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Lower coast gazette. (Pointe-a-la-Hache, La.) 1909-1925, March 21, 1914, Image 1

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064433/1914-03-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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_O IPOINTE-A=LA HACHE; LOJIITTN S," "''TU<'" ', RDAY ,- MARCH 21, ;114 . ;- ..-.: O
I~~~1 -r Ill I Ir I. .- II I l ...
TRADE 'COMMISSION
BILL AGiEED UPON
MEASURE BEARS APPROVVAL OF
PRESIDENT WILSON AND AT.
TORNEY.GENERAL.
FOR CORPORATION CONTROL
Committee of Three, Each Receiving
10,000 a Year, Would Be Vested
With'Power-Action by Con.
gross Expected Soon.
Washington.-The Covington inter
state trade commission bill, bearing
the approval of President Wilson and
Attorney-General McReynolds, war
made public, following many confer
ences among the members of the house
interstate commerce committee. Demo
crats expect this measure to command
substantial republican support, and an
effort probably will be made soon tc
briag about concerted action between
the'senate and house on this phase of
the administration program of comr
merce regulation and anti-trust' legis
lation.
The bill would transfer all the pow.
e's and. duties of the bureau of cor `C
porations and the commissioner of cor" A
porations to the proposed commission P
of three members, presidential ap- ti
pointees, subject .to confirmation, Ii
whose salaries would. be $10,000 an. o
nually each. Only .two of the com.
missioners could be from the same pol
itleal party, ' c
The Covington bill defines as a c6r"
poration all bodies incorporated under
the laws and, joint, stock associations
and -all other associations hivingr
sh'ares of capital or other capital stock N
or organized to carry on business for
profit. One section of the bill .Pro;
,rideo that corpbrations, furni.h an
niat reports to the commissoionifgt
ig all'lanfrmation the commission r~t
qu.r+. Violations of this provisi at
Would bei penalized at $100 a day. li
SENATE RAPS AMBASSADO re
..... Delivered in LondOn.
Washington.-A resolution callins
upon -Walter H. Page, United' States o6
ambalsado: to Great Britain, for anv
explanation of a Panama canal speech
which he is reported to have delivered e
recently before the Associated Chaine
hers of Commerce in London, has been
adopted by the senate. The resolution
was introduced by Senator Chambers t
lai;, democrat, of Oregon, an. opp t
neat Of the repeal of the free tolls pro
vision. 5'
The resolution then calls on the sec.
retary of istte to "furnish to the sen"
at. withoi t delay a copy of the speech aI
teal. by' the Americap ambassador, st
ihd particularly that part thereof glv. le
ii hlts definftlon of the Monroe doe bi
trine saia that portion thereof in which
g~e is alleged to have stated that the
~i~tia Would profit most by tie use ofp
.the'?ntalan canal" G
-hO definition attributed to the am
I 0a;iior was that the Monroe doctrine
!s.imply meant this: "That the United
:te iWould prefer that no European
'i4enment houl( gain p more land i:
TIDAL iWAVE DROWNS 1i,000 h
ioen t" urricane Drives Waters of
th- Sea of AsoV Over Two
Russias Towns. m
iuiflodar/, Rstsa.--Moie than 1,.
000 persoas perished in the inundation s
• th1e tlwns of Sianitst and AAchtyt
s-khaa by a tidal wave from the Sea of
Ast, The Wave struck the towns dur h
.ng a vioblent uirricane. which swept ci
the province of Kiban. More than 150
p ''ioz ero drowned in the floods in
A d.1n collapsd in te town of TNm
yakoni the Tamhan peninsula, 98 miles
torthi~ est of thth city, flooding the a
tirkatef.ipart of the eity and drowning a
many p.ersaons.e The sea' washed'away (
80 ilbadings .in Aehtyrsakaa. Ternm
r: is -historic town with a populac o
tih 1,000. It once was the ieat o
the luks fortress Aass.
.Raleigh, N .- C.-Itis statted thiat
North 'Carolina wi.ll collect $100,000
from the eetat of George WWander
bill. The estate li North Carolina lis
valued t $'fIO,000, and the inheri
a_ce tax on this 'will' amount to .
