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Vernon Parish Democrat. (Leesville, La.) 1917-193?, April 27, 1922, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064278/1922-04-27/ed-1/seq-8/

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each*y
Sam Blythe asks
old politick part
as doomaüs
ion, but
too many
born
oably
time son
Men
their religio:
jiot scrap both
are as dead
good suggest
ive. There are
and Republicans
* party will pro
slow process of
will be evolved.
*
litics as they get
theritance. Reason
or logic plays Bo part. Precedent and
obeisance to the dead hand rules the
world. > .
President Lewis of the coal miners
appears before Congress and says that
reform and control will not do in the
coal business. He says the mines must
be nationalized. He points out that the
average working ttime for the miner
runs between 125, and 150 days a year
and that he has to keep his children
on an income of some seven hundred
dollars. The tragic part of it .is that
he has to do any arguing whatever.
How can the uninformed be expected
to grasp vital problems when trSined
men remain obtuse?
* * * *
Scientists make the claim that the
June bug has been successfully imitat
ed—light without heat. The new bulb
will store up light for a year it is claim
ed.
An English scientist has evidence to
prove that there is sufficient energy in
a molecule of ether to run the wheels
of the Universe indefinitely. He trem
bles when he thinks of some genius
harnessing the elemental force and
turning it to destructive purposes.
# * * *
A plan advocated several years ago
was to establish a high tower on unde
fended sea coasts and have powerful
machines capable of throwing flames
an unlimited distance and burning to
a cinder any approaching ship. No
hostlie ship could reach a coast so de
fended. Steinmetz has demonstrated
the feasibility of this idea. He burns
to powder steel and wood at a consid
able distance by simply striking it with
a belt of lightning which he invented.
* * * ♦
Modern man is beginning to rival the
gods of old. It was no uncommon
thing for gods to slay men and monster
with a thunder clap of a bolt from the
blue.
* * * *
Bryan is being rapidity relegated to
the class occupied by Overseer Voliva
who claims the earth is flat and proves
it. Bryan does not believe in evolu
tion and proves that man did not des
cend from monkeys. It is quite aston
ishing to note the large following he
has secured 1 because of his anti-evolu
tionary ideas.
# * * *
It took Moses forty years leading the
Israelites over a barren waste that could
be traversed in three weeks and reach
the promised land. He realized that
the slave psychology of the bond men
he liberated in Egypt must die out. The
only way the retrogressive ideas can be
stamped out is to create a new enviro
ment and then introduce slow starva
tion.
Notwithstanding the backwardness
and the insistence on standing still, the
world progresses in spots. If it were
not for unselfish men laboring night
and day in the sciences and arts the
future would be hopeless. Twenty
years ago men thought that a revolu
tionary change would come within five
years and the Brotherhood of Man
would be a fact. Jesus and his fol
lowers thought that two thousand years
ago. So did numerous leaders long
ages before him. The great change is
to be upon us in 1925. We shall see.
* * * *
"Vienna in Tears"—So runs the
headlines over the death of ex-Emperor
Charles, who died on the Island of Ma
deira. The last of a line dating back
to 1600 in gone. Inefficient, erratic,
useless, yet a king, is mourned by thou
sands. How the trappings, pageantry;
and emblazonry is inborn. Is it any
wonder that men abuse power when it
is thrust upon them. Men actually
seem to like being bossed.
A man was arrested in Brooklyn for
"employing" beggars on the streets of
New York. He had several at work at
$3 a day. He received on an average
$10 from each. He furnished "hooch
' and the beggars would go forth each
morning in their rags, malformations,
and sores and return at night with
$10. Thus is the capitalistic system
exhibited. These men were doing it on
their own hoot. Another demonstra
tion that men love to be bossed.
Mrs. Amelia Maps, 100 years old, ad
vises to sing a little each day and live
"to be a hundred. It is sincerely to be
hoped that none of these peopie.desir
ing long life lives near me! \
Fatty Arbuckle, film actor oftgreat
renown, was freed by a jury in \ hu
man interest document. It asks viat
the public do not let the unfortunV«
Rappe death in the western city biV»
the mind. Millions thought Arbuclc
was Ihe victim of conspiracy with a de
"to get him."
Meajiderings
By Robert K. William«, D. C„ Ph. C
The courts usually are less kind. A
curt dismissal, when innocent, with the
air "we are doing a favor" is painfully
usual. Whether or not Arbuckle can
"come back" is problematical. Since
his retirement many new comedians
have come into the limelight. He made
millions laugh and that's doing some
thing in a world where so much is
drab.
