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New Iberia enterprise. (New Iberia, La.) 1885-1902, April 28, 1900, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064327/1900-04-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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RUGS «d CARPETS
SMYRNAS-A Big Line.
Tbo Broraly ninko (host in the market)
in bripht (colors and choice designs.
According to sizo $1.00 to*$3.JSO
AMERICAN GRASS RUGS.
Just out! A serviceable novelty. Two
sizes, at HOc anil $1 .OO
MOQUETTEfand BRUSSELS CARPETS.
Handsome colors and designs. Bor
ders to match. Art squares made
to order.
INGRAIN ART SQUARES.
In all grades and colors—largest lino
we ever had.
COCOA, CHINA, JAPAN AND GRASS MATTINGS.
ftaf See if you can think of anything I cannot furnish.
R. S. McMAHON
W. L. BUKKE.
WALTER M. GATES.
J. P. Sl'BEKBIELLE
Successors to .T. J. CRAIG & CO.
INSURANCE.
State Haul. Building. A Elf IBERIA, LA.
Representing Fifteen of the Largest Companies.
Losses promptly A personally attended to. Cheapest current rates. Best Inducements.
I
i
i
NEW IBERIA
ICE & BOTTLING CO., LIMITED,
NEW IBERIA, LA.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
Ice, Seltzer, Soda & Mineral Waters.
AGENTS FOR
Anheuser-Busch KEG BEER
AND THE CELEBRATED
Budweiser Bottled Beer
NEW IBERIA
BRICK FACTORY,
Aug. Erath and K. Southwell, Proprietors.
NEW IBERIA, LA.
FIRST-CLASS
PRESSED & COMMON BRICK,
BEST OF RAILROAD AND WATER SHIPPING FACILITIES,
TO ALL POINTS.
Prices quoted on Application.
Charbon! Charbon!!
Now is the time to have your stock innoculated. Don't wait until
the dreaded disease comes upon you, but innoculate early and .pre
vent it. I have just received a large amount of Vaccine and am
ready to innoculate your stoek. Also have the Vaccine for sale in
large or small quantities.
DR. SHEARD MOORE, Veterinary Surgeon
RESIDENCE, OFFICE and HOSPITAL, Lower St Peter Street
CUMBMLANO 'PHONE 240—-Calls Answered Day or Night.
E. W. Phillips,
ARCHITECT
CONTRACTOR AND'BUILDER,
NEW IBERIA, LA.
Will famish Plans and Specifications for Sugar Houses. Dwellings and all kinds of
BaiMuga in Iberia and adjoining parishes. Best of refference as to ability and at
i paid to contracts.
Sugar House Work Specialty Solicited.
H. P. DUPERIER,
UNDERTAKER lid DIRECTOR OF FUIER1LS,
Everything New and Rret-Class.
Will take full rh*r*e of »na OiriTt Funeral* and attend all de
tails. Pmmpt response made to all call« day or night.
Cumberland 'Phone 47. East Side of Bayou.
NEW IBERIA. LA.
New Iberia Foundry and Machine Shop.
GEO. SIMON, Proprietor,
MAKES .4 SPECIALTY Or
Repairs on Sugar Houses, Cotton Gins, Saw Mills
and Steamboats»
▲ Ml UMrtnent of Bran and Iron Steam Fittings, Refined Bar Iron, Anti-Friction
Metal», Late* Improved Packings, Machine Bolts, Nuts, V.'aahers,
constantly is Stoek.
ESTIMATES MADE ON ALL KINDS OP REPAIRS.
Undertaker and Funeral Director,
Old Odd Fellows Building, Math Street. New Iberia,
FUNERAL CAR, WHITE AND BLACK HEARSE
COFFINS, CASKETS, METALLIC CASES, BURIAL
ROBES, WRAPPERS, SHOES. ETC.
