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The Baltimore County union, the Towson news. (Towson, Md.) 1909-1912, September 18, 1909, Image 1

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VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2332.
Zl
- Bushels Per Acre
Our New ‘WHITE DIAMOND” Barley
produced almost 80 bushels per acre this
Xear. If von will cut out and send us this
d. we will mail you a large sample free—
be quick, we only have about 4,000 samples
left. None for sale this year.
BOLGIANO’S “GOLD” BRAND
TIMOTHY SEED
will produce the best crops of hay you 4
have ever grown. It Is new seed, pure
and clean, free from weed and trash. It
will produce most excellent hay, also
nutritious and abundant pasturage. The (
best merchants sell Bolgiano's “GOLD” j
Brand.Timolhy Seed. If you can’t get it, j
drop hs a postal and we will tell you j
where you can. Insist on having “GOLD”
Brand Timothy Seed—there will be money
In your pocket If you do. ,
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR <
Seed wheat, Crimson Clover, Alfalfa,
Dwarf Essex Rape. Alsyke Clover, Red
Clover, Sapling Clover, Hairy Vetch,
Winter Oats, Winter Barley, Winter Rye,
Red Top Grass. Kentucky Blue Grass,
Orchard Grass, Tall Meadow Oats Grass,
Canada Field Peas, Poultry Foods, Tur
nips, Rnta Bagas, Kale, Spinach, Winter
Radish, Onion Sets, Etc.
J. BGLGIANO & SON,
Light, Pratt and EUicott Streets,
Baltimore, Md. J
N———— :
;
THE fact that Amatite needs no. i
painting makes it the most. I
economical roofing on the]
.market.
A roof which requires painting
every couple of years to keep it
tight is an expensive proposition.,
Il you will stop and figure out the,
cost of the paint, you will find it is
frequently more than the roofing]
Amatite is covered with a real
mineral surface, which makes paint*]
ing absolutely unnecessary.
Anyone can lay Amatite. It reJj
quires no skilled labor. Nails and
liquid cement which requires no]
heating, supplied free with every ;
roll.
Oriffth & Turner Company
Farm and Garden Supplies
ita,y IT s *} Baltimore.
J. P. STEINBACH
Maker of
OENTLEMEN’S CLOTHES
PROFESSIONAL BLDG.
CHARLES AND PLEASANT STS.
Both l’bones.
C. A P. TELEPHONE
N. C. HAEFELE & CO.
Qas and Electrical Construction
in all its branches
Up-to-date workmanship and reason
able prices. Let me make an estimate
on installing your home with
QAS or ELECTRICITY
I guarantee entire satisfaction in good
work and fair dealing
Office and Show Room:
Bel Air Road, between Overlea and
Maple Avenues,
Overlea P. 0., Baltimore Co., Md.
JARRETT N. GILBERT
(Successor to BAY and GETTY)
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Grain, Wool and Hay
BOURSE BUILDING, Custom House
Avenue and Water Street
- - - MD.
DEsAL WITH
REITZE
Original “Square Deal ”
TAILORS
Saits : $13.50 up
Pants $5-00
Full Dress Suits $30.00 up
J. H. Reitze & Son
643 W. Baltimore Street, 2 doors
west of Arch,
Baltimore, Md.
THE COWIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Near Reisterstown Road, ARLINGTON, Md.
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
, ■, O
nsrow ODPiEisr foe btjsiitess.
. . o—. —.
Does a general Banking Business in all that is consistent with safe and careful man
agement. The location of our Bank makes it the most convenient place for a large
number of residents of Baltimore county to transact their financial business.
Daring the short time oar Bank has been open for business the amount of deposits
has reached a success far In excess of onr expectations.
We have a RATINGS DEPARTMENT and pay interest on money deposited there.
Call and see ns and we will explain why it will be to yonr advantage to open an
account with ns.
Prompt attention given to all collection business entrusted to ns.
—: OFFICERS:
CHAB. T. DOCKET, dr., JOHN K. CULVER, Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH,
President. HOWARD E. JACKSON, 2d Vice-President. Cashier.
