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Louisiana capitolian. (Baton Rouge, La.) 1879-1881, September 10, 1881, Tri-Weekly, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88064592/1881-09-10/ed-1/seq-3/

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SiIl AnI HIS Tlls VES.
The Battle of Gettrysbar.
GaTTYSI4UIan , PA., Aug. 24,1881.
In jaunting about the battle-fields
and studying in our crude way, the
campaigns of our war we cannot help
being convinced that the art of war
has not improved for centuries. In
this regard it mtch resembles other
arts. What has been the improve
ment in the plastic art eince Phidias ?
'rhe broken-nosed Buonarratti, with
all his genius, (and he was a regular
Polyhedron-and Admirable Crichton
of his day,) never turned from his
deft hands a statue that could corn
pare with those fashioned by the
mighty master who had gone over to
*the majority more than a thousand
years before him. Where has been
the improvements in architecture
since the old masters reared the Coli
seum and the Parthenon' The Al- t
hambra, St. Peter's, adl our Capitol t
are mere patchwork compared to '
them. Not that we wish to"say there
have not been minor improvements I
in war, in arms, projectiles, etc., but it t
cannot he denied that the principles t
remain the same as they were during I
the wonderfnl carupaigns of Hannibal. I
When Gen. Lee was discussing c
with Gen. Longstreet the then con
templated offensive campaign that B
ended so disastrously for their cause s
right here, Longstreet opposed it and
advised that, instead of this move- d
meut, Bragg should be reinforced li
heavily, march north, defeat Rosen- d
crans, continue, and by such means I
relieve Vicksburg. lie argued that i
Grant would be thus compelled to c'
raise the siege and hasten to Rosen- 0
crans' aid. When one of Hannibal's 0'
armies was besieged in Capua by tl
three Roman armies he conceived the A
idea, being outside with another tl
army, to march on Rome and thus gi
raise the siege. This 'identical ma- be
n,'uvre was carried out with great II
success by Jackson when McClellan bi
was drawing his lines about Rich- hi
meond in 1862, and it saved the rebel C'
'capital for the time. There are many in
ways to get here as shown by rail- to
·road guides; we venture to give one P
not set down-from Frederick, by th
buggy. The drive is delightful and lo
the country beautiful ; the dista1n4c is of
thirtyv-to milehs. to
VISte I' v, WEIDNESDAY, .JULY 1, 1ý63. i
it is too well known to be repeated dig
that the mighty shock of arms that Iv
clashed here eighteen years ago was th'
was an accident as far as Meade and A
Lee were concerned. The :placing be
him in command was a surprise to mi
Meade. He had seen much service th1
and knew the tremendous advantage it.
in modern warfare in securing the
tactical defensive. Well versed in t
the literature of war, he recalled Na- an
Ipolon's advice to Marmont: "Choose tin
your position and make the enemy tin
attack you." ile was familiar with thn
VWellington's battles where he had ac- str
:omplished so much by selecting a
position, and sticking to it until the tro
right time came to assume the offen- fro
sive, as he did at Tdalavera, Salaman- b
ca, and Waterloo. and hlie was fresh not
friom the hot field of Fredericksburg, aft
where he had seen a smaller army
than ours repulse us easily by adopt- bin
ing the same principle. lie deter- beg
ained to fight a defensive battle, and, tac
with this end in view, he had par- by
tinally selected a position about thir- all
teen miles south of hereo, behind Pipe ily
Creek, and he had thrown forward lien
his right wing under Reynolds, con- rern
sisting of Huford's cavalry and the tha
First and Eleventh Corps as a mask, the
behind which the army could assume a
thalit line. Buford with his cavalry our
was in tihe van and Reynolds and 1
Howard, with the First ajl Eleventh tag
('orps, following, when Buford struck pos0
the Confederates, deployed, and went parl
to work. lie was standing in the that
cupola of the Seminary, watching the the
distant fight, when Reynolds rode up and
about Ito ,. M., ahead of his ownT"
troops, and called to him: "What's E
tile matter, John I" dismounted, as- linez
oended, and joined him. The under- enec
standing was fromnt headquarters not earl;
to bring on a general engagement, ted
but it was seen that the difficulty in righi
withdrawing *e cavalry would be edtl
great--in fact, it had to be supported; four
So lIernolds threw the First Corps eratt
int.o action as it arrived, and sent or- made
