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The true Democrat. [volume] (Bayou Sara [La.]) 1892-1928, December 12, 1896, Image 1

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Official Journal of the Parish of West Feliciana and School Board.
W. W. LEAKE, Jr., Pub. and Prop ST. FRANCISVILLE, WEST FbLICfANA PARISH, LA., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1896. VOL NO 44
.. . .. .. . . . m- •-- l· mm m t mm m • mm
Samuel J. Powell, John H. Stone,
St. Fr:wmeisville. Clinton, La,
POWELL & STONE,
Attolrneys - at - Law,
St. Francisville, La.
ODBT. SErLPLE. W. R. PEBCY.
SEMPLE & PERCY,
,&ttorntey -- at -- Law.
Will practice in any court in this
district.
-Office in Bank Building.-
ST. FRANCISVILLE, LOUISIANA.
DR. A. F. BARROW,
:Fyslcian and Surgeon,
St. Franci:;ville, La.
Office in Leako building. Telephone
calls answered from either Kilbourne's
or Mumford's drug stores.
DR. H. LOFTON,
DENTIST.
Crown and IBril ge Work
a Specialty.
Will be in St. Franciaville ,n the last
and in Clinton on the 15th of each
month.
SIDNEY POWELL, D.D.S.,
DENTIST,
t. Francisviiie, - Louisiana,
Is prepared to do all work in
his line. Office at residence.
A. T. Gastrell,
HARDWY ARE, STOVES, WAGON
and CARRIAGE WOOD WORK.
House Furnishing Coods.
ROPE, WOODS' 31 WING MA
CHINES, HAY RAKES, SASH,
BLINDS, DOORS, ETC.
JOSEPH STERN,
....Dealer in....
General
Verchancise.
Lvery Stable in Connection With Store,
A supply of Horses and Mules for sale.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
JOS. STERN,
Foot of 11ill.
L. P. KILBOUR1E,
Druggist
and Chemist,
Corner Royal and Prosperity Streets,
St. Francisville, La.
Prescriptions carefully compounded.
Choice selection of Drugs, Patent
Medicines, and Notions.
Fresh Carden Seed on Hand
T . W. RAYNHAM,
Contractor
and Builder.
ahab, Doors and Dreased Lumber kept
constantly on hand at shop,
near residence,
Prices to Suit the Times.
Southern
Insurance
Company
Of New Orleans, La.
Cash capital..............$300,000
Cash assets.............. 625,000
s quitaJlg Adllusteo ant
Promptly Pai
Zaaures Gin Bouses, Saw Mills, Coun
try Stores, Dwelling Houses
and Barns. Address,
W,W. Leake, Jr., Local Agent,
Signal arlb b glaees.
Feliciana
Female Collegiata
Institute,
.,JACKSON, LOUISIARA...
The 48th session of this Institution
will open September 1, 1896. The
members of the Faculty are ladies of
culture. SPECIALISTS in e.ch depart
ment. Superior advantages are there
by offered to those young ladies desir
ing a thorough urtd finished education.
The health of the Institution is unsur
passed.
For particulars and catalogue ad
dress,
j MISS L. J CATLETT, Prin.,
Jackson, La.
"HOME SWEET HOME,
STI[ERE'S 15O PLACE LIKE HOME,"
Is a universal sentiment, and for that
reason doubly well named is that ex
cellent School,
The
Home
Institute.
To the young ladies and girls in its
charge it gives the advantages of in
struction in literature, science and art,
combined with all the environments of
a refined home; so that while the mind
is cultivated the heart is not neglected
in learning the ways of noble woman
hood.
For catalogue and terms, apply to
MISS SOPHIE ., WRIGHT, Prin..
1456 Camp Street, New Orleans, La.
STATE NORMAL SCHOOL,
NATCHITOCHES, LA.
Maintained by the State for the
training of teachers. Affords thorough
preparation for the profession of teach
ing; full course of academic study,
practical training in the art of teach
ing, one year of daily practice in
model school] under guidance of skill
ed training teachers. Class work ex
emplifies the best of modern thought
in matter and method of instruction.
Diploma entitles graduate to teach in
any public school of Louisiana without
examination.
Tuition free to students who teach
one year after graduation. Entire ex
pense for session of eight month, $110.
Twelfth annual session begins Oct.
1, 1896.
For catalogue write to
B, C. CAL, WELL, Pres.
BANK HOTEL,
MRS. F. M. DAVIDSON, Prop.
