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The Baltimore County union, the Towson news. (Towson, Md.) 1909-1912, September 25, 1909, Image 1

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VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2333.
80 Bushels Per Acre
Our New “WHITE DIAMOND” Barley
produced almost 80 bushels per acre this
year. If you will cut out and send us this
Ad. we will mail you a large sample free—
be quick, we only have about 4,000 samples
left. None for sale this year.
BOL6IANO’S “GOLD” BRAND
TIMOTHY SEED
will produce the best crops of hay you
have ever grown. It Is new seed, pure
and clean, free from weed and trash. It
will produce most excellent hay, also
nutritious and abundant pasturage. The
best merchants sell Bolgiano's "GOLD"
Brand Timothy Seed. If you can’t get it,
drop us a postal and we will tell you
where you can. Insist on having “GOLD”
Brand Timothy Seed—there will be money
in your pocket if you do.
WE ABE HEADQUARTERS FOB
Seed wheat. Crimson Clover, Alfalfa,
Dwarf Essex Bape. Alsyke Clover, Bed
Clover, Sapling Clover, Hairy Vetch,
Winter Oats, Winter Barley, Winter Bye,
Bed Top Grass, Kentucky Blue Grass,
Orchard Grass, Tall Meadow Oats Grass,
Canada Field Peas, Poultry Foods. Tur
nips, Ruta Bagas, Kale, Spinach, Winter
Radish, Onion Sets, Etc.
J. BOLGIANO & SON,
Light, Pratt and Eilicott Streets,
Baltimore, Md.
1
Him
THE fact that Amatite needs no'
painting makes it the most]
economical roofing on the]
market.
A roof which requires painting 1
every couple of years to keep it!
tight is an expensive proposition.]
Ityou will stop and figure out the
cost of the paint, you will find it is]
frequently more than the roofing]
Amatite is covered with a real
mineral surface,. which makes paint*]
ing absolutely unnecessary. “
Anyone can lay Amatite. It reJ]
quires no skilled labor. Nails and.
liquid cement which requires no
heating, supplied free with every]
roll.
Qriffth & Turner Company
Farm and Garden Supplies
SOSSST s *} Baltimore.
J. P. STEINBACH
Maker of
GENTLEMEN’S CLOTHES
PROFESSIONAL BLDG.
CHARLES AND PLEASANT STS.
Both Phones.
C. A P. TELEPHONE
N. C. HAEFELE & CO.
Gas and Electrical Construction
in all its branches
Up-to-date workmanship and reason
able prices. Let me make an estimate
on installing yonr home with
QAS or ELECTRICITY
I guarantee entire satisfaction in good
work and fair dealing
Office and Show Room:
Bel Air Road, between Overlea and
Maple Avenues,
Overlea P. 0., Baltimore Co., Md.
JARRETT N. GILBERT
(Successor to BAY and GETTY)
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Grain, Wool and Hay
BOURSE BUILDING, Custom House
Avenue and,Water Street
BALTIMORE, - - - MD.
DEAL WITH
REITZE
FOR*BEST*CLOTHES.
We beg to announce the arrival of our
FALL AND WINTER FABRICS, and in
vite your early inspection*
Specialists on Full Dress Suits... 30.00 up
J. H. Reitze A Son
643 W. Baltimore Street, 2 doors
west of Arcb, .
Baltimore, Md.
ONE: *
SURE *
# j;
< [ To have money Is to save It. The sure way to save It Is by depositing it In a,'
‘ > responsible bank. Ton will then be exempt from annoyaneo of having it barn < [
i * holes in yonr pockets, and aside from the fact that yonr money will be safe ] >
4 I from theft, the habit of saving tends to the establishment of thrift, economy, , *
] t discipline and a general understanding of business principles essential to yonr < ]
4 ] success. i
! To those wishing to establish relations with a safe, strong bank, we heartily < ,
4 ] extend onr services. , >
jiThe Towson National Bank,!]
j| TOWSON, MD. J;
; t direotohs, |;
JOHN CROWTHER, President; D. H. RICE, Vice-President; 4 ]
4 ' Col. Walter 8. Prankllp, Lewis M. Baeon, ] •
% Hon. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway, 4]
] > Hon. John S. Biddlson, Ernest C. Hatch. ( ,
4] Emanuel W. Herman, _ x _ , , !>
W. O. ORAUMER, Cashier.
5 goL.io-jjr nnnnfin rmnAimmmrumrij *
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Near Reisterstown Road, ARLINGTON, Md.
