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The Baltimore County union, the Towson news. (Towson, Md.) 1909-1912, October 02, 1909, Image 1

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VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2334.
/ ■—*
80 Bushels Per Acre
Our New ‘WHITE DIAMOND” Barley
produced almost 80 bushels per acre this
year. If you will cut out and send us this
Ad. we will mail you a large sample free—
be quick, we only have about 4,000 samples
left. None for sale this year.
BOUSIANO’S “60LD” BRAND
TIMOTHY SEED
will produce the best crops of hay you
have ever grown. It Is new seed, pure
and clean, free from weed and trash. It
will produce most excellent hay, also
nutritious and abundant pasturage. The
best merchants sell Bolgiano’s “GOLD”
Brand Timothy Seed. If yoB can't get it,
drop us a postal and we will tell you
where von can. Insist on having “GOLD”
Brand Timothy Seed—there willbe money
in jour pocket if you do.
WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR
Seed wheat, Crimson Clover, Alfalfa,
Dwarf Essex Rape. Alsyke Clover, Red
Clover, Sapling Clover, Hairy Vetch,
Winter Oats, Winter Barley, Winter Rye,
Red Top Grass. Kentucky Blue Grass,
Orchard Grass. Tall Meadow Oats Grass,
Canada Field Peas. Poultry Foods, Tur
nips, Ruta Bagas, Kale, spinach. Winter
Radish, Onion Sets, Etc.
J. BOLGIANO & SON,
Light, Pratt and Ellicott Streets,
Baltimore, Md.
I I II Nil HI
jH
THE fact that Amatite needs no
painting makes it the most
economical roofing on the]
market.
A roof which requires painting
every couple of years to keep it
tight is an expensive proposition.]
Ifyou will stop and figure out the
cost of the paint, you will find it is
frequently more than the roofing]
Amatite is covered with a real
mineral surface,. which makes paint*]
ing absolutely unnecessary. ~
Anyone can lay Amatite. It re^!
Jiuires no skilled labor. Nails andi
iquid cement which requires no
heating, supplied free with every]
roll.
Qriffth & Turner Company
Farm and Garden Supplies
266N , a.y1?“ st } Baltimore.
J. P. STEINBACH
Maker of
GENTLEMEN'S CLOTHES
PROFESSIONAL BLDG.
CHARLES AND PLEASANT STS.
Bot'i Phones.
C. A P. TELEPHONE
N. C. HAEFELE & CO.
Gas and Electrical Construction
in all its branches
Up-to-date workmanship and reason
able prices. Let me make an estimate
on installing your home with
GAS or ELECTRICITY
I guarantee entire satisfaction in good
work and fair dealing
Office and Show Room:
Bel Air Road, between Overlea and
Maple Avenues,
Overlea P. 0., Baltimore Co., Md.
JARRETT N. GILBERT
(Successor to BAY and GETTY)
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Grain, Wool and Hay
BOURSE BUILDING, Custom House
Avenue and Water Street.
BALTIMORE, - - - MD.
DEAL WITH
REITZE
FOMESMLOTHES.
AS tfiWK SSStt
vlte your early Inspection.
Specialists on Full Dress Suits... 30.00 up
J. H. Reitze & Son
643 W. Baltimore Street, 2 doors
west of Arch,
Baltimore,'Md.
owe: *
sutre: *
WAY * j;
1 i To have money Is to save It. The sore way to save it Is by depositing it in a < >
! > responsible bank. Ton will then be exempt from annoyance of having it barn < [
< [ holes in yonr pockets, and aside from the fact that yonr money will be safe * >
* , from theft, the habit of saving tends to the establishment of thrift, economy, , *
] discipline and n general understanding of business principles essential to yonr < [
< [ success. ] >
, To those wishing to establish relations with a safe, strong bank, we heartily <,
< [ extend onr services. ] >
|:The Towson National Bank, i|
TOWSONT, ZMIZD. ||
;! DinnoTOßs. <;
]- JOHN CROWTHER, President; D. H. RICE, Vice-President; \\
i ’ Cel. Walter 8. Franklin, Lewis M. Bacon, ]
S Hon. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway, <’
]> Hon. John 8. Biddlson, Ernest C. Hatch. <]
<] Emanuel W. Herman, w „ , . !