Slehop Scadibeough Dies.w
Srenton, N, J.-The Itt. Rev. John .
Bcaebroug+ +~+ .·.D.,+ lrtesta.t Episco'i u,
, bishop+ +f New ersey, died here,
$50,000 Fire in Toxia; 7Town
uilaboro, Te. - 're; fanned a
' ' ingh , w id 1 Si,0mr damas . hi '.th.
ainst irblock. i Theforigis. f othe. C
f ...gmtIoaunk tow
~ ~nbKil; iv riests. ~·: ~
ADMIRAL VON DIEDERICHS
ViCe-Admiral von Diederichs, who
commanded the German warships at
'Manila during the blockade of, that
port, has become involved in a con
troveriy with Admiral DeWey concern
ing the conduct of. the. German naval
officers there. He' takes issue with
iome of the statements made by Ad
miral Dewey in his nook of reminir
cence .
CALUMET STRIKE STILL ON
Northern Michigan. .Copper Miners
Will Not. Vote:, on Returning to a
Work at Present. t
Calumet, Mich.-"The strike has not I
been called off ahd will 'not be, pow. t
at any rate," declared President Wil. a
liam Rickard of the Calumet local of V
thei Western. Federation of Miners.
This statement was made followifig
report that the men might return to
work, regardless of the. Western Fed
paanies, although he "suggested" they
take's referendum. vote on the propo
sition.
Rickard said the matter of declaring b
off" the strike will not be put to a d
vote before the men now,,at least, and t
probably "not until further orders are o
received from President Moyer.":' c
General Manager Denton of the Cop- p
per Range Consolidated declared that t;
the companies had all/ along urged b
the men to turn in their federation
cards and return to work. ' .' a
'The federation has ceased paying s
salaries, here to strikers Two thou-.
sand men are still out in the district. r
It is claimed here that the companies j
are willing to take back to work the ,
strikers who have not bngaged in vio,'
lence, but hone of the injported strike p
breakers' Wli1, be discharged in der
to make vacancies for former em- t
ployes desiring to return to work~
GRADING OF COTTON ASKED c
Bills: Before Congress Give .Agriul- t
tural Control of Investigation and .,
Interstate Shipments. .,
Washingto.--Bllls to authorize the
secretary of agriculture 'to investigate I
handling, grading' and trahsportation
of i.grain and cotton ahd to establish
standards of gade;, quality aind condt
tifo ha'e beean introduced by Chair
man Lever fpt the house agriculture c
conniittee. J
.:They would prohibit interstate.sh$p c
ment of grain or cotton unless its' sale I
glde is fixed by the secretary .f asg
iculture and conforms to standards u
hea preicibes, but variations frotdm off t
cial standards may be permitted Um- t
der his rules .. '" " . . . ,
The bills, would forbid shipment of I
gwrain or cotton under misleading de- t
scriptions, would make subject to the e
agricultural department's inspection 1
.any grain entering into interstate com
merde which has been represented to i
conform to. a+ given standard and I
would authorize 'the secretary to set-.
tie any disputes as to proper grading I
ofi shlpments. Violations . woult be i
punlashable. by fines tof froin 200 to I
$1,000: r.
Bubonic Plague ht Havana
ashingtol.--·A second case of' b%
bonic plague in Havanahas been"re
ported to: Surgeon-Generfli 'Blue oft
the public health service, and inocuo:
latinas have iconfirmed its nsture+ The
first victim las deiL
Helen Keller Hears Sound. ...
deaf and blind. .young- woman; an
nounced that she believes she had at.
last hoerd a sound-the high notqt of a
singer; M adestinnie eve j w ilni gr r
hatherdaa..im..
:: Posse Killl Insanre iayer.'
S.Belletftaiinei, 0..- Sau:el odwin.
'80, Ajnsaige~mq~ wds~,ah a sn hilled
by ~poise terB so 4iad lots and prob
Cook oi gan county ndibarricaded
acere, -• : .
~~~~it in ~
MISS WILSON AND
M'ADOO0 RE TO WEO
ENGAGEMENT OF PRESIDENT'S
DAUGHTER AND TREASURY
HEAD ANNOUNCED.