—:DIRECTOEB:
CHARLEB T. COCKEV, Jr., HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT H. McMANNS,
ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON, J. B. WAILES, MAX KOSKN,
JOHN K. CULVER, GEORGE W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND,
J. FRANK SHIPLEV, H. D. EASTMAN. Dec. 26—ly
3; MRST <:
] > Thing to consider in depositing money In a bank is security. The Capital and < [
, > Surplus are the depositors protection fund. The ] >
j: TXJbfEW&SXJkX* ji
i * Government superintends and examines this Bank. Onr Directors are responsible, J >
< | well-to-do business men, who have made a success of tbeir own business. This < J
i; BJlLZarxe. i;
< , Has been established over 22 years, dnring which time it has served the banking < [
] public faithfully and built up a large and prosperous business. The best ser- ],
< ’ v i ce possible is none too good for onr country cnstomers and the people of ( ►
i;
] l Open yonr account NOW with ] >
The Towson National Bank,:]
TOWSON, TsOLJD. ji
3; DiRBOTOns. j ►
\ 3 JOHN CROWTHER, President; D. H. RICE, Vice-President; 3 ]
> Col. Walter S. Franklin, Lewis M. Bacon, ;►
- ] Hon. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway, < [
] > Hon. John S. Blddison, Ernest C. Hatch. j,
3’ Emanuel W. Herman, w 0 ORAUMER, Cashier. 3’
3 ’ Oct-
Second National Bank
TOWSON, 3VLd-.
JjjflL We invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies,
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, Ac.
A —A
n II No account too large for us to handle with safety, and none too small H It
to receive our most careful consideration.
I I ——* J {
* x Collections Made. Loans Negotiated.
Banking in All Its Branches.
* EVERT POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOR OUR DEPOSITORS.
-lOPFICBRSI
THOMAB W. OFFUTT, ELMER J. COOK, l VIOE-PREBIDENTB. THOB. J. MEADS
President. Harrison Rider, 1 cashier.
THOMAB W. OFFUTT. W. BERNARD DUKE, HENRY C. LONQNEOKER,
Elmer J. Cook, Wm. a. Lee, Z. Howard Isaao,
HARRIBON RIDER, CHAB. H. KNOX, NOAH E. OFFUTT,
JOHN I YELLOTT, W. GILL SMITH, FRANK X. HOOPER.
Feb. 6—ly _
Maryland Colleger
Westminster. Maryland.
REV. T. H. LEWIB, D. D., LL. D„ President.
A high grade College with low rates, $225 a year for board, furnished
room and tuition.
Three courses leading to degree of A. B. Classical, Scientific, Historical,
and a course in Pedagogy, entitling graduates to teach in Maryland
without examination.
Preparatory School for those not ready for College.
Forty-third Year Opens Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1909.
INSURE TOUR PROPERTY
X2ST
The+Home+lnsurance # Company
OF NEW YORK,
4V*Which has for the past twelve years paid every loss in Baltimore County*®*
CASH When Adjusted.
Assets—Twenty-Five Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The “Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHEELER & COLE, Towson, WEIDEMEYBR& SHIPLEY, Owings’ Mills,
WM. J. BIDDISON, Raspeburg, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
ptTSee that your Policy is in the “Home.” [June 5-0 m
J. J. GEORGE & CO.,
PRODUCE COMMISSION
109 MARKET SPACE,
Near Wholesale Produce Market, —:o: BALTIMORE, Md.
Red X Ohick Starter, Red X Chick Feed, Red X Poultry Feed,
Red X Dry Mash Feed, and Poultry Supplies.
Peerless Hot-Water System Incubators and Brooders, also the Peerless
Lampless Brooder. Portable Poultry Houses and Hennery Outfits.
Iron Age Potato Diggers. Farm and Garden Implements.
The United States Cream Separators. GET OUR CATALOG.
May 29—6 m
S. K. FENDALL & CO.,
TOWSON, IMUD.,
AGENTS FOR ALL KINDS
Farm Machinery and Implements
i international gasoline engines,
J (111 IV UCCII W DUUUICOi I The Beat Engine a farmer or manufactor can buy
Repair Parts for All Machines on Hand.