S « r r i aea tare beea scoured and he will take fall charge of funerals and attend to all
dataila. Ho h ash» r caidoaoc in rear of establishment and night or day —n- will
saaslvo jmapt
Livery, Feed and Saie Stables,
BISST AND FINEST OUTFIT IN ATTAKAPAS.
V S KS ^ f, Cm ' it* CurUm* tote.
AU «tpfoa 4m i t »w. Alf fea t f*r "
Me wr W re m m wn ed
Go to BURKE, GATES & SUBERBIELLË, Suc i c j"cra°g aco. for your FIRE INSVRANCE. Strongest Companies, Lowest Rates, Prompt Adjustment of Lossen.
The Enterprise.
; OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF IBERIA PARISH
AND TOWN OF NEW IBERIA.
MEETINQ OF THE LOUISIANA PRESS
ASSOCIATION.
i On Monday uext the Louisiana
: editors will bepiu to assemble in
j New Iberia for their twenty-first
' annual meeting, and will remain
! the guests of the city uutil Thurs
j day. That they will be accorded a
j hearty welcome and made to feel at
! home is a duty that devolves upon
I our citizens. Some families have
opened their homes already, and as
there is no better way to make a
guest feel at home than to receive
him at your fireside, if there are
others who can conveniently enter
tain in this way our visitors, they
should at ouce make known their
willingness to the members of the
committee on accommodation. An
other way to come in contact with
the visiting members of the press
will be to attend their sessions,
i which are all open to the public,
i This we specially urge upon our
people, as it will be the best oppor
tunity to give manifestation of in
terest in the presence of our guests.
If we will but do this we are sure
that they will leave New Iberia with
pleasant recollections of their first
meeting here, as other provisions
have been made for their entertain
ment which will be very gratifying
to them. Among these will be a
visit to the Avery Salt Mine, where
they will be lowered into the mine,
the management [having consented
to suspend operations for the oc
casion. After this, Gen. Dudley
Avery, on behalf of the Avery
family, will extend the visitors an
invitation to enjoy a luncheon a la
fourchette under the majestic oaks
in the front of the Avery mansion.
A steamboat excursion on the Teche
will also be given the visitors, while
on Wednesday evening they will
be tendered a public receptiou at
the rooms of the Attakapas Club.
On this occasion, Mr. Walter J.
Burke will address the visitors on
behalf of the Board of Trade, and
they will be welcomed to the Club
rooms by Mr. W. P. Dunbar, vice
president of the Club. Mr. Dun
bar will also deliver the address of
welcome on behalf of the town at
the opening session on Tuesday
morning. On Tuesday evening Mr.
M. H. Carver, the eminent attorney
of Natchitoches will address the
editors on the great and growing
economic question of the day—The
Single Tax.
SHREWD PARTY MEN FORESEE
SHREWD PARTY MEN FORESEE
DEMOCRATIC SUCCESS.
BT JAMIS CRKKLMAN OF THS N. V. JOURNAL.
An impartial investigation of the
present political situation onght to
convince any man that if the Presi
dential election were to take place
uow Mr. Bryan would be elected by
a decisive plurality.
Pour years ago the plain facts
compelled me to predict Mr. Bryan's
defeat, and I repeated that predic
tioD a'tiûoirt tiettae i

when I accompanied Mr. Bryan
from the scene of his nomination
to the hour when I stood beside
him in Lincoln and saw him cast
his vote.
Facts equally plain point to his
election this year.
There is but one serions point
of difference between the most ex
treme of the conservative Demo
crats of the East and the great body
of the party which supported Mr.
Bryàn in 1896. Many of the Eastern
leaders desire to have the ratio of
sixteeu to one omitted from the
money plank of the platform. The
leaders in the South and West are
practically nnanimons in their op
position to any change.
I have been present at several
important confereuces of Democrats
representing these two views of
party policy, and I can speak with
some certainty of the actual situa
tion. The aim and intention of the
great mass of the party who were
loyal four years ago has been to
readopt the Chicago platform, and
to incorporate it, word for word, in
the platform to be made in Kansas
City on July 4.
