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Louisiana capitolian. (Baton Rouge, La.) 1879-1881, August 20, 1881, Tri-Weekly, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064592/1881-08-20/ed-1/seq-4/

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,IEO, IAsTIIE[BE]K............e
W. . A. Le]UE$R .........**Pablisher
BATON ROUGE, AUGUST 20, 1881.
There was a very destructive storm at
Petersburg, Va., Sunday. A good deal
of property was damaged.
Two negroes went to sleep on the
Memphis and Charleston Railroad track.
When picked up the bodies were pretty
near thole, but life had flitted away to
the angel land.
A few weeks ago the Shreveport
Standard chided us for clipping an item
from its columns and crediting the
Times with the same. Now we return
the charge.
A woman exhorter among the negroes
of Southern Georgia wears on her head
.a halo of burnished brass, which she
says was given her by an angel in a vi
sion as a reward for superlative piety.
Sad to relate, the negroes believed her.
The Treasury Department has denied
the application of A. K. Miller & Co.,
of Now Orleans, for a refund of duties on
about 262 tons of coal which formed a
part of a cargo of 1977 tons imported
into New Orleans per steamer Elpis in
May last.
Egypt is to abolish slavers by a pro
cess of gradual emancipation. Within
a few days the Khedive will issue a pro
clamnation forbidding further addition to
'the slaves in his domiulonn. So that
with the death of the existing slaves,
slavery itself will die.
Shreveport Times: Arkansus seems
determined to keep up its well-earned
reputation for rapes; murders and rob
bcerics. They occur with such startling
rapidity we cannot keep pace with them,
and frequently get 'mixed': in endeav
oring to record them.
---
Prof. John H. Davidson, for many
years principal of the Vienna High
School, is now President of the Homer
College. From what we know of Mr.
Davidson he will make a fine executive,
and will reflect credit upon the institu
tion and keep up its high and meritori
ons standard.
"A dark horse," says Peck's Sun,
"named Lowry, whose modesty was
such that he had never been mentioned
in connection with the office, has been
nominated for Governor of Mississippi
by the Democrats, and a nomination by
the Democrats of that State is usually
enough said. It is a slice of of Ken
tucky,"
Nothing speaks better for a communi
ty than the'following from the Opelou
sas Democrat: "Fitteen or twenty bales
of cotton, of last year's crop, are sold in
Opelousas every day, by that class
known as small farmers. Some of them
still hold their cotton, and will not sell
it for some time to come. This is proof
positive that every farmer in this coun
try, with l,roper management, can do
well, be independent, and grow rich."
The Amite City Independent says:
"An instance of the prevailing disposi
tion among men to practice' extortion,
to the last possible penny, upon their
fellow men, was witnessed the other
day, when some trains full of passengers
were water-bound at Pensacola. T'hey
were fed on whet-leather beef, heavy
dough biscuits, soggy corn bread and
slop coffee, and made to pay six hits a
meal. Where has that thing called
shame flown to ?"
St. Bernard Eagle: Baton Rouge is
at last a city "on wheels." We gather
from the CAPITOLIAN that the Pacific
Railroad is now runing beyond that
point, and the New Orleans morning
papers are delivered on the streets of the
Capital at 2:15 i.. M. Another equally
interesting item concerning the future
prosperity of the State, is the descrip
tion of a central sugar factory, which
has been erected on the Holly Wood
Plantation, twelve miles below the city
of Baton Rouge. Of this we can say
that the CAPITOLI.AN has only done ius
tice-to this enterprise, in announcing it
as one of the greatest marks of substan
tial progress in Louisiana.
The procet, says the Baltimore Sun,
of subdividing the large plantations into
smaller farms is going on steadily in the
South, even in the States where the old
system had taken thedeepest hold. The
hard-working fthrmer who follows the
plow hi..self, ib gradually crowding out
the luxumious planter, who, in the ante
bellum days, scarcely took the trouble
to direct the operations of his laborers.
In Mississippi, for instance, there wete
42,0 plantations in lId,u and the aver
age number ot acres in each was ;170.
Ten years later there were ti,02: farms,
the average area of each being 1, acres.
