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The patriot. (Glenmora, La.) 1918-1955, July 19, 1918, Morning, Image 2

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064299/1918-07-19/ed-1/seq-2/

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TOWN OF CASTEL, ANCHIN
FARM AND OTHER IMPORT
ANT POSITIONS TAKEN.
500 PRISONERS ARE TAKEN
AM Objectives Were Attained in the
Attack—Village of Longport and
Javage Farm Taken By Poilus
—Make Successful Raids.
Paris. — French troops attacked
over a front of approximately three
wiles between Catell and north of
M&flly-Raineval (in the Picardy sec
tor$ according to the war office state
ment. issued. The village of Castel,
the Anchin farm and a number of
strong German positions were taken
and 500 prisoners were captured. The
attack penetrated the German linos
to a depth of more than a mile.
The statement reads:
"'Our troops launched a brilliant at- j
tack on a front of five kilometers be
tween Castel and north of Mailly
Raineval. All of our objectives were
reached and we have occupied the
Tillage of ÇlLstel, the Anchin farm
«md a Humber of strongly fortified
enemy positions. French troops have
penetrated the enemy lines to a depth
■of two kilometers and have taken
•more than 500 prisoners.
"Eastern theater: Near Varamina
-» detachment of Bulgarian assault
troops which had succeeded in gain
ing a momentary foothold upon Ser
vian positions were immediately driv
en onL
*Tn Algania oar troops continue to
•progress. On the right bank of the
Deroll River we have occupied the
heights of Kayani. Upon the left bank
of the river we have cleared the
whole mountainous region between
'the Devoll and Lomorica with the ex
ception of the heights which domi
nate the confluence of those streams,
where the enemy continues his resist
ance. The total number of prisoners
which have fallen into our hands is
-more than 400."
The day statement reads :
"Our troops continued their ' prog
ress north of Chavigcy farm and east
wt iforeroiles. Our troops occupied
the village of Longpont and the Jav
dge farm.
"Two raids, one north or Montdldier
and the other in Chompagne, resulted
in the capture of 15 prisoners.
"The German artillery was rather
-active on the left bank of the Meuse
« (Verdun region)."
Return Funds To T. R.
Washington. — A House resolution
authorizing return to former President
Roosevelt of the $40,000 Nobel peace
prize, which he had donated to an
industrial peace commission and
which he had donated to an indus*
trial peaoe commission and which
he now wishes to distribute to the
ReA Cross, Y. M. C. A. and other or
ganizations aiding soldiers because
no use was made of it, was adopted
•hr the Senate and sent to President
Wilson.
Germans Are Bombed.
London. —British naval airplanes
ha the period between July 4 and July
T dropped six tons of explosives on
German works at Ostend, Zeebrugge
«Bd Bruges. Direct hits were observ-
ed an buildings and vessels. Five Ger-
man airplanes were desctroyed and
three others were driven down out
•of control. All the British machines
returned.
-committee.
■ Would Exempt Miners.
Springfield, 111.—Exemption of coal
-miners from induction into military
in future draft calls das urged by
Trank Farrington, president of the
United Mine Workers of Illinois, who
•declared that to take any more min-
ers for military uses would result in
* serious labor shortage in the mining
Industry with consequent loss in coal
induction.
Springfield To Be Dry.
Springfield. Mo.—The Springfield
(tp Council passed an ordinance prc-
Rsting the issuing of liquor licenses
tier October 1. The ordinance also
»fufres that all saloons shall be
leeed January 1, 1919, and no intoxl-
ding liquors shall be sold in Spring-
rtd after that date.
U. 8. To Send Planet.
Paris. —Hopes founded on American
aerial aid to the allies soon will be
•realized, sayr Captain Herteaux, the
•teams French aviator, who has juet
returned from a visit to the United
States. Both American pilots and
American machines are coming in
-4wge number».-
U. 8. Flier Interned.
Washington. — Lieut James C.
Ash engen, an aviator" of the American
expeditionary forces, has been, intern-
ed in Switzerland. He "was forced to
land In Swiss territory June 23, be-
cause he ran out of gasoline. His
home is in Chicago.
German Meat Shortage.
Amsterdam.—Regulations providing
«• erne meatless week a month in
emuuty will begin In August, accord- J
ta to the Berlin Tageblatt.
of
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BARRICADED STREET IN FRENCH VILLAGE

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This interesting picture shows British troops who have barricaded a
street-somewhere on the western front in order to stem the onrush of the
enemy.
