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Feliciana sentinel. [volume] (St. Francisville, La.) 1877-1892, September 08, 1877, Image 1

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ELLIDANA SENTINEL
ji 2, ST. FRANCISVILLE, LA. SEPTMER 8 1877 N 11
is nROna Tohn Rebrn.
AtU~fOeme at LtntaW,
Clinton. Louiahna,
aB>ADEE, :
ttorney at Law,
Clinae Louisiana
A RCRNAN,
& COUNSELO* AT LAW,
' fCltnte Louisiana.
Sa the Courts of East and
na.
FLUKER,
Attorney at Law,
Clinton, Louisiana.
practice in the Courts of the 5th
District. Aug.2'76.-ly
J; PO WELL,
Attorney at Law,
Bt. Francisville, Louisiana.
Ira"tice in the Parishes of West
Feliciana. and Pointo Counee.
. WEDGE,
ATTORNEY AT LA ',
Clinton, Louisiana,
pactice in the courts of East and
Feliciana and the uprerne Court of
febl7-ly.
Wi. LEA KE,
Vserney at Law,
Francisville. Louisiana.
ice in the Parishes of WVest
Feliciana, and Pointe Coupee.
8. JONE,
ORNEY AT LAW,
Clinton, Louisiana.
on the North side of the public
june 28, '76.-ly.
KLIFFE. C. L. FISHER
KLIFFE & FLSHER,
Attorneys at Law,
St. Francisville, La.
practice in the Courts of WVest
Feliciana, Pointe Coupes and
g Parishes. june28'76.-ly
U. BALL,
YSICIAN AND SURGEON
Ilayou Sara, Louisiana,
at residence .iulue 2, '76.. ly.
ISTRY.
Dr. E. Green Davis oflers I
his services to the p]eople of F
this and adjoining Parishes. 1
ersaddressed to him, at his resi- 1
ill receive prompt attention. ti
ITRY! DENTITSRY ! !
ti
I will attend all calls on st
the Coast, t'ron Natchez to w
New Orleans; also the back
, when accessable with a bnggy.
ni wishing my services, can pro
same by addressing me, at my
D. STOCKING, D. D. S., m
li.-ly. St. Francisville, La "I
TINEZ,
Street, Bayou Sara, La.,
DEALER IN
Ds, Groceries, Confections, To
ene and Liquors.
IM.--nm.
OSEYTIIAL,
t L. Vresinsky's old stand,]
Bayou Sara. L:a.,
NABLE BOOT & SHOE MAKER I
tfully solicits a share of the pub- A1
go and guarantees satisfaction
HOTEL, le
em
cr of Camp and Cormmon sfreetR, s
• New Orleans. La.
FORD & WATSON.
ROPRIETORS. T
LRD,-Two dollars and fifty
iday. june 28,76--1y.
IRVINE,
Bayou Sara, Louisiana,
BALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN tr
lies. Provisions, Western RI
lace and General Plan- TI
tation supplies. le;
ALSO
WIGNO FORWARDING -
IMMISSION MERCHANT
AND
!E4MBOAT ./GENT.
hENRIETTA HOUSE.
eanbeprocuredby theday, week
h, and at sreaonale rates. In
Wt. h tlid very hst fare tile m
_fords. 1loegant and well fur- Re
aIe. Aceommodating servants tel
Y an attendance. Patronage so-Sp
lt satisfaction guaranteed.
 Rott, St. ~FranclsvilT, La. J3
ou teamn Coiton Gin I
Tseso and Rtftl Dealers is
-ess goods, ieneral dry goods,
eihhing goeia, elothing, boots, e
- r es_ ptovisions, hay, OV
-eltrlmpleu'ts, bag- e1a
a me 'nt r n
eot. for
rg" reoisrb' ri clean out .
St. SFtz'dicsvlle: I 'I.
John Roth,
FASHIONABLE BOOT & SHOE MAKER
St. Francisville, La.