I can say authoritatively that Mr.
Bryan will oppose the abandonment
of a single plank in the Chicago
platform. It is demonstrable that
an overwhelming majority of the
next Democratic National Conven
tion will refuse to abandon, alter
or modify the Chicago platform.
The one great question that now
remains before the Democratic
leaders is thia: Will the Kansas
City Convention content itself with
a simple reaffirmation of the plat
form of 1896 in three or four lines
and devote the rest of its utterances
to the issaea of 1900, or will the
convention raterate the Chieago
platform. All other questions are,
for the present, subordinate to this.
Mr. Hill says that Mr. Bryan will
be renominated. Mr. Hill declares
that he will work hard to elect Mr.
Bryan. No man who has met Mr.
Hill within the past two weeka can
doubt his earneatneas or his deter
mination to lend his whole strength
to the Democratic party in the ap
proaching
He sees victory iu sight for the
first time since Mr. Cleveland
wrecked the party. Mr. Hill will
support Mr. Bryan, Chicago plat
form or no Chicago platform. The
abandonment of the well-tried
American theory of equal rights
everywhere under the Hag for the
British policy of subject colonies
overshadows all other issues. * * *
Not only have men like Mr. Hill
and Croker, who were silent in 189G,
placed themselves earnestly in sup
port of Mr. Bryan, but thousands
and thousands of "gold Democrats"
iu New York and other Eastern
States who voted for McKinley
have returned to the party which
stands for the preservation of the
Republic and opposes a military
empire with colonies.
Men like John De Witt Warner
are heartily preparing to assist in
the electiou of Mr. Bryan. Mr.
Bissell, who was Mr. Cleveland's
law partner and afterward Post
master-General, if ready to stump
the State for Mr. Bryan.
It seems to be generally re
cognized that the financial question
is, for the time beiug, removed
from the sphere of practical things,
and that, while the money plank of
the Democratic platform is an im
portant issue, as between political
leaders, that question, too, will
disappear, and the whole strength
of the party will be devoted to a
vigorous war on trusts and a defence
of the Republic against the Mc
Kinley plan of military empire.
a
y
Every one of the Eastern leaders
to whom I have talked has assured
me that he will heartily support
Mr. Bryan whether the platform of
1S9G is reaffirmed or not.
All the talk about a "Democratic
conspiracy" in the East to nomin
ate Admiral Dewey or to injure Mr.
Bryan is pure bosh. Mr. Bryan is
supreme throughout the party. No
man challenges his authority, no
man seeks his defeat.
The change which the brutal and
corrupt policy of the McKinley Ad
ministration has wrought iu politics
is almost without a parallel in
America.
Mr. Bryan has become a platform
in himself, standing as he does for
honesty, decency, fairness, plain
speech and true Americanism as
opposed to hypocrisy, corruption
duplicity, evasion, imperialism and
shameless servitude to trust domin
ation.
Mr. Bryan has no choice for Vice
President; I can say that advisedly.
No candidate for the second place
has yet organized sufficient strength
to be considered seriously. All
seem to be waiting for Mr. Bryan
to speak the word, but I have been
assured by Mr. Bryan himself that
he will not interfere in any way.
The Vista of Two Years.
Two years ago to-day Spain de
clared that a state of war existed
between that kingdom and the
United States. Two years ago to
i d "ï' wi .' h "°
on/l nm fan no in Mn«tn il <> r. 1.
and united as in the days of Wash
ington, we had taken up arms not
only to free a struggling people
from tyranny, but to vindicate our
honor as a nation.
What have these two years
brought forth. Victory and mourn
ing—the return of great heroes and
the disbanding of armies, bnt not
the content that should follow
peace.
On opposite sides of the world
we have acquired islands and coal
ing stations and the care of brown
peoples. On these islands we have
seen our flag welcomed, our soldiers
hailed as deliverers and our country
blessed as a protector.