* * 9 *
"Fatty" can now appreciate this
from Omar:
"This world has gained nothing by
my presence and its glory will not dwin
dle with my departure. I have never
heard and have never been told the
reason for my coming and going."
* * * *
What's the matter with the railroads,
always borrowing money? This time
the loan was made from a coal mine,
the miners of which are on strike. The
mines are not making any money, nei
ther are the railroads—the miners and
railroad men say they are not making
any money.
How many more decades will slip
by before a "demonstration" shall have
been given that private ownership of
public utilities and necessaries is mere
juggling with law enacted privilege?
* * * *
City government employes have
formed a co-operative buying Associa
tion. The purchasing power is esti
mated at $50,000,000. Bids for the
business are already coming in. Con
centrated buying everywhere would de
stroy a lot of petty, useless businesses.
Buying should be so organized that the
amount of supply could always be de
termined, and distributed where a
shortage exists. This will happen when
we are all so sick that we won't care
what the costs are.
» * » *
To drink or not to drink, that is the
question—whether it is wiser to be wet
or dry, will be decided this fall in a
number of places. In the midst of a
pile of whiskey cases one's vision be
comes obscured and the impression
comes that the world wants it all wet.
In a Saharah, seeing empty jails, less
defectives in homes, less parental bru
tality and less demand for jail para
phernalia, an entirely opposite view
comes.
Many candidates will have to take a
stand before long. In some elections
already the wets were defeated over
whelmingly. The Republican party
will sink or swim on this issue.
f T ¥ #
Lady Godiva styles are coming into
fashion. The latest is from a Parisian
dancer who attended the races attired
in a hat, festoons of lace reaching her
ankles. "Modest and simple" is the re
commendation, but who wants modes
ty? This is the day of speaking adver
tisements. If the style is adopted
many "heathen" will be made more so
by several ship loads of knee-length
dresses.
Remedy for crime "Whipping. Post"
says Judge Gemmill to a committee of
the A. B. A. in Chicago. When men
Mid women are busy with their own
affairs, making money, pursuing pleas
ure' and have the opportunity to ex
press themselves as free animals of the
jungles, there will be no more such
remedies suggested. The right to work
and to happiness should be as easy and
as simple and cheaper even than mail
ing a letter.
When people are busy there is little
crime. The war proved it; the prison
records show it. What's that about the
Devil having jobs for idle hands to do?
That's all there *s to it.
What of the Genoa conference?
Shall the nations agree to fight no
more? Agreements won't do the trick.
There were agreements before and a
peace palace in The Hague. Unless the
fundamentals are settled equitably—
money—there will be no .settlement
Trouble already shows on the horizon.
Russia suggests that Japan go home as
she has nothing to say in the affairs
.of Europe. What will one of the big
powers of the recent Washington pact
do? Her Siberian-Kamchatka hold
ings will be the answer.
* * * *
The educational moving picture and
the radio will soon take their rightful
places in the school room, hall, church
and home as the most powerful fac
tor in the life of the nation. The slow
est kind of education is by reading or
studying. First show the picture and
then explain it and a year of study is
absorbed. Forward-looking educators
say that the day of long school attend
ance is doomed, though the schools will
be used for young and old as popular
educational centers. No reason why
the Qresent school books can't be mas
tered by 15 or 16. The picture radio
will do it.
* * ♦ *
Man is a peculiar animal. In an
unsegregated city he objects to opera
tions in the next apartment, at the same
time dressing to visit & selected lady in
the next black, who is under the ban
W her next-door neighboi. j
GOWN WORN BY JOHN WESLEY
English Wesleyan Body Receives Gift
of Bob« That Belonged to Found
er of Methodism.
The Wesleyan Methodist Connexion
has Just received from one of its lead
lug laymen a gown that belonged to
the founder of Methodism, according
to the London Daily News. John Wes
ley died In 1791, so that the garment
is more than 130 years old.
Time has, of course, left its marks
upon the gown. Some parts are dis
colored and others are worn and
patched. The material Is heavy, and'
u^on Jt, worked In black, ,are flowers
amT pranclng horses. As the great
preacher was a little man, the gown
must have hung about his heels.
It Is claimed that the gown was a
preaching gown, but it is very dis
similar to the ecclesiastical garment
that, according to authentic records,
John Wesley wore in the pulpit. This
one possesses an ordinary sleeve, and,
generally speaking, it seems to accord
with the style of a black study-gown.