JOSEPH VACARO,
Carp enter and Undertaker,
Wil give prompt attention to all busi
ness in his line in this andadjoining Par
ishes. June 2 76.-1y
TO THE PUBLIC.
ad WEST FELICIANA, June 16, 1877.
To parties. living in West Feliciaua
who shall at any time desire my profes
sional services I would respectfully an
nounce, that they have but to address
me at St. Claude, Waterloo, in care of
Messrs. Edwin Vigne, or R. Ponrciaux.
tli All calls from the citizengof this Par
ly ish so addressed will receive prompt at
tention and response.
P. G. A. KAUFMANN, M D..
pICARD & WEIL,
st nBayou Sara, La.,
Be. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
FANCY DRY GOODS,
CLOTHING, FURNITURE,
BOOTS, SHOES,
adl GROCERIES AND PLANTATION SUP
of PLIES GENERALLY.
- IIHighest market price paid for cot
ton.
JOSEPH STERN,
at Adjoining Post Office,
e. Foot of the Hill, St. Francisville, La.,
Retail Dealer In
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, HATS, CAPS,
Boots and Shoes, Glass and Wooden
Ware, Tin ware, Famtily and Fan
cy Groceries. Western Pro
duce andPlantation Sup
ic plies Generally.
Y. ALSO
n FURNITURE AND SHINGLES.
t HIIighest market price paid for cot
ton. July27, '76.-ly
A T. GASTRELL,
d IRayou Sara, Louisiana,
y DEALERI IN
PLOWS, AGRICULTURAL IMPLE
ments, IBridles, HIari-ss, Hardware, Guns,
Pistols, Pnmpls, Pipes, Maclhilmc Fittings,
Cocks, Valves, Castings, Ropes, Hollow
Ware, W\'agon and Carriage °oodwork,
Bllaiksnmitlh' Materials, Etc., Etc.
TIN 'COI'PEIR AND SHIEET IRON MAN
UFACTORY.
Also Agent for the celehrated
"C(HARTEIR OAK" ST'OVES,
5 Urie, Garrett & Cottman, Brinley, Jas. 1
f H. Hall and other plows, Allen's Horse
. oes, Wood's Mowing Machines, Horse 1
f lay Rakes, all of which .I will guaran
tee to sell lower than can be purcha:sed
elsewhere.
Grangers and others will find it to I
thelr advantage to call and examine my
t stock and prices before pue.thasing else
where.
 . O. & BAYOU SARA U. S. MAIL
PACKET
The superb passenger I
steamer,
Gov. Allen. 1
J. J. BROWN.......... ......... Master. t
S. S. STRECK---..........-.........Clerk. c
Leaves Bayou Sara for New Orleans
every eduestlay after the arrival of the
cars .r II o l 1. II i e, and every saturday,
at 7, p. in. Returning, leaves New Or- t
leans every Monday and Friday, at 5, p. i. .
JOHN F. IRVINE, Agent d
UNITED STATES MAIL & PASSEN
GER PACKET.
The superb passenger e
steamer, a
Robert E. Lee. a
Irt~- CAMPBELL--- ...--------...........BlMaster
McVAY ............ ..........--- Clerk
Will leave Bayou Sara, on her upward ii
Itrip, every ednesday. Retur ning, will \
eave Bayou Sara every Sunday at 7, a. h
m., reaching New Orleausbefore dark the h
same day.
E. Jr. WHITEJLI1 Agent.
June 28, '76-1y. g
NITED STATES MAIL STEAMER.
y The magnificent passenger c1
packet, ii
NATCHEZ. e
T. P. LEATHERS-.........Captain. u
J. F. MUSE .. ............Clerk.
jill pass Bayou Sara, on her upward g
trip, every Sunday morning, at 8 o'clock. p
Returning, will leave Bayou Sara every t,
Thursday, at 7, a. imi., reaching New Or- II
leans bcfo,re dark the same day.