<! W. O. ORAUMER, Cashier. ];
] > ;
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Near Reisterstown Road, ARLINGTON, Md.
.—p——.
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
*——B—> —*
TsTO'W' OPETT JFOPI BTJSX3STESS
——O—*—*
Does a general Banking Business in all that is consistent with safe and careful man
agement. The location of onr Bank makes it the most convenient place for a large
number of residents of Baltimore connty to transact their financial business.
During the short time onr Bunk has been open for business the amount of deposits
has reached a snccess far in excess of onr expectations.
We have a SAVINGS DEPARTMENT and pay Interest on money deposited there.
Call and see ns and we will explain why it will be to yonr advantage to open an
account with ns.
Prompt attention given to all collection business entrusted to ns.
*——o—-►
—: OFFICERS:
CHAB. T. COCKSY, Jr., JOHN K. CULVER, Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH,
President. HOWARD E. JACKSON, 2d Vice-President. Cashier.
—: DIRECTORS:
CHARLES T. COCKRT, Jr., HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT H. McMANNS,
ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON, J. B. WAILKB, MAX ROSEN,
JOHN K. CULVER, OEOBOE W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND,
J. FRANK SHIPLET, H. P. EASTMAN. Deo. 26-ly
Second National Bank
TOWSON, Md.
JMM We invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies,
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, Ac.
jfO) m_a.rn.nm-a,— (\
to receive onr most careful consideration.
I \ —“ / 1
' Collections Made. Loans Negotiated.
Banking in Ail Its Branches.
ip EVERY POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOB OUR DEPOSITORS. Ifl*
I Ea II HW I
—I OFFICERS
Thomas W. Offutt, Elmer J. Cook, l Vice-Presidents Thos. J. Meads,
PRESIDENT. HARRISON RIDER, I CASHIER.
THOMAB W. OFFUTT. W. BERNARD DUKE, HENRY C. LONGNECKER,
Elmer J. Cook, wm. a. Lee, Z. Howard isaao,
Harrison Rider, Chas. H. Knox, Noah E. Offutt,
JOHN I. YELLOTT, W. GILL SMITH, FRANK X. HOOPER.
Feb. 6— ly
Maryland College*
Westminster. Maryland.
REV. T. H. LEWIS, D. D„ LL. D„ President.
A high grade College with low rates, $225 a year for board, furnished
room and tuition.
Three courses leading to degree of A. B. Classical, Scientific, Historical,
and a course iu Pedagogy, entitling graduates to teach in Maryland
without examination.
Preparatory School for those not ready for College.
Forty-third Year Opens Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1909.
* July 17—3 m _
INSURE YOUR PROPERTY
The+Home # Insurance+Company
OF IffßW TORK,
49* Which hu for the past twelve years paid every loss in Baltimore
CASH When Adjusted.
Assets-Twenty-Five Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The “Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHEELER & COLE, Towson, WEIDEMEYBR A BHIPLEY, Owings’ Mills,
WM. J. BIDDISON, Raspeburg, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
1 3P~See that your Policy is in the “Home.” [June 5-6 m
J. J. GEORGE & CO.,
PRODUCE COMMISSION
109 MARKET SPACE,
Near Wholesale Produce Market, :o: BALTIMORE, Md.
Red X Chick Starter, Red X Chick Feed, Red X Poultry Feed,
Red X Dry Mash Feed, and Poultry Supplies.
Peerless Hot-Water System Incubators and Brooders, also the Peerless
Lampless Brooder. Portable Poultry Houses and Hennery Outfits.
Iron Age Potato Diggers. Farm and Garden Implements.
The United States Cream Separators. GET OUR CATALOG.