S' ■ O"
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
—— o ►
TsTOW OZPEICT FOR BUSINESS.
——
Does a general Banking Business in all that is consistent with safe and careful man
agement. The location of onr Bank makes it the most convenient place for a large
number of residents of Baltimore county to transact their financial bnsiness.
During the short time onr Bank has been open for bnsinees the amount of deposits
has reached a success far in excess of onr expectations.
We have a SAVINGS DEPARTMENT and pay interest, on money deposited there.
Call and see ns and we will explain why it will be to yonr advantage to open an
account with ns.
Prompt attention given to all collection bnsiness entrusted to ns.
,—o—
OFFICERS:
CHAS. T. COCKEY, Jr., JOHN K. CULVER, Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH,
President. HOWARD E. JACKSON, 2d Vice-President. Cashier.
—:DIRECTORS:
CHARLES T. COCKEV, Jr., HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT H. McMANNS,
ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON, J. B. WAILEB, MAX KOSEN,
JOHN K. CULVER, GEORGE W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND,
J. FRANK SHIPLEY, H. D. EASTMAN. Deo. 26-ly
Second National Bank
TOWSON, Md.
We Invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies, /Hhl
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, Ac.
/H (\
to receive our most careful consideration.
" * Collections Made. Loans Negotiated.
Banking in All Its Branches.
4* EVERT POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOR OUR DEPOSITORS.
-lOPPIOBRSi
Thomas W. Offutt, Elmer J. Cook, l Vice-Presidents. Thos. j. Meads,
President. Harrison Rider, 1 Cashier.
Thomas W. Offutt. W. Bernard Duke, Henry Q. lonqnecker,
Elmer J. Cook, wm. A. lee, Z. Howard Isaao,
Harrison Rider, Chas. H. Knox, Noah E. Offutt,
JOHN I. YELLOTT, W. GILL SMITH, FRANK X. HOOPER.
Feb. 6—ly
Maryland Colleger
Westminster. Maryland.
REV. T. H. LEWIB, D. D., LL. D„ President.
A high grade College with low rates, $225 a year for board, furnished
room and tuition.
Three courses leading to degree of A. B. Classical, Scientific, Historical,
and a course in Pedagogy, entitling graduates to teach in Maryland
without examination.
Preparatory School for those not ready for College.
Forty-third Year Opens Wednesday, Sept. 16, 1900.
* July 17—3 m _ _
INSURE YOUB PROPERTY
I2ST
The 4 Home # Insurance 4 Company
OF N-ZIW YORK,
O'Which has for the past twelve years paid every loss in Baltimore Connty"W
CASH When Adjusted.
Assets-Twenty-Five Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The “Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHEELER & COLE, Towson, WEIDEMEYER & SHIPLEY, owings’ Mills,
WM. J. BIDDISON, Raspeburg, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
fST~9ee that your Policy U in the “Borne." [June 6—Bm
J. J. GEORGE & CO.,
PRODUCE COMMISSION
109 MARKET SPACE,
Near Wholesale Produce Market, :o: BALTIMORE, Md.
Red X Chick Starter, Red X Chick Feed, Red X Poultry Feed,
Red X Dry Mash Feed, and Poultry Supplies.
Peerless Hot-Water System Incubators and Brooders, also the Peerless
Lampless Brooder. Portable Poultry Houses and Hennery Outfits.
Iron Age Potato Diggers. Farm and Garden Implements.
The United States Cream Separators. GET OUR CATALOG.