eiors to the rear for Howard to bring back
!hiS troops up as soon as possible. ning
!'Part of Hloward's troops conie for- now
,ward to the Seminary Ridge, Stein- Hard
wlher's division remaiining in reserve (char
ccc Ccmtent ry Ridge. Reynolds was anotl
killed and tlI contnand of the liel Ouli
ftill upon Iloward, and this wva a tlthe1
damipener on the nmen, and we all Incl
know how it terminated. Our line his ci
was about three miles is extent, to cha
the north and west of the town, and hop
the sad results that are inevitable Wt
when the attempt is made to hold
. much ground with few troops, unless
that ground be intrenched, were again
illustrated here. Buford sent word
away back to Meade that Reynolds
Is was dead, and in his opinion, there
e was no directing person. Meade or
dered Hancock to the field with di
r rections to take command, and, if the
n position was a good one, he (Meade,) 1
)r would order up the rest of the army. 1
When Hancock arrived, after a s
mad gallop of twelve miles, our
h troops were falling back in a confus- 1
ed mass from the field through these
streets, and all there was of order
was a reserve brigade of Steinwher's 1
Division, on Cemetery Ridge, with a s
e battery or two, and IBuford's cavalry I
, fighting as infantry, in the plain. c
1 Nearly all else was confusion and the n
] enemy coming on. Hancock soon re- i
stored order, took advantage of the a
Sfinee olural position, posted the t
troops as they came in, turned over o
the command of the field to Slocum f
when he arrived, returned to Meade's g
headquarters at Taneytown, and re t
ported the position good. Our losses a
that day were ten thousand; we had fl
been driven from the field; our new c
position's strength was not then tl
known to the Confederates-and the si
evening and the morning were the 'I
first day, and they saw that it was h
good. tl
SECOND D)AY, THUIIiSDAY, JUi.Y 2,1863. si
Meade, after Ifancock's report, tl
dropped as obsolete the Pipe Creek cl
line, and gave orders for an imme- l
dtate concentration at Gettysburg, yi
he himself arriving at 1 2. r., and he of
inspected the position as well ashe di
could before daylight and approved in
of it. It proved to be a bloody good cc
one. As the differeut corps arrived w
they were placed with rare judgment. m
Above all else our Army had secured an
the defensive, and this was a very fu
great deal. No man who has ever ru
been soldiering in earnest, whether w
he wore stars or searched for gray- gI
backs, lived on canned goods or on sli
hard tack, could stand on Round Top, in
Cemetery Ridge, or Culp's Hlill, and Sa
not know, see, and appreciate that
for once we had a position as was a
position, and the Confederates pa
thought so tll). T'll,'y felt :e'round a ch
lodg time ; they tried to lure us out Ip
of it; they badgered Meade to at- hli
tack --the wary, long-necked, cool- in'
headed, hard student and good sol- he
dier, with his goggles on, saw his ad- tal
vantage, stuck to it, and defeated IBa
the enemy before he got through. cha
A heavy pressure was brought to ish
bear upon him at headquarters to off
mass his troops and plunge through no
the enemy's centre; he couldn't see plc
it. HIe (lid think of ordering Slocum, Th
who conmmanded on the right, to Th
take the initiative there, but Slocum sa3
and Warren reported against it, and wa
that was given up. In thle nmean- al
time the men worked like beavers in of 1
throwing up crude breastworks to cisi
strengthen what was already strong. of I
Sickle's error in advancing his as I
troops to take advantage of a rise in Iil
front of the general line can ie seen is r
by any soldier. His anomalous fix did Thi
not become known to Meade till the and
afternoon when hie (Meade) reached of
there, but it was too latoeto withdraw and
him, as the enemy, about 4 ,. M., est
began the attack. And such an at- stre
tack. Longstreet threw his corps in thi
by brigades, crowded Sickles and tint
all who came to reinforce him stead- mo1
ily back, tighting like devils against win
heavy odds; but our main position od,
remained unbroken, and the day, in ri
that part of the field, our left and fiel
their right, ended. We had drawn derf
cavily from our right to reionforce Lon
ur left, and that left our right poor- wou
y manned. Ewell, taking advan- and
;age of this, by. a furious rush, got is al
)ossession of our lines there and a his :
art of his troops slept within them diat
hat night. And the evening and "cro
he morning were the second day, take
nd they saw that it was good. only
muI11W DAY, FRuI)AY, JULY 3, 186:3. oral.