May 29 —6 m
S. K. FENDALL & CO.,
TOWSON, JMLJD.,
AGENTS FOR ALL KINDS
Farm Machinery and Implements
■nai~KWTMMK I INTERNATIONAL GASOLINE ENGINES,
ipUHH IIECIf V DUUUICvi I The Best Engine a farmer or manufactor can buy
Repair Parts for All Machines ou Hand.
If we haven’t them we will get them on short notice and can save you money on our full tine.
The Hoosier Con Planter a Sjeeialtj.
Envelopes i
IXTILOPES !
ENVELOPES
For Professional Mid BmlnMi Men,
Furnished In large or small lots, with neatlf
printed corners, at a verysmall advance on their
original cost. LARGE STOCK to select from.
OFFICE OF THE UNION,
Deo. T.—tf. Towson. Md.
J. MAURICE WATKINS & SON,
—D BALERS IH—
Staple, Fancy k Green Groceries
Fruits. In season. Fresh and Salt Meats.
Full line of Tobaccos, Foreign and Domestic)
Cigars, Ao.
Sept. 18—lj TOWSON, Md.
TOWSON. MD.. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1909
WANTED
1000 Orders
From your section
FOR -f?
LUMBER ~<
MILL WORK
CDMPO-BMRD.The
great substitute for
Lath and Plaster
<
"i 1
i
J.L.GILBERT & BRO. LUMBER CO
East Falls & Eastern Aves.
Baltimore, Md.
The Balto. Go. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
Why swing a pump handle
when you can get
WATER
by merely opening a faucet
in your house
LET US SERVE YOU
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
I
E. SCOH PAYNE CO. ;
362 and 364 N. Gay St. <
Baltimore, Md. (
BOTH PHONES:
St. Paul 1228 Courtland 267
HEADQUARTERS FOR j
Bar Iron, Steel, Axles, Springs, Shafts, |
Spokes, Rims, Hubs, Wheels, Wheel
Material, Horse Shoes, Horse Shoe
Pads, Horse Shoe Nails, Rubber Tires,
Rubber Tire Machines, Rubber Tire 1
Channels, etc.; Wheelwright Material.
A Full Line of Builders’ Hardware ]
HEADQUARTERS FOR
FIELD FENCE, LAWN SWINGS, LAWN
MOWERS, LAWN SPRINKLERS,
At a big reduction. A postal card will 1
reach us. <
E. Scott Payne Co.
362 and 364 North Gay Street,
Baltimore, Md. ' ]
GEORGE W. GRAMMER !
i
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
WHEELWRIGHT
and COACHMAKER 1
1
Builds and Repairs Carriages and ,
Wagons of all Kinds
t
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and EMBALMER
Caskets always on hand. First-class .
service at moderate price. Carriages
furnished at the lowest prices and satis- 1
faction guaranteed in every particular.
PUTTY HILL, Bel Air Road, 1
Fullerton Post Office, BaltimoreCo.,Md.
1
VISIT
The Largest
Sample Shoe House
In the World
Majestic Shoe Company
The Great Price Cutters
419 E. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Md
Wm. J. Brady
Buyer and Manager
W. L. Douglas, $3.50 Shoes $2.39
Crawfords, $3.50 and s4.ooShoes. .$2.49
Burt & Packard’s $4.00 Shoes $2.49
ill Dr. J. Wm. Harrower ij;
1? Jjf
l[l SURGEON DENTIST |[j
jtj Washington and Allegany Avenues jr
! Towson, Md. ij
Office Hours ]*'
j[j Daily, from 9A.M.t06 P. M. jjj
C. &P. Phone, Towson I® 1 " - ® jj 1
FALLING LEAVEB.
(From October Farm Journal.)
Amidst the Indian summer haze
1 he forest’s regal hues unfold
With richest crimson, cloth of gold.
Russet and scarlet, all ablaze.
How quickly have the days flown by
Since spriDg her first faint colors threw
In pure relief against the blue
Of charming April's sunny sky!
The budding white oak’s rosy tint
The summer changed to vivid green;
The slender birch’s silvery sheen
Was heightened by the sunbeam’s glint.
Now soon each leaf all sear and browned.
With cutting wind and biting frost.