May 28—8 m
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AGENTS FOR ALL KINDS
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muy iKDfrinftriec I INTERNATIONAL GASOLINE ENGINES,
wUHn UCEII w DUUUICdi I The Best Engine a farmer or manufaotor can buy
Repair Parts for All Machines on Hand.
If we haven’t them we will get them on Bhort notice and can Rave you money on our full line.
The Hoosiei Com Planter a Specialty.
Envelopes i
envelopes I
ENVELOPES
For Professional and Bnsiness Hen,
Furnished In large or small lota, with neatly
printed corners, at a verysmall advance cm their
original cost. LARGE STOCK to select from.
OFFICE OF THE UNION,
Deo. T.—tf. Towson. Md.
J. MAURICE WATKINS 4 SON,
—DSALIHS ni-
Staple, Fancy & Green Groceries
Fruits In nmoil Fresh and Salt Meats.
Full line of Tobaccos, Foreign and Domestic
Cigars, to.
Sept. 12—ly TOWSON, Md.
TOWSON. MD., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25. 1909.
WANTED
1000 Orders
From your section
FOR &
LUMBER...
MILL WORK
COMPOBOIRD.The
great substitute (or
Lath and Plaster
J.L.GILBERT & BRO. LUMBER CO
East Falls & Eastern Aves.
Baltimore, Md.
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
Is It
WATER
YOU WANT ?
We supply it anywhere
and everywhere in
BALTiriORE COUNTY
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
E. SCOTT PAYNE COT
362 and 364 N. Gay St. *
Baltimore, Md.
BOTH PHONES:
St. Paul 1228 Courtland 267
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Bar Iron, Steel, Axles, Springs, Shafts,
Spokes, Rims, Hubs, Wheels, Wheel
Material, Horse Shoes, Horse Shoe
Pads, Horse Shoe Nails, Rubber Tires,
Rubber Tire Machines, Rubber Tire
Channels, etc.; Wheelwright Material.
A Full Line of Builders’ Hardware
HEADQUARTER^OR
FIELD FENCE, UWN SWINGS, LAWN
MOWERS, UWN SPRINKLERS,
At a big reduction. A postal card will
reach us.
E. Scott Payne Co.
362 and 364 North Gay Street,
Baltimore, Md.
GEORGE W. GRAMMER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
WHEELWRIGHT
and COACHMAKER
Builds and Repairs Carriages aad
Wagons of all Kinds
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and EMBALMER
Caskets always on hand. First-class
eervice at moderate price. Carriages
furnished at the lowest prices and satis
faction guaranteed in every particular.
PUTTY HILL, Bel Air Road,
Fullerton Post Office, BaltimoreCo..Md.
VISIT
The Largest
Sample Shoe House
In the World
iMaJestic Shoe Company
The Greet Prlee Cuttere
419 E. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Md
Wm. J. Brady
Buyer end Meneger
W. L. Douglas, $3.50 Shoes $2.39
j 'Crawfords, $3.50 and $4.00 Shoes. .$2.49
J Sort & Packard’s $4.00 Shoes $2.49
s ii) Dr. J. Wm. Harrower ijj
\ J J If
Jjl SURGEON DENTIST
jij Washington and Allegany Averaes jtj
jjj Towson, Md. i|l
L] Office Hours §1
j jij Daily, from 9A.M. to 5 P-M. jj
| C.*P. Phone, Towson 131-R jp
“OLD MAH SCISSORS.”
(From the New York Sun.)
There’s a quaint little man who comes down our
street
And jingles a bell as he goes;
He minds not the glare of a summer day’s heat
Nor fears be the worst gale that blows.
Wrinkled and worn by the sun, rain and time.
He plods through the long sultry day.
Ringing his bell and seeking a dime
Or a quarter that may come his way.
“Old Man Scissors”—he’s coming again!
He don’t mind the sun and he don't mind the
rain;
Jingling his bell till some housekeeper hears
And up goes a window and out come the shears.
Blades that need edges, and points twisted in.