Ewell having secured part of our ofhi
nes the night before, Lee strength- the o
ned him so he could begin work othel
arly on the 3d, but Meade anticipa- bull
ud this; the troops taken from our train
ight were returned and they assum- num
d the offensive at 4 A. M., fought His 1
ur long hours, charged the Confed- burg
rates plumb out, and our right was head
ade secure, and the problem sprung And
ick to where it was in the begin- ativ
ing.I Lee, according to Swinton,; arnmy
aw determined to imitate Wagranm. lhook
ardly. If Wagram had been ;m swiag
large in the centre simply, this waL ,l.
other Wagram, but I)Davoust andl tihe n
ldiniiot played lHail Columbia on joyfn
,. left of tihe Archduke's line, while gling
tacDonald's column advanced on fir I
a centre at Wagram; here, it was And
chargeon the left-centre only, with. try tl
it suppiort, diversion, or reasonable life, a
>pe of success. ing 1.
We all knoiw the history of this that
o hold day. Artillery flie at nob distance
unless as separates Semninary and Cemetery
eagain Ridges, when men hug the ground
word closely, don't do mueh general dam.
ynolds age. It may demoralize green troops
, there but men who have heard such racket
de or- before know how to take care of
th di-. themselves; the day has gone by
, f the when armies are put: to rout by
[eade,) breaking pitchers, blowing trumpets,
army. and holding up lamps. Lee placed
fter a along his lines by noon one hundred
s, our and forty-five guns. Meade had in
onfus- position but eighty, and the scream
these of shot and shell and the roar of
'order guns lasted two hours, This two
wher's hours' fire showed a peculiar char
with a acteristic in each army; the fiery im
wvalry petuosity of the Confederates and the
plain. coolness of our men. They wasted
nd the a tremendous amount of ammunition
on re- in random firing; our firing was
)f the slower, surer, more like target prac
il the tice. Better soldiers never marched
over or fought than were in both armies
locum from 1861 to 1865; there was this
eade's general difference; the Southern
d re troops would come into action with
losses a whoop, a scream, a yell, load and
o had fire fast and wild, and empty their
r new cartridge-boxes in a few minutes-
then the Northern troops were cooler,
i the slower, and better for a 'long pull.
re the The Confederates, thinking their
t was heavy bombardment had prepared
the way, formed their column of as
1863. sault, consisting of about fifteen
port, thousand men, and started on the
?reek charge. It had to march over a
lme- space of some fourteen hundred
burg, yards, in plain view and exposed to
ad he our artillery fire all the way, but this
asie (did not stay its steady advance an I
eovd instant. It approached to within a
good couple hundred yards of our lines,
rived when it received terrible punish
nent. ment from our musketry, that tore it s
:ired sadly, but, with a loud yell, chock h
very full of vim and vermin, its survivors
ever rushed upon our works and guns,
ether where, after a short but severe strug- A
;ray- gle, it was repulsed with awful
ir on slaughter. And the evening and the
Top, morning were the third day, and we
and saw that it was good. P
that O)SERIVATIONS.
nas a Thisjbadly managed battle on the
rates part of Gen, Lee was always terribly "
rid a chagrinning to that sedate and proud P
out spirited man. He felt and knew that D
at- his errors here were not only a great A
cool- injury to his cause, but they were a
sol- heavy blow to his professional repu- g
ad- tation. Gen. Ewell told the writer in o
ated Baltimore after the war that the A
ugh. charge of the third day was a "fool- C?
it to ish thing" and "that the fighting an st
rs to offensive battla away up there was I
angh nonsense." Longstreet almost im
see plored Lee not to order that charge.
um, The second day was one of errors too. M
to The Adjutant G(eneral of Iris Army
unIr says of this day : "The whole taffair
and was disjointed. There was an utter Mt
an- absence, of accolrd ill the miovoemlents A:
s in of thie several commands, and no de- In
Sto cisive results attended thire operations
ng. of the second day. This charge was
hiis as hopeless as the charge at Malvern st.