We have seen the patience of
these peoples and their faith in our
honesty gradually worn beyond en
durance by tde degeneracy of the
party in power. We have seen
them—already naked and starving
—burdened with additional taxes
We have seen established in the
islands we assume to own a system
of tyranny and injustice such as
Spain never dreamed of.
We have seen the dawn of im
perialism—the dream of govern
ment by the few and for the few—
the lust for colonies, the overrid
ing of pledges, and a financial ra
pacity on the part of the Adminis
tration such as would do credit to
the old Carthaginian kings
Was the war worth all thist
Should it not have left something
nobler in its wake than chicanery,
injustice and legalized robbery f
These are questions for the people
to answer at the polls.— X. T.
Journal.
Justice N. C. Blanchard, whose
term as a member of the State Su
preme Court expired April 5, will
be named by Gov. Foster to succeed
himself.
Patrolman S. Robinson, of the
Boston police department, who died
ou Sunday, leaving $53,000, has
bequeathed $40,000 to the town of
Gilmantou, N H., the income to be
expended for good roads. The re
mainder of the fortune is divided
among the friends, relatives and
police associates.
A MODEL TOWN.
Results of Intelligent Control of Public
Utilities.
by uioRuicarv ÏOGLKSTON.
The following article will prove
intere sting to New Iberians on tlie
eve of the proposed public control
of it, water .„a light sys te ms , 1«.
dicating what can be accomplished
in this direction by intelligent unity
of action :
I have made a discovery. I have
found and studied the very prettiest, j
happiest, and in its unambitious j
way, the most prosperous small j
town I ever saw. I have seen there
an almost ideal object lesson in the
municipal ownership of public util
1Ü !f, . „ ■ v . , T . .. I
The town is \ evay, Ind. It lie» j
on the Ohio River, about midway
between Cincinnati and Louisville.
I was born there, and I have been
revisitintr tl»p tnnm nff-cr nn oh ;
revisiting the town after au ab- 1
sence of foity-five years.
Hie count} of which \ evay is the
seat has not one foot of railroad
within its borders. The town has no j
factories. And yet its people, less
t . tl J .. F V
than three thousand in number, are :
en\ iablj well-to-do. They have i
two banks and three prosperous |
weekly newspapers. Their homes
are all comfortable, and many of ;
khem luxurious. They have a court,
house that would do credit, iu its j
architecture and its proportions, to!
a town twenty times the size of Ve- !
y ay. j
Their main thoroughfare, lead
ing down to the river, and the broad
wharf or levee, at its foot, are well
paved with stone. All their other
streets are macadamized after the
best modern methods, and are kept
iu perfect order. So are all the
main country roads that lead out
from the town into the rich aud
highly cultivated farming regious
round about.
Iu all the residence streets there
are perfectly laid and perfeotly kept
sidewalks of artificial stone. Every
where the sidewalks are free even
from dust, and the streets clean
enough to satisfy the demands of a
Waring. They are bordered on
either side with stately sycamores,
tall elms and broadly-spreading
maples—all jealously cared for by
the municipal authorities.
In addition there is an adequate
water system supplying water in
lavish abundance for all uses
There is a telephone system with
astonishingly cheap rates—so
cheap that almost every house of
any consequence has an instrument
in it—and with long distance con
nections to Cincinnati, Louisville,
Indianapolis and all towns between
Still further,* there is an electric
light plant which furnishes light
so cheaply that no gas company
can exist in the town.
The municipal tax rate of a peo
pie who enjoy all these benefits—the
well-made and well-kept streets,
the smooth, artificial stone side
walks, the abundant water supply,
the trees which make the whole
town a park, the telephone and
electric light conveniences, and
all the rest of it—is only one per
cent, and the growing profits of the
municipality from the telephone
and electric light plants promise,
within a year or two, to reduce even
that tax to one half.