By ruthless autumn torn and tossed,
Will fall and wither on the ground.
But tiny rosebuds are hidden there
To show forth beauty by and by;
Sheltered from winter’s winds they lie.
Although each limb and branch be bare.
And so our lives must bud and grow.
Warmed by the sunshine of God’s love.
Showered by mercies from above.
Till we in health and beauty glow.
s>us ’mid the frosts of sorrow, still
We shelter those lives yet to come,
And when we fall, our voices dumb,
They live to do the Father’s will.
THE RETREAT OF THE GREEKS.
(From Leslie's Magazine.)
My business was to find Miss Mame
Cowcher, of No. 17 Cheeseit Street.
Since the matter was urgent I could
have wished that Cheeseit Street were
less difficult of access and freer of en
cumbrances. The district wore an
air of resigned dilapidation; the
stoops sagged 1 the window-blinds
lolled and the shanties inclined towatd
one another. Babies, goat s and quad -
rupeds of the “just dog” variety
prospered. The rear guard of a stag
gering procession of wooden cottages
proved to be Cowcher’s.
Obviously supper was in progress.
Intimation to this effect was in the
•air long before I reached the back
door. One whom I judged to be
Cowcher was tilted back in a chair
against the woodbox, where he mum
bled blearily and breathed with much
noise. Another, unquestionably
madame, a creature of lavish propor
tions and unstinted voice, sent a tor
rential volume of rough shod Eng
lish cracking about the ears of Cow
cher, and she thumped the rickety
stove with a smoking saucepan byway
of accentuation. There were many
other Cowchers of all lengths and
lasts. I asked for Miss Mame, and
explained why.
“An* it’s no wander shure you’re
wantin her pictur’ an’ an intervoo, as
ye call ut,” remarked Mother Cow
cher, giving me her undivided atten
tion. “Did ye hear iv the scrap she
put up in the mill rite?”
“That’s just it,” I said, “the mill
riot. We have heard of Miss Marne’s
charge upon the Greek strike-break
ers, and want to print her picture and
some of the facts in her case.”
“She’s the wan. Mame done ut,”
exclaimed Mrs. Cowcher with ani
mation that dominated the room.
“She claaed up wit’ a dozen iv them
sthroike-breakers, an’ thim Greeks is
fierce divils. I tell ye, sor. She
pitched inta the hull fifteen iv thim,
an’they wit’stones and cloobs. An’
what she done to them I couldn’t -be
gin to tell ye ! Ye wouldn’t belave ut
that in the toirae it ud take the wind
to blow yer hat off, she had the twinty
iv thim runuin’ fer their loives an’
shriekin’ murder an’ Avie Morias.”
“Aw, can that kind of talk, Maw,
I ain’t no bloomin’ prize-fighter,”
roared a voice from the stairway, and
an instant later I beheld Mame. She
was huge and yellow-haired, and
challenged me with flashing, blue
eyes. “I’m a lady, lam, and they
ain’t nottin’ goin’ in that paper’bout
me that a lady wouldn’t stand fer.”
“The public is much interested in
the strike, Miss Cowcher,” I said,
“and especially in your part of it.
We would like to print your picture,
if you’ll lend us one. It will be re
turned promptly.”
“I ain’t got no picture,” she said.
Pride and suspicion mingled in her
tone.
“Don’t you moind th’ wan in tV
parloor, Mame, darlin’,” mumbled
Mr. Cowcher persuasively.
“Come to, Paw. This here feller
wants a growed-up one.”
“Don’t you b’lieve she ain’t got
none, Mister,” said a smaller Cowcher
shrinkingly. “I saw her give one to
Bob.”
“That’ll do fer you, Tiddy. This
here’s my department,” said Mame.
Then turning to me she added : “It’s
a fac’, though, Bob has got one.”
“Ah,” I exclaimed, “I’m very
glad. If I should call on Mr. Bob
and state the case, would he not lend
it?”
Here I was greeted with a hoot
from Mame, and the other Cowchers
voiced a derisive chorus. “Do you
know what Bob ’ud do to you if you
went to him and asked for my pic
ture?” the heroine of the strike ques
tioned dreadfully, lowering her face
to mine.