In 10 the number of farms was 7,05,0,
averaging 1l5 acres each. While the
area of cultivated land ik less than it
was in 1N;0 yet the productuion of cotton
is nearly twice as grea;. The :eInIus of
190 will doubtless show a still ,'reater
change in the domestic economy of the
South, as indicated by a large number
ofland-owners and a vast increase in
agricultural products.
Reed's Gilt Edge Tonic assists Digrestion
The most striking-y the most
wonderful peculiarity of the age ,is
the avidity with which a great many
newspaper men seimz upoi fiaudalet
advertising contracts. A propoesitit
comes to them from a stranger. It is
surrounded with every evidence of
fairness and legitimate dealing. The
bottom of the proposition is supple
mented with satisfactory references,
as far as names and firms tend to
contribute. Without a thought as to
the ease with which references can be
forged, and the total inconsistency in
the use of them on the part of res
ponsible business men, the publisher
inserts it in his paper, and at the end
of the first quarter sends his bill. He
receives no answer; he writes the sec
ond and third time-still no answer.
Fraud is then apparent ! He comes
out in an editorial and denounces the
advertiser as a swindler and advises
the public against dealing with him.
In this way publishers are bit year
after year, until we are sick and tired
of reading their yells of duplicity.
Still they continue the same policy,
allowing themselves to be defrauded
and at the same time defrauding their
readers of a great deal of valuable
reading matter. They not only wea
ken the tone and lower the standard
of their journals, but subject their
readers to the swindling operations of
worthless schemers. The readers, in
turn, feel the injustice, and become
careless about paying their subscrip
tions.
This is so often the case we cannot
comprehend why publishers, who
hav1' been duped time and again, will
not place themselves on the common
basis of business.
No groceror othermerchant will ad
vance goods to strangers without col
lateral or a sufficient guarantee from
responsible parties. If they did, the
cpmmercial interests of the world
would not be worth shucks. And yet
newspaper publishers continue in
this groove of dupes, apparently with
no business experience to protect
them. Have they no tact-no apti
tude at all? Is it the fate of the
newspapers to be managed by indi
viduals of this class ? If so, we have
a reason for the inferior quality of
our country journals!
One of the greatest frauds in the
line of advertising is the due bill-the
part cash and part advertising sort.
Not one out of a hundred of these
due bills are ever redeemed, and in
transactions where they are used, the
amount of cash accompanying the or
der will not cover the real value of the
article purchased. We hope no one
will feel aggrieved, when we say that
the journals having the largest dis
play of these one-third cash electro
plates in their columns are the very
poorest and mniost uninteresting of all
the papers we receive; for our object
is to throw out beneficial suggestions.
These papers have no attractive fea
tures about them, except possibly
where the electro-cut pictures take
the eye of the unlettered African or
the A B C schoolboy.
We could have been swindled per
haps. fifty times within the past
year; but we escaped by demanding
spot-cash or legitimate security. In
two cases we made inquiries of prom .
inent parties, who represented that
the contractors were solvent; but
even then, the bills three months la
ter found them insolvent. Now we
have adopted the cash basis, and
these swindlers-whom we believe to
have a regularly organized associa
tion, by which they keep each other
posted-have nearly stopped sending
us their vile propositions. Our waste
basket, consequently is not emptied
half so often, and we move along
with less annoyance.
We may talk about maximum rates
and all that sort of stuff, to be fixed
by press conventions; but we can
do better. Let every publisher or
ganize himself into a committee of
one for self-protection, by the adop
titon of steadfast business principles,
with which to stifle irresponsible ad
I vertisers. Newspapers will then make
more money and become more indc
pendent of the ambiguous sharks
that seek to steal away their hife
giving substance.
GEi NEROUS INVITATIONS TO THE
PRESS.
Major M. RI. Spelman, the wide
awake and clever general passenger
agent of the N. O. Pacific R. R. hav
ing hieard of the meeting of the Press
Association which takes place in this
city. on the 5th of September, has ex
tended that body-a cordial invitation
to take an excursion free of charge on
that road, to and from New Orleans,
during, or at the close of their
Ssession. This generous invita
tion having been addressed to the
editor of this paper, in his capaeity
the Dame, with. the h . that
members ofthyarqsbwill it cop
vieient to avaUl thbiuqh of it`. }
In ariddition, we ae piaseal to state
that Maji ThPmpsoan . ird, tile
faithful nperianendent ttheC itol,
has tendered the ute of th Senate
Chamber, to the Press Mseolatlon,
for their meeting of the 5th of .Sep
tember, pror.
