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The patriot. (Glenmora, La.) 1918-1955, September 13, 1918, Morning, Image 6

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064299/1918-09-13/ed-1/seq-6/

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' •;, * *
You Show Your Pa
triotism by Helping
Finance the Wan
Buy W. S, S.
hile our Army makes the
• * :v. _ irf''
Hun jump, let's tickle Unde Sam
some more by buying W. S. S.
To the lady in the Glenmora
District selling the most stamps by
Dec. 31, goes $25 in W- S. S.
V
*
J. S.GERSON
GLENMORA, LOUISIANA
SUGGESTIONS ON
SELECTING SEED CORN
Field Selection of Seed Means Greater
Yield and Better Com.
Field selection of seed, corn is of toe
much importance to be left to the av
erage laborer; it is almost always 0 f
good plan for the farm owner to su
pervise the work. A groat deal more
corn will be pulled than Is needed, and
It should be reselected In order to get j
the ears that conform to A type.
"There is no argument that can be
need against this- Kind of seed selec
tion," says A. F. Kidder, professor of
agronomy, Louisiana State University,
"because it means more corn and bet
ter corn. When field-selection of seed
becomes more generally practiced in
Louisiana some of the money that our
fanners are now sending to the corn
belt will romain at homo.
"The ear should be from four to
five feet high on land where peas art
to be sown in the com.
"Long shanks and good oars are sel
dom found on the same stalk. The
shank should be sufficiently long, how
ever, to allow the car to bend over
when mature.
"AH ears of corn not covered by
shuck are apt to be damaged by black
weevil and the corn ear worm.
FIELD SELECTION OF
SEED lM?;iuV[$ OS'S
Much More Prof 1 '
From the C
Seed corn should Be ^ dieted from
stalks standing where they grew, be
cause only then, with certainty, can !
seed bo obtained faom—
Stalks that have a tendency to yield ;
well, 03 shown by the superiority over '
surrounding stalks that grew under the
same conditions. Such seed lnLeriU
high producing power.
Stalks without suckers. Such seta |
produces fewer suckers than seeds
from sucker-bearing stalks.
Storm-proof stalks with
desirable height
Seed com .j^oniu be sole;
as it matures, becausi—
* Desirable stalky, especial
taring stalk;; with hang
Then most easily fottnd
YVa.ui, wot ww ; maj
nela to sprout bofom
If the selection in drk.y
,m*y become infe; i
grain moths, and tb
it is as ea.:y, nur
much more pro! :a!
. from cribs in the
Press Bulletin.
Spi
eras at
rly mi
;ay csii- e ucr
tf'-'a 1
r.y.-.d the ears
.. ..cevils,
ggs.
. .'.ctory, and
a selecting
;.g.a-L. S. U.
jthetr cupboards can lessen the sugar
consumption by using more of such
things for dessert».— L. S. U. Press
Bulletin.
_ ...... - . - '
LUT CAKE-MAKING
ON A WAR BASIS
Icing is not needed. Why net leave
It off? Putting cake on a war bàais
Is another way to save sugar without
hardship. Thick frosting involves the
use of sugar needlessly at this time.
Furthermore, many recipes call for ex
cessive amounts of sugar. Try smaller
quantities In your cake recipes, etc.,
end give preference to cakes which
'are sweetened with molasses or syrup.
'Housekeepers who have a stock of
canned fruits. Jellies and preserves in
Few Hern in England.
England has one hen to the acre
ef territory.
FOR SALE
Choice cut-over lands suitable for Homes. Farms,
and Cattle Ranches; in tracts of 10 acres and up
wards; in the neighborhood of GJenmora, La.
For further particulars apply to,
John. Evans, P. O. Box, 68, Alexandria, La.
Andries'Confectionery
THE PLACRTO GET YOUR
Cigars Candy
Fresh
Fruit
Cream
J0~N0T RUSH
COTTON TO MARKET
EVERY GROWER WHO RAI8E8 10
BALES OF COTTON SHOULD
PUT TWO IN WAREHOUSE.
f
j
SELL THE C OP GRADUALLY
If There Is a Surplus It Must Be
Abs^rbad By Reduced Produc
tion Next Year.
!
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In a recent speech on the cotton
situation, Clarence Ousley, Assistant
Secretary of Agriculture, said that as
he sees the situation "no calamity
impends if we do not lose our heads,''
and that he is more concerned about
the gathering "i the crop than about
disposing of it.
He offered a icitr*ion, even if there
is a surpius of from three to four
million baits, and says:
"If every jariae. who raises 10
bales of cotton will put two in the
warehouse and sell the remainder by
installments from month to nlonth
throughout the winter and spring in
stead of forcing it all on the market
at one time, the difficulty in even its
worst aspects will disappear."
He thinks mat if there is a surplus
of cotton this year it must bo ab
sorbed by reduced production nejJ
year. Furthermore, he points ou'
that the Government did 90 t ask for
so large a crop, and that in all fair
ness this fact must bo recognized, the
crops having been produced because
the Southern growers refused to
bçcd. {he warning of agricultural lead
ers. and economists.—L. 3. U. Press
Bulletin.
i <4 Ï v. Lw
ilD.itu lit Pui
New Bulletin Tells How Sweet For.,
toes Should Be Handled.