Board by Day,Week or Month,
TERMS, $1.50 PER DAY.
Monthl)y rates made on application,
Location, central. SPrround
ings, pleasant. Tran
sients solicited.
Bank Building, St. Francisville, Louisiana.
Hotel Windsor,
...t.$SAil81TER, LA..,.
Mrs. J. O. Howell, Proprietress.
... BOARD....
By the day or month. Single Meals
Furnished;
Chas. W2eydert,
....BAYOU SARA, LA.....
Blac idl and Wheelwrilit,
LOCIK and GUNSM1ilTIHI,
Boiler and Gin Stand Repairing a Speolalty.
All work that remains in my shop over
90 days will be sold to pay cost.
J. G. DIEM,
,...St. Francisville, La..
Practical Tin Smith,
COPPER and SHEET.IRON.
WORKER,
Tin Cuttering and Rooflng
a 8peolalty.
l"All work guaranteed,.
THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE,
To Congress of the United States.
As representatives of the people in the
legislative branch of their government,
you have assembled at a time when the
strength and ýxcvllence of our free in
stitutions and the fitness of our citizens
to enjoy popular rule has again been
made manifest. A pultical eJntest in
volving momentous consequences
fraught with fevorih aprehension and
creating aggressivencss so intense as to
ap)prach bitterness and passion, has
ben ~ aged throughout our land and
dctrmi:rues by the decree of free and in
dependent suffrage without disturhan:.e
of our trantluqlity or the least sign of,
wcaknessa in our constitutional strue
ture. Whean we conid r these incidents
and couitenipato the peaceful obedience
and manly submission which have suc
ceeded a heated clash of political opin
ions. we Adi-cov\(r abundant evidexrc2 of
a dcterminati.-,n on the part of our coun
trymen to abide by 'the verdict of the
popular wiil and be controlledI at all
times by an abiding faith in the agen
cies established for the direction of the
affairs of the g,\overnment. Thus our
peole:l exhibit a patri :tte disposittion
which entidles them to demand of those
who under:ako to make and execute
the laes sai h faithfp.l and unse!fish ser
vice in the:r l:ehalf as can only be
prompt.-d by a serikus appreeiation of
the trust and c idaidenco wlleh thll'e
cepitane of public: duty involves. The
above cndnit'ons are hereby agreed to.
ARMIENIAN OUTRAGES.
At the :utset of a reference to the
ore imnportant matters affecting our
relations with foreign powers, it would
afford me satisfaction if I could assure
the congress that tho disturbed condi
tion in Asiatic-Turkey had, during the
past year, assumed a less hideous and
bloody aspect, and that there, as a con
sequence of the awakening of the Tur
kish government to the demand of hu
mane civilization, or as the result of de
cisive action upon the part of great na
tions having the right by treaty to in
terfere for the protection of those ex
posed to the rage of mad biggotry and
cruel fanaticism, the shocking features
of the situation had been mitigated. In
stead of the government affording a
softened disposition or protective inter
vention, we have been affected by con
tinued and not infrequent reports of the
wanton destruction of homes and the
bloody butchery of men and women and
children made martyrs to their profes
sion of Christian faith. While ione of
our citizens in Turkey have thus far
been killed or wounded, though often in
the midst of dreadful scenes of danger,
their safety in the future is by no
mean assured. Our government at
home and our minister at Constantino
ple has left nothing undone to protect
our missionaries in the Ottoman terri
tory, who constitute all the individuals
residing there who have right to claim
our protection on the score of American
citizenship. Our efforts in this direc
tion will not be relaxed, but'the deep
feeling and sympathy that have been
aroused among our people ought not to
so far blind their reason and judgment
as to lead them to demand impossible
things. The outbreaks of blind fury
which led to murder and pillage in Tur
key, occur suddenly and without notice
and an attempl)t on our part to force
such a hostile presence there as might
be effected for prevention or protection
would not only be resisted by the Otto
man government, but wvuld he regardl
ed as an interruption of their plans by
the great nations who assert their ex
clusive right to interfere, in their own
time and method for the security for
life and property in Turkey.
CUBAN INSURRECTION.
