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The true Democrat. [volume] (Bayou Sara [La.]) 1892-1928, November 28, 1914, Image 2

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The True Democrat
ELRIE ROBINSON,
MRS. MAY E. ROBINSON,
Editors.
Official Journal of the Parish of West
Feliciana, the Towns of Bayou Sara
and St. Francisville, and of the School
Board.
We also own and publish the Felici
ana Record, a weekly newspaper for
he town of Jackson, La. Advertisers
will do well to get joint rates for both
papers.
Entered at the Post Office at St.
Francisville, La., as second class mail
Subscription $1.50 a Year In Advance,
Saturday, November 28, 1914.
SMALL VS. LARGE FARMS.
A planter-friend of ours, who says
that "we hear too much nowadays
about dividing up into small farms,"
sends in the article prepared by the
government bureau on "the relation of
size of business to the farmer's in
come." But while the article shows
that on farms in the west, with capital
of less than $10,000, the labor income
was only $1,000; and where only $5,500
was invested, the labor income was
$235; the land seems to have been all
high priced. The same amount invest
ed in Southern land and equipment
would bring better returns proportion
ately, because the farms would be
larger.
On the other hand it is distinctly
said that "the number of acres is not
always a true measure, as a big busi
ness can be conducted on a small area;
20 acres of truck and small fruits may
equal a 200-acre farm devoted to grain,
hay, cattle, and hogs. It is the type of
farming that determines the number
of acres necessary for efficient opera
tion. Many persons have made the
mistake of buying too high priced land
for successful general farming. In
other words, they paid truck-farming
prices for land which, on account of
market relations, should be used for
only grain and general farming."
The plea for smaller farms is not
made because the small farm per se is
better than the large farm, but the
division is proposed because the large
plantations have not been properly
farmed or manipulated, and greater
returns would follow more intensive
cultivation. No one wants to put out
of business the big farms that are
thoroughly cultivated. It is surely
better to have 10,000 bushels of oats
to sell than only 100, but the small
farm opens the door of hope to the
poor young man, whose capital is too
limited for anything larger: If he has
real ability he will in time acquire the
big farm and make it pay.
OUR FATHERS WERE NOT
80 BLIND.
The farmer of to-day, land-poor,
sugar-poor or cotton-poor, is apt to
consider the wisdom of the agricul
tural schools as so much folly, pure
and simple, and the teachings of such
institutions as theoretical, quite un
tried and probably unpractical. The
man who comes to such conclusions
has forgotton or he never knew the
history of the South in ante-bellum
days. Then no planter confined him
self to one crop. He may have done
so for a'fnoney crop, as many com
modities which he raised in abund
ance, it was impracticable to handle
for shipment, when transportation was
slow and uncertain. But he raised
enough meat and lard to supply his
family from year's end to year's end.
His barns overflowed with provender
for his stock. His meal was home
made, his poultry and fruit home
grown. On the plantation there was
the greatest diversification of crops
and of industries. The greater the di
versification, the ampler the home life,
the larger the fortune.
Diversification is no new project.
It is an old forgotten lesson, in process
of being re-learned, more or less pain
fully, as one is slow or quick, stub
born or facile to see good and follow it.
ARMED PEACE.
Believing "Armaments Mean Peace"
They kept the cannon loaded;
But when the first spark found release,
Their theory exploded!
Most of us who are inclined to be
lieve that "armament means peace"
are disillusioned by the outcome as set
forth in the above-quoted stanza from
the New York Mail.
On the other hand, the experience
of Luxemburg and Belgium, does not
lead one to trust very heavily to the
fact that because a nation is unpre
pared for war, little, or peaceably in
clined, any protection is assured to it
thereby, should it lie in the way of a
stronger nation set out to war.
Disarmament can only come about
by agreement of the world's powers.
Until then, a country, that remains un
equipped for defense, does so at its
peril.
It apparently grieves the N. O. Item
that the United States is 'not at war
with Mexico: but the superlative rea
son for thankfulness is that our coun
try is at peace with the world.