He’ll fix them all up—now watch his wheel spin!
Patient, contented, he labors alone.
Unheeding the din of the street;
The water drops splash on his old grinding
stone
And the sand grains spatter hts feet;
The children all come and gather near by
While the old man is working his heel;
It’s fun to stand bv and watch the sparks fly
And list to the hum of his wheel.
“Old Man Soissors”—he’s coming again!
He don’t mind the sun and he don t mind the
rain; „
Patient, contented, he bends o er his wheel.
Droning an air to the hum of the steel;
Blades that need edges, and points twisted in.
He’ll fix them all up—now watch his wheel spin!
THAT WILD YOUNG TODD.
(From Uncle Remus’s Home Magazine.)
Old Bill Todd, leaning against the
end of the polished bar, listened to
the click of the telegraph in the pool
room beyond the swinging door and
wished somebody would come in and
buy him a drink. Old Bill was as
lean as a lath and so tall his elbow
rested comfortably on the oak as he
slouched limply in the angle at the
wall. His tightly buttoned “Prince
Albert” accentuated his thinness, but
it served to hide the fragments of a
shirt which had lingered too long
away from the laundry, and Old Bill
had long ago learned to value clothes
for their utility rather than their
decorative value.
A young sport slammed the swing
ing door of the pool-room behind
him, and the click of the instruments
grew into a fierce clatter through the
opening and died away again.
‘‘What d’ye like at Sheepshead,
Bill ?” queried the youngster, patron
izingly- f u v
‘‘That’s not my line of business,
my young friend,” returned Mr.
Todd. ‘‘l’d as soon bet on what a
hill-billy jury’s going to do in a dam
age suit than put good money on a
horse I never saw and running a thou
sand miles away. Gambling’snot my
particular vice, anyway.”
‘‘lt’s easy to see what Old Bill’s
pet particular vice is,” remarked
young Cummings, at the round table
in the corner. Mr, Cummings was
dressed carefully, if a little floridly,
and he seemed well pleased with him
self and the rest of the world. Todd’s
a good example of what a long bat
tle with booze will do. You can’t
beat it. This one’s on me, Gus.
Give us another of the same, Cicero.
“Let’s talk business,” said Brewer.
“We’ve got to make up that slate and
get right into this fight before the old
gang gets the edge on us. Charley s
good for District Attorney and
McPherson’s a cinch for Sheriff. Mac
can beat Parker in that race, for
Parker’s letting that guy that shot
Archer get out of jail looks too fishy
for the county to stand for, and it’s a
dead certainty he was fixed by the
old crowd—and that stops his clock
so far as election’s concerned. He’s
a dead duck. The rest of the ticket’s
good enough and we can put it
through—but who can we put up for
Criminal Judge?”
“It don’t matter a tinker’s cuss
who you put up,” said Charley Cum
mings. “Cartwhrlght has a cinch on
it as usual —he’s good until he drops
dead on the bench in one of his long
winded charges. We can’t beat him,
and we don’t need the place. Just
put somebody out to fill the ticket
who’ll get out and hustle for the rest
of us.”
Old Bill Todd straightened the
kinks out of his system, wobbled a
bit to regain his balance and lounged
out of the door.
‘ ‘There’s your man, ’ ’ laughed young
Cummings. “He’s been a loser all
his life and he ought to be used to it.
Run him for Judge.”
Old Brewer grunted and spat at
the stove door. “There’s bigger
fools in Willingham county than Old
Bill Todd,” said Brewer. “But he’ll
never land anywhere.”
As the party at the table broke up,
a breathless youngster rushed in.
“Ob, say, Mr. Cummings,” he in
quired, “have you independents made
up your county ticket yet?”
“Why, certainly,” returned Cum
mings. “Just finished the slate.
You know all but one. We’re going
to nominate the Hon. William Todd
for Criminal Court Judge. ’ ’
Mr. Cummings’ joke pleased him
mightily, but he bad forgotten that
young Bevins was a very new cub on
the Morning Times and statements
from politicians were as yet to be
considered by him as pearls of truth.