The insurrection in Cuba still con
tinues with all its perplexities. It is
difficult to perceive that any progress
has thus far been made towards the
pacification of theisland,or thatthe sit
untion of affairs as depicted in my last
annual message has in the least im
proved. Spain still holds Havana and
the seaports and all the considerable
towns. The insurgents still rove at
wi!l over two-thirds of the Inland coun
try. If the determination of Spain to
put down the insurrection seems but to
strengthen with the lapse of time, and
is evidenced by her unhesitating dei'o
tion of a largely increased military and
naval force to the task, there is much
reason to believe that the insurgents
have gained in point of numbers
and character and resources, and are
none the less inflexible in their resolve
not to succumb without practically se
curing the great objects for which they
tok up arms. If Spain has not re-es
tablished her authority, neither have
the insurgents, yet made good their ti
tle to beregarded as an independent
State. Indeed, as the contest has gone
on, the pretense that civil government
exists on the island, except so far as
Spain is able to maintain it, has been
practically abandoned. Spain does
keep on foot such a government more
or less imperfectly in the large towns
and their immediate suburbs, but that
exception being made, the entire coun
try is either given over to anarchy or is
subject to the military occupation of
one or the other party.
It !s r p-rtcd, indeed, on relinabe au
thority, that at the demand of the com
mander-fln-chief of te insurgent ar
my, th= r putative Cuban government
has nnw gven up all attempt to exer
cise i s furctions, leaving that govern
ment confessedly (what there is the best
reason for suposing it always to have
been in fact) a government merel , on
paner. TWe:e the Spanish armies able to
meet their antago*lsts in.the open or in
pt he l battle, prompt and decisive re
suits might le looked for, and the im
mense superiority of the Spanish forcesa
in numbers, discipline and equlipmnent'
could hardly fail to tell greatlytto their
advantage. Biit they are called upon to
face a fo? that can chose and does
chose its own ground, that from the na
ture of the country is visible or invis
Ible at pleasure, and that fights only
from ambuscade and when all the ad
vantages of position and numbers are
on its side. In a country where all that
is indispensable to life in the Way of
food, c:othing and shelter is so easily
obtainable, especially by those born and
bred on the soil, it is obvious that there
is partly a limit to the time during
which hostilities of this sprt may be
prolonged. Meanwhile, as in all cases
of protracted civil strife, the passions
of the combatants grow mere and more
inflamed and excesses on both sides be
come frequent and mor_ deplorable.
They ar5 ai'o pzrticepated in by bands
of raatade s who now in th.l name of
one pai3;y, and :ow ino the namn of the
o ther as may best suit the occasion, har
rass the country at will and plunder its
wre:ch- d inl:abitaTts for their own ad
Vantage. Such a conlition cf things
would inevitably entail immense' d
structlon of property even if it were the
policy of both parties, to prevent it as
far as practicab:e.. But while such
seemed to be the original policy of the
Spanish government, it has now appar
ently abandoned it, and is acting upon
the same theory as the insurgents,
namely, ihat the exigencies of the con
test requires the wholesale annihilation
of property, that it may not prove of
use and advantage to the enemy. It is
for the same end that in pursuance of
general orders, Spanish garrisons are
now being withdrawn from plantati.ns
and the rural population required to
concentrate itself in the towns. The
result would seem to be that the indus
trial value of the island is fast dimin
ishing and that unliss there is a speedy
and radical change in existing cond:
tions it will soon disappear altogether,
as the value Consists very largely of
course by its capacity, already much re
duced by the interruptions to tillage,o
wrhlch have taken place during the last
two years. It is reliably asserted that
should the interruptions be contfniued
during the current year and practically
extsnd, as is now threatened, to the en
tire sugar producing territory of the'ls
land, so much time and so much n:pney
will be required to restore the' land to
its normal 1:roductitene-s that it is ex
tremely doubtful if capital can be in
duced to even make the attempt. The
spectacle of the utter ruin of an adjoin
ing country, by nature one of the mos:
fertile and charming on the globe, would
engage the serious attention of the gov
ernment and people of the United State;
in any circumstance. In polat of f.ct
they hate a concerti:'*ith it which is
by no means of a wholly sentimental
or philanthropic character. It lies so
near to us as to be hardly separated
from our territory. Our actual pecu
niary interest in it second. only to
that of the people and government of
Spain. It is ieasonably estimated that
at least from $30,000 009 to $53,000,000 of
American capital are invested in p'an
tatlons and railroads, mining, and the
other business enterpirses on the island.