E. 7F WIH.ITJEMI4A, Agent.
tl
A DEALER ti
.3 wanted in
everytownin the it
South for ithe cel- vi
ebrated el
WEED oe
-_7 MACHINES.
The easiest learned, lightest running, pi
most durable and popular machine made. ii
Received the highest award at the Cei-. t
tennial. i
Special inducements offered. Address
Weed Sowing Machine Co., it
No. 182 Canal Street, tc
New Orleans, La ai
Jane 1, '77.--1year. cl
WOR GANS. "
Elegant styles, with Valuable Improve- pl
mer J. New and beautiful solo stops.- tt
Over one thousand Organists and Must
cians endorse these organs and recom
mnend them as strictly first class in tone, to
Mechanism and durability. Warranted ol
for six years. t
~Most Elegant and Latest Improved. .
Have been awarded the highest pre- di
mium in competition with others for
S1nmplicit), Durability, a
Promptaess, and Piano like action. rure, hi
sweet, and evenly balanced tone, orches
tral effects, and instantaneous access
which may be had to the reeds. For 1
price list aldressI
DANIEL F. BEATTY, E
Washingion New Jersey w
,eiti an i na Seftinl
A DEMOCRATIC PAPER
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF WEST FELICIAA.,
Ii
r- OFFICIAL JoUnNAL CITY OF BAYOU SARA.
Ly
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.
sa S. LAMBERT...PROPRIETOR
- JIVO. D. AUSTEN V ..............Editor.
of 8. O. RIHEA................Publisher.
r St. Francisville Sep.. S, '77
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
One copy, one year (in advance) .... 3 00
" 6 mo. " " .... 1 75
" " " 3" " " .... 1 00
AD VERTISING RATES :
[A Squaro is the space of ten lines solid
brevier.1
Space. I 4t I S I 8 g
1 sq're. $ 1.00 8 3.00 $ 6.50 $ 9.00 $ 12.00
2 " 2.00 5.00 9.50 15.00 20.00
4 " 4.00 8.50 15.00 23.00 30.00
- col'm, 5.00 10.00 1800 30.00 40.00
S" 19.00 20.00 40.00 50.00 70.00
1 " 20.00 40.00 60.00 90.00 125.00
Announcinq Candidates:
F or State and District offices,......825.00
, For Parish offices, ................10.00
For police District offices,......... 5.00
(to be paid invaiiably in advance.)
Transient Advertisements will be inserted'
at the rate of $1.50 per square of ten lines
for the first insertion, and 75 cents for each
subsequent insertion.
Personalities charged at transient adver
tising rates.
Yearly advertisements payable quarterly ;
Quarterly, payable monthly; Transient, in
advance.
The above scale of rates must be the hbas;
of all contracts with advertising agents.
Obituaries, tributes of respect, resolutions,
etc., charged as advertisements.
[ li rittenfor the Sentinel. ]
THE DUMB WITNESS.
VILLETTE.
"'A lawyer in the practice of his pro
fession often accnmulates a varied ex
perience frequently as strange and start
ling as thatof his coadj ntor, the detective,.
if so I may be allowed to term him," said
Judge Clark in conversation with somu,
friends, who one stormy November even
ing had collected in that able lawyer's
cosy office to while away the hour before
dinner with chat, the fragrant weed and
a little prime old Port that glowed rich
and rnddy in the tall decanter on the ta
ble drawn in close and comfortable pros
mnity to the blazing fire. "And your ex
perience, my dear sir, is no exception to
the rule I insinuatingly questioned one
of the group; "well, no, answered the
Judge, smiling shrewdly at the evident
attempt to "draw him out." "Icannot say
that mine is, I have passed through some
rather trying ordeals, and have seen a good
deal of the bright and shady side of life,
but I think," he continued ictlectingly.
"one of the most singular eases that I
ever had on my hands was one in which
a member of my own household played
a most promine- t pLart, in fact I may say
was the chief actor or rather actress, in t
it; if you care to hear the circumstance I
will relate it, as I see," with a glance at
his watch, "that we've yet a good half
hour before we go homeward."