If we haven’t them we will get them on short notice and can save you money on our full line.
The Hoosiei Com Planter a Specialty. Brz *' “•“
ENVELOPES I
ENVELOPES 1
ENVELOPES
Par Profeaaional and Business Men,
Furnished In large or small lots, with neatly
printed corners, at a verrsmall advance on their
original cost. LABGE STOCK to select from.
OFFICE OF THE UNION.
Deo. 7.—tf. Towson. Md.
J. MAURICE WATKINS & SOM,
—DIALERS Of—
Staple, Fancy fc Green Groceries
Fruits In season. Fresh and Salt Meats.
Full line of Tobaocos, Foreign and Domestic
Cigars, &o.
Sept. 18—ly TOWSON, Md.
TOWSON. MD., SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 18. 1909.
WANTED
1000 Orders
From your section
<£? FOR
LUMBER and
MILL WORK]
COMPO-BOARD.The
great substitute for
Lath and Plaster
J.L.6ILBERT & BRO. LUMBER CO
East Falls & Eastern Aves.
Baltimore, Md.
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
Is It
WATER
YOU WANT ?
We supply it anywhere
and everywhere in
BALTIHORE COUNTY
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
E. SCOn PAYNE CO.
362 and 364 N. Gay St.
Baltimore, Md.
BOTH PHONES:
St. Paul 1228 Courtland 267
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Bar Iron, Bteel, Axles, Springs, Shafts,
Spokes, Rims, Hubs, Wheels, Wheel
Material, Horse Shoes, Horse Shoe
Pads, Horse Shoe Nailß, Rubber Tires,
Rubber Tire Machines, Rubber Tire
Channels, etc.; Wheelwright Material.
A Full Line of Builders’ Hardware
HEADQUARTERS FOR
FIELD FENCE, LAWN SWINGS, LAWN
MOWERS, LAWN SPRINKLERS,
At a big reduction. A postal card will
reach us.
E. Scott Payne Co.
362 and 364 North Gay Street,
Baltimore, Md.
GEORGE W. GRAMMER
OENERAL BLACKSMITH
WHEELWRIGHT
and COACH MAKER
Builds and Repairs Carriages and
Wagons of all Kinds
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and EMBALMER
Caskets always on band. First-claes
service at moderate price. Carriages
furnished at the lowest prices and satis
faction guaranteed in every particular.
PUTTY HILL, Bel Air Road,
Fullerton Post Office. BaltimoreCo.,Md.
VISIT
The Largest
Sample Shoe House
In the World
Majestic Shoe Company
The Great Price Cutters
419 E. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Md
Wm. J. Brady
Buyer and Manager
W. L. Douglas, $3.50 Shoes $2.39
Crawfords, $3.50 and $4.00 Bhoes. .$2.49
Burt & Packard’s $4.00 Shoes $2.49
![! Dr. J. Wm. Harrower ~iij
11 If
i?j SURGEON DENTIST
ji] Washington and Allegany Avenues jij
ifi Towson, Md.
?|l Office Hours |r{
j|j Daily, from 9A.M.t05 P. M. jjj
jfj C. &.P. Phone, Towson 131—R j:j
Si SiSiSiS?SiSiSiSi@
THE OPTIMIST.
(From Harper’s Weekly.)
A motor car had run him down.
His leg was amputated.
But he, with ne’er a sign of frown.
Seemed very much elated.
“A wooden leg.” quoth he, “is flop,
For there Is little doubt
That timber toes like these of mine
Can never suffer gout.”
His party at the autumn poll
Was totally rejected.
But he, O bright and sunny soul,
Was not at all affected.
“If things go wrong at all,” quoth he.
With ne’er a tear nor sigh,
“It really won’t be up to me
To tell the reason why.”
When by Perilla fair one day
He found that he was jilted.