“Not murder, surely,” I whispered.
“No, but he’d eat you, young fel
ler. Why. Bob wears that next his
heart, he does.”
“Is there anything to be done,” I
asked.
“Bob ’ud never let go that picture
to you or no one else,” she said,
“but—”
“Is it too far?” —Would it be ask
ing too much for you,—l’d appreciate
it more than I can tell,” I stammered,
breathlessly. .
Mame snatched a big plumed hat
from some mysterious recess under
the kitchen sink, slapped it on with
two jerks, a stab and a flourish, and
announced that she supposed she
would have to go along. At the
door she paused, and addressed a
slim, run-down slip of a girl,—the
image of Tillie Slowboy:—
"Look here, Liz,” she said “you
come on wit’ me an’ this feller. Bob
might crumple him fer walkin’ wit’
me, an’ no ebaper-oon.”
Liz left off banging crockery to re
mark that she would see her sister
banged first. The wrath of Mame,
however, altered all. As she had
brought about the retreat of the
Greeks, so she charged Liz into sub
jection and obedience. As we passed
out, a muttered challenge mounted
above th? fumes surrounding Mr.
Cowcher to the effect that he would
match his Mame against any man of
her weight “in th’ ait ward.”
It appeared that Bob was a flag
man. After we three had traveled
for hours through darkness, and in
an atmosphere imminent with death
from uproariousfreight engines. Liz
pulled me back, and Mame directed
an amatory onslaught upon a male
figure carved in the dim doorway of
the shanty.
“That’s Bob,” Liz whispered.
'“Stop here a minute. Marne’s a
lady, you kuow, and mightn’t not
like to have you by when they come
together. Besides, Bob’s as jealous
as a tiger 1 Why, if you’d come here
alone for her picture —”
We both shuddered. Then Mame
called us.
“This is him, Bob,” she said.
“He wants it fer his paper, and ’ll
give it back. He come wit’ Liz-”
Bob bowed to me cheerfully. I be
gan to lose the fear of encountering
violence. Bob seemed a most even
tempered little chap.
“I aint got yer picture, honest,
Mame,” was his astonishing declara
tion.
“Oh, that’s all right, Bobby,”
coaxed the big girl, with fond affec
tation of incredulity. “But you’ll let
him have it to please me —”
“Honest, Mame, —”
“Come ou, fork over. It’s all
right, or I wouldn’t ask ye Bob.
He ses he’ll put it back in yer hands
wit’out harmin’ a hair of it—"
“That’s all right. But, honest to
God, Mame, I ain’t got yer picture.
I did have one, but I give it away !”
Just here Liz pushed me back in
the dark. An upheaval of nature
seemed to be taking place within the
flagman’s shanty.
“Do you suppose she’ll kill him ?”
I gasped, remembering the rout of the
Greeks.
“Naw. Mame won’t fergit herself,
Marne’s’ a lady, she is I”
FREEDOM REGAINED.
(Written for The Union News.)
A little way back from the street,
where the trolley cars whirr and hum ;
where the labored chug-chug and
pound of ponderous wheels on steel
keep up an incessant clatter day and
'■ night, dragging commerce to distant
> States ; where the busy mart of trade
keeps up its ceaseless toil and grind,
stands a massive pile of granite, with
numerous barred windows and steep
tiled roof. There’s nothing of archi
-1 tectural beauty about its exterior.
• The sole aim of the architect seem to
have been solidity and security. If
nothing else, the very guard who
keeps up a ceaseless vigil upon its
outer walls is sufficient to denote the
character of the institution. The
busy tide of humanity which hurries
along glances furtively at the latticed
1 windows and grim walls, and perhaps
there may be some in the hurrying
throng who breathe a silent prayer
for misguided youth within its walls ;
little children play upon the pavement
in their shadow and give no heed to
the suffering and heartaches of the
inmates, as their childish laughter
rises and penetrates the open windows.
