ISSUES
IMPORTANT NOTICE'
-t
CALL ON PROPERTY OWNERS TO
HAND IN LIST OF LANDS THEY
HAVE SOLD
Elsewhere in thiq issue appears an
official notice of the assessor, Mr. t
Rene C.' Fontenot, in which he calls
on property owners to Thrnish his
office with a list and descriptibn of
lands they have sold to other parties
since the taking of the 1920 assess
ment. This in order to correct their
assessment for 1921, so that any lands
they have sold will not again be ass
essed ,to them. This is a splendid idea
of the assessor and all who have dis
posed of property will find it an easy t
matter to notify the assesor to that
effect, thus saving him, the tax col
lector and themselves considerable
trouble in making the 1921 assess
ment and incidentally save the tax
payer some trouble and money wheu n
he pays his 1921 taxes.
The assessor also states, very wise
ly that if a law was passed requiring t
all notaries to file in his office every
transfer of real estate so that hite
could correct the assessment ;of the
parties interested in such transfers lý
the mater of double assessments, etc.,
one of the glaring and uncorrected i
evils, would be to a great extent eli.
mineted. The general assembly I
could pass no wiser law than one
drafted along these lines.
A ·sla 4,r db4IA~l iL ,1
zd wutshl a 1 a1 oL enuStlUAM 'Wda
beaned with a can of beans. So, can
ned beans are really useful
"Men's Clothes Coming Down,"
says a headline. Defective suspend
er or belts? Try safety first and use
both.
The democrati is soon to be separ
ated from his office take no stock in
that< "parting is such sweet sorrow"
stuff.
ACTIVE DRILLING IS
NOW UNDER WAY
OPERATIONS ON THE PROSPEC
TIVE OIL WELL ON CRESWELL
FARM STARTED WEDNESDAY
Resumption of drilling on the pros
pective oil well on the Creswell farm
began Wednesday morning, a full
crew of experienced men under Jim
Daniels and Tip Dearman handling
the machinery. A boarding house and
commissary has been established
close to the well to supply the de
mands and needs of the men employ
ed on the rig. Work is progressing
both day and night and there will be
no let-up until the well shbows up a
dry hole or a real producer.
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Moresi and
little son motored to Jeanerette last
week to visit relatives. On account
of mechanical trouble with their car
they returned bome by rail.
Lee McClelland, former Opelousas
boy but now in the insurance business
in Baton Rouge, spent several days
here this week visiting friends.
HUNDRED YEARS
OF ORPORATION
CFLEBRATED HERE
Appropriate Ceremonies in
'Honor, of Occasion Were
Staged Monday
HIGH RSCHOOLSCENE I
OF THE PROGRAM
Town Granted Charter by
.Legislative Act of Feb
ruary 14, 1821
One hundred years ago last Monday,
or on February 14, 1821, the legisla
ture of the state of Louisiana adopt
ed an act granting the town of Ope
lousas a municipal charter. The town
before that date was not incorporat
ed, but there are sufficient records
and ample proof that it was some
:thing of a settlement, and that it had
been one since during the days of the
first French ownership of the terri
tory of Louisiana.
The celebration of the centennial of
the town was staged at the auditorium
of the high school building Monday
afternoon, according to a proclamnation
previously issued by Mayor Loeb.
When it was decided to have the cele
bration the time was too short in
which to arrange a more elaborate
program, but a. splendid crowd as
sembled at the school building to wit
ness the funotion.
Myor Loeb called the meeting to or
der and read his official proclamation.
Judge E. T. Lewis, now in his eigthy
seventh year, a native• and lifelong a
resident of Opelousas, presided over
the meeting. Speeches were delivered c
by thd venerable jurist, Judge G. L.
Dupre and W. J. Sandoz. The inyoca
tion was delivered by Rev. S. L.
Riggs of the Methodist church while 1
Rev. D. R. Pevoto, pastor of the Bap
tist church, delivered the benediction
closing the meeting. Splendid music C
and singing was rendered by the
school chilren and Mrs. W. T. Ste
wart sang "The Old Folks at Home" t
and other appropriate vocal selec
tions. The entire audience stood
while "America" was sang. Miss Belle '
Daly, teacher of music at the high a
school, presided at the piano.