He simply smiled all grief away
And snowed himself unwilted. •
“She might have married me,” he said,
“But now she’s taken wing
I find I’m forty bones ahead
On the engagement ring.”
And later on when he became
A prey to indigestion.
He took his troubles just the same,
With neither doubt nor question.
“ ’Tis bard,” said he, “to lose one’s health,
And yet how nice that I
Will never have to squander wealth
On lobster broiled and pie.”
'And. when at last ho went to jail.
And found himself in limbo.
He neither wept, nor turned be pale,
But, with bis arms akimbo.
Right jauntily he went his way.
And to his labors bent.
Rejoicing that for many a day
The public paid bis rent!
FLOTSAM.
(From the Boston Post.)
Flotsam crept quietly to the old
derelect that had been beached high
and dry years before and stretched
himself out on the sand in its shade.
To be without kith or kin at six is a
hard proposition, but to be six and
have a round, baby face framed in a
mass of golden curls, besides being so
small that one looks scarcely four, is
a harder proposition still, and thdNßt
tle boy who was trying so hard to
choke back the tears that would gath
er in his eyes despite his utmost ef
forts to prevent them realized it only
too well.
When old Uncle Ben, the light
house keeper who had rescued him,
died the winter before, big, good-nat
ured Ned Grant had kindly taken the
little fellow home, but the winter had
been a hard one for the Grants and
Flotsam knew that they could keep
him no longer.
If he was only larger and older, he
thought, or if someone would come
for him as Uncle Ben said they would
if the someone would only be his Lady,
his Lady that came to him so often in
his dreams, and who called him —but
he never could seem to remember
what she did call him, for when she
held out her arms to him she always
faded away before he could reach her.
He would awaken with the echo of
her voice in his ears, but what she had
called him or who she was he never
could remember.
Uncle Ben had found him all alone
in a little boat floating out to sea one
morning after a big storm, and had
named him Flotsam. He was all that
was ever found of some boat that
must have gone to pieces on the rocks.
The old lighthouse keeper believed it
to have been a private yacht and that
friends would come some day in
search of survivors or for news of the
wreck. But four years had rolled
away, the fourth taking Uncle Ben
with it, and as yet no one had come.
If he could stay there*a little long
er, he thought, perhaps the Lady
would come, but they were to take
him to the city in the morning and
put him out for adoption, then he
was sure she could never find him.
The tears that he had fought back
all day could be restrained no longer,
and burying his face in the sleeve of
his little blouse he sobbed himself to
sleep.
When Flotsam opened his eyes an
hour later he found that he was no
longer alone, for two men were lean
ing against the old wreck. Their
backs were toward him, but he knew
they were strangers, and wondered if
they were not the people that were to
occupy the pretty cottage on the cliff
that summer. He was about to steal
quietly away when he caught a bit of
their conversation which caused him
to pause.
“Yes,” one of the men was saying.
“I would advise you to adopt a little
boy about the age of the child you
lost. The sea will help her some,
but the child will bring back her
memory if anything will.
“Do you happen to know of any
child, doctor?” asked his companion,
a big man with dark, sad looking
eyes and hair tinged with gray. “I
cannot promise to adopt it at first, but
if it will help bring my wife back to
her old self I will take one for the
summer at least, though it will be
mighty hard to see another in my lit
tle son’s place.”
“No,” answered the doctor, “I
have no child in mind, but when I
get back in town I’ll look around and
see what I can do.”
Flotsam waited no longer. Here
was a man who wanted a little boy to
adopt, and he was a little boy to be
put out for adoption.
He came from behind the wreck,
trembling but brave, and faced the
two men. “ Couldn ’ t you please take
me instead of getting a little boy in
town ?” he asked. “You see, I’ve
got to be ’dopted, and I don’t like to
leave here just yet, ’cause I’m wait
ing for my Lady to come.”
“Why, why !” exclaimed the doc
tor, good naturedly. “So you want
to be adopted. Don’t you suppose
your mother would object, young
man?”
Flotsam shook his head. “I don’t
’xactly want to be,” he answered,
“but you see I haven’t any father or
mother; I’m just Flotsam, ’cause
Uncle Ben found me in a boat and
took me to live in his lighthouse.