MARRIAGE. DATE IS NOT SET
Briefness of. Announcement Causes
Commen..-.McAdoo is a Grand-.
father and' Twenty-Six Years
SOlder Tha His Fiancee.
Washington.-Just as society was de
3pairing of an official announcement
from the white house about the report
,ed engagement of Miss' Eleanor Wil
son' to William G. McAdoo, secretary
of the treasury, a statement was given
gut by the president's secretary, Mr:
Tumulty, to this effect:
"The president and. Mrs. Wilson an
nounce the engagement of their young
eat daughter, Eleanor Randolph, to
William' Gibbs McAdoo.",
Those few words made certain that
the wedding bells will again chime in.
the white house for the second time in
the Wilson administration within thep
space of six months, and that Miss
Eleanor Wilson will .be the fourteenth
white house bride.
The briefness of the announcement I
was -much commented on, because I
when the engagement of Miss Jessie i
Wilson to Mr.' Sayre was announced I
it' was with' a wealth of detail and cir- I
bumstance., It is understood that the
wedding day has not been fixed. Ru
mor has it, however, that it will oc
cur at a very early date..
The old adage that 'love laughs at I
age, race and creed," is borne out in
this engagement, as Secretary McAdoo
is twenty-six years older than-Mis
Wilson, tle father:of-Six children and
the-grandfather of two. He has been ,
a widower for. several ygars and de
voted to business projects.; ::
U. S. EXPRESS CO. WILL QUITI
Success Of' Parcel-" Post .and- Recenlt
New York:-Directors of the United
States Express company voted unan
imously, to liquidate its affairs and
dissolve 'it in the shortest possible
time. The precise plan for realizing
on the company's aqsets was not dis
closed, but it is thought a syndicate d
will be formed to take them over so'
that they may be disposed of to, the r
best advantage. - .
Persons familiar with the company's
affairs declare' that the return to the
shareholders will be between $90 and
$100 a share. There is considerable
real estate as well as costly equip
ment and outstanding contracts with
railroads, which, it is expected, will:
hb transferred to other express. com
panies at a fair Drofit.,:
The success of the parcel post and
the recent express rate reduction by
the interstate commerce coiihmission
are held directly responsible for the
ompany's retirement from business
after sixty years of continuous opera- i
tion over some of the leading railroadsl
L the country. ' .. ..
SLAIN BY- FREIGHT THIEVES
Bandits Shoot Down Engineer Near
Peoria, Ili., Whein 'urprised.:
By Train Crew. ./ .
Peoria, Il1t-Arthur Fisher, a 'Chti
eago & Northwestern 'railroad freight
engineer, was shot and killed in the
cab of his engine near Manlius,' Il,11
forty-five miles north :of Peoria, by
bandits who were surprised while
stealing merchandise fromn the freight
train. A deputy sheriff, in pursuit: of'
the band, was shot through the head
and may die. The station agent at
Langley, Ill., was shot in the arm and
the fireman on the fieight train was
shot through the ;g. 'Three 4bbes
were captured.I . -
Near Sheffield, Ill., the posse:came i
up with the robbers, who opehned fire.
Bert Skoglunhd, deputyl slerift of iBu I
reau iounty, was shot through'the 1
face,; shoulder and throat. He.is be.
lieved to be fatally woiunded. ;I Leslie
Beyer, son of the sheriff of Burea 1
ounty, was shot in the leg'
Made,23 Sulcide Attempt: is.
New York,--Herman ,E. Atkins of
Brooklyn has begu- sauit for separa
tion against his wife/on the ground 1
that his nerves were hbattered by her
repeated attempts to commit suicidel
Twenty-three times, alleged Atkins;
iMrs: Atkins vainly attempted to take
Tenemen t Fire Kills. Four.
Bridgei0orti : Conu.-Three meA are
dead and a fourth s 'dying from hay-.
ing been overcome iby smoke hin a:ten
ement fire here
S..Cr.atesC at. . Gu I sre/_'Y.]
bill ta create-a .coast guard sei ;e l:y
onsolidating the sevenue: cuttriserv
ice and the- IIteavifge ~ leinicTheT
house is expcE tpldav h
SEITOR W, T. STONE:.:
". }"" .. Y.