In connection with this centennial
celebration, the Clarion has been
furnished with the following facts re- t
Lating to Opelousas by Hon. William
1. Sandoz, who, besides being a native
Df this city, has devoted much of his
time to posting 'himself on the past 1
history of this. As submitted by Mr. d
Sandoz, the facts are as follows: f
Facts About Onelousan- I
1. First charter of Opelousas grant
ed by the legislature, February 14,
1821.
2. Opelousas probably founded by
the Spanish, about 1776.
3. Possibly founded before or dur
ing the first dominion of France.
4. Said to have been an Indian vil
lage prior to advent of whites.
5. De Soto discovered the Miss·s
ippe river, 1541.
6. 'Lassalle took possession of
Louisiarfa for France, 1682.
7. France ceded Louisiana to
Spain, 1763. *
8. Spain retroceded to France,
1801.
9. France sold to United States,
1803.
10. Louisiana admitted as a state
April 8, 1812.
11. Earliest records of 'atholic
church here, 1777.
12. New Orleans founded, 1718.
13. .First cargo of French girls ar
rive in Louisiana, 1728.
14. The coming of the Acadians,
about 1754.
Opelousas located on grounds sev
enty feet above sea-level on a level
tract, the land gradually sloping from
all sides; agricultural and natural ad
vantages, climate, health; its promi
nent part in the history of state; aý
seat of education and refinement;
hospitality; its distinguished dead.
MRS. MORN-INVEG TO OPEN
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE HERE
Mrs. Doucie Mornhinveg announces
that on March 1 'she will open a Wo
man's Exchange in the Veazie build
ing, corner Landry and Mrket streets,
this city.
Tea, coffee, sandwiches and lunch
will be served at popular prices. An
art shop to Ibe run in connection, and
a ladies rest room will be at the serv
ice of visitors and guests.
Parent-Teachers Meeting Changed
The meeting of the Parent-Teachers
association, which wasto have met on
last Monday, February 14, has been
postponed until next Monday, Febru
ary 21. The session will be held in the
high school auditorium at 3:30 oclock
in the afternoon, and all members are
requested to be present without fur
ther notice.
4
NEW DEMONSTRATION AGENT'"
APPOINTED FOR PARISH
Mr. Mary B. GiGsen, district home
demonstration agent and who was
,agent for $t: Lands ve'al years
ago, was in Opelousse, ths week in
stalling the new parish agent, Miss
Lida Dowell, in her work here. Mrs.
Geisen was warmly welcomed by her
many old friends in'Opelousas all of
whom were pleased to welcome her
here again. During her work in St.
Landry she made an enviable reputa
tion as a home demonstration agent
and her departure was regretted by
all.
MEAT TAKES DROP
AND ANOTHER ONE
SOON SEEMS SURE
Boagni Market Follows in
Price Reduction to Ope
lousas Consumers
BAKERS ARE SILENT
AS TO THEIR MOVE
Nothing Indicates They Will
Return to Pre-War
Bread Price
The Boagni meat market announced t
some days ago that it had lowered the r
price of beef-to the consumer five
cents per pound, making choice cuts j
selling at twenty-five cents and lower 12
grades at proportionate prices. A
further reduction is promised if such
a thing be possible. Mr. Boagni stat
ed to a .newspaper man that overhead
charges and expenses weer such at
the present time that it would be im
possible for him to sell beef and pork c
for less without entailing financial
loss to himself, but that if there was
any reduction, in these fixed charges
he would immediately give the local
consumer the 'benefit thereof by re
ducing the cost of meat again. r
Three of the local markets within I
the corporate limits of the city are
now selling choice meat at the same
price-twenty-five cents per pound-
while at least one market, situated h
also in the city limits, is selling at e
twenty cents for choice and another t
market, soon to be established, is go- i
ing to meet this lowered price. Peo- j
pie in a position to know state that
the dealers who go out through the
rural districts and buy their cattle
and hogs first hand and do their own e
butchering can afford to sell at the
low figures named, but that those
dealers who buy the dressed meat
from some other source at so much
per pound delivered can not afford
to sell for less that the prices now
prevailing, for to do so would entail a
loss to themselves. This appears to
be a sensible view of the situation d
and until there is a material reduc
tion in the first cost to the dealer the
consumer can not well expect to buy r
meat at any loer prices than he is
now paying.