( He’s dead now, though, and nobody
i wants me, so I’ve got to be’dopted.”
Just then a breeze caught Flotsam’s
shabby hat and blew it from his head,
i revealing a mass of tangled golden
i curls. The big man, who had been
[ listeninge agerly to the child’s words,
j grasped the doctor’s arm. “Doctor,”
j he whispered huskily, “doctor, that
j boy has the hair and eyes of my wife;
he says he was found in a boat. Can
| it be possible—doctor, say there’s a
i chance.
I “Steady, man, steady,” said the
| doctor, then turning to the eager
looking child. “So you’re Flotsam,
are you ? And who is the lady you
are waiting for?”
“Well,” answered Flotsam, “she
comes in dreams now, but I thought
she might come here*some day look
ing for me, ’cause Uncle Ben said —”
but he went no further. In a wheel
chair pushed by a white capped nurse
was a lady coming along the beach.
With eyes fixed upon her as one fas
cinated Flotsam crept slowly toward
the chair, while the doctor restrained
the man by his side.
The lady had been listlessly watch
ing the sea, but now she turned, and
her eyes met those of the little fellow
before her.
“Oh!” he almost shrieked in his
excitement. “Now, I know —it’s —
it’s Mumsie !”
The woman sprang from her chair
“Laddie,” she cried in a dazed sort
of way, “Laddie, no, you are too
large for my Laddie, bnt, but —Oh,”
she sobbed, “I remember now —the
storm —the rocks —my Laddie ! —l’ve
lost my baby.”
Her husband was at her side, try
ing to explain. “Edith, it is all
right, dear,” he said unsteadily.
‘ ‘You have been ill, and Laddie has
been lost —but I think —I think we
have found him. This little boy—”
But Edith was not listening. She
had slipped to her knees by the boy,
searching his face for familiar features.
Pushing back his hair she hunted un
til she found a tiny scar, then she
caught the child in her arms. “My
little son,” she murmured, “my Lad
die grown big.”
After a few moments she raised a
tear stained face to her husband and
held out her hand. As he looked
into her eyes he saw that the old list
less expression had vanished, and
with a glad, happy cry, though tears
glistened in his eyes, he caught them
both, Flotsam and his Lady, in his
arms. “God is good,” he whispered.
“He has restored-both my treasures
when I had given up all hope.”
ARAB SCHOOLS.
(Washington Herald.)
“An Arab school,” said a traveler,
“is one of the most interesting places
in Cairo to visit. The children, with
the schoolmaster, sit upon the floor or
the ground in a semicircle, and each
has a tablet of wood which is painted
white and upon which the lessons are
written. When the latter are learned
they are washed out and replaced by
other lessons.
“During study hours the Arab
schools remind one of the Chinese,
for the children all study aloud, and
as they chant they rock back and
forth like trees in a storm, and this
movement is continued for an hour or
more at a time. The schoolmaster
rocks back and forth also, and alto
gether the school presents a most
novel appearance as well as sound.
Worshipers In the mosques always
move about while reciting the Koran,
as this movement is believed to assist
the memory.
“The desks of the Arab schools are
old contrivances of palm sticks, upon
which is placed the Koran or one of
the thirty sections of it. After learn -
the alphabet the boys take up the
study of the Koran, memorizing en
tire chapters of it until the sacred
book is entirely familiar.
“A peculiar method is followed in
learning the Koran. The study be
gins with the opening chapter, and
from this it skips to the last. The
last but one is then learned, then the
last but two, and so on in inverted
order, ending finally with the second
chapter.
“During the student’s progress it
is customary for the schoolmaster to
send on the wooden tablet a lesson
painted in black and red and green to
the father, who returns it after inspec
tion with a couple of plasters pasted
upon it. The salaries of the school
masters are very meager, indeed.”
HIGH BALABIBD ANIMALS.
(London correspondence of the New York Sun.)