TWO PASSENGER
TRAINS WRECKED
MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED AND
FIFTY PERISH IN HEAD-ON
COLLISION.
Nashville, Tenn.—The total number
of identified and unidentified dead
from a head-on collision between two
fast passenger trains on the Nash
ville, Chattanooga and St. Louis rail
way at Harding station, five miles
west of Nu8hviile, has reached 126.
Rescue parties are still recovering
bodies from the wreckage and many
of the seriously injured in the hospi
tals are dying hourly. The total num
ber of dead probably wifi, reach 150.
The total number of injured Is now
estimated at 75 and many of these
are said to be at the point of death
in the various hospitals.
Both engines reared and fell on
either side of the track, masses of
twisted iron and steel, while the fear
ful Impact of the blow drove the ex
press car of the north bound train
through the loaded wooden coaches,
telescoping the smoking car in front
and piling high the two cars behind
it, both packed to the aisles with ne
groes en route to the powder plant
here, and about 150 other regular pas
sengers.
The scene immediately after the
collision is indescribale. Those es
caping unhurt or with lesser injuries
fled in panic. The cornfield on both
sides of the track was trampled by
many feet and littered with fragments
of iron and wood from the demolished
care. The dead lay here and there.
The dying moaned appeals for aid
or, speechless, rolled their heads from
side to side and writhed In agony.
Everywhere there was suffering and
chaos. ,
All morning attention centered
about the telescoped smoking car on
the outbound train, crews working
hard to raise with jacks the heavy
body of the express coach, beneath
which were pinned or crushed most
of the white victims. In one of the
seats, his body held as in a vise, sat
one of the passengers, still conscious,
but with three of the dead crushed
against him. The side of the car was
chopped away and the man released,
apparently in a dying condition.
Of the train crews five are dead,
including the engineers and firemen
of both trains, and the baggagemaster
of train No. 1.
Fortunately fire played no part in
piling up the horrors of the day, a
slight blaze at the end of one of the
coaches being almost instantly extin
guished.
For Liberty Bond Issue.
Washington. — The administration
bill authorizing issuance of $8,000,000.
000 additional Liberty bonds and $jl,
500,000,000 more for loans to the al
lies recently passed by the House was
passed by the Senate without amend
ment or a roll call, and now goes to
President Wilson for his approval.
Opposed To Zionism.
Chicago.—The Central Conference
of American Rabbis adopted a reso
lution opposing efforts to reassert
Jewish nationalism in Palestide.
Loyal Russian Slain. ''
London.—Captain St. Chasnig, for
mer commander of the Russian Baltic
fleet, who was convicted of havttig
opposed and agitated against tlie Bol
shevik government of Russia, naa
been executed.
No War On Ind'a.
Amsterdam.—The German govern
ment half ho intention of undertaking
a campaign into India, Foreign Secre
tary von Kuehlmann told a questioner
in the Reichstag.
ALLIES DEFENDING
THE MURMAN COAST
RAILROADS AND ICE FREE PORT
OF KOLA BEING PROTECTED
FROM BOLSHEVIKI.
London.—Measures taken by the al
lies to aid non-Bolshevik Russians on
the Murman coast and protecting the
Murman railroad and the ice free port
of Kola are summarized by the Daily
Express from Russian newspapers.
While the Bolsheviki opposed the
landing of allied troops, and even
agreed to trade ihe Murman coast to
Finland, the local population has de
cided to join the allies and secede
from the Bolsheviki.
The first , allied intervention oc
curred early in April, when Finnish
White Guards, assisted by Germans,
faced the Red Guards at Kem. The
Red Guards were reinforced by an An
glo-French detachment that had come
up on an armored train. The next
Russian report mentions the landing
of a force of British marines to co
operate in the defense of the coast.
Defensive measures were said to be
under the leadership of three men, a
Russian, a Britain and a Frenchman.
Two British and one French war
ship and some British trawlers were
in the harbor of Kola in addition to a
Russian squadron. A report rrom the
committee of the White Sea fleet to
the Russian naval commissioner in
Moscow, pripied in a Russian paper,
said that Kemp (assumed to be Rear
Admiral Kemp of the British navy)
had decided that there was no aggres
sive design regarding the Murmansk
region, only a desire to help the Rus
sian republic and protect the coast
and the railroad. He also offered to
assist in developing the local fisheries.