"By all means, let's hear it." cried the
group simultaneously. "To premise then,"
commenced the Judge settling himself
more comfortably in his capacious arm d
chair, "you must know that I commenced b
life in a small town in one of the South
ern States, or rather I may say in the
nucleus of a town, for though now it has
grown to be a place of some size and im
portance, Wilton was then but the cen
tre of a thliving" neighborhood, it was o
however, the County-seat, and that added to
to its dignity. Besides the Court House
that was built upon the larger of the o
two streets, there was a church, or meet
ing-house as it was called in the native r
vernacular, the usual complement of
shops, smithys and groggeties, and two
or three roughly painted signs that bore a
evidence as the oatward and visible
signs of the learned professions that
held forth within, namely the 'aw and
physic; lahst but not least this ambitions
little hamlet boasted of' a bahnk, a bank
too that never'yet had failed to meet its a
liabilities, or py dollar for dollar upon il
its paper, this was the institution of the
town, an institution that was the pride tl
and glory of every man, woman and tl
child within a radius of ifty miles. For
miles and miles around the neighborhood si
was composed of thriving and well-to-do I
planters, with a sprinkling in sumner of t
the city gentry, who allured by the pure
air and cheap living I suppose, had eree
ted illas and country house in all styles t(
of architecture and in which these mnigra- ti
tory birds of summer usually spent the
sultry months of the hot season. One
day while idly slttlih: in my little office
a large and roomy vehicle that might o
have served as the state-coach of good 1
Queen Bess so antiquated was it, drove tl
up and out stepped a damo as ancient
looking as that royal virgin of Morrie
England herself. This lady was one of t
whom I had often heard but had never i
before seen, an eccentric spinster, Miss
or as she was generally more respectfully.
called, Mistress Elizabeth Peyton, the
sole representative, with the exception
of a nephew who lived in another State,
TA, of an old and wealthy family. She lived
S alone and secluded in a large and time
A. stained mansion upon her plantation
some four miles from Wilton, and rarely
if ever visited the village, not even com
ing to church.. Her present call upon
me was occasioned by her desire to pur
)R chase an extensive tract of land which
agreeably to the wishes of the owner, for
rr- whom I acted as agent, I had a short
ar. time before offered for sale. We soon
satisfactorily arranged terms &c., where
in Mistress Elizabeth showed herself pret
ty shrewd in driving a bargain. "And
now said she as she arose from her seat,
00 I must beg of you to accompany me to
75 the bank, the money with which I will
00 pay you is deposited there, I will with
draw it now, and to-morrow return,
lid when I hope you will have the necessary
documents properly drawn up and ar
ranged ready for me so that I will not be
detained longer than in hour or so in
town." "Why not wait then until you
00 come in town to-morrow , to draw the
00 nubney from the bank,"I asked. Because
00 if I get it this evening it will save me
00 that much trouble and time on the mor
00 row." But Madame," I returned, "will
- it not b safer in the bank t pardon me
00 for saying so, but you live so isolated,
00 and if it is known that you have so large
00 a sum of money in your house, the knowl
edge is quite enough to tempt the cupidi
ed" ty of the designing." "I will run the risk"
es she answered, with a little good humor
c ed nod, no one will know that I've the
r- money at home but yourself, and I hope
you have no idea of becoming a house
I; breaker, I have never spoken to any one
ti else on thesubject." "But yonrservants,"
; I urged, "are they trusty? "I never
speak before nor to servants of my busi
s, ness affairs," she replied a little haughti- 1
ly besides the quarters are fully a mile
from the house, neither the negroes nor
the overseer, a good and honest old nlan
who lives near them, ever know what is
goilg Olln at the house. I have but one I
family of servants in the yard, the cook
3 and her children one of whom is my car- I
rilge driver, their cabin is at the ex
treme end of the yard, and they rarely I
come near tile house, Priscilla a woman f
whoul I raised and on whose fidelity I
" would stake my own life, is the only: sir- 1
i- vant I keep near me; she sleeps in a.