The published statement that the
chimpanzee now performing at the
London Hippodrome draws a salary
of “SSOO a week for eating his meals
and smoking cigarettes twice a day in
public” has surprised many, but man
agers explain that “turns” are paid
for according to their power to at
tract money to the box office, irre
spective of whether they are artistic
dancers or trained chimpanzees.
There is a moukey, called Peter
Consul, who is at present filling en
gagements in Germany and for whom
$1,500 a week for an American en
gagement has just been refused.
Trixie, the clever old gray mare
who is well known at the Palace
Theatre in London, can earn S4OO a
week for her owner, and Emir, the
musical horse, draws #250.
A troupe of three or four elephants
will appear on a salary at from SSOO
to S6OO a week, two tiny parrots now
going the rounds of music halls are
good for some 8250.
Pilu, the thought reading dog, is
earning 8150 a week for his master,
and the boxing kangaroo draws $250.
One of the most expensive animal
“turns” is Seeth’s troupe of lions,
which get 81,500 a week. Henrick
son’s tigers get half that sum. Leop
ards are also good salary earners, but
snakes have small value nowadays.
Good dog “turns” always command
high pay. Merion’s dogs, on theii
reputation as sabot dancers, are get
ting SSOO a week in Paris, and Bar
nold’s dog pantomime, on the fame
of a terrior who acts the part of a
drunken man, is drawing SI,OOO in
the American music halls.
Cats when well trained are a great
attraction, but they are rare. Oneol
the best known and highest paid
troupes of cats disappeared with theii
mistress, Claire Beassy, on the nighl
of December 28 in the earthquake al
Messina.
“Waiter, get me a newspaper so 1
can hide my yawns; this concert is
so stupid.” “Yes, miss; I’ll bring
the largest I can find.”
THE UNION ESTABLISHED 1850 j
THE NEWS ESTABLISHED 1905 \ Consohdated 1909
A FORTUNATE ESCAPE.
(From the Youth’s Companion.)
Crossing from Rotterdam to New
York recently, Alan Dale, the author
of “The Great Wet Way,” met an
acquaintance who was evidently in
trouble. He describes the meeting
and the cause of his friend’s anxiety :
She wore a look of haggard dis
tress, and could scarcely find time to
ask me how I was, or say how pleased
she was to meet me. She stood
quite still as she reached the deck,
and inquired of me most imperiously,
“Have you seen Miss Myers?”
“Who is Miss Myers?” I asked.
“Oh, I don’t know,” she replied.
“I wish I did. I’m so tired 1 I’ve
been trapesing about Boulogne all the
afternoon, waiting for this wretched
boat. I should love to go to bed,
but I must see Miss Myers. Do,
please, see if you can discover her.
Ask the stewards; search well, and
bring her to me. I will wait here.”
High and low I searched for Miss
Myers. I read labels on steamer
chairs, and got down on my knees to
decipher legends on trunks. It was
no use, and I had to give up the
search.
I broke the news as delicately as I
could. I had noi found Miss Myers ;
in fact, I believed there “wasn’t no
sich person.”
“But there is! there is!” Mrs.
Kelly almost wept. “They told me
about her in London ; they told me
about her in Paris; they told me
about her in Boulogne. The very
thought of her drives me wild —”
Then, and then only, it dawned
upon me that my poor friend, Mrs.
Kelly, was mad. Pleasure, European
pleasure, had unhinged her reason.
“Never mind,” I said, gently, try
ing to humor*her. “Never mind.
Perhaps there is a Miss Myers, but
she won’t hurt you. I will see that
she does not. Now if I were you, I
should go to bed, and tomorrow you
will feel better and more like your
self.”
“Don’t be idotic!” said Mrs. Kel
ly, peevishly. “I won’t go to bed.
This Myers woman is my roommate,
and I’ve got to find her. I begged
the company for a room alone, but
all they could give me was a small
cabin with Miss Myers, and” —here
Mrs. Kelly tried to keep back the
tears—“l’m a stout woman. I may
: even say that I’m a fat woman. I
need space. Suppose, suppose Miss
Myers is also fat! What then ?
What does the company care?”