The fraternity have therefore, in
prosp the ho or of being the first
body t assembl in the new Capitol
and a d1ghtfufa excursion to the
Crescent City, on the great N. 0.
Pacific Railway...
;NATCHEZ &BZW OI EANt S B.B.
The Natchez Democrat, in an inter
esting editorial, $nnottcies that a
company has been ,rgni~idin Nat
chez, and the moe of one hundred
thousand dollars ; bed to con
struct a railroad frqNatohez to New
Orleans, via Baton ouge. ,
The Democrat, after showing the
great advantages of the proposed
railway, calls upon the Advocate of
this city, who urged the construc
tion of the line described, together
with our citizens, to come to the as
sistance of the Natchez people, and
thus insure its completion.
Though we have always believed
that a line running farther east of the
proposed one would be more advan
tageous to this city and to the people
of the interim country, lyingbetween
the Mississippi and the Jackson road,
on the principle that railroads are
beneficial, no matter which way they
run, we readily yield our opinious
to the enterprise of the go-ahead
people of Natchez, whose pluck we
greatly admire. We would therefore
urge their project to the favorable
consideration of the officers of the
Eastern Louisiana Railway Company,
with the hope that their well-known
public spirit will prompt them to ex
tend a helping hand to our Natchez
neighbors.
HARK YE !
"N. O. W.", a Baton Rouge corres
pondent of the Donaldsonville Chief,
makes the following striking refer
ence to certain" coercionists in this
city, who wanted people to throw
aside their inclinations and take up a
sanctimonious observance of the Sab
bath, which they did not believe to
be in accordance with their religious
teachings. It is a practical illustra
tion of the old proverb-"straining at
a gnat and swallowing a camel:"
" '-Now, Mr. Editor, Idont want you
to take me for an infidel, but I have
this to say: that some of the greatest
sins we commit on this earth are
against our fellow men, and ourselves.
We have men among us too consci
entious to participate on occasions
like the one of last Sunday, but who
were mean and sinful enough to
close mortgages for one-fourth the
value on property and turn poor
helpless widows and orphans out on
the streets to starve! And they are
membersof the church; too! We have
others amongst us who freely partici
pated in the pleasures of the day,
who have often taken the last nickel
from their pockets to help those poor
unfortunate fellow creatures that had
thus been treated by some of
these church brethren. We have
brethren amongs-uswho make it a
business to swindle the poor half
paid laborer out of his hard earned
dollars-filk their pockets with ill
gotten gold'and swim in luxury, while
human want and misery appeal to
them in vain."
President Garfield's condition, from
last accounts, is anything but prom
ising. Five or six surgeons hold four
or five scientific consultations over
him daily, without being able to stop
the fever that is slowly' consuming
him. They have had a refrigerating
apparatus arranged to cool, artificial
ly, the atmosphere' of the room in
which lies the patient. If, instead of
of being over-doctored and over
nursed, the President had been at
tended to, as the Confederate wound
ed were, in their field hospitals, with
cold spring water compresses and no
extra cure, the chanices are that he
would be much better. In a word,
nature ought to be given a better
chance to work for his cure.
Booles, a young man at Coldwater,
Mich., has been arrested for embez
zling the funds of a Bible class, and
for robbing the Young Men's Chris
tian Association. We can excuse the
fellow, says Peck's Sun, for robbing
the young men, for they can go
around among the business men and
take up another collection and may
be get more than they had before,
but it is a mighty serious thing to
embezzle a Bible class
Connlssenrs in Ceofee.
S Can find some splendid selections in Java, Cot
dovasd fancy Pea Berry, by calling at Family
Groeery of JOSHITA BEAL.
3 Cut ! Cut! Cut!
New Cheese, "York State" now "on the out"
at Family Grocery of JOSHUA REAL.
rolation of the Bord of,, f
olCmeter ,'at their .me h
g9th,s 1881, all who are orwing Jn, id
,e a e -take t . o GRle $ haeaE
in thirty days; othe.rwse they wll be poce
ed angalhata oedfn to aw and thenrlu n
regtirtlta ofsad t oard.