PISTOL IS POPULAR.
"The pocket pistol is without a friend
save the outlaw who provides himself
with the weapon made to kill people,"
says the Homer Guardian-Journal. Not
so. The pocket pistol has innumerable
friends, passive if not active. The
blind ministers of the Gospel who fail
to denounce it; the smug officers of
the law who never see it when most
it should be seen; the timid legislators,
who are afraid to pass laws against it;
the easy public opinion that permits it
to exist as an easily bought, sold, and
carried weapon of the day. The trouble
is, it has too many friends.
When it has no friend but the out
law then will the ministers and the
sheriffs, the judges and the lawmakers
decry it and it will be no longer the
companion of manly men.
WOMAN'S WORK ON THE FARM.
The story is told in a farm paper of
how both a woman and her daughter
became cripplied temporarily, so that
the men of the family relieved them of
wood- and water-getting and other
chores so heavy upon feminine
strength. This woman happily con
cludes the account thus:
"We both walk a little now, but we
are never going to walk well enough
to milk the cows, carry in wood and
do heavy lifting again. We have learn
ed that it is man's place to do the
outside work, that a woman cannot
be a good home-maker if she is tired.
We have learned that the boys should
be taught to be tender to their mother
and sister, and that the man is really
happier when the women are cheerful
and pretty and rested and have a clean
house, and the things they like to eat
ready for them when they come in
cold, than when the women are wor
ried and tired, with working beside
them in the barn or field or garden."
She is right. Men are at their best
when their tenderness and chivalry are
called out in protecton of the weaker
sex:
THE LAW OF LOVE.
Col. C. Harrison Parker's interview
given to an evening paper was in a
humorous vein when he said that
modern crimes, such as shooting into
a boxcar, food adulteration, carrying
concealed weapons, ballot box stuffing,
auto speeding and innumerable others,
are not touched upon by Moses in the
Decalogue.
Not specifically of course, but the
commandment of Jesus "to love thy
neighbor as thyself" is comprehensive
enough to admonish against all crimes,
that the man of to-day or to-morrow
can invent.
"I shall pass through this world but
once. Any good, therefore, that I can
do, or any kindness that I can show to
any human being, let me do it now.
Let me not deter nor neglect it, for I
shall not pass this way again," said
Robert Louis Stevenson. The men
and women, who have been inspired
to deeds, even lives of kindliness to
their fellow-men, by this beautiful re
mark of Stevenson's, are unnumbered,
but their name is legion. Does not
any reader feel a quickening of the
spirit when he reads it? "I shall not
pass this way again." This particular
opportunity never comes again. An
other chance may, but not this one.
Use it, for it will not pass thit way
again.
A prominent New York City hotel
has placed in its lobby a bale of cotton,
with this inscription on one side:
"Cotton good as gold. Cotton ware
house receipts accepted by the hotel
in payment of room accounts." On the
other side this appears: "Why don't
you buy a bale of cotton and help the
South? Inquire at office," etc. This is
proving faith by works.
Florida out-flanked Louisiana's own
Orange Day by striking advertisement
in national papers, on that day, of its
oranges. No harm was done. If Florida
induces people to eat oranges, at all,
the chance for Louisiana oranges is
increased.
Sheriff Peterman of St. Mary's has
taken a flight in an air ship, which was
more fun even than building air-castles
with the Bull Mice.
It looks like poetic justice for the
Zeppelin factory to be injured by
bombs thrown from the sky.
A boy at Brookhaven, Miss., who was
chastised for fighting by his teacher,
actually died of mortification over the
fact. Must have been different from
the average boy.
The printing press has made presi
dents, killed poets, made bustles for
beauties and punished genius with crit
icism. It has curtailed the power of
kings, converted bankers into paupers
and graced pantry shelves. It has
made paupers college presidents; it
has educated the poor and robbed the
philosopher of his reason. It smiles,
cries, dies, but it can't be run to suit
everybody, and the man will be crazy
who trie,
WHERE PROGRESSIVE PARTY
FELL SHORT.