The volume of trade between the.UJnited
States and Cuba which in 1889 amount
ed to about $04,000,000, rose in 1893 to
about $103,00,000, and In 1894, the year
before the present insurrection broke
out, amounted to nearly $90,000,000. Be
s:des this large pecuniary stake in the
fortunes of Cuba, the United States
linds it e:f inextri:ably involved in the
present contest in other ways, both vex
a:ious and costly.
Many Cubans reside in this country
and indirectly promote the insurrection
through the press, by public metings,
by the purchase and shipment of arms,
by the raising of funds and by. other
means, which the spirit, of our Insfitu-'
tions and the tenor of otrt.jlaws do, not
permit to be made the~ tbject of 'eritnl
nal prosecutions., Some ofi tqni,tlhough
Cubans at heart and in all their feel
ings and interests, have taken out nat
uralizatIon papers as citizens of the
United tSates, a proceeding reqorted to
with a view of possible protection by
this government and not unnaturally
regarded with much indignation by the
country of their origin. The insurgents
are undoubtedlY encouraged and sup
ported by the widespread sympathy the
people of this country always and in
stinctively feel for every struggle for
better and freer government, and
which, in the case of the more ad
venturous and restless elements of our
population, leads, in only too many in
stances, to active participation in the
contest. The result is that this gov
ernment is constantly called Upon to
protect American citizens, to claim
damages for injuries to person and
property, now estimated at many mil
lions of dollai and to ask explanations
and apologies' for the acts of Spanish
officials whose zeal for the oppression
of rebellion sometimes blinds them to
immunities belonging to the unoffend
ing citizens of a friendly power. It fol
lows from the same causes that the
United States is compelled to actively
police .a long line of sea coast against
unlawful expeditions, the escape of
which the utmost vigilance will not al
ways suffice to prevent. These inevit
ably entangle the United States with
the rebellion in Cuba.. American prop
erty interest affected, a consideration of
philanthropy and humanity ,n general,
have leo to a vehement demand in -
rious quarters for son [email protected]
Intervention on the pt of t $
States. It was, 'at! t Jrop
bel'igerent riits tudbe a
the insurgents, a tb4ilon n
urge'd, becruie s Tii ,,
ticable operat Y
ilous 'ad inJ.u
It has s'. ·.ii'
times contenf ,'d,
of the insurgent~
but Inrqerfect at.
Spanish gove"nmn
be,no. other existh
4f. the milltary -.
coliiaand of a part'
1Ugilfied' as a spd
- ,, tiiu,
SAiQ. ,Iwaso; Pree, A. TiuRTcn, Viee-Pre . . J. Bo~os
BANK OF WEST FELIGIAN ,
. ...ST. FRANCISVILLE, LA....
Cash Capital, - - - $25,000
Safely Deposit Boxes for Rent,
Exchange bought and sold. Prompt service guaranteed. Your bnsine.: isa
solicited. Bank hours from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
DIRECTO s:--E. J. Buck, S. McO. Lawrason, Adolph Te.teob, O. D.
Brooks, L. P. lilbourine, James Leake, M. D.; John P. Irvine, Sr.; E. I'I
Newsham, Robert Dauiel, T. W. Butler.
F . M. Mumford, M.D.,
.....DEALER IN.....
DRUGS AND CHEMICALS,
.....Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Soaps and 3rushes.....
Fine Stationery & Blank Bookh,
.....PENS, INK and PENCILS.....
CUTLERY, NOVELTIES and FANCY COODS,
CIGARS and TOBACCO.
PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLy CDMPOUNDED.
Agency of F. Hammer & Company's READ
MIXED PAINTS.
NEW GOODS I NEW PRICES
Roumain Bros.,
The Jewelers,
.... BATON ROUCE, LA....
For the Fall and Winter Trade we have as. :
cured the finest selection ever seen in this puetb: -
of the State of
Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Jewelaly,
Optical Goods, and Silverware,
AT THE VERY LOWEST MARKET PRICEti.
We can and will sell lower than any house in the South. We give a pez
sonal guarantee on all goods bought of us. Country orders solicited and
promptly attended to. .
Fine Watch Repairing and Engraving a Specialty.
A Few Words
With You About Clothes......
We have one thousand Suits of Men's Fine 0lothing jiua
from the tailor's hands, new and up-to-date Styles-we ami
fit yaour figure as well as your purse.
OUR STYLES ARE EXCLUSIVE I!
Not to be found elsewherea ur price range froam ISbi;l
to $25.00.
S. 1. ReyJnmond,
BATON ROUGE, LA,
L . 'p b- I u'E
/- S
_____________ j3

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