room adjoining mine, and am sure would t
peril her life for me, so you see your ap
prehensions are quite untfunded." Sil
It enced but not clnvinc·ed,. I said no more, I
though afterwards I had bitter cause to r
reproach myself for not ha.:ing insisted 1
upon her leaving the money in its safe f
repository. I rode to the bank with her r
e and saw the money. a tempting roll of v
a crisp notes, in all amounting to the nice e
little sum of $9800, delivered in her had. t
V As I assisted her in the carliage I could v
0 not forbear again eautioni, g her, laugh- a
inug good naturedly she said I could not b
make her nervous, and that she would b
come in early in the morning fur the fioa. t]
settlement of the business, when she e
hoped my fears would be quieted. I ti
watched the lumbering olu ark as it a
drove in slow state out of town, little h
thinking how Miss Peyton aunl I would ce
next meet. tr
Late that evening the driver brought b
me a note from his mistress saying that T
she had sprained her foot severely in des- I
ceuding from her carriage on reaching s,
home and consequently she would be un tr
able to keop her appointment the next Iv
day, but as she wished no delay in the it
business, could I go to her in the morning h
with the papers, the Notary and necessa- eI
ry witnesses, adding that we should be p:
well recomDensed for our extra trouble. as
It so chanced that Coart opened the cm
following day, and as I Lad several cases to
oa docket, I knew I would be compelled tl
to start very early for Miss Peyton's if I to
wished to return is time for the opening tl
of court; so putting oni my hat I sought w
the Notary and finding him wiling to nm
rise at even 4 o'clock in the morning, as tl
he averred, for an extra dollar, I returned ti
word to the old lady that we would be tL
at her house very early in the morning. he
Accordingly sunrise found us ea route; the I m
Notary, a young and jovial man, a mutual kl
friend whom I had asked to accompany I
is as a witness, (I depended upon Miss to
Peyton's overseer as the other witness,) g
and myself. I well remember what a tl
lovely morning it was, a light shower a '
fewv hours before had laid thie dust and i
the pendent drops were still qiverlung on fi
the boughs and branuches of the hedges of
nud trees that stretched along on either am
side of the roadl. Vo were well mounted, ti
I suppose about three fourth's of the dis- q
tance when we descried a horseman ap- m
proaching, riding at full speed, as he o'
neared us, I recognized in him, Miss Pey- pn
tonr's coachman, Isaac, whom I have ien-l e
tioned before, but not the tidy, self- nh
s atistled and smilingboy of yesterday was di
this Isaac; every feature now betokened i m
solme strong emotion, ~ither ofexcitement ti
or fear, and as I hailed him he reined up w
his horse with a sudder Jerk that nearly 'T
throw the animal back upon his haunch- ti
es. "Thank de Lord, Marse Clarke, dat's vi
you." hlie exclaimed, "I was jest a riding c
to town arter you." Why? what's the a
matter" I asked. "Matter enongh, mar
ster, d-ars been awful work up to our
house last night, Miss Elizabeth and
Priscilla bofe are dead, somebody cut
n dere throats." "What!" we all cried out
together, "It's de trufth, Marster 'fore
t God X'clare it's do trufe," returned the
poor negro, solemnly, while the tears
gushed from' his eyes. "I never seed
such a sight before, it made me sick to
see it, my poor old Mistress," and evereome
by his sorrow he fairly blubbered out.