All this is the result of the muni
cipal ownership of public utilities,
under the vigilant scrutiny of an
alert public opinion, acting in per
fect harmony for the public good,
the town's ownership of the profita
ble utilities has enabled it to pro
vide the comforts and to create the
beauty, from which there is no di
rect profit, without imposing more
than the very lightest tax bnrden
upon the people. The total muni
cipal debt is only $70,000, with an
interest charge of less than $3,500
and both are diminishing at a rate
which will extingush them within
a brief period.
But what about politics ?"
asked. "Suppose a gang of rascals
shonld get control of your city gov
ernment?"
"They never can," was the an
swer. "Every man of us makes it
a part of his personal business to
to prevent that. We have party
nomination for municipal offices,
of course, but everybody in parties
feels that no man should be nomi
nated for local office in whose hands
we cannot confidently trust the con
trol of the vital interests of the
community. No snch man is nom
inated in fact; and if by chance
any such shonld be, his own party
would leave him without any votes
to count when the polls close. We
cannot afford any snch mistake as
that, and we all know it."
Under the system of municipal
ownership it haa been the care of
every citizen that all works of con
struction should be well done, at
honest prices, with no "rake off"
for anybody. Nothing has been
undertaken by the municipal au
thorities till a committee of the
wisest citizens of both parties had
thoroughly investigated methods
and counted the cost. Then the
-op« «he
thods found by the committee to be
beat, and in no instanee, I am told,
has the cost of any work exceeded
the committee's estimate.
There is no such thing as pauper
ism in this well ordered community
j—or trace of the "poverty that
suffers." There are some rich men
i tliere. The great majority are com
fortablv well off in tlipir wnrlr ind
i theil . m,dert,ti"gs ' There
! i s not 0 ue human being there who
nas not a roof over his head, com
fortable clothing on his back, and
Stature. it has enjoyed the im- i
, . , .. ...
measurably better growth in beauty,
a ll the wholesome food that he
j wan ts to eat, every day in the vear.
j The town is very slightly "more
j populous now than it was when I
knew it, half a century ago. But if it
ii a g not grown much in municipal
I "ii-Muinuij UCLLCL giu« iu iu uettuiy, !
j comfort and social advancement,
which I have tried here to indicate.
Now, as then the sole business of i
Vevay's people is to exchange the
; j " .1 * „
1 g00 ds that prosperous farmers
need, for the products they dig '
out of the soil and to send the hit
ter to larger markets for sale But
j there was little of beauty in Vevav
then little of comfort some ratW
' conuort, some rather
: squalid poverty, and practically !
i nothing of that enlightened public t
| spirit which has wrought almost
a miracle since the people learned
; w hat the real purposes and fuue
tions of municipal government
j Äre
to! ^ ^
! ^ severe storm swept over a large
j portion of the State of Texas on
of the State
Friday, causing loss of life and
great destruction of property. It is
reported to have been very disas
trous also at Lake Charles.
_
1 Lake Charles', La*, April 27.—
The plant at the sulphur mine near
the town of Sulphur will be start
ed to morrow. The establishment
has beeu shut dowu for a year or
more. A force of men have been
at work for several mouths making
repairs and betterments. Addi
tional boiler power has been pro
vided aud additional facilities have
been installed for gettiug the sul
phur out of the mines and for hand
ling the product. A force of fifty
to sixty men will be employed as
soon as the works are under full
headway.
The Democrats iu the Senate will
prevent, by filibustering tactics if
necessary, the passage of further
unsatisfactory legislation at this
session of Congress. The ship
subsidy bill will not come to a vote
if they can prevent it.
Some of the administration's acts
whioh the Republan platform will
not indorse are the pro-Bitish con
duct of the State Department, the
attitude of hostility against the
Boer republics, the Macrum inci
dent, the favoritism shown by the
Secretary of the Treasury for the
Standard Oil banks, Alger's beef
contracts, rotten transports and
plague-ship scandals, Root's dred
ging permits and Griggs' crusade
of passivity against the trusts. But
the Republicans can't put every
thing they have done in their plat
form. It would read too much
like a treatise on crime if they did
so.—Kansas City Times, Dem.
