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The Voice of the people. [volume] (New Orleans, La.) 1913-19??, July 31, 1913, Image 1

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TURN THE SAB CAT LOOSE!
EAT TO PEONACE DOWN WITH TENANTRY! a , "
FELLOWDRK(E UNITED WE STAND, DIVIDED WE FALL! TrVVM M i~P mb Frm , - IMIl bI IFli
of
the IPE PLE
"AN INJURY TO ONE IS AN INJURY TO ALL."
VOLIME II1 1ýI is RFiý'r NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, TURSDAY, JULY 31, 1913 "TUTH CNQURS" NUMBER 30
BEWARE!
Beware all ye who would enter in
This bewildering maze of crime and sin
'Tis here the lawyers wait their prey
'Tis here the judges justice slay
'Tis here the sheriffs with their hounds
And detectives make their rounds
Beware all ye who would enter in
This bewildering maze of crime and sin!
Moyer's "Samaritans."
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Is 1ring some for a comnon organizer.
I'They started clos on to 700 men liv
inr. on $t ;(..(, per dlay, then they cut
it ,ldown r iil ii all 1,ft. whetn 200 men and
th ir I';lm lie.s \,.ere. left all this whole lot
IhICI ,',it was $10.(10 per day. I sup
...... tihey all that living rations for
211" r ::(). Whl about all the money
.1(1.1 that 1 lthese ,orgariuiz;ers" thought was
,,ri ni in ,i,' oif them left and then an
,,ih, r let'. bliit Ibefore the last one (Tan
nri. ICft h-i. sent c-lose oil to a thousand
,Ill;Lr. tia;k to head(Iill.harters at Denver,
th r.ii it li,.',ii . to these imen here on
.tr l, ;it lEl I' ao . The alen arei left
i-, t f'r theiiselve's tiow that W . F.
, -\.. It,, .i an t win andi the\- are
1*1 :I11 their l,.k he.arise the panish
I \\ W. pailpr t1frii T:amplla, 'la.. "El
r(ia,:j':rl Ilil.lstrial.' .;rlle on the scene
'1ir ,1 iI ,,h 1 .... I t.--' ive w ork. A ll
i\ l. Il lt Il 111i .ail. S soion as
t1 ~~. eI -.,. .,,t l,,1 a r, , i the h rul er, . uil
11, , . f,,r Ell I'a ., to he o(i n the nrlap
.i : r ,.a plrr f t,. l Iise pesky erit
r l tr r,. 1 f. \\' \V .
Twins.
\Vash!ingt,,n. July . 2 . 1913.
I. -. thian 1beiu o.f Martin M. Mulhall's
,i-ts : a lhvist for the National
\ -.. i;itin ,f lManufa'turers. remained
i, !* , t i r th, re ore! when lthe senate
in\eti-lI t i ltg ecnitrnittee met to-day.
Att'reys for the association and the
*\nweric.an Federation of Labor will at
tellt to shake Mulhall's story before he
is turned over to the hous- lobby com
Initte'.
IThe 'lNve dispatch remind.s us of that
sweet heart-rending song that used to
thrill us so in our boyhood days: "Two
,IIl, with hIut a single thought, two
hearts that beat as one." Let us weep.
Loggers Stay Away
The fellow-workers held here in jail
f,,r 21 days and charged with assault
in first d.qgree in connection with shoot
ing of .Jamies Donovan have been re
Iý..cl: }ltherefore.- you may discontinue
the bIrnh.rjaeck'as Defense Appeal; but
yu nar. put notice in the paper to
tIi-. effect that the strike is still on
ani we are determined to fight the A.
('. M. Co. till we win; their camps are
IN.ted ,,n the Blackfoot, Montana.
Y,,urs for the One Big Union.
P. STOCK, Seety. No. 40.
Missoula, Mont.
Remittance Notice.
Please send all money, subs.
and news to: THE VOICE OF
THE PEOPLE, 335 Carondelet
Street, New Orleans, La.
Exchanges please make note.
All Locals owing for bundles
please rush remittance. Address
335 Carondelet Street, New
Orleans, La. C. H.
The Portland "War"
TELEORAPHIC NOTICE.
Portland, Oregon, July 28, 1913.
"The Voice of the People,"
335 Carondelet St., N. O. La.,
Please insert the following: "The
I. W. W. ioeals in Portland are not
connected with any free speech league
and are not calling for any assistance fti
nancial or otherwise, letter follows."
B. E. NIssoN, Secty.
CAUSE OF FIGHT.
Portland, Ore., July 20, 1913.
Fellow-worker--You have probably
read in the papers about the free speech
situation here and wonder why we re
mained quiet, and a few words of ex
planation is needed.
First. There was a strike of cannery
workers (women) and Mrs. Schwab of
the S. L. P., was the only experienced
woman speaker at hand; this gave the
S. L. P. a chance to take a prominent
part. Some of the strikers appplied to
the Socialist party for speakers, and that
brough Tom Burns of the S. P. into
the strike. We made no attempt to get
control of the strike, becausme, as we saw
it, such an attempt could have had no
better result than to create discord and
confusion in the ranks of the strikers.