The bakers have given no f.tima
tion as to what they propose in the
matter of reducing the price of bread
to the consumer. The ten-ent loaf
stil holds the boards, and that despite
the steady decline in the price of
wheat and flour. Consumers, reading
the newspaper articles appoEing in
the local press recently anent this
matter, endorse the stand taken
by the newspapers on the price of
bread, nad we have heard nothing
but commendation thereon. The man
who foots the bill each day, week or
month for the bread his family con
sumes has begun to do some tall
thinking about the maintainance of
the war-time price for the "staff of
life." We have already recounted i
how at least one bake shope in 'Crow-.
ley cut the price of bread to the pre
war figures, five cents the loaf and ]
twenty-four loaves for the dollar. Her
in Opelousas, according to consum
ers, the price is ten cents per loaft
straight--or ten loaves for one dol
lar. It is stated that loaves here
weigh fourteen ounces. That may be
so, but granting that it is, it appearss
that fourteen ounces of flour, water.
and "contents" is pretty hid~ priced
eating in these days of declining 1
pricet for wheat and flour.
There is no excuse whatever for
the ten-cent loaf of bread in O.pelou
sas at the present time and under the
present conditions, and the bakers
should as well get wise "Qt that fact
and follow suit with the bakers of
Crowley and almost all other cities
and towns of the state. There is an
awful supply of cheap rice and a tre
mendous amount of cheap corn in
the land and people haven't forgotten
how to cook and eat both rice and
good old cornbread and every one who
has eaten these two articles know
that both are pretty strong on "stick
ing to one's ribs."
Tdbacco growers are complaining
that the price of "the weed" is too
low but retail buyers have registered
no such kick.
AR ASSOCIATION
FRAMES PLANFOR'
JUDICIARYCHANGE
Committee of Organization
Devises Unique
Plan
MIEETS APPROVAL OF
MANY ATTORNEYS
5Iodified Appointive Sys
tem Included in Draft
of Ordinance
The committee of twenty-five mem
iers of the Louisiana bar association
ppointed by President Provosty, to
raft proposed changes in the judl
tary of the state, has made its re
port and the same has been published
a pamphlet form and widely circu
ated. Along with the proposed ordi
lance to be submitted to the consti
utional convention appears the let
ers received from a number of Amer
ca's leading lawyers expressing their
lews on the subject matter. In the N
lain these eminent attorneys ex
ress satisfaction over the proposed
hange in Louisiana.
There will be a meeting of the
ench and bar at the Grunewald ho- m
as in New Orleans on Saturday, Feb- P'
nary 26, to discuss the plan proposed m
y the bar association's committee. c1
'he ordinance as drafted may be sub- be
acted to some changes at this meet- el
ig, but in the main it is expected to pl
tand, and in its present or modified w
xrm be submitted to the convention ft
rhen that body assembles in March. ox
The most drastic change is in the *tb
latter of selecting the judges of the
aritus courts. All lawyers practi
ally ,agree that the appointive sys
am is the best and produces the best
asults. In the large class favoring
le appointive system there are two a1
thools of throught, one believing the i
ower of appointing judges should to
ast exclusively in the hands of the
overnor, the other favoring a more SI
beral plan. On the other hand,
mong the vast majority of the people
sere is a disposition to oppose any
lan which will take out of their at
ands the selection of the judges of lo
very court, the claim being set up
sat the appointive system. robs the
adividual of his right to vote for al
adges.
The plan of the committee ie v.l- ri
lently framed so as to meet and cov-y
r all objections to either radical f
few. Theoretically it is proposed that s
11 judges shall be selected according I
o their fitness and qualifications for 9
he positions. On recommendation of I
he supreme judicial councils the gov- d
eraor will appoint, by and with the
.dvice and consent of the senate, a
ean or men to office. They serve
luring life and can only be rotired at
er a fixed term of years by vote of
he pepole, only negative votes being [
ecorded at such election on the ques
ion "Shall Mr. So-and-So be retired?" e
t is also proposed that aster a judge c
hall have attained a certain age and v
lfter serving a certain length of time c
ie can voluntarily retire. a
The supreme court membership is I
acreased from five to seven and div- 0
led into two sections of three eachP
he chief justice to preside over each t
ection.