A call for proposals for a muni
cipal telephone system, to be ac
quired by the city of San Francis
co, has been drawn up by request
of the public utilities committee of
the Board of Public Works. In
cluded in the specifications are : A
central station and a sub-station,
wires to all parts of the city, con
duits and poles, switchboard and
all other apparatus necessary for a
complete telephone system. The
capacity must be sufficient for 25,
000 subscribers, with provision for
its increase to 50,000 wheu re
quired.
History Coatest a Tie.
The History Contest held at the
City Hall, on Tuesday afternoon,
resulted in a tie. The judges, who
had first marked the result—
Lillian Hills.
10
0
9
10
10
8
10
10
8
10
85
David Todd.
10
0
10
10
10
10
10
10
2
10
82
H* 6 •' thou & h M 1 "
g,Ie °' be
Davtd challenges her to another
{public contest immediately.
of course awarded the medal to
Lillian. Discovering almost im
mediately, however, that David had
misunderstood the ninth question
and being convinced that he had
correctly answered the question
contained in the first half of it,
they decided that he was untitled
on that to 5 instead of *2.
Miss Fasnacht, with her usual
sense of justice cheerfully made the
correction, in which Miss Pollard
concurs, so that the matter now
stands—
Lillian.
10
0
9
10
10
8
10
10
8
10
83
David.
10
0
10
10
10
10
10
10
5
10
83
School Board Proceedings.
Broussard, Brenux and Pierson,
The minutes of the last meeting.
"» 7I " -»- »
New Iberia, La., April 7, 1900.
The regular meeting of the School
Board was called to older by the Presi
dent with the following members present :
Messrs. Lawton, Robin. Weeks. Oscar
Nov.
the 7th. were read and approved as read.
President Lawton stated that many
things pertaining to the school interests
of the parish had occurred since the last
meeting of the Board, and during this
while had been acted upon after confer
ence with other members of the Board.
As per agreement, Mr. W. B. Hale was
allowed to remain in New Iberia as as
sistant to the principal at a salary of $75
per month, and Mr. A. J. Dupuv had been
selected to take Mr. Hale's place as prin
i C 'Tl ° f the Jea,, erette schools at a salary
of $00 per month. The following teachers
! had been selected by the Committee
Teachers to till the following schools:
Miss Lautier, :!<i Assistant Jeanerette
i SehooIs ' salary. $40 ; also Misses Mattie
Harro P andMar >' Bader. Jeanerette, salary
$40 each ; Guv Tanner, Bernard School.
vice Miss Bascle, salarv $40 ; Miss ciop
' ton, Stewart School, vice Miss Steele, sal
ai *y $-*<) ; Miss Nell Campbell, Avery is
land - sal;ll - v * 40 : Miss Daisv Kiehardson,
City 8ohoo ' s ' viee Ml s W R Hal °' sal "
ar - v$40 : J - ]) - 11,inter - School,
salary $4i -, w ,, Smithi Pai k Perdu,
! salary $40 = Miss M. LeBmn, Beuna Vis
t :1 - salary, $40 ; Miss Laura Keid, Der
ouen, salary. $40; A. S. Reniek. Dugas,
salary $35 ; Miss Lucy B. Wells, Stock
ier, salary, $40.
President Lawton stated that I'rof. Du
puv, of tho Jeanerette schools, asked that
his salary be increased to $"."> per month.
In accordance with the request, and the
K'eod services rendered by Prof. Dupuy,
Dr. Pierson moved, which motion was sec
onded and carried, that the request be
granted, and that from the 1st of April,
the salary be $75 per month.
President Lawton also announced the
acceptance of the resignation of the prin
cipal of the city schools, Prof. J. E.
Keeny, who had accepted a chair in the
State Normal School at Natchitoches, La.,
and in his stead the selection by the Com
mittee on Teachers of Mr. W. B. Hale as
principal at a salary of $100 per month; ;
VINE
LAND
GRAPE JUICE.