The donor of the gown has also pre
sented a pair of slippers belonging to
Wesley. These are in good condition,
and are of the kind that he would
wear In his study.
Wesley, of course, traveled through
out Great Britain and Ireland in all
weathers on his preaching tours, and
It was suggested that he wore this
heavy gown as a protection against
atmospheric conditions.
The Wesley museum contains a
large number of interesting relict of
John and Charles Wesley. It possesses
the study chair of John, and presently,
as a gift from the donor of the gown,
Charles Wesley's study chair will be
placed there.
A large proportion of the visitors to
the museum come from the overseas
dominions and the United States,
where the Interest in all that relates
to the early history of Methodism Is
very keen.
BLACKBIRD IN THRUSH'S NEST
Correspondent of Scottish Newspaper
Calla Attention to Remarkable In
cident He Has Observed.
Last week I discovered In the Ivy
on a sunk wall In my garden a nest
which had all the characteristics of a
thrush's nest, with plastered lining
only, and which contained two eggs,
pale blue with small black spots—the
eggs of a song thrush, writes a corre
spondent. Later on I noticed a bird
Bitting on the nesti Only the head
was visible, but It appeared to me
that the bird was a hen blackbird and
not a thrush. It was some days be
fore I found the bird off the nest,
when on looking in, I discovered that
the plastered lining of the nest had
been slightly covered with dried
grasses, and that the nest contained
four blackbird's eggs—bluish green
with mottled ends. The two thrush's
eggs had disappeared. They could not
be found at the foot of the wall below
the nest, but there was found on a
green above the wall the broken egg
of a song thrush. When I discovered
the nest part of Its outer wall -was
slightly torn, as If a cat had climbed
up the Ivy and endeavored to claw out
the bird then sitting. Is it possible
that the thrush may have beeij scared
away and the nest taken over by a
blackbird and adapted to her require
ments? None of my friends, versed
In the habits of birds, fever heard of a
similar case.—Edinburgh Scotsman.
People Generous With Tips.
New York likes to refer to its
spendthrift millionaires. The head
waiter of a magnificent eatery told me
that for the bountiful gratuity he pre
ferred the visiting sod-buster to the
son of a millionaire. The young man
from Hohokus having his annual fling
has read so much about huge tips
that he thinks anything under a $10
bill will be tossed back at him. The
Information volunteered by the head
waiter came after a well-known spend
thrift had departed with two young
ladies. His dinner check came to $25
and he gave the waiter $2—the head
waiter nothing. "And," continued the
head waiter, "see that young fellow
over there in the green suit with a
lnrge Adam's apple. He has been
shucking off $5 bills to every waiter
In the place. And he gave me a half
century note. I'm afraid his keeper
will be along soon and make us give
It back."—Exchange.
See Eve as Idealistic Woman.
Most Italian women K they had their
choice to be anything they wished in
their sex, would rather be Eve, ac
cording to results of a vote recently
taken by one of the Roman papers.
The argument advanced for being
Eve '■«as that she, of all women, had
no competition. Her husband was
never away from home and there was
no other woman on whom he might
cast an alluring glance.
Those who did not choose to be Eve
chose for the most part to be Mary
Magdalen, because, after being al
lowed to enjoy all the sins of the
world, she was forgiven and after
ward became a saint, thereby enjoying
all Joys of heaven.
Unearth Home of Cave Men.
One of the most comprehensive of
ma ny finds of relics of prehistoric man
In Austria has been discovered In a
cave near Mlxnltx. The cavern known
as "Dragon's Den," Is being excavat
ed for enormous deposits of phosphate.
In a side cave 1,000 yards from the
opening, evidences of human occupa
tion In ancient times were uncovered.
Great quantities of quartz Implements
and other utensils and human bones
have been taken out,
6
You'
MAY DAY
To Attend the
EXHIBIT
At
LLANO COLONY
On
Monday, May 1
ifl
ALL DAY PROGRAM
9:00 SPORTS for old and young.
10:30 PUBLIC MEETING: Good Speakers and
Music by Llano Brass Band
12:30 BEEF DINNER, 25c
2:00 FANCY FOLK DANCING by School
Children. Music by Orchestra.
3:00 BALL GAME
Leesville vs. Llano
8:00 FREE DANCING till 11.
f A
■4L
icaataoacczgoo
Sunday Night at 8:00 —FREE CONCERT
Exhibit All Day of Live Stock
and Industry

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