e in lill. Men are but men. A soldier
eon is not a steam engine or a mule.
did The're is a limit to human endurance
the and possibilities, and it is the duty P
hed of a Genera[l in command to know
raw and figure on that fact. It is the veri
A., est fudge to try to throw on Long
at- street's shoulders the failure of the w
9 in third day-to blame him for not put
nd ting in hris whole corps. Such a
ad- movement would have left the right
nst wing of the Confederate army expos
ion ed, or rather left that army without
in a right wing at all. Lee was on the
ad field, within immediate view and or
wn dors; isit to be supposed that if
rce Longstreet had disobeyed the world
or- would not have known it right then
in- and there ? Lee said to Wilcox: "This
ot Is all my fault." Did he not tender
i a hIis resignation to Jeff. Davis imme
m diately afterd Was thee not much
od "crooking" in hIis army ? It is a mis
iy, take to suppose, as many do, that he
only was thie Southern ideal of a Gen
33. eral. Even in his native State many Two
ur of his soldiers looked upon Jackson as
h- the officer, some thought Stuart was,
rk others Johnson. He fought like a
a- bull-dog on this ground-not like a
ur trained soldier. He was largely out
n- numbered and must have known it.
ht His brilliant success at Fredericks- r
d- burg and Chancellorvilie turned his
as head and lured him on to this defeat.
g And the next day there was compar
n- ativ quiet, and he gathered his broken
I, :ar'my to retreat, and kind nature
. looked with horror upon tihe awful
a slaughrter, stood in dismay for a little
whiile, and then burst into tears, and
,5 a tiny spark flashed across thire rivers,
d the rmrountains, ard the hills, sped
u .i joyfully; withi glad tiding, to our tin
Ie gling ears, andl swolled to a mighty
ocean of tlamne that illuminated our
in fair land, "Vicksburg has fallen." Tom
is And the big, loyal heart of our coun
1- trSy throbbed happy with renewed
he lifie, and the evening and the morn- of
ing were the fourth day, and we saw
is that it was good. SquI.
uon. P ss to she a° 0 is.
op.
ket ew wOrlaaes emool
et of 'The latest btiletin of the census
b bureau gives the populatfon of the
by various subdivisgions of Louislana,
such as wards, towns and villages.
eed The following lit gives the popula
red tion of the vari, municipal organi
red zations of theo M:
NEW 'OUiLEANes.
S1st ward.......4,41 9th ward........15,575
of td t ll.......8...1i . 10thward.........1,185
3d waod ......... 171 11h ward.......18,317
wo 4th ward........19,18 19th ward........ 8,305
5th ward........ 1 13th ward........ 5,407
a l- 6th ward........128 14th ward........ 2,30
7th ward........9,110. 18thwanr........ 8,855
Im- 8tha ward........ .88 16thward........ 3,087
the 17thward........ 3,081
red Total................ .........16,070
iOn Town. Parish. Popolatioil.
Sacramento, Btlo,...,.Asoension......... 3
ag Donaldsonvile...... ..1.Acenson .........4,567
Pirt Barrow ...........Ascenon ........ 843
. Plattonville............Asnumption ....... 08 By
Labadteville ......... Assumption ..... . 10
led Napo°ionvile .......... Assumption ....... 497
lPacortville ........... Assui on ....... 293
ount Lebanon.......Bievie ......... 30
his nart ................. Iienvlle ........... 160
inggold .............. o ........... 133
rtn Shrevopurt........*.. .Caddo ............. 8,00
Ureenwood......... .. eaddo .......... 174
ith Lako Charles...........Caloasleu ......... 838
nd Columbea ..............aldwelld...... ..219
Leesburg. ..........(.metan . ........ 80
eir Harrisonburg...:::.: .Cat.hola ......... 243
Trinity...... ...........Catahoula......... 28
i- Troy ....t..........Catahoula .... 9.. 90
" Haynesville ........Claiborne.......... 123
Or, Arizona .......*.Claiborne.......... 136
SHomer .................Claiborne.......... 718
Vidalia .................Concordia ......... 440
Bir Keatehi...........De Soto......... 316
Mansfield ..........De Soto...............716
ed Baton Rouge.a........East Baton .Rouge.7,197
Jackson .a.............East Feliclana..... 880
18- Clinton.................Fast Feliciana.....1,12