'-Go directly to town" said I to the
frightened negro, and tell Dr. Smith to
come on out, I will go to the house, per
haps Miss Peyton is notyet dead." So say
n ing we gave our horses the reins and
galloped forward: As we neared the
place the deep tones or the plantation
bell smote on our ears and on entering
the gatewe saw a dusky thronggathering
in the grounds, all frightened, and wild
with excitement. Old Mr. Palmer, the
overseer,'had just arrived, and to him we
proceeded inquiring if Isaac's fearful tid
ings were true. 'Indeed;gentlemen, I know
as little of the matter as you, replied the
old man, his pale countenance and tremb
ling accents testifying how much he felt,
"a few minutes since one of the cook's
children came running to me saying
thate his mother becoming alarmed at
not finding the doors and windows open
ed, as Priscilla usually unclosed them at
a very early hour, and hearing no an -
swer to her calls "for the woman, had
broken down a window and entered the
house and had found both Miss Peyton
and Priscilla murdered in Miss Peyton's
room. I have not yet gone up stairs and
would like you to accompany me there."
After mounting the broad steps we cross
ed a spacious hall, at the farther end of
which was Miss Peytop's room, the
scene of the tragedy; the door was slight
ly ajar and as we pushed it open a scene
of confusion lay before us, armoirs, cabi
nets and bureau drawers were open, their
contents scattered through the room,
boxes that had been rifled were piled
pell-mell upon .the earpeted floor, and
clothes and papers were strewed around,
clearly the burglars had made a thor
ough search for the treasure, which we
found afterwards they had succeeded in
getting. Across the foot of the bed in a
heap of blankets and pillows lay the (
old lady-a hideous gash half dividing
her head from the body, she had not yeild
ed up her life without a struggle for her
arms and hands were dripping with
blood that still oozed from the numerous
wounds upon them. On the floor beside
the bed lay the negress literally bathed
in gore. ., cursory examination showed
us that Miss Peyton had been dead some
hours, there was no hope for her, she had I
passed beyond the reach of all human aid,
but Priscilla's still warm body gave
faint indications of life, and upon the ar
rival of the surgeon he decided that there
was enough vitality apparent to admit
of an effort to prolong it. His examina
tion showed that she had rccived a
wound that had escaped the heart, and
at first he thought her head had also
been injured, as it was lying in a pool of S
blood that evidently had flowed f:om 1
that member of her body, he soon discov
ered upon a more thorough examination
that the blood proceeded from her mouth
and on opening it, the horrible and bar- E
barons fact was disclosed that the mis
crable creature had been deprived of her
tongue, that organ having been cut out
by the fiends who had killed the mistress.
The coroper's inquest f.ilcd to throw any J
light upon the horrible deed. , It was o
seaposed that having in some way ascer
tained that the sum of money had been
withdrawn from the bank and deposited e
in the house, the ruffians, there evidently I
had been more than one, had successfully b
entered by a window left open in the
pantry, this window, strongly grated by
an iron screen, was found with its bars
cut and wrenched apart. Having eflec. C
ted an entrance, their way up stairs to
their helpless victim's chamber was easily
traced, probably she was awakened b.i
the noise made in opening the cabinet
where undoubtedly she had placed the e
money. Her clies for holp had apprised ti
the villains that they were detected in
their work, and from robbery to murder
the transition - as easy. Priscilla on Ii
hearing the struggles and cries of her e
mistress rushed in to her aid, and the a
knife that was dyed in her mistress'
blood was imbrued in her own. Why her S
tongue had been cut out no one coull '
guess, such barbarity savoring more of
the acts ofdemous than of humnan beings.
All this we had conjecture.l it is trne,
but later our conjectures were fully veri
fled by Priscilla who after many months a
of suffering finally recovered her health I
and streoungth. Bult who lhad conmmitted
the awful deed? This was a puzzling
question, at first it was thought that the i
murderers might be found on Miss Piy v ton's h
own plantation, but as suspic'ion (coul V
poitt to no part icular slaves blood-thirst y
enough to have colnmlmitted so foul 'm 1ut1
der, that suspicioll soon died a llatural I
deathl, even tle good old overseer andl tl
myself wore at one timuo charged with
the deed but easily proving aLn alibi, we
wvere honorably amln quickly dischargeid.