Gifford Pinchot in "The Masses"
startlingly tells why the Progressive
party failed to make good. He calls
it "a party without a cause."
"It should", he contends," either
have undertaken to go deeply and in
telligently into the cause of the econ
omic troubles which threaten the peace
of society or it should have kept its
fingers out of the pie.
"It did neither. Under blind leader
ship, the party followed a shallow,
middle-of-the-road course, with no se
rious economic program; with only a
series of unobjectionable reforms, sup
posedly adapted to vote-getting from
all quarters.Carrying a withered and de
cidedly suspicious-looking olive branch
to labor and capital, and to democracy
and oligarchy alike, it pleaded for ap
proval. The plea was rejected."
Pinchot describes how, cleverly and
insidiously, the moral zeal and enthus
iasm of the thousands of earnest men
and women who had leaped to join the
hew party, because they had hoped it
would be a power for economic justice,
was betrayed by the men in charge of
its machinery.
"Within a few months from the
party's birth a new atmosphere," he
says, "began to pervade its councils.
The fight against privilege was aban
doned. Any one who now talked about
'privilege' or the distribution of wealth
was called a visionary or a doctrinaire.
In the disputes between the consumer
and the trusts, between labor and the
trusts, and between capital and labor,
the Progressive party headquarters
either kept silent or else took the side
of capital."
When Pinchot, representing the rad
icals of the group, protested to Colonel
Roosevelt at this mischievous reac
tionary influence of Treasurer Perkins,
Pinchot says that T. R. replied:
"I believe that the spirit, however
honest, which prompts the assault on
Perkins, is the spirit which, if it be
comes dominant in the party, means
that from that moment it is an utter
waste of time to expect any good from
the party whatsoever, and that the
party will at once sink, and deservedly
sink, into an unimportant adjunct of
tae Debs movement."
So Perkins was continued at the box
office, and the party literature varied
between eulogies of Perkins and the
steel and harvester trusts to attacks
on the principle of public ownership.
Pinchot concludes as follows:
"The Progressive program had some
thing of everything in it, from the care
of babies to the building of a bircLh
bark canoe. Yet it contained little
which dealt with the actual problems
of the United States in any but the
most superficial manner.
"We may affirm, in the most earnest
way, that wages should be higher, and
working conditions better; or that
honesty is the best policy; or that the
camel is the ship of the desert and the
dog the ebest friend of man. But we
cannot build a new party on such. The
public deserves specifications.
"As Thoreau said, if you find a trout
in the milk it is circumstantial evi
dence, not proof. And if in a Progise
sive party you find the steel or har-s
vester trusts, carrying its financial
burden and directing its policies, it is
not proof-but it is at least suggestive
of a certain dilution of purposes."
The Broussard bill now pending in
th9 Senate will make New Orleans a
port of entry for beef cattle. This
trade has heretofore been turned to
Galveston, Savannah and other points.
The bill is designed to open up for
Louisiana an extensive industry for
New Orleans and Baton Rouge, both
deep water harbors where equally
good facilities may be enjoyed for
bringing in feeders from South Ameri.
can ports and once this bill becomes a
law we should have stock yards at
each of these points to supply the great
range of country, north, east and west,
for nowhere is forage so cheaply and
easily raised, considering the twelve
months of the year as in the region
adjacent to the lower Mississippi
valley.
DR. DOWLING AND HIS HEALTH
CARS.
Economists, who are alarmed lest
Dr. Dowling's health cars are costing
too much, are informed:
1. That through the courtesy o the
railroads, subject to a ruling of
the Interstate Commerce Commission,
transportation is gratis.
2. That the extension and thorough
educational, inspectional work of the
State Board of Health as conducted by
the present executive officer costs the
state little more than did the mainte
nance of a certain near sinecure that
was abolished shortly after Dr. Dowl
ing's appointment to the presidency.
3. That Dr. Dowling, in devoting his
entire time to the public service, an
nually donates to the state at least
$10,000, representing conservatively
the difference between his earning ca
pacity and the $5,000 paid him.