Joannorette...........Iberia ........... 96
n New Iberia..... ....Iberia....... .....2,709
he Plaquomine ............I wlreille........ ...2,051
Rosedld .......... ...Iberillo... ....... 195
a i Vernon...........Jackson............. 7
Gretna......... ...........elrn ...1,013
ed Mechanickhamu........Jefferson........1,183 ts
to New Mochanickhanm...Jeffoersonm.......... 198
to Kenner............Jefersn.......... 970
li Vermilonvillo.......... Lafayettoe.......... 818
Rayville...............Lafyette........ 100
LI Brainardaville.........; Lafayette.......... 78
Thibodaux.............Lafourche........1,515
a Lockport...............Lafouroche.*..... 171
Baton Pilon..........Lafourche......... 94
s1 Upper Choupec.........Lafeurche......... 107
11. Longnoville........... Lf ....Laforh .... 101 ITS
Vienna................Lincoln........... 363
it Springfield......... ....Livingston ........ 99 B1
Delta....M.. .......Madison......... 399
k Millikern's Ben........Madison............ 156
Bastrop ........... Morehouse ... 822
1" Natchitoches . N........Natchitoches*.2,783
Lake Village..........Natchitoches...... 27
Campte................Nato hitoehes...... 101
- Allentown ............Natchitoches...... l13
C:loutiervillo............Natohitoch es..... 111
iii Moonno...............O nachita ..........2,070 IT
'ITrenton ..... .........Ouachita.......... 528
Bertrandville.... ...laquemines ..... 136
ye (Grand Prairie......... Plaquemines....... 92
Little ]'Prairie.........Plaquenmines....... 73
P'oint I'lasant........ Plaquemines....... 247
'Port Eads.......... ......Plaquemines....... 100
South West I'as.....Plaqn iens....... 2. 36
Iretown................Plaquemines***. 50
10 Red River Landing.....Point Coupee...... 148
(Alexandria.............Rapides......,....100
Cotile.. . .. ...R apides........... 38
id Pinevillo........... :Ralide...........763
Couhatta ....... .........
it Delhi................ILichland .......... 315 i
t Rayville................Richland .. 216 UI(
Altoe................ .Rio hlaand .......... 98
SMany .................Sabine............. 143:
Poscadreville......... t. Bernard........ 162
1- GOreensburg ...........St. Helena......... 297
Opelousaw.............S t. Landry........1,676
S(Grand Cotean......*....t. Landry... ... 02
SArnandv·ill&e........ St. Landry......... 149
Washingtoni.............. t. Latrdry..........,195
. Chicot....... ......St. Landry. .... 4
Ville P'latte...........St . Landry......: . 199
D St Martinaville.........St. Martins........1,04
Breaux Bzidqge......... St. Martins........ 443 Ti
L1 Frnnklin ...............it. Mary...........1,702
c- Centreville.............it.Mary........... 24
Pattersonvill,..........St, Mary........... 5,00
IBayou Irufl......... ...Mary.......... '6
Berwick ................St. Mary........... 96
. Morgan City.......... St. Mary...........2.015
Pienx Island............. Mary.........
Y Madisonvill,.......-...St. T.,mmny...... 441
r Cooingliton..... .....**St. Tanmmany......5 ,7
Louisbnrg..........st.. Tammnany...... n9
1, Maudevillh............t. TaRmmniany.** 753
Anmite City.............Tangip hlroa ....,120 d
8 ArcoIn .................Tangipahon........ 9. 4
Tangipahcea...........-Tangipahon.. ..... 239
- Inrlepvndenvc . ...Tangipahos...... GB
Tickfaw............a ngipahoa........ . 3
a Hannnond............angipshoo.......277
3 Pass Manchac.........Tngipahoa...0...
Ponchatoula....... ....Tangipahos...... 2 93
3 Xt.Joseph............Tcnsea .......... 48
Waterproot ...........Tensa., .......... 316 Tir
SHoumna...............Torrobonne......!084
Bayou Blen...........,Terrobonne... . . 193
(Ouachits City. nion ......... 124
i Spearsvile .........Union ......... 4
Abberille.......... .Vermllion... .
l 'erry's Bridge.........Vermillion....... 33
Minden........... ....Webster..... *.1,133
Briuldy Landltng......West Baton Rouge 216
.R avou Sara.........W est Fehciana.... 710
St. Franclsville...o.West Feliciana.... 721
) Wintlold ...........Winn...........133
Geinaville.... ....Win a.. ........ .47 1(
;'lTHE GENUINE SINGER
I TRADE MARK
,n
Sewing Machine!