The circuit courts of appeals are re
ained in the general scheme, there
eing four such circuits, or one for
ach of the four districts proposed
nd to conform to the four general
istricts created to replace the old
idicial disrticts of the state. Under h
his proposed change the four judi
lal districts will have a certain num
er of judges and the court will have
he same jurisdiction as the present
istrict courts. The number of
ddges, however, are reduced as coam
a.ped with the present number, but tl
a salaries are increased for judges of f
11 courts, it is doubtful if the plan
fill do other than increase the cost
(fhe judiciary to the people. -
The office of justice of the peace
I abolished and the old parish court
f a previous constitution is revived. tI
'his court will have jurisdiction on all tl
iatters now coming before justice of
he peace and city courts and this
sature marks a step in advance. Sal- b
ries of the parish judges will be fix- a
d by the legislature.
The present office of district attor. r
ey is in a sense abolished, and the
ffice of parish attorney created in A
:s stead. The duties of the office are
recisely the same as those of the d
resent district attorney, except that
ach parish will elect its attorney and
be official will not have to attend
ourt or prosecute cases outside his n
wn parish. This plan increases the v
umber of officeholders in the state a
nd will further increase the cost to I;
be taxpayer. t]
Whether the entH.e scheme, or a v
lodified form thereof will meet with "a
be approval of the ,majority of the 1
elegates to the convention awaits to p
e seen. That a dhange in the exijt- t
ng judicial system is an absolhte
:OCODRIE CLOSING
BILL IS ADOPTED
ieausre Introduced by Senatqr 'Ran
adell Passes Upper Houpe..With-"
Qut: Opposition
The bill Introduced in the Uni
ted States senate by Hon. Jos. E.
Ransdell of Louisiana, declaring
Bayou Cocodrie a non-navigable
stream, passed the upper house
of congress the middle of the
week without opposition. S
The final pasage of this :meas
ure through the house of repre
septatives is foreshadowed by s
the action of the senate, as it is
not presumed any opposition will
develop in the lower house. The
adoption of this bill removes
one of the obstacles to the con
struction of the giant grravity Si
canal of the pompany headed by ex
Welman Bradford, eminent civil
engineer of southwest Louisiana.
EWERAGE PLANT
NOW IN ORDER :
-th
IEEDED REPAIRS MADE BY CON- til
TRACTOR AND IS NOW IN
FINE SHAPE gi
The sewerage board has had some a
.ch needed work done at the dis- cc
eal 'plant within the past few CO
onths. The settling -tanks have been ea
eansed and the grvael beds have
en put in good order and new gray- ca
and sand placed on the beds. The er
ant is now functioning porfectly, and
ith a little care it is believed this be
ae system will be kept in thorough se
der. About $1600 was expended in f
ds work.
Improvements are now in course of ai
nstruction at the plant, a small
)use being built over the pumping tr;
ation end a wall of concrete lll re
ace the wooden wall on the southerln a
de of the beds. This work is be- as
g done by J. E. Allen, lkcal contrac
r. th
UNDAY MORNING FIRE
WIPES OUT LANDMARK be
Fire last Sunday completely de-'
royed the residence of J. J. Mistrot, th
cated just without the eastern cor-in
ration line of Opelousas. The fire an
m.~pany responded promptly to the
arm but the last water plug on'o
aurent street was too far from the a
re to permit of the hose to reach th
.e blaze. Much of the household ef- a
cts were saved. The residence de-. t
royed was once known as "White
pl,
all" and a half century or more ago i a
as the home tof the late Dr. William te
ill during his life a prominent resi- in
)nt of Opelousas.
^u1i MK MEAT MARKET TO
OPEN IN OPELOUSAS SOON
Simon Lalonde, Jr., living in the
oteau section near Opelousas, stat
d this week that within a few day. .
e would open a meat market in this
ity and that his place of business
'ould be located as near the business
snter as possible.; He is .ooking
round now for a suitable Building. i
[e stated he would sell choice cuts t.
r beef and pork at twenty cents per-t,
Fund, and the lower grades at fit- n
ren cents.
a
'OLICE JURY CLERK
HAD GREAT TASK
FAKES OUT APPROXIMATELY 7j
WARRANTS TO PARTIES WIHOSE
BILLS WERE APPROVED
J. J. Healey, clerk of the police
iry, stated Thursday that he wasas
len busy making out the warrants
,r bills approved at the last meet- a
g of the jury held the first of last
eek. o
Something over seven hundred bills
ere approved at that meeting and
te wqrk of making out and issuing
Le warrants was conalderable of a
,b. The number of bills approved
r the jury at its February meeting
ooke all existing records, the total
nount to be paid out running far in
t the thousands. There were war
4nts for small sums and quite a num
sr for several thousand dollars each.
great majority of the approved, bills
as for road and bridge work in the
ifferent wards or road districth of
te parish, the contingent claims ap
yoved being small as compared with t
ie road and bridge claims. t
ecessity goes without argument; but i
hether the taxpayers can stand any a
iditional burden of expense is entire
another matter and this phase of
le question will not doubt have much
'eight in the convention, and the
tembers of that body who are not
twyers may not look with well
leased eyes on any change, no mat
tr how desirable, which will add to
ie suture cost of government.