A dispatch to the Daily Mail from
Copenhagen, quotes German papers
as saying that there are 25,000 Bolshe
vik troops left on Kola Peninsula.
A new provisional government for
Siberia, which has the unanimous sup
port of the population and which will
continue to fight the central powers,
has been established, at Vladivostok.
According to a Times dispatch from
Tokyo, quoting the Vladivostok corre
spondent of the Asahi, the new gov
ernment intends to summons a con
stituent assembly and to restore law
and order throughout the country.
Kaiser Is Angry.
London.—As soon as Emperor Wil
liam heard of the assassination of
Count von Mirbach, the Germafi am
bassador to Russia, according to an
Exchange Telegraph dispatch from
Amsterdam, he ordered Foreign Sec
retary von Kuehlmann to break off
negotiations with the Russian dele
gates in Berlin.
Huns May Tax Jews]
Amsterdam.—The Jewish Corre
spondence Bureau of The Hague says
It learns from Berlin that the pan
Germans are agitating for a tax on
Jews.
Snow in Colorado. '
Denver, Colo.—Snow fell for a quar
ter of an hour recently at Boulder,
near here. This is the latest snow
fall ever recorded there.
To Cruise War Zone.
Washington.' — Chairman Padgatt
and other members of the House Nav
al Affairs Committee will leave on a
batiieyhip this month to make a tour
of Inspection of the naval activities
in the European war zone.
a
of
to
Floods in Germany.
Amsterdam.—Berlin dispatches re
port that severe floods followed a
sudden, heavy rainfall in many parts
of Germany
and loss
In
1 1U
PEACE OFFER
MILITARISTS WILL NOT BE AU
LOWED TO BARGAIN OVER RE
STORATION OF BELGIUM.
KUEHLMANN'S RETIREMENT
Mason Say3 That Two " aken Togeth
er Show Deceit of Germans— Hin
denburg's Reputation Dead Even
If He Is Not.
a
the
al
on
to
a
a
New York.—Germany has begun a
new campaign for peace with the old
gang of militarists still in control of
the Hohenzollern empire.
Chancellor von Hertling has been
pushed forward to assure ihe western
world while German diplomacy is pil
fering all it can in Eastern Europe.
The patter of the Kaiser's spokesman
has ever been made to include a re
pudiation oi any intention by Gee
many to hold Belgium after the war.
Instead, however, of offering to
give up the western loot unreserved
ly, as an evidence of contrition, Von.
Herltnig demands that the allies must
bargain over the restoration of Bel
gium's independence.
Bargaining necessitates the recog
nition of the right of the German
militarists to participation in delibe
rations over conditions to govern Bel
gium's future. If any conditions are
allowed the militarists will not have
been defeated. Militarism's defeat
.mplies its first essential the uncon
ditional and undebatabie evacuation
of Belgian territory by the German. !
taristic spirit insolenetly intimates j
army. Von Hertling is trying to
evade this issue, and in the true iriiii
that Belgium is being held as a host
ge for the western democracies to
ransom. The kaiser cannot succeed
with that kind of camouflage. Amer
ica is in the war to prevent it.
Von Kuehlmann's enforced retire
ment from the foreign secretaryship
because of his public disavowal of
Germany's ability to win peace on
the battlefield shows the spirit which
is back of Von Hertling's peace drive.
The same childish attempts at deceit
still characterize German diplomacy
Repudiation of Von Kuehlmann by
the militarists is accompanied by pro
testations that the lords of Germany's
destiny have no imperialistic am tui
tions. With such clumsy tactics as
these revealing the truth, it is im
possible for the world's democracies
to be led into a peace trap of Ger
many's making.
Reports of the illness and death or
Von Hindenburg recently probably
have originated in the continued in
activity of the German armies. Wheth
er or not Von Hindenburg is dead
physically, his reputation as the con
queror of Western Europe is rapidly
nearing destruction. His name has
mysteriously disapeared from com
ment in Germany. The shadow be
gan to make its appearance simultan
eously with the announcement of rfie
uninterrupted arrival of Americans in
France by the hundreds of thousands.