The Honorable William Todd was a
new name to young Bevins, and it
sounded promising. And a sleepy
night editor let the story get by him
without an inquiry.
Old BUI Todd climbed out of his
tumbled bed next morning with a
pain in the temples and a thirst such
as no man knows who goes thirsty
to bed. He had worked late the
night before, propped up on pillows
with a queer little squat-bottomed
lamp balanced on his forehead to cast
a glow on law-book after law-book
which might bear on the case of Dod
son versus Pitts. Of course it wasn’t
Bill Todd’s lawsuit. He never found
one beyond the Police Court now,
but more than one great law firm
knew the value of Old Bill’s legal
skill in “working up” a knotty case.
After it was won a ten or twenty
! from the fee found its way to Mr.
i Todd’s pocket, but it never stayed
long.
i Coffee and cakes formed Mr. Todd’s
i breakfast at the beanery around the
[ corner, for his appetite was no more
j lusty than his purse. When the man
j at the next stool laid down the Morn
i ing Times, Mr. Todd spread it out
I against the catsup bottle and began
j reading political news. The full
j ticket and plans of the Independents
i caught his eye and he read on, idly:
r I “For Criminal Court Judge —The
Hon. William Todd—” was the third
name in the list.
“ ‘The Honorable William Todd’,”
read the subject of the paragraph.
“I reckon that’s me.”
Yes, he was the Hanorable Wil
liam, by right of a term in the Leg
islature, a term marked by brilliant
speeches on the floor and illumined
with rounds of applause from the
galleries. There had been predic
tions of a future career —but the fu-
J ture had not materialized and the
“Honorable” had long been laid aside
with a college diploma and other use
less impedimenta.
There was not much remaining to
Old Bill Todd from those days—
nothing but a memory and a note
from The Girl. It had come the day
after that dance at the club, the dance
where he had lingered too long be
low stairs and returned to claim his
waltz with something beside tobacco
on his breath and a flash in his eyes
that did not come from The Blue
Danube which beckoned them to the
floor.
The Girl had gone home with her
aunt that night and “that wild young
Todd” had never known how she
cried in the dark corner of the fami
ly carriage. But he knew that the
note had come next day—the day
The Girl went back to her home in
the West. And no answer had come
to the frantic apology which he had
dispatched hurriedly in his next
morning contrition. Old Bill Todd
folded up the Times and shoved it
aside.
“Not a very decent joke,” be
grunted ; “I’ll have every briefless
lawyer in town guying me now.”
* * * * * * *
“Look here, Cummings,” said
Brewer, three days later, “that gag
about runnin’ Old Todd is goin’ too
far. The town’s talkin’ about it, and
it’s too late to explain the joke. And
the funny part is the crowd’s sayin’
we could go further and do worse.
They know Old Bill’s straight, and if
he’d cut out the booze there’s a lot
in him.
“You know what he did in that
Winston case. It was his work that
cleared the boy, though of course
Miles and Molesworth got the credit
and the coin. He’s got a whole cy
clopedia of criminal law under that
greasy hat, and he’s got a street full
of friends, too.”
“Why, Bill Todd’s helped a thous
and youngsters and poor men out of
trouble and never asked a fee, and
they all mean votes if he wants ’em.”
“He’ll lose, of course,” chipped
in Mr. Darius Cobb, one of the coun
cil of war. “But we never expected
to win that place, and Todd’s line of
talk can put the rest of the bunch
through. If he’ll make the race he
can swing the voters.”
“Go see him, Charley,” suggested
Brewer. “Offer him the nomina
tion.”
Mr. Cummings set forth on his
mission and in fifteen minutes was
back in the office, looking rather
queer.
“Stung!” he remarked. “Noth
ing doing with Todd ; said I’d made
a joke out of him and now I could
wiggle out of it. He knows there’s
no chance for him to win.” And
pleading nor cajoling had any
effect on the abdurate Mr. Todd.