BA'.tZL P. GRiVU8,Treaente'.'
WANTED,
MOl WOOD A W !
-I'FT CORDS OF ASH, GUM, BEkHi
Sand Oak Wood, mixed, are wanted h. the
Louisiana State Univerbity,for cash on
Sealed bid for same will be received inlWl;the
20th day of August next. Wood to be corded
in the yard of the University. Addreas,
LAMBERT JADOT.
La. State University and A.and M. C.
1TANTED-An honest colored boy,18 to 22
years old, to do general work in agrocery
store. Must be well recommended. Good wa
gee paid. Apply at the Capitolian office.
FOR SALE.
FINE PIANO FOR SLEI!
At loweet Figures.
The Celebrated Mathushek.
The instrument was brought here by the
Cencert Troupe which accompanied the Army
of Tennessee. It can be seen atthe University,
For further particulars, apply to
EDOUARD DE'JAN, Agt P. Werlein,
At Mrs. Mentz's, Boulevard Street.
TFOR SALE-RARE CHANCE-A 1 Garden,
in good running order, containing 4 arpents
of land. New House, Stables, Good Well, etc.
Situated on Continuation of North Boulevard,
Square 28. Apply to J. COMBOUZOU, on the
premises or at the CAPITOLUA Office. apr30.
FOR RENT.
TO RENT--A pleasant, commodious house on
St. Anthony Street, between Main and
North. It contains nine rooms, a large yard
with cistern and a fine well of water, Rent
reasonable. Apply to E. D. THOMAS.
OFO RENT-A Cottage Residence, situated
on the northwest corner East Boulevard
and Government streets, formerly known as the
Louis Powers property. Terms reasonable.
Apply to JOSEP T. YOUNG, Aqseesor's of.
lice, Baton Bonge,
Churns! Churns!
Having purchased the State Right for Pat.
ton's Celebrated Rotary Churn, I am
now prepared to fill all orders for the same.
They sell on sight. Call and see them at the
store of Nick. Wax. opposite the Court House,
Baton Rouge. La. * ANTHONY WAX,
Sole Agent for Louisiana,
SHERIFF'S SALE.
STATE OF LOUISIANA, LATE FIFTH,
now Seventeenth Judicial District Court,
Parish of East Baton Rouge.
H. M. FAVROT vs. A. A. DELARODERIE.
No. 2582.
By virtue of an alias writ of fil fa. issued in
the above entitled and numbered suit and tome
directed from the Honorable Court aforesaid,
holden in and for the said Parish and State, I
have seized and will expose to public sale, in
front of the Court House door of said Parish, on
Saturday, the 17th day ofSeptember
next, A. D. 1881, between the hours of 11
o'clock A. x. and 4 o'clock r. M., of said day, all
the right, title, interest and claim of the De
fendant A. A. Delaroderie in and to the follow.
ingdescribed properties, to-wit.
THE UNDIVIDED THIRTEENTH SIX.
teenth (13-16) of ten certain lots of ground sit
uated in that part of the city of Baton Rouge
laid out by Elie Beauregard, and designated on
the plan thereof as lots Nos. 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,9
and 10, of square'No. 3, supplemental plan, to.
gether wth the saw.mill and improvements
thereon.
ALSO, FIVE LOTS OF GROUND, NUM.
bered 1, 2, 3, 4 and 12, of square No.- 4, supple
mental plan, Beauregard Town, City of Baton
Rouge.
ALSO, LOTS NOS. 4 AND 5, OF SQUARE
No. 5 Beauroegard Town, City of Baton Rouge,
with buildings and improvements thereon.
ALSO, LOT NO. 8, OF SQUARE NO. 10,
Beauregard Town, City of Baton Rouge.
ALSO, LOT NO. 8, OF 8QUARE NO. 12,
I Beaure"ard Town, City of Baton Rouge.
ALSO, THE UNDIVIDED ONE-FOURTH
(}) interest in lot No. 3, of square No. 2, Beau.
regard Town, City of Baton Rouge.