Ducks rill clear ponds of mosquito
larvae. Observatiqn has shown that
ducks are avid in the pursuit of such
larvae, and their disturbance of the
water, completes destruction of the
pests,
TO FARMERS AND LIVE STOCK
RAISERS OF LOUISIANA.
Realizing the importance of stock
raising throughout Louisiana, and the
necessity of eradicating the diseases
of charbon and hog cholera, I have had
my inspectors and farm demonstrators
taught by practical demonstration the
proper mode of vaccinating against
charbon and hog cholera by Dr. E. P.
Flower, veterinary surgeon and secre
tary of the Louisiana State Live Stock
Sanitary Board.
You are, therefore, tendered the as
sistance of anhy of the inspectors and
demonstrators of my department. Call
upon the nearest one in your territory
and he will gladly assist you in vacci
nating your stock to prevent the spread
of these diseases.
E. O. BRUNER,
Comm. of Agriculture and Immigration.
SOME SLAUGHTER WE CAN STOP.
(New Orleans States.)
When the cable brings word of thou
sands slaughtered in battle, the chances
are that most of us are still sensitive
enough to shudder, and to say, at the
supper table, where we sit and eat in
peace: "Too bad! too bad!"
Of course, we have to let it go at
that, for there isn't anything else that
we can do.
But if you happened to notice a re
cent bulletin of the Chicago health de
partment on the subject of mortality
due to preventable bad air, the chances
are you weren't shocked at all, not.
withstanding the yearly death toll in
that one city is 10,000 and the fact
that you could do something to reduce
it, if you tried.
What could you do do you ask?
Well, for one thing, you could throw
your owdn windows open wide, every
little while, to let the foul air out, and
keep the windows open all night in the
bedrooms.
Then, if the street car, the lodge
room, the church or the other public
place in which throngs gather isn't
properly ventilated, you could register
a kick and keep on kicking till some
thing was done to improve matters.
Bad air is nothing more or less in
the world than bad habit. There is
plenty of good air absolutely free of
cost and waiting to be used. So it's
nobody's fault but your own if we
don't use all we need of it.
You've probably heard the
story of the little Mississippi
steamboat that had uch a big
whistle that every time it
blew the boat STOPPED.
That's the way with some
newspapers about their value
as an advertising medium.
We try not to blow too
boisterously. Our "Little
Ads" are giving a lot of folks
satisfaction. YOU test them
and see.
"LITTLE ADS,"
FOR SALE-Creole Onion Plants, 10c
per 100, 90c per 1000. AMADEE S.
LEONARD. (28N4
WANTE D-A three hundred acre
tract of land. Seller to give particulars
as to location, price per acre, water
supply, and improvements, etc. W. K.
DOUGLAS, Agent, Wilcox, La.
LAND
WANTED
We have buyers for farms, planta
tions, timber, cutover and large tracts
of all kinds. Must be bargains. De
scribe fully, name bottom price and
terms. DE SOTO LAND CO., Masonic
Bldg., Baton Rouge, La. (14N4
FOR SALE-Cabbage Plants, $1 per
1000. C. A. TIEBOUT, Roseland, La.
FOR SALE -Frost-proof cabbage
plants, $1 per 1000; Bermuda Yellow
Onion Sets, $1.50 per 1000. Buy at
home. G. L. PLETTINGER.
Antique mahogony furniture wanted.
Address A. A. S., 1448 La. Avenue,
New Orleans, La. 8
FOR SALE-Red Rust Proof Seed
Oats, Pea Vine and Lespedeza Hay
and Seed. JAS .P. BOWMAN.
FOR SALE-25 high grade South
down Ewes, bred to registered ram,
$3 each. PARKER STOCK FARM.
FOR SALE-A few fine Duroo-Jersey
pigs. PARKERI STOCK FARM. tt
FOR SALE-Grade Hereford Cattle.
Lespedeza Hay and Seed.
EDWARD BUTLER,
St. Francisville. La.
NOTICE.
Automobiles will not be permitted
in the Rosedown field.
tf JAS. P. BOWMAN.