Every week Von Hindenburg has
delayed his fifth offensive has meant
the reinforcement of the allies by
from 60,000 to 100,000 fresh Ameri
cans. No wonder disillusionment is
beginning to arise concerning the ef
fectiveness of Von Hindenburg's
strategy of slaughter. If Von Hind
enburg Is not dead there are enough
Germans who are to drive the lesson
.home.
The most dangerous policy the Ger
man war lords can accept would be
another offensive gamble. Victory fs
made wholly impossible for them by
the presence in France of America s
armies. Yet if a new drive is not
forthcoming the former ones of this
fateful year are proved vain and con
demn Von Hindenburg as Germany's
evil genius. Perhaps, scenting Von
Hindenburg's waning popularity, the
German leaders are inspiring reports
of his death to abserve the reaction
upon German public opinion. If thh
public shows no regret there may be
no more German offensives, whether
Von Hindenburg is dead or alive.
No Sugar Famine In Sight.
Washington. — Definite assurances
that there is no danger of a sugar
famine were given by the food ad
ministration, and the food situation
generally was declared to be better
than at any time since America under
took tne feeding of the allied world.
Big War Bill Passed.
Washington. — The $12,000,000,000
army appropriation bill was complet
ed by Congress and now goes to tho
president. The conference report on
the measure was approved by both
the House and Senate, after only brief
consideration.
to
Loan To Italy.
Washington.—An additional credit
of $10,000,000 was granted to Italy
by the Treasury Department, making
a total of $660,000,000 for Italy and
of $6,091,590,000 loaned to the allies
to date.
Royalty Makes Air Trip.
London.—King Albert and Queen
Elizabeth of Gelgium reached England
In an airplane, when they came to
1 1U tut <xti ^Kiur, vv uc-u tue J Lalli c lO
attend the silver anniversary of Kin»
George and Queen Mary.
ing
tlie
the
the
of
ing
a
to
The Depressing
When yonr blood is not in good condition, the
Summer heat weakens all the muscles of the body.
Tc avoid spells of weakness and sickness during the
hot weather, you must have pure, rich, red blood.
Growers
Tasteless chill Tonic
destroys malarial parasites in the blood and removes
other poisons by Purifying and Enriching the Blood.
You can soon feel its Strengthening, Invigorating
Effect and when you feel strong, the Summer heat
will not depress you.
Groves Tststsies» sshSSS Tciiio is an
exceptionally good general strengthening tonic for
the Child, the Mother and all the Family. It is
pleasant to take. Price 60c.
- Ferfeoffy Harmless« Oositsius Ho
Hux-Wosozsca or other Poisonous Drugs,
_ ;
Growers chill 1 onic T&islcis
You can now get Grove's Tasteless chill Tonic in Tablet
form as well as in Syrup, the kind you have always bought. The
Tablets are intended for those who prefer to swallow a tablet
rather than a syrup, and as a convenience for those who travel.
The tablets are called "GROVE'S chillTONIC TABLETS'' and
contain exactly the same medicinal properties and produce ex
actly the same results as Grove's Tasteless chill Tonic which is
put up in bottles. The price of either is 60c.
Bel
are
1 mic tiling that lia* saved many, a
man from hanging i tin* fact that tin
jury did.
Comfort Baby's Skin
When red, rough and itching with hot
baths of Cuticura Soap and touches of
! Cuticura Ointment. This means sleep
for baby and rest for mother. For
free samples address, "Cuticura, Dept,
j X, Boston." At druggists and by mail.
to
to
of
on
by
tui
as
or
in
in
is
fs
s
Soap 25, Ointment 25 and 50.—Adv.
Talkative people seldom say much,
hut as long as they think they do they
are happy.
Important to Mothers
Examine carefully every bottle of
CASTORIA, that famous old remedy
for infants and children, and see that it
Bears the
Signature of
In Use for Over 3Ö Years,
Children Cry for Fletcher's Castoria
The quality of mercy must not he
strained, hut It's a safe bet the price
has gone up.
GIRLS! USE LEMONS
FOR SUNBURN, TAN
Try itl Make this lemon lotion
to whiten your tanned or
. freckled akin.
Squeeze the juice of two lemons in
to a bottle containing three ounces of
Orchard White, shake well, and you
have a quarter pint of the best freckle,
sunburn and tan lotion, and complex
ion whitener, at very, very small cost.