Some of our members gave the strikers
active assistance, although they did not
approve of the manner in which the
strike was conducted; they did not rep
resent the locals, nor did the locals try
to restrain them from taking part in
the strike. They acted as individuals
only.
The picketing at the cannery resolved
itself into a continuous street meeting,
and the authorities finally stopped these
meetings on the grounds that the speak
ers used indecent language. Some of our
members who attended these meetings
ray that the speakers did lay themselves
open to that charge.
The Portland newspapers and authori
ties were unanimous in crediting the
I. W. W. with all the strike meetings
that were held in front of the cannery
and in other parts of the town, although
we had very little to do with it. This
shows that there is a deliberate at
tempt to use the strike meetings as a
pretext for stopping our street meetings
and possibly to drive us out of town. We
did not swallow the bait, but kept off the
street, with the result that the police have
broken up some alleged I: W. W. meet- s
Ings in which the I. W. W. had no part, t
iandl clubl,ed a number of quite law- i
abiding citizens. About 100 people au
have been arrested, among whom were ti
perhaps a dozen of our members. 1O
There can be no doubt that the police
have received instructions to break up E
the [. W. W1 in this town, and will s(
force us into a fight before they quit; N
but we are trying to pdstpone that fight w.
until next winter, or at least until the
police have made a few more blunders. rn
We are not in need of any assistance
at present. W, will let. you know when
we d, need help.
W.v are not connected with any free ha
speech league, and it is not at all likely d1
that we will be. When we take up the ,ii
fight it will be as an I. W. W. fight str
straight. it
Yours for Industrial Freedom. <;I
B. E. NSrssoN, Secty. s
Note-When we re'ad in the Assas
sinating l'rer·s that Portland's ma.yor is
had suppressed all street speaking be- th
cause Tom Burns and I. W. W. speaker
had said the Red Flag would soon rceplace,
the Stars and Swipes on the county
courthouse, we were under the impres- Cf
Seamen's Strike Off
The strike of the Seamen against the
Fruit Trust has been declared off, by
the Saiiors' Union or Monday night and
by the Marine Transport Workers on
Friday evening of last week.
he The strike began on June 2d, and
ot ended on July 25th, lasting less than
me two months, but in that short time three
ti- workers lost their lives, three were bad
ly, and 10 to 15 more or less seriously
wounded by the police and stoolpigeons
of the trust, white seventy odd were
jailed on trumped-up charges of differ
ent degrees, the most serious being that
Ly of "shooting at with intent to commit
h murder" (of police sergeant Dunn)
placed against Felow-worker Frank
Prego, whose trial takes place on Thurs
day, the 31st.
All things considered, the breaking
if of the strike was a phyrric victory for
d the Trust, for all the Seamen now see
that it was only by pittihg worker
it against worker that the Trust was able
to even temporarily take back the ad
t vance in wages the workers forced out
o of the Fruit Plunderbund a year ago
by, as "Captain" Rose put it, taking
them unawares. That's always the way
to do it--butt the Boss when he's got
his breeches down.
As matters now stand, the building
np of the Marine Transport Workers
I'nion of'the I. W. W. is the only hope
of the Seamen, for this Union is the
only organization the Bosses have not
been able to wreck, and because it is
founded on INIIERENT POWER. TIIE
SOLIDARITY OF TIHE RANK AND
FILE.
LATER
Prego & Kundson Discharged.
"Can't Understand."
"Mother Jones says that all the time
she was in the Bull Pen, she did not
have a bel to lay on. Nothing but an
old lounge. She said that she could not
eat the foodl that was given her. And
just think, she, spending here 81st birth
day in the Bull Pen, and the American
working class, doing almost nothing to
'hange conditions that tolerates such
things. She said that day and night
there was an armed guard. outside her
dlwr', she said that she can't understand
how, any mother coul raise a son that
would hiold a gunlll over an old woman
like her." NINA LANE MclctsIDE..
siin that there was somuthliitig fishy in
the report of the trouble, so we made
little cornllent. for we couldn't imagine
an i. \V. W. oirganizer who would care
three hoots in hurrahl as to what fl;t
flew over the countlJ courtIhous.. And
ieven as we smelt it, so it was fishy.
Ev'ery play now to "P 'ress" is filled with
Soie lying statement about the I. \VW.
W\.. all of which is good for it 'lhows that
WIe are levtv.loint JW\E. airllI
I'OWER lItiealts .lIlliIT, and i llggIIT
iet'iS its lilT, and II HlGIT nianus the
overthrow of c;apil;talist ,soit-y by the
INI)W'STHIAL DE1MO('IC\y.
'Thie end of the Old Order is nigh at
hand, for when a rUling Class ui'imt
dlesei'd to the grossest lies anld per.,,
e'ltiorins in ordlr to, sa .ei itelf, its
slr(nylh has pass..d away, its pou, r lgone.
it is already dead. Even the "'Swiss
;iuards" tuirn upon it. singing the Mar
svillaise.
The newll ago. the atre (,f Free Labor,
is at hand. Liberty is thunderin' at
the doors ,f the class ,so long inlprisonid.
The loni. lolng night i.s allbout to end.
The STATE is dead.
Long live the INI)USTRIAL DEMO
CRACY." -"The Voice."

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