I will appreciate any information
leading to the recovery of cattle brand
ed N. 6. that may have strayed from
the pastures near Plettenberg.
F. S. PERCY, Agent,
Plettenberg, La.
EDENBORN LINE
(Louisiana Railway & Navigation Co.)
THE SHORT LINE THE POPULAR ROUTE
BETWEEN
Shreveport, Alexandria,
Baton Rouge and New Orleans
and to all points in the East and Southeast
E. C. D. MARSHALL,
General Freight and Passenger Agent
Shreveport, La.
SEEDS
CLOVERS, OATS, RYE, ETC., CABBAGE, ONION, TURNIP, ETC.
PLANTS
CABBAGE, CELERY, CAULIFLOWER
LEHMANN'S SEED STORE.
245 Main St., BATON ROUGE, LA.
DAY-NIGHT1 E88iONS.
Bookkeeping Gregg Shorthand
Arithmetic Roge Touch Typewriting
Rapid Baton Rouge Engllsh
Calculation Spelling
Penmanship B siness College Punctuation
Banking Cllege Definitions
Business Law Grammar
Civil Service Correspondence
David W. Thomas, A. B., University of Michigan, principal; Miss LeBlano,
Mr. Case, assistant principals. Entire Third Floor, Singletary Building.
EVERY GRADUATE EMPLOYED.
E 1oTH's oES SOOLE COLEGE81
MUOL OF BUSINESS." O OL
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
Shouldbe Sven thebesttsutalastog i
pare them for suacess n business.
SPersonal nastra.tioa., ree $mpom
meant Department, Ctomplete Coi
BansUc olle 8tore and h
No misrepresetatious to sdcts ato.
dents. Through the success ofits
2IO00 former students, Soule Oo legs
L reosiiiie evzcwher as a Wid&
Awake Practical. Ponusie and *P.
0uIO. suLt & bi0le
A
" 4 Postal
Brings
/ This
Book
It is free-it tells how you can have
local and long distance telephone ser
vice in your home at very small cost.
8end for it today. Write nearest Beil Tele.
phone Manager, or
FARMERS' LINE DEPARTMENT
Cumberland Telephone
and Telegraph Company
INCORPORATED.
482 80UTH PROYOR STREET, ATLANTA, GA.
PAPCEL POST SERVICE
KEAN BROS.
LAUNDRY AND BOWSER'8
SYSTEM OF DRY CLEANING
Baton Rouge, La.
Coats . . . . . . 785
Trousers .... . 50c
Vests . . . ... . 25
Ladies' Dresses a Specialty.
We pay return postage
on 50c or more.
HIGHEST PRICES
PAID FOR
HIDES, MOS AND
COUNTRY PRODUCE
M. NEWSTADTER,
OFFICE AND TELEPHONE AT
D. W. LEVY'S STORE.
It pays to advertise.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given to all persons,
Arms and corporations whose names
appear as depositors on the books of
the Farmers and Merchants Bank, of
St. Francisville, Louisiana, calling upon
them to present their claims for such
deposits, for adjustment, to the State
Examiner of State Banks, or his duly
appointed Special Agent, L. W. Rogers,
at the office of said Bank at St. Fran
cisville, Louisiana, on or before the
eighth day of October, 1914. This notice
is given in accordance with the pro
visions of Act 300 of 1910.
W. L. YOUNG,
State Examiner of State Banks.
L. W. ROGERS,
Special Agent.
(Sept. 5, Dec. 5.)
On motion, duly seconded, bids will
be received for working the following
roads in the 6th ward (all not worked
by the road outfit): From Mississippi
line to Jackson ford, about 13 miles;
from Mrs. Lee's to cross roads, 5
miles; from Thompson creek to Con
cord church, 2 miles; from Palmer
Smith's to Cas. Smith's, 3 miles; from
Minortown to Whittaker springs, 2
miles; total, 25 miles. Specifications
on file at Clerk of Court. Bond will
be required.
C. F HOWEml, President
L . LEA L N OWiL.

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