He liked the party and he liked the
platform, but he wasn’t in politics
these days.
Next morning the postman left a
letter under Mr. Todd’s door. When
the addressee had sworn a bit at the
insistency of creditors and stooped to
pick it up he had a surprise. •
The missive bore the postmark of
a Western town—the town where
The Girl lived—and Mr. Todd went
back and shaved his stubbly chin be
fore he opened it.
“I see in the Times,” wrote The
Girl, after a word of greeting, “you
are nominated for Judge. I am so
glad of your success, and I know you
will win, as you won everything you
wanted. I don’t know why lam
writing —except that I am coming
back to Springville soon, just a day
or two after the election —and I hope
the new Judge will come to see me
again.”
Old Bill Todd sat down on the bed
and read the letter twice. Then he
placed it carefully in the old wallet
with another which bore the same
bandwriting and went whistling down
the stairs.
“I reckon Robinson will credit me
for some new things,” he muttered
to himself. “I helped his boy out of
a muddle last week.”
*******
The council of war had a surprise
when the Honorable William Todd
passed the porter at headquarters and
strode into the inner sanctum.
Young Cummings gasped as his eyes
traveled downward from a new Fall
hat, past a smooth shaven chin and a
pleasant smile, past a natty necktie
and a well cut coat, past trousers that
hung superbly to boots that shone
like twin mirrors. The counselors
waited in silence.
“I’d like to change my mind, gen
tlemen,” quoth the Honorable Mr.
Todd.
“Will you make the race?” asked
Brewer,
“I’ll make the fastest race you
ever watched,” returned Mr. Todd,
“and I’ll win it, too.”
* * * * * * *
The story of that campaign is an
cient history in Springville, but the
cigar store politicians still relate with
gusto how Old Bill Todd turned his
back on the Bottle and set his face
toward the Bench; how he spoke
night after night, from the wagon
yard to the opera house, weaving a
spell of oratory which wrapped his
listeners in enchantment; how his
final burst of eloquence on the eve of
election swept the city to the polls to
vote for the Independents, and how
the whole ticket, excepting only
Charley Cummings, went through tri
umphant, with the name of William
Todd leading the list of majorities.
“And Todd’s in his third term now,
and there’s not a better nor squarer
THE UNION ESTABLISHED* 1850 i
THE NEWS ESTABLISHED 1905 \ Con.olid.ted 1909
Judge anywhere,” they’ll tell you.
“Hasn’t touched a drop since the day
he announced for the place,”
But if a woman were telling you
the story of the Honorable William
Todd’s success, she might follow it
with something about a certain girl
—hardly a girl then but a woman
grown —who came back to Spring
ville the day after election and was
the very first person the new Judge
called upon.
“They live in that pretty place up
on the hill, now,” she’d likely tell
you. “It wasn’t a long courtship—
but they say Judge Todd used to love
her years ago. They called him
‘that wild young Todd’ in those
days.”
BURS TO WIN.
(From Law Notes.)
Justice is of course loudly demand
ed by every litigant in a court of law,
but it is a frequent infirmity of the
human mind to confuse justice with
one’s own cause. The late Thomas
B. Reed used to tell an amusing story
to illustrate this tendency.
He was once retained by an enter
prising client to prosecute an action.
On talking with the plaintiff’s wit
nesses Mr. Reed found that their
stories were far from consistent, so
he reported the fact to his client and
advised that the suit be dropped.
The client was somewhat perturbed,
but told the attorney be would have a
talk with the witnesses and let him
know the next morning what he had
decided.
True to his word, he dropped in
bright and early, wearing the cheer
ful look of one who has fought the
good fight.
“I’ve seen those witnesses,” he ex
plained, “and they say they must
have been mistaken when they talked
with you. They all see it alike now.
I’ve also seen some of the jurymen,
and they think I’ll win. Now, if
there’s such a thing as justice in law,
we can’t lose.”
OWNEBBHIP OF A MINE.
(From the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.)