Tho only token thle ,murderers had left of P
their presence, besides tih bodies of their fi
victims and the r:nsdiacked rooms, was a
comlmnolUl dirk that could be purchased f(or
a few shillinugs in any hardware stor .
Vith this they had accomplisbed thclir C
enefarious work. It had bedn dropped
L after using it, adcideunally pithiaps, .id
the bed clothes which in the stsdgglehad
bcen strewed over the flodr and there 'd
found it, no malk whatevt ttpIn it to
implicate any one,' friend dO attang;e.
Even the footprints of the villains had
I been obliterated by the rain that had fal=
> len at daylight.
There was but one chance b? 6e~i at
ris :ng at the tunth, and that was throegh
Priscilla, should she ever tegtn hrt
health. Miss Peyton's nepheW- as sole
heir took possession ofherptoprty 'rhish
in a short time he offered for saWe, ne
i groes as well as land and houses. I
3 bought Priscilla for a nominal san. I
i was influenced in my purchase partly
by compassion and partly. by
desire to have in my possessio.x so faith
ful and teustwoithy a servant as she had
proven herself to be, and during all her
after life she evet sustained the teputas
tion biss Peyton had given her for poes
sessing those eminent quaitles. Wheh
she first passed Into my posteesieu
she had not yet recoveted from her
wounds and for some time aftetwaeds I
was much in doubt if she would ever do
so. Withcate and nursing however, she
finally got well, butof coureewas fotever
dumb. I was so anxious to ascertain
what she knew of that tberible night'A
work that as soon as I could do so, I
commenced to teach her the deaf-mute
alphabet, and in a .few months sh9 be.
came so proficient as to readily answer'
any simple question. It was atthis time
that she gave us all the information she
had in regard to the murder.
(to BE CON1IrUED.)
A SCANDAL
IN MILWAUKEE-THE WIFE OF STAT6
SENATOR JoInr L. MITCHELLL.
ATTEMPTS to OB'AIN POS
SESSION DF HER CHILD,
BUT FAILS.
MILWATUKEE, August 14.--A
scandal in the best social cir=
cles of Milwaukee, of which f
sent you intimation recently
without naming names, has
come .to the light of day most
disagreeably in consequence of
an effort make by the lady
involved to regain the custody
of her infant son. State Sen
ate John L. Mitchell, the son
of Mr. Alexander Mitchell,
who was a member of the
forty-third congress, and more
recently chairman of the Dem
ocratic State committee, had
been living in unpleasant re.
lations for some time-with his
wife, a charming and accom'
plished lady, and a separation
was recently agreed to be
tween them, faults on both
sides having been alleged.
The infant son of Mr. and
Mrs. John Mitchell was given
into the charge of his grand
mother, Mrs. Alexander Mitch
ell. To-day Mrs John L.
Mitchell called at the house of
her father-in-law during Mrs.
Alexander Mitchell's absence
on a visit to the family of Mr.
N. J. Emmons, and attempt
ed to carry her child away.
The servants followed her to
her carriage, and, before she
could reach and enter it, she
fainted through extreme ex
citement, and the little one
was captured and taken back
to its grandparent's house.
The affair has created much
excitement here, all the par
ties being well known, and
Mrs. John L. Mitchell a leader
in Milwaukee society. Mr. Al
exander Mitchell is regarded
as the richest man in Wiscon
sin, if not thile whole north
west.
MILWAUKEE, AuguSt 20.
The Mitchell scandal case,
which for some days past has
agitated the .community, at
last will be settled by the
courts, Nrs Blanca Michell, wife
of John Michell, having filed
her bill of complaint for di
voi'ce, with a petition also for
alimony. She charges her
husband with being an habi,
tuial drunkard, with adultry
with a servant, with cruelty,
etc. A response to the ap
plication for divorce will bt
lillcd within a day or two,
when another chapter will be
unfolded of tlhi family scan
dal in Millwaukee high life,

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