Your grocer has the lemons and any
drug store or toilet counter will supply
three ounces of Orchard White for a
few cents. Massage this sweetly fra
grant lotion Into the face, neck, arms
and hands and see how quickly the
freckles, sunburn, wlndbum and tan
disappear and how clear, soft and
white the skin becomes. Yes! It is
harmless.—Adv.
Not Equal to Three.
They had not been married very
long, but she had grown cold and list
less; so one evening, after she had
yawned about seventeen times, he
said :
"You seem to he so cold and indif
ferent, Matilda. Have you forgotten
those happy days when I was paying
you my addresses?"
"I should .think I haven't ! I should
think I haven't forgotten those happy
days. I never had less than three fel
lows every evening calling on me."
"But. dear, haven't you got me to
pay you attention now?"
"Yes. I suppose I have. You are do
ing the best you know how ; hut you
don't Hatter yourself that you are
equal to tlirp*, do you?"
Farmerettes Rallied in 1776.
They had farmerettes .during the
revolution, says a writer in the Phila
delphia ledger. Nothing new under
tlie sun. It seems. Here is a para
graph which appeared in the New Eng
land Chronicle September 5, 1776:
"Philadelphia. — Sin«; the depar
ture of the able-bodied men from the !
forks of the Brandywine in Chester j
county in the service of their country j
the patriotic young women, to prevent
the evil that would follow the neglect {
of putting in the fall crop in season, j
have joined the plows and are prepur- j
ing the fallows for the seeil* and should ;
their fathers, brothers and lovers be i
detained abroad in defense of the lib
erties of these stutes, they are deter
mined to put In the crop themselves—
a very laudable example, and highly
worthy of imltatloft."
j
;
j
I
j
j
j
!
Up Against It.
"This daylight saving scheme Is
rough on the bashful young fellow who
goes courting."
"How ho?"
"He hasn't, the nerve to drop around
until it gets dark, and »hen it's time
to gc home.''
DAISY FLY KILLER
attracts and kill*
allfliee. N«t,ciMo,
urnamsaUl, eonvoniont,
cheap. Lasts all ae ieaB
Made of metal. ctn'tepiU
or tip over ; will ®ot
or Injure anythinp. Guar
anteed effective. Sold hf
dealers, or ß eentbjr «•
preee, prepaid, for Sl.Oft.
HAROLD SOMERS, ISO OI KALB AVI., UBOOKLYH. VLB*
GUARANTEED TIMBER KILLER'
"Sure Shot."
Kills Timber of any species in 5 to 55 day*.
Seldom takes longer than 15 days.
Rapidly decays Timber.
Makes all other: ways Impractical.
Also kills timber which has been belted
old way. stumps from which timber has
been cut: sprouts. Write for particulars.
SUMMKRFIELD BROS..
205 Linden. Dept SS. Memphis, Tenn.
Nothing matters but victory.
Grove • Tasteless chill Tonic
destroys the malarial terms which are transmitted
to the b loud by the Malaria Mosquito. Price 6Uc.
HOW SNAKES HELP FARMER
Man Who Knows Points Out How
Valuable to the Tiller of the
Soil Are Hi« Services.
Snakes are a valuable asset and
there shotild be a campaign against
j killing them, writes Gayne T. K. Nor
ton* in the American Forestry Maga
; zine. The article goes on to show
what the shake does for food conser
j vution by ways of killing rodents add
I insects, the greatest enemies to grain
j that man knows. The public has be
come acquainted with snakes as never
j before, writes Mr. Norton, because of
j the thousands who huve been engaged
! in the campaign for war gardens that
lgis been conducted by the national
emergency food garden commission.
"With this summer the millions of
war gardens have given the suake pop
ular interest. Tremendously increased
tillage lias brought people and snakes
together.
"Unless much education work is
done the number of snakes that will
lie killed next year by the well-mean
ing but misinformed gardeners will be
very large. Our snakes are a national
asset worth many millions of dollars
and should be conserved. The rela
tion they bear to successful crops is
important—more important than even
the average farmer realizes."
All men are born without wisdom
and some never outgrow It.
Tfie
Balance
as between POSTUM
and other table
. beverages
is m favor of ihe
Wholesome*
tteeklphrfui
drink.
postum
is aU this and mm
ns most delicious.
Besides theresno
waste, and these
are days when one
should Sctve. Tty
INSTANT
POSTUM

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