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The weekly messenger. (St. Martinsville [i.e. St. Martinville] La.) 1886-1948, May 04, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064454/1918-05-04/ed-1/seq-2/

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When you visit New Orleans
Stop at the
PLANTERS HOTEL.
EUROPEAN PLAN, _i UP.
Dauphine and Iberville Streets.
A. D. STEWART, Manager.
ST. MARTINVILLE, - LA.
ALBERT BIENVENU. EDITORS
LAIZAIRE BIENVENU D
School Board Official Journal
Suscription $ s ,oo a year n advance
SATURDAY, May 4 1918
LOCAL NEWS.
Cow Peas at A. G. Goulas.
Wanted - A milch cow at once,
Laizaire Bienvenu.
Mr. L. . J. Gardemal made s trip
to New Orleans this week.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Theaux of
Lafayette were visiting here Tues
day.
- Mr. Carles Blanc of Baton
Rouge is here to spend a few days
visiting relatives.
--Bobinet Bars 108 inches only
just imported at K. Schwartz, the
leading store.
Miss Evon Bienvenu is in La
fayette where she will spend some
time with relatives.
Messrs. J. E. Hitter and Frank
Mouton of New Iberia wete at
dending to business here this week.
-Just received from New York
(100) one hundred Ladies Fancy
Silk Waists, not two alike, in the
latest style - Biemveam Brothers.
Mr. Cisyms L.mBa w'ho is with
the army at Osmp Vas home
this week tseped a'ew days with
relatives.
-diet your First Communion
goods from me and save money,
Everything for boys snd girls
K. Schwartz.
Mr. and Mrs Frank DeBlanc of
Lockport, Mr. and Mrs Vincent
Barr"s and Mr. an Mrs. Romain
Barras of Port Arthur, Texas,
were called, here this week on ac
count of the sickness of Mrs. Vin.
cent Barras, Sr.
AU kinds of First Communion
goods for boys and girls. See our
goods before buying elsewhere -
K: Schwartz. t
Mr. and Mrs. George Ganthier a
of Lafayette and Henry Gauthier
of Broussard and Mr. and Mrs
Chas. Billeaud of Brousestd were I
here Sunday to spend the day with 3
relatives on Live Oak plantation.
-A full line of Straw Hats and
Palm Beach and Crash Suits are
now ready for your inspection at
Jk Schwarts.
PROCLAMATION.
ln vlew oe tb pomew a am vestedby m
law. I now preelaim ad order - ele
tie to toe held l the Town e St. Mar
tlrtllle. L. at the City Hall, on Tme
days May 1st.. 1918, belg the third
T inr et mid month, to elect a Ms
pesg.U Cosunellmem ad a Chief of a
to re , fot a term of two ylar. ta
ALBBBRT 81NVKNU, r
St, 1.1 1918. MaYor. th
Fine mens shoes at K. Schwartz of
I
SThe wife, child or widowed mo
t ther of a soldier or sailor who may
die during the war will receive
, from $20 to $25 per month for
child or widow, up to 875 per
month for a widow with several
S children. In the event of total
disability, incurred while in the
service of Uncle 8am, the soldier
al or sailor will receive a minimum
. of $80 per month if he has neither
:e wife or child, up to $75 per month
, if he has a wife and three children,
g with $10 per month added for a
widowed mother dependent upon
him. It the disabled man requires
a nrse $20 per month may be
added for her; if the disability is
due to the loss of both feet, both
hands, or total blindness in both
eyes, or if the man is helpless and
permanently bedridden, the com-.
pensation is fixed at $100 per
month. Compensation is made
for partial disability, measured by
the degree to which the earning
capacity is impaired
t. Iate of Ohio, City of Toledo.
Leuas County. a.
Frank J. Cheaes makes oath that he
is asmlr partaer of the Alrm of F.J.
s Chbeaey Co., doing busluem in the City
of Toledo, County and 8Late aforesaid,
sad that aid Arm will pay the Nues of
y ONS HBNDR0B1 DOLLARS for each and
e every ema of Catarrh that cannot be
bured by the use of HALL'S CATARRH
MEDICINE. iRAtn J. CuaaY.
Sworn to before me and subscribed in
0 my presmes. this eth day of December.
A D. IS6. A. W. OuLIsoN.