Judge Norman S. Buck died early
this morning. Judge Buck was a
pioneer resident of the Cceur d’Alene
mining district and was widely known
and popular.
In the late ’Bos Judge Buck ren
dered a decision while sitting on the
bench in Idaho that attracted atten
tion throughout the nation, as it de
cided the ownership of the Bunker
Hill and Sullivan mine, the greatest
silver-lead producer in the world, still
said to be worth $10,000,000 and hav
ing an annual output of over $3,000,-
000.
The mine was located by Phil
O’Rourke and his partner during a
prospecting tour in the winter of
1884-85 as a result of the uncovering
of the outcropping through the paw
ing of a pack mule which they had
found astray and appropriated.
“Dutch Jake” Goetz and Harry Baer
owned the mule, and Judge Buck de
cided that they were therefore entitled
to a grubstake interest in the mine.
They sold their interest for $300,000,
which became the foundation for a
much greater fortune accumulated in
business in this city.
AN ELEVATED GRASSHOPPER.
The Royal Exchange in London is
still being decorated with paintings
by leading artists depicting the great
events that have brought about the
supremacy of England through the
medium of this historic building,
Yet the many thousands who visit
the Royal Exchange daily have very
little idea, says the Strand, that this
pile owes its origin to a curious cause
to nothing else than the chirping of a
grasshopper.
The chirp of this insect attracted
the attention of a little boy to a baby,
the son of a poor woman —so poor that
she could not support the child, and
therefore had left him to perish alone
in a large field near her hovel. The
little boy took the child home and it
was brought up and eventually blos
somed into no less a person than Sir
Thomas Gresham, who built the Roy
al Exchange.
The prosperous merchant, to hand
down to posterity the incident which
saved bis life, took the grasshopper
for his crest, and that is the reason
why that insect is placed, as every
one can see, over the Royal Exchange.
BOTH AWAY FROM TEMPTATION.
(From Tit-Bits.)
A story is told of a west country
Bishop who rebuked the sporting par
son for his hunting proclivities. “I
hear you go fox hunting a good deal, ’ ’
he observed one day. “You ought
not to do this; there is plenty of
work to be accomplished in the par
ish.” “But,” protested the vicar,
“fox hunting is merely healthy exer
cise ; besides, I hear you were at a
ball the other night.” “In a sense
that is so,” replied the Bishop, “but,
truly speaking, I was three or four
rooms away from the ballroom.”
The vicar smiled and then retorted.
“I qm always three or four fields be
hind the fox, so what’s the difference?’ ’
Mrs. George Gould, who before her
marriage was Miss Edith Kingdon,
and a noted actress, will take part
again this winter in private theatricals
projected by Mr. Frederick Townsend
Martin. Mrs. Gould was on bis pro
gram last winter and was said to have
lost none of the charm of her youth
ful days, although she is now the
mother of eight children.
Harrison Tull the track walker be
tween Westville and Wenonah, N.
J., has buried 200 dogs found along
the third rail since the installation of
the electric service.
When a dentist in China is extract
ing a tooth for a patron an assistant
pounds on a gong to drown out the
cries of the patient.
Don’t be cast down by every bit of
adverse criticism you hear.
COHVICTB BUILD ROADS.
The list of States now using con
vict labor on the highways is too long
to mention in detail, says Popular
Mechanics, but Colorado, New Mex
ico and Wyoming are using such labor
to construct a great highway which
will run throughthe three States, and
Washington, Oregon, North Carolina
and Georgia, as well as several other
States, have gangs at work.
The convict road gang at work in
the southern part of Colorado num
bers eighty-eight men. They wear
no distinguishing badge in the way
of clothing, and no armed guards are
to be seen anywhere. If a man wishes
to escape from such a camp it is con
ceded that he can easily do so, but
that he may be overtaken elsewhere
follows as a matter of course, and the
penalty—dreaded by any convict who
has had a taste of open work —means
that his activites will from then on to
the end of his term be confined within
the prison walls.