Very few sweet potatoes stored in
pits or banks ever reach the nrr!
par from.25 to 50 ya t u. spurt, ......
those that rtmau arc- not of geo.,
quality, according .0 warmers' Bulletin
700. This bulletin, the title of which
Is "Sweet Potato Sto age," describe-,
in considerable detail the typeset stor
age houses tirât have proved succ- .s.
ful and the proper method of haulint,
sweet potatoes from harvesting to
marketing. For those growers who are
not able to build storage houses, direc
tions are given for saving the sweet
potato crop by using outdoor cellars
and banks.
Copies of this bulletin may be ob- !
t&ined free by writing to Agricultural
Editor, Extension Division, L. S. U.,
Baton Rouge, La.
USE DISHES WHICH
, Ö0NTAIN LITTLE SUGAR
- i -
Sugar, consumption in many house
holds can be easily lowered nftt only
by giving - preference to dishes which
contain, little sugar or with which
sugar is not usually served, but also
by the use of sweet puddings, or a
sakid in place of dessert. Sweet dried
fruits, such as dates, raisins or figs,
served with breakfast cereals will re
I dace the sugar needs.—Extension Di
vision, Louisiana State University,
^
Obvious.
The man who getkmucb satisfaction
oat of the fact that he has a high.
:
I
aristocratic instep never worries abou«
1410 height of his brow,
i U
MIL CROPS TO
OFFSET DROUTH DAMAGE
Oats, Rye, Wheat, Hairy Vetch and Barley Are Recommended for
This Purpose.
CROPS PROVIDE WINTER GRAZING FOR
LIVESTOCK AND PRODUCE GRAIN
Every Farmer Urged to Raise Feed and
and Winter.
3e Freparad for the Fall
The summer drouth damaged the pastures and feed crops to such an
extent that the necessity of growing during the remainder of the year all of
the feed crops possible becomes very urgec-t in Louisiana. It is therefore
urged that every farmer put forth his best energy and endeavor to be pre
pared for the winter.
Rye. Rye should be used more, extensively in Louisiana as a. winter
grazing crop, it should be planted in September if possible, or in October if
not convenient to plant earlier. Use oue bushel to one and one-fourth bushels
per acre,, select as good ground as can be had, and drill in the seed, or sow
broadcast and disk in. The crop does not winter kill, and era be depended
en during the winter. Plow up the crop in April and plant the land to a crop j
Ol corn, sorghum, or soy beans for a summer crop. j
Oats is probably the best grazing crop for Louisiana. It produces
1
Oats.
a$ much grazing as any of the other Bmall grains, and can be harvested as a
hay or gzain crop. The seed can be readily obtained. The important factor
in growing- cats for gracing la to have the land in good condition and plant
early. The ground should be well prepared, and planted the last of September
or early in October. Rod rust-proof oats should be used, planting two and
one-half to three bushels per acre. Planting with a drill is preferable, but
sowing broadcast and disking in is very satisfactory. Very little grazing is
to be had from oats and other small crops when the planting is delayed until
late in the fall, or when the crops arc planted on poor land. If a grain crop
is desired it should not be grazed later than the first of February.
Wheat. Wheat is of about the same value as oats or rye for grazing !
purposes, and. a limited acreage of it is recommended to all farmers in the
northern half of the State, first for fail grazing and second for a crop of grain
for bread making. It withstands the winters well, and when planted on rich
soil in September or early October will give splendid results as a grazing -
crop. Do not graze wheat later than January if a crop of grain is expected, j
3ow preferably Louisiana grown seed of the Red May or .Blue Stem
variety, and plant one and çpo-fotirth to one and one-half bushels of soed^j
per acre: If no grain is prodtiee<| the grazing obtained will amply pay for the ;
eeed and planting, and the laiu) will, be available early in the spring for oîfeèr
•CpltLfj-aps. •
1 Hairy Vetch. Halnrtfrétch if one of the best winter legumes that can be
grown in the South. ' It possesses especial merit as a companion crop for oats
ur other fall-sown small grain. The seed are very high in price and difficult !
to secure, bo that it is not recommended that it be planted extensively. Every ,
dairy farmer should secure a few pounds of seed, inoculate them and sow a j
small patch for the production of seed, so that every oat crop planted after ;
a few years will be accompanied by this plant. !
Barley. Borley thrives in Louisiana when the season is not especially
favorable for the development of the grain rust. When the fall and winter
season is dry and cool, barley may do exceedingly well, and from a single
year's experience lead one to think it the best winter grazing grass to be
had. The following year it may be almost a complete failure. It is more
variable in its habits, with us, than any of the grains that may be sown in
the fall of the year. . , ,
Those wishing to try it should sow from one and a half to two bushels
per acre, as they would oats, in early October, or even late In September.