{I
'ARISH FARMERS
WORKIS FAST IN.
PLANTING CORN
plendid Weather Aids
Them in Starting. the
1921 Crop
OME EARLY BIRDS
'THOUGH WITH WORK
oil in Fine Shape For Pre
paration And All Are
Hopeful
Corn planting among the farmers of
Landry is under full swing. "Ev
ybody's doing it" during these balmy
r:inglike days, and seeding the crop
well prepared soil is going on full
ast. A few have not started ant
e waiting until next week; a large
umber are half through and a small
unber report that they have planted
e last row and are only waiting un-
it gets up to a 'stand" before be
aning the work of cultivation. This
tter class is thinking about getting
start with the preparation of their
tton land, and if the warm weather
ntinues some cotton will be put 1a
rly in March.
The winter, according to every indi
tion, is at an end. In fa-ct, as sev
al expressed, there hasn't been any
.nter, freezes and frosts having
en few and far between. The only
vere weather we experienced was in
a late fall, and there also was a few
>sts during January, but not enough,
do any damage to vegetation. Trees.
e putting out, especially the fig and
ina trees; peach and and plnn
ees are in full 'bloom and grass is
owing green n lawn and psatur'et
d the dry days have put much sub.
ince in it and milk cows will soon
quire no feeding other than what
ey gather from nature's harvest.
Both sweet and Irish potatoes have
en or are being planted now, and
e growers are figuring on 'putting
a large acreage of both- kinds this
ar, especially the former, for witllh
e erection of a modern curing plant:
this city by local interests a ready
d certain market for the sweets is
sured. Mr. John Sibille, one of the.-,
rners of the curing plant, stated to -
Clarion representative this week
at he intended making a trip to Tex
shortly to view the market situza.
m in that state. He has had .n-m
a experience both in the growing
.d marketing of the sweets! and la
ads to kbep abreast of the' atattidq,
order thta he will be in the posi
nm to aid the local growers next
.rvest season.
While n.ear n.. , ,, ..
'.-a- W L was nut a very
rofitable crop the past- year, str$l a
nsaiderable lacreage will be plamted
it this year, as many farmers pro
Dee to raise at least a sufficient.
apply of syrup to snpply their home
3quirements. Others will grow thew
mne on a commercial basis to sell to
te large sugar refineries and syrup
[ants scattered throughout thi seo
on of the state. Diversiflcatki is
ie recognized rule these days among
ie St. Landry farmers, and it is
o. practically certain that the acre
te In cotton will be cut in halt or
early so. Growing a plentiful lup
y1 food for men and beast is go
ri ti be the slogan in 1921, firalers
iving learned by the bitter experi
ace of the past year that all get-rich
themes -will prove ruinous evritual
if not Ctooner,
Nothing happening in the matter of
disastronus season, St. Landryl
wouJd produce a bumper crop dutring
)21-a bumper crop of so many
itngs that it would be almost trqpos
tie to list them in, a brief spaee.
There is no starvation here nowr
id there will be none in the future,
ame Nature being willing. PlSnty
corn, hay, potatoes, syrup, garden
aess," milk, hogs and cattle will
rive the wolf of starvation from any
or.
ION. H. E. ESTORGE
UNDER THE KNIFE
OPULAR OPELOUSEAN UN ER
GOES SURGICAL OPERATION
HERE WEDNESDAY
The thousands of friends of .o.o..
feriry E. Estorge, scattered through
at this parish and state will lear :
'ith interest that he successfully
assed through the trying ordeats of
surgical operation at the local san.
arium last Wednesday. This )rt
ay) morning it is reported that he il
oing splendidly though sufferizd
Imewhat from the elects otfthe Oper
tion. It is fully expected that be..
rill recover quickly and that hi ev
r-smiling face will again be seek of
)pelousas' streets.

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