Senator William Joel Stone4 li
souri hais been': named.hhaiiian of
the senate committee on foftig re
lations, succeeding Ith _late enator
Bacon. For some time ih he been
outspoken in favri of jIntervention in
Mexico, but it is expected he -wll mod
iy his views.
ADMITS iEXEMPTION IOBBY
Washington' Lawyer tfleaWas
Employed to Work;on Panama
Washington. --enewal of t sen
ate lobby iinvestigtingcor te in
iuirt has turned toward repel that
there is organized oppbstion h
lngton, ibacked by:influental
against= the proposed repeal :L the
Panama tolls exi p . om
mittee 'elianinedA_ Clarence :f De;
flatly denied:
knowledge of any lobbying eOforts to
prevent the repeal.
The lawyer admitted having entered
tnto a contract with the Fore River.
Ship Building- company, .through for
mer Admiral P. T. Bowles, its press
dent, to work for free tolls for coast
wise shipping. .For this service he
received $1,000, he said, but a contin
gent fee of $4,000 additional depend
ing on the passage of the tolls bill in
that 'form had -. not been- paid. De
Knight agreed, to produce this con
tract.
DDe /Knight told also --of : urging
through congress .varlou. bills provid.,
bng for increasiein pay and higher rank
for men of the, army and navy.. He
estimated that 6ontracts he made for
this. work with individuals and assocla
tlons of enlisted men had brought hit
i40,000.. s .:..
LARGEST, WARSHIP AFLOAT
Giant Superdreadnought Texa Turned
SOver to the United States Gov.'
S-,ernment by Builders.,/i.
SNewport .News, VYa-All ready: for
'fight or. frolic:," the giant superdread
nought .Texas, most powertul battle
ship afloat in the world, left the'yards
of 'her builder~s here, the- Newport
News Shipbuildinig company, for.- the
Norfolk navy yard 'distant only a few
amles, there to be turned over to Rear
lAdmiral UsherI commandant -of the
.. in length the-fighter'is 573 feet with
a beami'of .95:feet 2W6 inches so that
In passing through the Panama canal
loCks she would have almost fifteer
"eet to epare.
$1,000,000 Portland Pire.d.
; Portland, Ore.--Flre swept all that
sction ofthie Portland water front on
he .eaist side from the aupper~to the
lower A:lbita~ ferries;, destroying Co
iumbia -.dok No. 2 and Montgomery
dock No. 1, the steamships Cricket and
~ienroy, and much qther. property, en
talling ~a'. loss estimted at $1,000,000
The area burned covered six bloclks.
. Cov.. cta.-. Make U ,p twaird.
Datll, T x.-A treward of a $35 for
the returt, of two of their number,:who
boke parole anild escaped, has been of
ierd by ..forty-six oVC~onvicts, inembes
OL ,-:a party w.hic.h recently began
working roade"'withoult' guards or
"hiclei aunder an eXperimental pla
itme 'the risign tionu of the Ital.
Ian cabineti offically announced 'by
o iBmo~e Md OeU thousand. pu:
pils i"apltiii' hooi here were
mgbd fro t adiCg i good or
der iW itre, whic orliginatedu'in the
structure
IALLQ Vý LOUISIANA
,,PROTEST AGAIS ''I
EXPRlESS TARiFF
dAILROAD COMMISSION PETITION*
.0-ED" .TO SET ASIDE NEW'
SCHEDULE OF RATES.
Western Newspaper Union News Serviee.
Lafayette.-The traffic committee 6f
t:'"e Chamber of Commerce instructed
its traffic manager, B. F. Martin, to
appear before the State Railroad Com
'mission in New Orleans at a hearing
bld March 10 and ask the commission
to set aside the hew express rates,
which became effective on Feb. 1; and
reestablish- the old scale, : Manager
Martin says that "the demand for the
change from the old uniform rates of
.the commission, which were estab-4
lished in Louisiana in December, 1911,
never came from the general shipping.
public of Louisiana, but from the ex
press companies themselves.. '
""The necessity for the change inso
far as the shipping public is concernI
Sed- has never been made apparent, as
the old uniform mileage system which
was adopted by the, comnission in
'1911 after' a lengthy and complete
hearing, has proven universally satia
factory, few, if any, -complaints hav
ing been registered by the shippers
in Louisiana since that time.