A long shaft of golden light
streamed through the upper sash of
one of the big grated windows, struck
a dazzling radiance of brilliant, check
ered sunshine across the tes&alated
floor; it crept silently over to a
stained spot in the stone flagging made
by the shuffling of countless feet,
marking off the hour of noon. To
the casual visitor the golden bar of
light meant nothing, but to the Man
who sat within the confines of his 6
by 6 foot room, it meant much. The
Man had whiled many hours away in
watching the sunlight steal to this
spot, and had turned away with each
recurring visit with a feeling of relief,
as it marked one day less in the
monotonous round of life which sepa
rated him from friends and society.
For 20 years these four walls had
sheltered him ; he knew every crack
and seam in their roughened surface,
and through the tiny square of light,
facing the east, he had caught a
glimpse of sky, sometimes gray as his
thoughts, and at others refulgent with
color, as the rosy dawn chased the
gray shadows away and replaced
them with royal banners of gold and
amethyst. Then, too, when the
world was hushed in silence, the gold
en crescent and silver stars, floating
in a sea of blue, flitted across the
limited space of his vision as he caught
their shimmering light from his pal
let. An occasional flock of pigeons,
wheeling high in air, broke the
monotony of cloud and sunshine.
But there was to be an ending of
these daily visions and day-dreams.
One day the big, grated door swung
open to admit a little woman in black,
who greeted the Man in the superin
tendent’s office. Not a word was
ntiered by the black-garbed figure
as she took the Man’s two hands in
to her own, but the touch which was
exchanged the world knew nothing
of. For years she had waited for this
moment, and at last she was to see
her fond hopes realized. Down the
long flight of granite steps to freedom
slipped the Man with the little black -
: clad figure beside him. There was
so much to interest that he was
speechless. As the big bell in the
tiny cupola in the tower clanged out
' the hour of 2, the Man paused at the
corner of the street, and with a back
• ward glance at the pile of granite
: which had been his home for 20 years,
: brushed a tear from his cheek, and
1 then, with the light of hope in his
: eye and with squared shoulders,
trudged silently on.
> “A mothers’ club!” exclaimed
Mrs. Farmer Hayrick, putting the
newspaper down. ‘ ‘The very idee o’
• setch a thing! I never use nothin’
' but a shingle. Nice sort o’ mothers
thev must be that has to nseaclub !”
I - -
: Old violins of famous makes are
becoming costlier all the time. A
l dealer in Berlin is offering two fine
l instruments by Antonio Stradivarius
. for $21,250 and $25,000 respectively.
I —Musical America.
THE UNION ESTABLISHED 1850 i
THE NEWS ESTABLISHED 1905 f Consolldate<i
THE FARMER AND THE ROAD.
(By F. N. Godfrey. Master New York State
Grange.)
The problem of highways has prob
ably concerned the farmers of this
country more than any other class of
people, inasmuch as upon them alone,
for many years, devolved the building
and maintaining of the roads. From
the old tortuous woods roads follow
ing the streams very largely, or a
blazed trail over the hills and moun
tains, the corduroys and slab ways
through the swamps aud lowlands to
the present good and improved high
ways graded and straightened almost
to the grade of a steam railroad, the
farmers have largely been the factor
bearing the burden of expense, and
therefore the ones most to be reckoned
with.
In the early history of the country
the blazed trail and first wagon roads
were winding and loug, often making
the distance double that which now
is as the country has been cleared
and the roads straightened and grad
ed. As the country was settled and
new farms were opened up new high
ways were built without much thought
as to grade and line, and today we
have in many States, especially in the
East, very crooked and irregular roads.
Gradually the sentiment for better
and improved roads has grown; the
coming of the bicycle started the
movement with greater acceleration
than any other one thing for many
years; then the arrival of the auto
mobile has no doubt culminated in
the climax of road improvement by
creating a greater interest with the
whole people until all are ready to
lend a hand in the improvement of
the highways.