In the sickroom there is no bev
erage more nourishing nor more
palatable than the rich unfer
mented juice of the luscious Con
cord Grape And for those in
health, unfermented grape juice
is the best of all beverages.
-AT
LEE'S.
Drink only the
Best and Purest
"Harmony Club"
RYE WHISKEY.
On sale at GIRARD'S SALOON, New Iberia.
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p.
N mrtffinal plan, under which you ran obtain ensier trrmm > n< i .
chase of the world famout "White ' Sewin*» Maehin* than mlue \n the p«r
elegant catalogue and detailed particular* hÎÏ w i-Î of+r+H. \\ rite for onr
a high grade »ewing machine and the m«y «erwur *f »mifmnt ThiîtT ****** in V*® p#rffcii * °f
afford to pa**. I on knotr th* « White*— h î opportunity tou cannot
srription of the machine and iu fon.trotionare ~mrr r Mm 1^?^ therefore * detailed de
«•hange, we WrtteïUS? ^Addr^Tin Sî: " W "
»oole
Main Office: NEW IBERIA, LA.
«•Excla.ive control of Iberia. Lafayette, St. Martin and Vermilion Parfahe..
UK'K BOX S3»
E. C. FEWER.
P risidixt.
JOHN GLYNN, J*,.
VlCB P bcsidext.
C. H. SOLANAS.
SBrrr-Tar*».
Carriages, Surreys, Phaetons, Buggies, Har
ness, Etc., Studebaker Wagons.
315 Magazine Stmt .... ^ ^
KITE FOR CATOLOOCB AND PRICES.
Regulator
The Best Liver Medicine.
| ***■» Price tfa.
Package on the Market.
•tea
roe sale by james a . lee .
:
also the selection of Mr. John T. Mosely
at a salary of $85 per month, to succeed
Mr. Hale as assistant principal.
The completion of the commodious new
school building at Loreauville, at a total
eost of $ , was announced. The pres
ent standing old school building at Lo
reauville being of no service to the School
Board, it was decided to sell same to any
bidder. For particulars any one who de
sires to purchase same, might apply to
Mr. J. B. Lawton, presidout of the Board.
The furniture for the Loreauville school
having alieady been ordered, would short
ly reach here.
The President of the Board stateii that
in accordance with a previous resolution
of the Board, appropriating the sum of
$25, which was intended to assist in the
maintenance of the free night in New Ibe
ria. La., had given the Kev. C. Kramer
a warrant for the above amount.
Supt. Pierson reported to the Boatd that
an institute of one week had been held in
Jeanerette during the month of February,
the corpoiation of Jeaneiette beaiing all
the expense of the institute, where all the
white teachers of the parish with two ex
ceptions were in constant attendance.
Prof. J. B. Aswell, State Institute Con
ductor, ably assisted by Miss Elsie Cross,
conducted the week's institute, and it is
not extravagant to say that the institute
with its superb good results, was ihe best
in the history of tho parish.
Mr. T. Duplantis, of the second ward,
appeared before the Board with the re
quest that a new school be established at
or near Lydia, claiming that there were
many children in that neighborhood with
out school opportunities. Thereupon it
was moved, seconded and carried, that in
so far as the present school term was so
far advanced and the new school board
would bo appointed before long, it was
deemed best to take no definite action
just yet, but to refer the matter to the
School Board of the parish at some future
meeting.
Similar action was taken with reference
to the establishment of a school at Grand
Marais, at this particular season of the
year.
A bill of Dr. Pierson of $4.65, for
stamps, stationery, telegrams, telephones
and expressage, being found correct, up
on motion of Mr. Weeks, was ordered
paid.
Upon motion of Dr. Pierson, duly sec
onded and carried, the school board ad
journed till some day in May, subject to
the call of the President.
C larence P ierson *, Sectv.

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