.The milk of the cocoanut is this:.
The Interstate. Commerce Commission
'said to the express companies:., 'Re
duce your charges and make them unt
form,' or words to that effect; In com.
plying with his-order, a great lost of
revenue was experienced' on interstate
business, which means- a net loss un
lesss is icold be made up from. ihtra.i
state shipments, over which the Interi:
istate Commerce ommisalon bhad. i"i
jurisdiction.. Hence the necessity .;i
the part ot the express companie!fif
,evlving . system that Wwould : meet
t e remenits o a the Interstate
to mininie their Ioss!s1' UtI
various Failroad commissions= of eachI
state toi'follow the Iflterstate Com
merce Commission and aopit the same,
system for each state, which in: effect
means 'that the 'intrastate shipments
on Interstate are helping to pay the
losses' sustain ed oon interstate- ship
ments.' For instance Ithe rate from
Lafayette, La., to Vicksburg, Miss., is
reduced 40 :per cent, while the rate
from 'Lafayette to. New prleans; La.,
is increased 40 per :ceit. Both points
are exactly. the same distance from
Lafayette
"Great 'noises- are healf :as to 'the
'enormous reductions in rates on pack
ages weighing less' than 50 pounds,
while no fuss whatever is made over
the enormous advance in- packages
weighing over 50 pounds, neither is
mention made of the fact that: our
parcel post system can handle 90 per
cent of the 50-pound package 'business
within a radius of 150 miles at 25 per,
cent less than the express rates.: But
on packages over. 50 pounds they .find
no competition, hence- from the. 'ex
press companies' point of. view r~ ;the
necessity of lowering, rates -on pack
•ages up to 50 pounds and of raising
them over 50 pounds. Fivedays' busi.
ness of one express company covering
every package received in Lafayette
from points within the State of Louiro
lana for that period show a net in
'crease over the receipts under old
BLOODY WINNFIELD -AFFRAY
Man Namied Jordan,. Acting :as Pace.
maker Is Fatally Wounded.
Winnfield.-Albert Sholers was :ili.
ad, a man named Jordan was 'fattlly
wounded and anotheir named McCullen
was shot through the shoiulder in an
affray here, Jordan' was acting as aI
peacemaker. ' .. ..
oMcCullen is saijd to have been shot
by Sholers, who in turn was killed by
V man named Hudgens, a friend of
bMcCullen. The trouble originiated, it
is said, when McCullen and Hudgens
were found in company with Sholers'
wife. Sholers, armed with a shotguin,
took his wife home and was followed
by McCullen and Hudgens, the 'shoot
ing taking place at Sholers' home. 
Sholers Was a son of former Police
Judge J. RI. Sholers,. •. "
.. Baptiste Men wcit',- Meet.
,Alexandria..-There rill ibe held in
Alexandria April 7:9 the first seession
of the Louisiana Men's Bdptists op-:
vention.' It is especially urged that
every Baptist man whol possibly -can
attend this meeting do so.
WATERS-.PIERCE IS GUILTY
!ased Against Corporation.
enl oir i iDourteen: t I t
n~m~l~Afl1P~t'On eai copj wa
YAUNTL 'S RISE
HAS1 j EMARKABLE
FEW YEARS I CLERK IN A
STORE, NO . LECTOR QF.
INTERN :-I "VENUE.
Western Newsp ews -ere.ce.
. New Orl .-A poor. boy, who
clerked in a store, taught school, work
ed. hias way through: the' Louisiana
State University by serving as a wait
Br in the mess hall, and then became
private secretary. of Congressman Jo
seph E:. Ransdell, studied law at odd
times while' in Washington and came
back to Louisiana in 1911 to 'manage
the campaign' of Mr. Ransdell' is the
brief and strenuous career bf ,ohn 'S.
Y. Fauntleroy, aged 28 years, who has
been -nominated by President 'Wood
row Wilson* for the post 'of collector
of. internal revenue for,the district of
Louisiana, at a salary -of $4,500 per
year.