Only five officers are in charge of
he camp, which is composed of tents.
The convicts sleep in one big tent,
and during the day they are divided
into five gangs, each officer having
charge of a gang. Eight hours of
road work constitute a day’s labor,
and the men must go to bed prompt
ly at 9 o’clock every night except
Saturday, on which they are allowed
an additional hour.
Amusement is allowed to all in the
camp. Some of the convicts own and
play musical instruments. Cards are
also allowed. Some spend their time
pitching quoits, and a ball game is
usually played every evening before
darkness sets in.
The method of guarding the con
victs working on the roads in the
State of Washington is a little more ’
strict, but amusements are just as
numerous. The provision.allowing
the convicts to do such work in that
State was passed in 1907, and the point
selected for making the first experi
ment was one of the most remote from
the penitentiary, the idea being to give
the new system the most severe test
possible.
The work selected was the build
ing of a wagon road along the face of
a nearly perpendicular rock bluff, the
work involving the handling of a
large amount of dynamite by the con
victs. The character of the rock en
countered was extremely hard, mak
ingdrilling very slow. Nevertheless,
the average daily work accomplished
by each man amounts to 2.42 cubic
yards of solid rock moved and one
cubic yard of earth and loose rock
moved.
As the lowest bid received for mov
ing the rock was Si. 50 per cubic yard
and for loose rock and earth 40 cents,
the average daily work of a convict
was valued at 54.03. The camp es
tablished for the care of the prisoners
consisted of a stockade 80 by 125 feet,
inside of which was erected a barrack
18 by 48 feet. On the outside of the
stockade and adjoining it was built
the guardhouse. The number of con
victs employed at the camp has never
beeu more than thirty, guarded by
five officers.
COWB IH THE LAP OF LUXURY.
The milk which is furnished in the
seven depots of the New York Milk
Committee to the babies of the tene
ments is what all country milk could
and should be, says Hampton’s Mag
azine. The cows on the farm sup
plying the committee are taken care
of as if a cow were the rarest of ani
mals and likely soon to join the dodo
and disappear entirely.
They live in a St. Regis sort of
bam, the concrete floors and iron and
glass walls of which are kept as clean
as a parlor. Twice daily the cow
stalls are sterilized with live steam.
As a precaution against dust they
keep no hay or other food in the barn
but send it in as it is needed, by
means of a trolley system.
Every day the cows are inspected
by a physician and any cow not in
perfect condition is immediately re
moved from the herd. Twice a
month chemists analyze the milk to
make sure that it is fully up to the
standard of richness and purity.
Before being milked each cow is
groomed and sprayed with pure spring
water by a man-who has been medi
cally examined and has just had a
bath and put on a perfectly clean
white suit. A second man dries the
cow with sterilized single service
towels, after which the white clad
milkers, sitting on spotless metal
stools, perform their duties.
The milk is strained through steril
ized cotton pads into sterilized cans
and cooled in a dustproof room which
no one except the white clad workers
is ever permitted to enter. Here the
milk is bottled, sealed and packed for
its journey to the city. Within thirty
hours after the milk is packed it is
delivered at the doors of the milk
committee’s model laboratory in New
York.
Five men work in the laboratory
sterilizing and filling the bottles. In
reality they are filling prescriptions,
for every baby has its food especially
designated by a skilled physician, the
prescriptions varying from week to
week according to the age and condi
tion of the child.
These men in their spotless white
suits and caps work in a speckless
room that is sterilized with steam
every morning, preparing food after
the most scientific methods and ac
cordingjto physicians, prescriptions,
not for infant millionaires, but for
babies of the tenements.
“How long has the minister been
preaching?” whispered the stranger
who had wandered into the church
and sat down away back. “About
thirty years, I believe,” replied the
other occupant of the pew. “That
being the case,” rejoined.the strang
er, “I guess I’ll stay. He must be
nearly done.”
Finnegan —“An’ is there anny
money in goats?” Hannigan—
“There is in thot one. He ate me
pocket-book this mornin’.”

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