(Seal) Notary Public.
Ball's Catarrh Medleine is taken in
ternaily and aets through the Blood onl
the Muoeos Surfaces of the System.
Sead for testimonlal', free.
F. J. CsnIs & Co., Toledo. O.
Sold by all druggsllt, 76c.
Ball's Family Pills for conustipation.
LAND OWNER.
Would like to hear from any
'one having small tracts of
land for sale, containing from
4o to 5oo acre.
Box 77, Church'Point, La.
ATTENTION.
For First Communion
Goods be sure to see
goods before buy
ing elsewhere.
IC SCHWARTZ.
Mrs. George Gary entertained
the Bridge Club Tuesday after
noon.
-The colored people will give a
play at the' True Friends Hall on a
May 11th.
-There will be prayers at the 0
Catholic Church every night at 1
seven o'clock during the entire '
month of May. d
List what you have for sale with
me, especially real state. The de- b
mands aregood. LisaireBienvenu 2
real estate and fire insurance agent
As per notice in this paper, the
Asessor call to the attention of
tax payers that his books are now
redy for their inspection, before
they are sent to the'State Board LI
of Afairs at Bston Rouge.
of Soldiers' and Sailors' Families!
--0-
Do you want to feel that your
loved ones will not suiffer for ad
vice and necessary help in your
absence'
Ask The Home Service Section!
Mothers, wifes, sisters, chiklden,
Do you understand the War Risk
Insurance,Law?
Ask The Home Service Section!
Have you experienced any diffi
culty in securing your allotment?
Ask The Home Service Section!
Do you need advice and syllpa
thy?
S Ask The Home Service Section!
We act as a clearing house I).
ve
tween the enlisted man and his
family cares, that he may, with
l untroubled mind, devote his time
and thought to the immediate
he business of stamping out autoram.
er cy.
Help him win the war! Don't
er tell him your troubles, bring them
to us.
Home Service Sertion. St. Mar
tinville Red Cross.
a
es A large g umber of persons conm
) ing from all sections spent the (lay
is at Lake Catahoula/ Sunday and
itI reported that they had plenty fish.
th All ,njoyetl the day spent at that
id lovely fishing ground.
AMERICA NOT SAFE
FROM HUN AT1TAK
Germany Determined To Keep Farm.
era From Shipping Products to
European Markets.
J.
Atlanta. - The average Southern
farmer, situated far from the seacoast,
thinks he is secure even should the
Kaiser, in his mad desire for conquest,
id attempt an invasion of America.
a He is enjoying the most prosperous
SIperiod of his life. Cotton is bringing
thirty cents a pound-and more; there
It Is a ready market for hogs and cattle
r. at fancy prices; food crops are being
sold at unprecedented prices; and
the manufacturers have paid top notch
figures for velvet beans and other
crops.
I It is but natural that the farmer.
contented with lf ., should have no
thought of the dangers surrounding
him.
"Why shou!d thi. war worry me?"
the farmer asks himself, thinking of
the miles t f hills and valleys that
separate. him from the seacoast. "I
am not concerned with ;i. ':reedom I
of the seas' and Germany's ri ht to
overrun Belgium. France arid Italy.
If they should ever send an army
f here, why I'd fight." he says.
Anything that affects the general
welfare of the Country affects the'
farmer. And the 'freedom of 'the
seas"-no other policy established by
the United States has been and will
be more beneficial to the Southern
farmer.
Keep Seas Free.
It was the government's determina.
tion to keepl the seas free that has
enabled the Southern farmer to mar
ket his cotton crop for thirty cents
a pound instead of six.
When the war is over a steady
stream of agricunltural products manu
factured articles and materials of all a
kinds will continue to flow to war
stricken Europe. Thousands of ves
sels will be engaged in this commerce. ti
With a hunery market and plenty of d
bottoms available. freight rates will
hbe correspondingly lower. The South- e
ern farmer should be as vitally inter.
ested in ocean' transportation as In
rail transportation.
The rugged hills and vast pl:ins
will not .to, CGermany from wiling 0
the commerce off the seas and cutting ec
off the rest of Europe from tradle with
the Southern farmer. Neither will t
they protect the farmer sheuld Cer
many actually inva 'e America. A hos
tile army would not strike first at the
farms. It would tasck the seat rof y
government- Washington -- situated
only a short distance from the sea. And ct
once In control of Washington it
would have the re ~n and from there
would force the farmer to do its bid- he
ding.