'He is now secretary of. the Senate
committee on public health 'and quar
antine,' of which Senator Ransdell is
chairman.` He will come to New Or
leans, at once to asssume his new
duties,
'Mr. Fountleroy was one of the :two
boys" who managed the senatorial
-campaign .of Ransdell so sucessfully
in their battle against Murphy J.:Fos
ter in the recent state primary.
FAILED TO ROB A BANK
Operations of Yeggmen Cause Great
Excitement at ,Robeline.
Western Newspaper Unton News. See.
Robeline, La.-The,. operations of
yeggmen here .hive :created consider
ble excitementi In.one case the men
secured 'a' small amSount: of booty but
it e her they were :unsucessful in
ti i; nto -the vault' tdhey attacked
pid beeiisi of that failure p5,000 wOas
Y 4 ree occurred
got away with all the available
stamsi and about forty` dollars in
cash. .
After their success at the postoffice
the robbers forced one of, the bank
wlindows of the. Bank. of Robeline
.and made. an effort to dynamite the
safe of that institution. But in this
they failed.. The explosive used prac
tically wrecked ' the- office, furniture
and badly damaged the vault, but only
the front door of the safe was blown
off.. The money box was. intact when
found. It contained- about five thous
and. dollars.
Immediately after the last explosion,
three meni were seen to emerge from
the rear of .the :ba;k,' coming out of
the same window they had entered.
They' went :.some little distance and
then disappeared-. This circumstance
led to the arrest on auspiciAn of three
men who have been operating a pfcture
show not far from the bank. Three
.other parties were also taken on sus
pilion:. later in the-day. , .
INSURANCE COMPANY SOLD
HiberniA of Loulatana Merged Into
S the" Home of New York.
Wcsternn Newwpar r thlUnfn News ere.
New Orleans.-Sale-of the Hibernia
Insurance. Company of Louisfaia to
the Home Insurance 'Company of New
York was completed here. The Home
company takes over between $9,500,000
and '$10,000,000 of life insurance in
Louisiana. The Hibernia was one-of
the oldest local insurance' companies,
bein8lg, organized in 1871-s, and it has a
cap'ital of $200,000 and surplus of $263.
000.. The book value of the stock was
rated at $261 a share.. :.- ...
.::Negro Agriculiural School.
Baton Rouge.-With about seventy
students and more than 200 negroes of
Baton Rouge and vicinity present,
Southern Univeresity, the state institu
tifon for the agricultural and industrial
education-of the negro, formerly open
ed its doors at its new site on Scott's
Bluff, north of Baton Rouge. Addresses
were made' by Superintendent of ]nt
cation T. H. Harris and -Prof. B. C.
Caldwell, secretary of the board of
administrators of the institution, John
S. Clark, the president of the institu.
tion, was' present with almost all of
his faculty. '-.
B iranch Sank for Bogalusa."
Bogaldtsa.-It- is' reported that the
a.nw bank at' Franklinton - ha. plr
chased the old Commercial Batik build
ing and will open a' branch bank about
A. pril . 1 ,: . " " . i
- Cotton L.abor Goes NrIth.
-$ a:ioleonville.--Tlhe i-weather has
ibeen, unfavorable the past week. Wor-k
Shas stopped on the -plantations. There
.a .e I~eral - cotton- farmers from inoith
usista : here ,gettiingai.ll the labor
Siath c i:ndUce :;to -:go ::up t::in thbir
o cultivate 'more cot .The
pastuWek dfuily-fori tyfamil have
over' $5Qi000
*· .''·~~~,:~
YOUUNG REFUSES
TO UIT OFFIC E
GOV HALL REQUESTS THE RE
TIREMENT, OF BANK EXAM
"-ý "INER W. L. YOUNG.
Western Newspoper Union News Settee.
Shreveport.-The right of Gov. Hall '
to 'ýummarily remove State Bank Ex- '
aminer W. L. Young will be tested 'in .
the curts. !.Mr. Young, whose reslgna-;;
tion "wae demanded by, the governor
on the ground that his work has not
been satisfactory, declines to resign,-.
declaring that the charges of the gov.
ernor are so vague that he cannot
reply to them intelligently, and fur-;
ther, that as his office is a constitu
tionaldone, he can be removed only
upon the two-thirds vote of the Gen
eral Assembly. In this view Speaker
L.:E. Thomas and others concur.