ALSO, THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT NO. 5.
of square marked "B,"'sapplemental plan of
Beauregard Town, City of Baton Rouge, with
bullaings and improvements thereon.
Seized to pay and satisfy the amount ofjudg
ment, interest and costs claimed in the above
entitled and numbered suit.
Terms of sale-CASH, with the benefit of ap.
praisement. J. W. BATES, Sheriff.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
STATE OF LOUISIANA, LATE FIFTH,
now Seventeenth Judicial District Court,
Parish of East Baton Rouge.
FAVROT & LAMON vs. MRS. ADELINE
ARIBOUR, No. 2706.
I By virtue" of a writ of ii. fa., issued in the
above entitled and numbered cause and to me
directed from the Honorable Court aforesaid,
holden in and for the said Parish and State, X
have seized and will expose to public sale, in
front ofthe Court House door of said Parish, on
SSaturday, the 17th day.ofe eptember
next, A. D. 1881, between the hoursof 11 o clock
A. x. and 4 o'clock Pi. M., of saidday, all the
right, title interest and claim of the Defendant
Mrs. Adeline Arbour, in and to the following
described lots of ground, to,wit:
TWO CERTAIN LOTS OF GROUND SITU
P ated in that part of the City of Baton Rouge
laid out by Elie Beauregard, and designated on
the plan thereof as lots Nos 4 and 5, of square
No. 2, supplemental plan of Beauregard Town,
City of Baton Rouge.
Seized to pay and satisfy the judgment, inter
eat and costs claimed in the above entitled and
numbered sunit.
Terms of ale-CASH, with the benefit of ap
praisement. J. W. BATES, Sheriff.
oor Sale and to Rent.
RE UNDERSIGNED HAS A LOT OF
Insurance Office Furniture for sale at a
bargain, which can be seen at the office next to
the telegraph office, Pike's Row. He also has
two or three officep for rent at the Row.
A ppI~ to J. W. BATES. Sheriff's office.
RAND-MADE
Sour Mash aWhisky
F'RANKLIN CROSS R)AD8 K., Han -
' Made Sour Mash WhUey, Franklin Cross
  Roads, Ky., sold EE EN
J. STEENSEN,
BATON ROUGE, LA.
Pork, Bacon and Lard!
You will find a good stock of Pork, Bacon and
SLard; also Bacon $ lder Athie store of
IANDRW JACKSON.
ý .. ,. I,;
="ir
" '" OW
Lpmsit
:4
Ith
the aolwys on hand. I a l
;the hT s at m aso re . h
D and Frederiokeon'. pour el
-merhants torbi feight sca4 oe *
trial lbefore maigyuSuoae lew·e ý E' ý
NOW IS YOUR. TIME TO PURCHAS
AT REDUCED PRIES! .
.1-o8I IIIT U1 AD ii~ 'll MI
A Full Line of HOSIERY, LACES AND t IWIDERIES, Sold almos at Cost
ALL THE LATEST STYLES!
Bea Sureg toA   .
MAIN STREET::::::::: :: NextDoor to Lefeve s
W. 0. RANDOLPH ...............E. W. WILLIS........ .....J. E. BLOUR1N
W. G. RANDOLPH & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers,
--AND bEALERS IN-.
WESTERN PRODUCE, W1XES & LIQUORS,
Main Street, Near the Ferry Landing (Thos. J. Woods' Old Stnd) BATON RUGUf, LA
Highest Market Price Paid for Cotton.
,il a • a I I I i i i N -- I l id'
LOCUST DALE ACADEIY,
MADISON COUNTY, VA.,
NearlRapldan tation, Va.
DAVID F. BOYD...........Principal.
A BLY ASSISTED IN THE ACADEMIC
Departme3t by Graduates ofthe Univeiri.
ty of Virginia, and by a competent Officer in the
Military Department
This Academy has been long established and
successfully conducted. It is mainly a Prepar.
atory School for the University of Virginia;
and the instruction, therefore, in Mathematics
and in the Aiolent add Modern Languages, in
cluding the English, is very thorough.
The Location is in one of the HEALTHIEST
and most Beautiful portions of Piedmont, Vir.
ginia, under the Blue Ridge and near the Rapid.
an River, and in an Intelligent and Highly Re
fined Community, with Churches of various Do.
nominations convenient.