Building Many Ships.
The United Statrs Government has (i
determined to check. not only Ger- L
many's greed for territory but its am
bition to control the seas. The gov- R
ernment has undertaken a shipbuilding
program that will sunnlv the vessels
for the farmer to send his.products to
European markets not nnly during the
war but afterward. These projects
cannot be suecesPftllv carried out utn- 88
ic.s the ovrrrnment is gtven support
by the lpeople. Rillions of dollars are
needed. The farmer not only disp!sys fa
his patriotism by lending the Govern
ment money through subscribing to
Liberty Bonds, but protects his future
interets.
S---1
HELP YBR I
:, WIN THIS FLAG
u!
II!
II BUY LIBERTY BONDS
l MILK GOATS.
In this country the goat is usual
t ly regarded simply as a plaything
"' for the children, but in some parts
of Europe it is regarded as the
r- poor man's cow. A well-known
American importer of live stock
states that "the goat of Switzer
1- land is the Swiss peasant's cow,
,y the Swiss baby's foster mother, a
ld blessing to the sanitariums for in
b. valids, and a godsend to the poor "
,t In England and in many other
parts of Europe people who leave
the city during t h e summer
months, either for their country
homes or for travel, often take a
milk goat with them in order to
insure a supply of good milk of
uniform quality. In this country
the fact that the goat will supply
sufficient milk for the average
family at low cost and can be kept
where it is impossible to keepl a
cow, is beginning to appeal to
many people, especially those in
the small towns and in suburbs of
cities. In this way the milk goat
can be made to relieve the milk
shortage which is now felt in many
localities.
8100 REWARD SloO
The readers of thtl paper will be pleae I
to learn that there is at least one dread
ed dieease that science has berea able to
qure in all its stages and that is ratarrrh.
Catal rh being greatly iunluencedl aby
countitutional conditiunt requires con
ttitutional treatment. Hall's Catarrl t
Medicine is takei, internall and acts t
th lI tIhe Blisnt on the MIICuus Surfaces I
If the 'Systei-l thereby Ilestroying theI
founllatluu of the dihease, gi'dug the a
pautiet elllsalglh by building up the l
eoei.stlti tiolnl I tl I ietill1 IuiItllts iii dio
iug its work. The pries bitors have so
minui.h faith I11 its relrativg, iso wers at ii
It,:l .s ('ai l i r n ildl'rie that they offer
Olin Illlldl. ,I I.L.larsa for aIv cause thati
it falls to curt. . 'nld for list of testi- o
IIolallels. Adldrtes F.J. CHIENKY & COt. ii
Toledh. Ohiio. S Id by all Druggist. Te 7
-- a
"THE REASON WHY" C
B. A. Thomas Stock Remedies ii
are the best, they are scientifically ,
made antd all umedicine. Thley keep H
the health up. and the feed bille
dowu. There is a cu.se for every
effect, removet tlhe cause the etftect t
remnoves itself.
The Poultry Remedies are espe.
cially made to relieve all the dtis. -
eases inii the Fo.wl family and mnakes l
the Hens lay. G
The. Hog HRemetdy will positive- a
ly keep ~f the ('holera, and if gi I
vyen in the stages, will cure 90 per
cciit. - be
D)on't forget to keep on hand a al
bottle of F'ar, is' Colic Remiedy for
Horses. It is so, simple with a as
dropper, that a child cian give it. r
Also) a bottle of Farrie' Healing in
Remedy for Cuts and Bruises oi I
man or beast, they ne'er fail. ci
These remedies are all guarai
teed to you by your dealer, to give t
satisfaction, or your money back.
Made by ()ld Kentucky Manu- In
facturing Co., Paducah. Kentucky. :
For sale Iby A. L. Duranid, th
St. Martinville. Louisiana.
We do all kinds of Printing m
sa
McA0D0 APPEALS TO
FARMERS TO BUY BONDS
Twenty Million Subscribers Neded To
Make Third Liberty Loan
Complete Success
Atlant.-"The more people who buy
$50 bonds and $100 bonds and $500
bonds, the better it is for America
and the more dlscouraging it is to our
enemies!"