Accompanying the order` of rep'
moval a statement was made in theb
expitlive1 department, partly as fol-.
"Mr. Young was appointed during :
former adminiseration, and was re,'
tained in office, notwithstanding there -
may have been strong political reasons .
why- he should be replaced. The em-*
ployees in 'the department were not.::
'disturbse l,, The governor was not diSc,
posed to make changes unless the good' `.,,
of the: service seemed to him to re;.
quire. He had not sufficient informar:
flon at the time to justify; he conclu
tion that the work of the department
w&k Cot satisfactory. However, .Mr.
Youn gen expressed, and has since'.
rett~'tp Itk his willingness and pu-
pose to retire whenever the governor:;i
should deem it desirable. :
"For some months complaints of the :;:
conduct of the department "had be- '.
come.:so persistent as :to render the
sittion i ,embarrassing.: boon after `:
ti4;df ca lnng in the, ,rpevership of;
"While -the. gvernor 'made n.
chbiarges' against, h$m, e detailed t4ia
him some 'o'the compIlaint against
hip It. was diffcult fo, te governo,
toW1~et1 qýmfnite andc speo fc inforina
tion as to the groundsi for complaint.
Without reciting details, it may be.
said that Mr. Young deniqd that. there,
was any Just or rqasonablb foundation:
for such complaints." :.':.
Q iI ch o : Go(v. Hall received v.
from Mr.' Tung Tetter in response to-:
his demand for thq:examiner's resig-'
nation. He reviewedtl4.the case :at'
length, said the. charges',f the Bgov-.
`neor were so vague that he could not
r~,ty ~ intellige tly to them .' that he
wbtild not hesitate to reorganize his
department if it could be shown= where
any member; had been guilty of mids:
conduct and then concluded; 'r:.,u a-m e
"You are reminded that minne is (.
constitutional office, like; your own,
said fbe law- provides :a method for:
determining- culpability- or innocence
of such offcers when accused of negli
genbe or violating a. trust reposed l:h:::
them. ' - '. '
"I respectfully queo -tur right'
to call for my' .resignation, and ':it i::
not my intetion to transmit esme to'
'you. If there. Is anything in .my of~_'
fidfcieStdu t' which merits inquiry'
a`iU action. by. those' clothed with, au'.
thdrity :in law 'to -conslder and .pass:
upon the matter, I will cheerully sub:,
mit to their'investigation; judgmentK:
and decision; but I will not submit tio
the request of yOur excellency for my n
resignatlcn, and by so doing acknowl-i.
edge nmnself guilty of faults which are.
rist"mine and of 9ffenses which I did.
not commit." . .
IDENTIFIES :HER LOST SON
Lad Held at Lafayette for Burgt~lry:
Sought by Mother in North.
Western NewTspaper Uilon- fews Servic. .
Lafayette.-Sheriff Locate received
a telegram irom Mrs,, W. 8. Wiener,
of Brooklyn, 1. Y., confirming itho
identity of her ison, Oscar, held here
charged with -burgiarLitig the home of
Dr. P. E,. Girard. Weiner is about 20
years.old. and has' 1been here about
two tiionths. Recently he took a large
dose of strychnine; but was saved from
death by Dr.'F. ItR Tolson.
In his pocket was found a newspa.
per clipping 4i twhich his mother ad-:
vertised for. news of her lost son.
S-eriff ,LAtcopte Is certain of the boy's
identity, but isawaitfing a s·photograph .
to be absolutely sure... Owing to .'the
seriousness of the charge, Weiner will
have to stand trial here. : .
'New Orleanian Buys Tract1
.: Napoleonivlle.-lThe Sta plantati :n,
belonging to the Ai Klotz Manufactur;
ling Company;, of Klotzville, :La., was,
sold by Sherifft:: 'Auclon to, Sam nZyu, .
rait,'of Niw Orleans. .-. '- -
':..Woiuld. Repeat Carn.ival Piarade.' :'-:
Thibodaux'.A movement is on toot .i
Ito present this year's .iardi! Gras :pa,. .
I geant again "the' day previous to t::h
:Iremen's parade this yreay;.as tile
wathertbeir reaveutieal waner fidmMi

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