1 A little later Mrs. Kelly was told
that she could have the cabin to her
self, as Miss Myers had been accom
modated elsewhere.
ICEBEBGB.
(From the Scientific American.)
The distance covered by an iceberg
: of the north Atlantic from the time
it is formed until it reaches the banks
i is fully 2,500 miles. It may have
been afloat for a year, exposed to
wide changes of temperature, battered
by ice floes, possibly other bergs and
: ceaselessly washed by the waves.
1 Yet some of those seen 2,000 miles
: south of their starting point are nearly
300 feet in height and truly of ma
jestic proportions, often 1,000 or more
feet in length, while it is an estab
i lished scientific fact that so much
more of the bulk is under water than
1 is visible that the largest bergs may
• extend into the ocean to a depth of
1 over half a mile.
> Their enormous size when they be
: come detached from the glaciers is
l proved by the observations of explor
-1 ers along the Greenland coast. A
few years ago a berg was measured as
t nearly as possible around the edges.
1 This distance was about five miles.
1 It had several peaks estimated to
> range from 300 to 500 feet high.
• Judging from its appearance, it was a
I solid mass that had separated in its
• entirety from the glacial edge of
Greenland.
As arctic navigators who venture
far north often see a score or more of
> great bergs in a day, the tremendous
glacial activity in this region can be
| appreciated. The majority of these
' that drift to the Grand banks come
from Melville bay. Some of the dis
’ tinct glaciers that terminate the Green
land ice cap on this coast extend
j along it a distance of fully twenty
five miles. Their thickness or height
can only be estimated, but in places
1 near the open sea it is believed to be
several hundred feet.
Recent examinations of this coast
[ show that during the short summer
• the formation of bergs in the bay is
almost continuous. The glacial
movement keeps pressing the ice for
ward until a thick stratum often pro
[ jects many feet beyond that beneath.
" After a time the great weight over
„ comes the tensile strength of the mass
' and it falls into the sea, and a berg is
s created.
3 DEMAND FOB BAT SKINS.
7 (From Fur News.)
e The use of rat skins in various in
. dustries has created a demand in Lon
don alone to the amount of nearly
’ $200,000 a year. They are used,
j among other things, for bookbinding,
photograph frames, purses, and for
' thumbs in gloves.
' A new branch of work is likely to
’ increase the consumption largely, and
as much as 75 to 90 cents a day has
j been earned by the unemployed in
Denmark last year, when the rat act
was passed. The damage done by
rats in England alone is estimated to
amount to many million dollars per
“ annum, and their capture already oc-
Q cupies a large number of persons.
Mrs. Naggs—“My husband has
just joined the I. O. R. M.” Mrs.
jaggs—“What does that mean?”
d Mrs. Naggs — “The Improved Order
r of Red Men.’ ’ Mrs. Jaggs— “I wish
my husband would join the I. O. W.
x M.” Mrs. Naggs—“Meaningwhat?”
Mrs. Jaggs—“lmproved Order of
i White Men.”
s * ‘Were you ever in a railroad disas
g ter ?” ‘ ‘Yes—l once kissed the wrong
girl while going through a tunnel.”
MONEY IN MULES.
Raising mules for the market is an
industry which for some reason is al
most entirely neglected in the Eastern
and Middle States, yet there is no
safer, surer method of making money,
especially for the small farmer.
The notion that one needs bound
less acres or a ranch covering half a
county to raise mules successfully has
been threshed out and exploded long
ago. There are no extensive mule
breeding plants in Missouri, yet this
State raises the largest and finest
mules in the whole world.
A farmer with a hundred acres
could raise a couple of mules every
year ; When three years old, if a fair
size, they will bring him S2OO each.
If extra large and well shaped they
will bring almost as much more.
There is always a demand and a
ready market for any mule, and the
bigger the mule the bigger the price.
One man with a farm of 200 acres
keeps one driving horse and ten mares.
Each one of these mares raises a mule
colt every year besides doing all the
farm work, and on this particular
farm there is plenty for them to do.
The colts are allowed to run with
the mares until four months old.