■ If grazing is discontinued in early February, a fairly good erop of gram
may be secured. If the plants are not badly damaged by rust Probably twentj
I bushels of grain would be a maximum crop, and ten bushels an average crop
on the thinner soils, and better returns from the better soils —W. & Perkins,
Director of Extension, Louisiana State University.
Revival begins Sept. 22 at M, E Church
Women Lawyers Gaining Ground.
Women are now eligible fer admis*
dion to the bar in «11 Federal courts,
end in Maine, Massachusetts, Connec
ticut, New York. New Jersey, Penn
sylvania, North Carolina, Indiana,
Michigan. Ohio, Oregon. South Dakota,
Washington and several other states.
—Law N otes .
Fate of Majority.
One mllMon patents have been I»
sued in this country, most of which
have served so other purpose than to
put the Inventors' money In circula
Uon -'Cb'enjro Tribune
Cannon Bafts of Stone and from *
Stone bullets were used until the
paar 161* -when they were supplanted
by Iron It was near the close of the
sixteenth century before leaden bul
lets ware generally adopted. Stone
cannon balls are- yet used in some of
the easter n conn tries _
YOUR WIFE CAN USE IT
If yon are away from home and
ooe of your horses take the colic
your wife can treat him if she has
Farria'Colic Remedy in the house.
Just drop it on the horses tongue
and in tuirty minutes he is reliev
ed. Get it today. You
A.
GOOD FOR BILIOUSNESS.
"Two years ago I sufiered
form# requent attacks of stomach
trouble and biliousness. Seeing
Chamberlain's Tablets advertis
ed I concluded to try them. I
improved rapidly.
MissEtnmaVerbryke, Lima Ohio
DI RECTO RY
Fraternal and Religious
The Colombian.Woodmen Household No
2J3 meets the first' Thursday In each month
at9 ih m. Da. oso. M. Mos» os.
Worthy Oonsul.
Edwin oxa. Worthy Clerk.
CamP No. iso meets
the first Saturday
in eateb mo tb at >
P.m* v;
,t\ ncHoceow.
-, c. c.
j. W. B»rrr.
Clerk
Qlenmors txxlge No. i
H6 meets third Satur {
day In each month at
I : m. ■»
i. t.
j.W.Witr,
THE GLENMORA PATRIOT
(Successor to Lecompte Drummer-American.)
Published Everv. Friday
W. W. PERRY
Publisher
^ne Year
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One-Dollar-and-Fifty Cents
Entered at the postoffice at Glenmora, La., as second class matter
SMIy Saying Still Lives.
The saying that fish Is the he?
orain food romes of an old lone
tongee windbag years ago saying
"Thought Is impossible without pho,
phorus." So a Swiss chemist, know
ing that fish co'-.taint'd pbosphoru*
put two and two together and brought
fo»-th a saving that -vtll tw<*er die
SAVE MONEY
By trading at Gienmora's Square
Deal store. Strictly cash only.
W. W. Johnson, Prep.
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!?S
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Authorized
Dealers
FORDCARS
And Real F©rd Accessories
Auto Transfer and Repair Work a-Specialty
■ ' ' i . M , I .. ..............
Anything you want for your car, we have it;: if not, we
w ill get it for you. Before retiyeiug, see us for casings
and inner tubes—we hav« *ëm. The GOOD onea-Good
Year, Fisk, United States and'HHresionej
Did you ever think about it, pufctiûg shock absorbers on
your Ford? We have 'em,, four styles to pick from.
Why don't you put supports on your Radius Trtoda-1
We have 'em. How about bumpers ^or your c&r? Save gr
a big bill from a big bump. We have 'em—(Bumjstfrk) c= *'
Don't throw that casing away-letus vulcanise it for yon.
If it can be done, we can do.it.
- :■
------c&
"We to serve." **;
C. A. CARRUTH MOTOR CO.
Phone 75 GLENMORA, g
Taberlet's Restaurant
—and bakery—
Fresh Bread, Cakes, Pies Baked and Delivered
Every Day. Patronize the Homé Man
In the Restaura
We are prepared to serve on short order many of the good
thing to eat. Our service is the best. Our prices are
very reasonable. Get in the habit of eating at Tabarlet
You will grow fat and save enough to start a bank account.
Try our Home Parched, Special Dripped Coffee.
Pies, the kind mother use to make
A. R. TABARLET, î ; : Proprietor
r=J. W. BRITT:
Real Estate Agent
Notary Public
Justic of Peace.
All kiuds of Insurance- Rental
Non- residents.
Agent. nc^Ta:
axes
or
WE MUST WIN THE WAR! j
Let's help the soldiers who must have woolen
clothes. I can take your old clothes in exchange
for now ones. Save money for you and wool for
the United States. Try me.
W. H. Harrison,
Box 82 Glenmora, La.
CLOTHES CLEANED AND PRESSEND
Clotla.es
Clea-iraed.
PRESSED AND DELIVERED
—by—
CHARLES SEGARS
back of Savoy's Barbar Shop.

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