50000,000 SOLD ANNUALLY.
Y Two-thirds of all the Sewing Machines sold in
the United States are SINGERS.
The best is the cheapest, and the
SSinger is the best.
It will last a life time. Send for price list.
THE SINGER MANUFACTURING CO.,
a ý5 Canal Street, New Orleans.
-Branch ,f ce
Main Street, BATON ROUGE, La.
B. H, KEYSER, Manager.
TOMBSTONES,
*1:1
Tombs, Head & Foot Stones. Iron Railing, etc.
'G.B.&E. ENOCHS
would call the attention of those in want of any
of the above articles to their new place of busl.
nees, on Main Street, next door east of Piper's
Furniture Store. All orders will neet with
rompt asttetion. at red"c pdie.. fJa
rgani
.., .
3a20 , laoorporat 1i08 for
. N,855
. 3,087
. 3,081
,,Us6,7 TWENTY - FIVE .l!AlS !
Ilatioh.
.. 315
.,3167
497 and Charitable purposes
.. 993
1 with a.Capital of
133
, 1,000,000!
.. 80
228 g To which a reserve fund of over
.. 90 4
130 $4o0,000 o
449 hao since been added
* 316
. 710
e.7,197it
" o880 By an overwhelming
..1,129
e . 6
2,709 Capital eote
..1,013
..1,183 its franchise was made apart of the present
198
970 State Chnstitution, adopted De.
..818
" .. 0100
.. 100 comber 2d, A. D, 1879,
* 78 -
..1,515
.171.
94
107
101 ITS GRAEND SINGLE NoUMBER DISTR
1. 363
9.A BUTION WILL TAKE PLACE MONTH
" 156 ' LY ON THE SECOND TUESDAY.
822
S27 - ...
S101
4. 13
528
1306
399
.247
Spll'took at the Following Distribution b
50
148
.1,800
138
763
143
Wt97 CLASS K,
.1,676
.D02
149
tls AT NEW ORLEANS, .
198
..015
S Capital Prize,
103
2 aPRIZpS OFita0...l . 5,000
3 -an 1
2 . 1.000................ 5,000 PO
100 .T a 0................ 10,000
, 0 0 .. 50.............. 10,000
APPloTIMATIO , 01Ins
9 do do ,00......... 1,800
7 1857 CriesaIoTLg to............. 3 110,000
& iand I
100 .ea .... ....., o..r1ii0
2. . o
50 20.......0,0 Ff~c
S 'r "to a S'
to
BRIKERIRAND,
Mo n est ;l1fin e s ad L tlu o r,
t' o
PR BE-··--RTRAND
N.74,76 VII O
E! II i
New Levee Street,
Ir
SNEW ORLEANS,7
LETUISIAN4
Varieties*Bali
n . BER TRAND,
NEW ORLEANS. A
17 ROYL STREETA --..NEW ORLEAN
Finest Wfthne and LCioMlan
LOUIS HAALL. LOU18 COOK.
HALL & C OOK,
0o0 NEW ORLEANS,
Sand FISHING TACKLE m every descrtn.
00 POWDER, SHY SHELLS and CED
0 Five Aruet Nepalued n te erIeased t
S ** P.O.oxos7*
oyManhaetner of Hard R mbberaed DuckCall.
.-Superior to anything ever ued. N. AutRN's
CS 8OPOLITAN
N 8.13 & 15 ROYAL STREET,
NEW ORLEANS.
O The FINEST ROOMS for the accomBnodatIe
of travelers at all times.
.VERY DELICACY
th FTe r A ee the ery a bt style
FL. Cu. ARNY,
26,28 & 80 Bieaville St.,
NEW ORLEANS, LA.d
SNorthern Cider, Glger Ale, Lemonade aA
Sarsaparilla,
and bottles constant yon band,
THE FINEST H
w n 2O r 0Y~t home S aoP.le w.a
ofjjjelrss Ajjsties

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