They are then placed in a pasture by
themselves and are never allowed to
stop growing until they have attained
their full growth. From the time
they leave the mare until they are
shipped to market they are never fed
hay or oats. Sowed corn, bean fod
der, cornstalks and straw in winter
and grass in summer is their diet.
“My experience,” writes this far
mer in Country Eife in America, has
taught me that mules thrive best on
coarse food —not fence rails and the
windy end of a barn, but any other
food than hay or oats. My rations
for sixty mules engaged in heavy
railroad construction work are six
quarts of corn a day for each, and one
bundle of rye straw for two mules at
night.
“It would'be hard to find a smooth
,er, slicker bunch anywhere, and they
have not lost a week’s work in five
years. They are groomed and cur
ried every night, the same as any val
uable working horse, and the drivers
are never allowed to whip ; any abuse
or overloading results in the quick
discharge of the driver, for a mule is
of all working animals the most timid
and shy. They will go any place and
do anything if they know it is all
right, and if they do not know it will
not do it.”
HOW A HORSE GALLOPS.
(From the Chicago Tribune.)
How does a horse gallop ? Owing
to the rapidity of action it cannot be
seen by the human eye. However,
as the individual spokes of a rapidly
revolving wheel can be made visible
by a flash of lightning, so the action
of a galloping horse can be and has
been analyzed by instantaneous pho
tography.
The statuette of Sysonby, the thor
oughbred, has been made from pho
tographs taken at the instant when
all four legs are off the ground. The
back is arched, the hind feet are di
rected forward, the fore feet back ward,
so that all are tucked under the ani
mal’s body.
When the limbs again touch the
ground the first to do so is one of the
hind feet, which is thrust far forward
so as to form an acute angle with the
line of the body, and thus serve the
purpose of a spring in breaking the
force of the impact of the hoof when
the horse is going at top speed.
In the conventional mode of repre
senting a galloping horse all four legs
are off the ground at once, but the front
pair are extended backward in such a
way that the under surfaces of their
hoofs are directed skyward, the body
being at the same time brought near
the ground. This conventional pose
appears to have been derived from a
dog running, when the front and hind
pairs of legs are respectively extended
forward and backward, with the soles
of the hind feet turned upward.
This pose, it is thought, was adopt
ed to represent the gallop of the horse
by the goldsmiths of Mycenae be
tween 800 and 1000 B. C., whence
it was transmitted byway of Persia
. and Siberia to China and Japan, to
return in the eighteenth century, as
the result of commercial relations, to
1 western Europe.
HAT THAT CAN BE TAKEN TO PIECES.
(From the London Chronicle.)
A leading Parisain milliner has j ust
1 invented a hat which may be adapted
for various occasions at will.
It can be taken to pieces. When
its removable brim is packed away
under the brow it becomes a close fit
ting toque suitable for motoring, rail
* way travelling or for walks in rough
1 weather. If it’s owner finds herself
unexpectedly called upon to appear
in evening dress she has simply to re
adjust her crown and she is ready for
any function demanding the greatest
* elegance.
r PEPPERMINT FARMS.
(From the Minneapolis Journal.)
, The world’s peppermint is grown
on peppermint farms in the neighbor
hood of Kalamazoo. Over 300,000
> pounds of peppermint oil, worth $5 b
1 pound, is produced annually from the
} moist and ink-black soil of southwes
-1 tern Michigan.
t Peppermint farming is simple. The
r roots are planted in the spring ; the
> bushes, which are about three feet
r high, are cut down in the late sum
' mer; the stilling goes on through
August and September.
An acre yields about twenty-five
3 pounds of oil. The cost of this pro-
I duction —planting, weeding, stilling
—ls about 815. The oil itself brings
r $125. Thus every acre of a pepper
-1 mint farm gives a profit of sllO.
f *
, “I thought the Agricultural De
-1 partment was run in the interest of
the farmer.” “Well, ain’t it?” “I
- wrote ’em for some literature to help
\ me get Summer boarders, but they
* had nothing of the kind in stock. ’ *

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