The Buildings and Grounds are extensive and
attractive, and specially adapted to the pur
poses of a Boarding School.
The Session begins the third Monday in
Septenber,and closes the third Thurs.
day in Jnne.
The terms are $900 for a Session ofnine (9)
months for every expense except Clothing,
Text Books and Medical Att4ndance.
This is a Private School, and under the abso
lute control of the Principal.
For further information, address the under.
signed at Baton Rouge, La,. till August 1st, af
ter that time at Locust Dale P. 0.. Madlion
County, Virginia. D. F. BOYD, Principal.
July 9th, 1881, tw 3m.
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY
-AND
SAicur alhecha~ical College
BATON ROUGE, LA.
COL. WM. PRESTON JOHNSTON,
P RE SIDENT.
Session of Nine Months R3egin
October 5, 1891.
Healthy location. Free tuition. Board. lodging,
medical expenses, &c., $16.00 per month. Cheap
uniform. Full corps of competent Professors.
Workshop of Mechanical Department in opera
tion. Military discipline. I'or further partic.
ulars, apply to
PROF. L. W. SEWELL,
Baton Rouge, La.
IENTIENIRY 1OLLME,
JACKSON, LA.
I ESSION 1880-1 HAD 133 STUDENTS,
six Professors and Teachers and three A.B.
Graduates. The entire expenses for board and
tuition for scholastic year need not. exceed $144
in Preparatory Department, nor $164 in College
Classes. Next sepsion begins September 5th,
1881. Send ftotr catalogue.
C. G. ANDREWS, President.
Jackson, La., Jane 1, 1881.
Dentistry. ..- eitutry.
DR. B. C. D EIJPR , Deitit,
BATON IOUI4I, LA.,
TH'AVING 'JUST FUNIiED HIS (Y-,
l cewith ai thelatet tvemen ofthe
art, offers his profeopal osoes to the otisens
of Baton Rouge aid inrronding country.
fOilo at residence on Main street, between
Church and Fith streets.
11P' wll l ria ltt wi rompt Attentiotr
An work,, don . bt ito o p aron and
r y m. hlv.
PROPOSALS!
RHE UNDERSIGNED WILL RECEIVE
T Proposals up to 11 o'clock A. M.,
Ieptember 5th, 1881,
for the building of a TwOaStory Brick COUR'f
HOUSE and also a One.Story Brick JAIL, for
the Parish of West Baton Rouge, near the town
of Port Allen, on the Misssslppi river. P ana
and specitications asadopted by the Police Jury~
can bhseen in the Clerk a Office at the town of
Port Allen. All propdo shall be sent sealed,
directed to the Prqient of the PoliceJary and
marked "proposal ."
The contract will be let to the lowest biddbr,
who will be required to give a good and solvent'
bond for Eight Thousand Dollars, for the faith-.
ful performance of the work according to the'
contract.
All bidders must acconmpany their proposals
with the names of the bondamen they will olter
and also a sworn statement of sid propose
bondsmen that then are worth the amount they
agree to pay on said bond over and abeve alle
gal exemptions and special and judicial mort
P The Police Jury reserve the right to reject
any and all bide at their option.
Biddera are invited to be present at the open
uing of bida. C. BARROW.
President Police Jury.
West Baton Rouge, July 2Sd, 1881.
Use Home Remedies
Being compounded with great care and on
scientifc prinoiples, and with the freshet an ,..
most reliable Ingredients, they are nfinitely
superior to the Northern patent nostrums.
Use Steensen's;
SCANDINAVIAN COUGH SPr IFIC I
For Coughs, Colds, Consumption, etc.
Phosphodzed Cod Liver 0111Oil
For general debility, Pulmonary a'ections, etc.
BACKE'S ASTRINGENT CORDIAL, for
Cholera, Bowel Complaint, etc. PAULSEN'S
HEBREW DROPS, for Chills and Fever, Agne,
etc. Prepared and forsale by
J. lTEEl(TSEN,
ntn924f Third srt. Baton Bouge.
CORSETS-A new nsuppy o Corsets of evtery i
description jst received stBoeenflad's.
. .`

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