This is the message which Secretary
ot the Treasury McAdoo bore to the
people of the Sixth Federal Reserve
District in his tour of the district last
week in the interest of the third IAb
erty Bond campaign.
Speaking before thousands of people
in sib cities of the Southeast, the Sec
retary was cheered to the echo by his
immense audiences, as he told of the
needs of the government, the charaoter
of the bonds, and made a stirring plea
for every man, woman and child in
the district to get into this war which
is now being waged for their liberties,
if only by the purchase of the smallest
bond.
- Mr. McAdoo made it plain that with
out the aid of the farmers of the
South, of the merchants and prof.s
8 sional men and all the Iaboring classes,
the third loan would be a failure,
which would be worse than a German
n defeat.
k "The banks must perfor' their nec
essary functions and keep their funds
in liquid form to supply credits to the
industries engaged in the manufacture
of munitions of war and in carrying
a on the general business of the country.
and we must not take all the funds out
of these banks," he continued.
" Want Twenty Million Buyers
r "Do you know, it would be a most
impressive thing If we could say to
e the Kaiser that not 9,600,000 Ameri
can citizens, as In the last loan, had
subscribed, but that this issue was
} taken by fifteen or twenty millione of
American citizens!"
In his speech, which rang from one
o end of the district to the other, the
head of the treasury tased the part
which America has played in her one
year of war: how she was forced into
the struggle against her wish, and
only took up arms after all her sacred
rights had been contravened by the
unprincipled Hun. He told how the
American flag was ordered of the high
seas by Berlin, and how the only Amer
ican ships that were allowed to sail
would have had to be painted like a
barber pole in order to escape the ter
L-does of the submarines.
In defense of freedom and the
world's liberty, America has in one
short year marshalled her resources to
a wonderful extent, and now at this
great crisis, when the supreme strug
gles are being waged in Picardy and
our allies are crying for more men
and dupplies, it is our problem to
mobilize America's might for the bat
tlefield as quickly and effectively as
possible. The only way this can be
done is through the IAberty Loan!
through the subsoriptions which must
come from the rank and file of the
Speople of America.
Appealed to Women.
Mr. McAdoo spoke of the fine work
that is being done by the women of
the nation, and urged them on to
greater efforts. He stressed the abso
lute necessity for saving, both food
and materials of clothing, that our
armies may be fed and our allies sup
plied. He insisted that the people of
this country must learn to sacrifice in
order that the war may be won.
"We must realise that we are really
in this war, and that war does mean
sacrifice," the secretary emphasized.
"We must learn in the second year
of the war that we must not indulge
ourselves to the extent that we have
in the past. We must purity our souts
and fortify our souls for this great
and mighty contest which is now pro
ceedipg upon the battlefields of Pi
cardy. And the extent to which we do .
that is the extent to which we are go
ing to help ourselves.
"I have been ,told by some people
that the rate of interest on Liberty
Hunds is too low, and, therefore, we
could not rely upon the patriotism of
the American people to buy these.
bonds. * Ibhave been urged to mak,
the rate of interest higher than it ja
today. in order that the bonds might
sell more readily. 1 do not believe,
my friends. that it is necessary to
raise the rate of interest on the bondb
in order to scill them. I do not believe
that the patriotism of America is ex
pressed in the rate of interest on a
Government Bond. I do not believe
that the American dollar is a fugitiv
and must be chased by high rates of
interest whbn the government's credit
is back of them.
"I want to tell you, fellow-citizens.
because this is your problem, as well
as mine, that it we do not all take
an intelligent stand now In favor of
keeping the rate of interest on, gov
ernment bonds stabilized at 4% per
annum, ynless we are willing to make
a fight to preserve the Government's
credit upon that basis, then it is go
ing to be the most unfortunate thing
that can possibly happen to the Amer
ican people. We have got to maklbit
clear to every man, to every woman.
and to every child who buys a govern
ment bond. that while it may be true
that they could invest their money in
something else that would pay a larger
return, they can invest their money
in nothing else that in so full of blood
and necessity as a United States Gov
ernment Bond. If we do the wrong
thing at this time, it comes back to
you."
The response to Secretary McAdoo's
appeaj in this territory has been im
mediate. Wherever he appeared, the
sales have been boosted to a wonder-

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