The farmers at first have been
loath to favor the more expensive
improvement of the roads, believing
the movement was lagely in the in
terest of the manufacturers and users
of automobiles, but be that as it may,
as soon as an improved road is proper
ly constructed through a farming sec
tion, the farmer is brought at once to
see the value of it in the great advan
tage to him in the movement of his
produce to market, and since the
whole people are assisting in the ex
pense, we farmers are withdrawing
our objections and are willing to as
sist.
Taking up the improvement of the
highways, let me emphasize this fact,
that the market roads should be the
first to be improved, thus bringing
about greater prosperity to the coun
try by reducing the cost of marketing
the enormous products of the soil in
lessening the cost of hauling to ship
ping points an nearby markets. Later,
the trunk lines may be connected up
to accommodate the wealthy seeker
of pleasure in touring the country
with the automobile. It is the labor
ing men, the great producers of the
country, those who must use the
highways every day of the year,
whose interests must be looked to
first if the prosperity of this country
is to continue. The pleasure seeker
who uses the roads only during the
summer months aud for pleasure only,
finds but little trouble now on the
highways, even if only dirt roads, if
they are contented iu driving their
machines at a reasonable rate of speed.
The highways of the country are
of vastly more importance than the
so-called waterways, which are re
ceiving so much attention just now.
The deep waterways such as the great
lake system, and such rivers as are
by nature deep and navigable should
be maintained, but transportation by
water on canals and streams that have
to be maintained by State and nation
at enormous expense are antiquated
and slow, and should be relegated to
the past. The high ways, railroads and
deep natural waterways should and
must be maintained, and the whole
people should help to do this. Per
haps in the near future we shall have
the new and modern method of trans
portation to cope with, and laws will
have to be enacted controlling the
navigation by air through the great
milky way.
The Grange, the great farmer’s
organization, stands for the improve
ment of the highways of this country
through national aid, believing the
national government can do no greater
work toward the prosperity of this
great country than that of improving
the highways, thus aiding the great
est industry of the country in trans
portation to the markets the magnifi
cent and bounteous products of na
ture, at the lowest possible cost and
yielding to the producer the profits
entitled therefrom.
GIRLS AND OUTDOOR GAMES.
(From Black and White.)
Women in their ambition to be
athletic contend against innumerable
difficulties. One of these difficulties
is skirts, a second is waists, and a
third —almost insuperable —is hair, in
cluding hairpins.
Watch a girl playing tennis or
cricket, and after a more than usually
brilliant effort she invariable puts her
hands to her head, as if she expected
something to fall off if she did not.
Energetic play is usually attended by
dishevelment of the unruly locks and
a shedding of hairpins that causes the
pretty athlete distress.
Her pleasure in the game is marred
by a sense of insecurity and a constant
fear of consequences. No woman can
wield a racquet or essay a run with
an undivided mind. Half her brain
is occupied by the fearful surmise that
her hair is coming down —a surmise,
by the way, which is probably too
painfully justified by the fact.
Automobiles are making a greater
demand on inventive genius in New
York city than any other machines.
It is estimated that more than a thou
sand men are actually working on im
provements for them, besides those
who are devoting simple thought to
their betterment.
In a guessing match at Pittsburg
as to how many grains of corn a 27-
pound turkey could eat in a week,W.
H. Kuhn won the bird, guessing 2802.
Theactual number consumed was 2809.
SWELLING TIDE OF BEEK.
Practically all the alcohol sold as a
drink in this country is in two forms
—distilled liquors and beer. For the
past fifty years the per capita con
sumption of distilled liquors has been
about stationary.
Because of the Civil War and the
fact that great quantities of alcohol
were used as burning fluids before
the general introduction of kerosene,
only estimates of the consumption of
distilled liquor as a drink in the ’6os
can be had.
The best of these was made by the
Federal Government’s taxation com
mission of 1865, headed by David A.
Wells. This placed the average con -
sumption by drink at less than a gal
lon and a-half. 0
The Government’s excise commis
sion reports show the average per
capita consumption through the ’7os
to have been gallons, through
the ’Bos gallons, through the ’9os
gallons, while in the last four
years, the period covering the recent
active temperance agitation, it has
been a gallon and a-balf.
Roughly speaking, says McClure's,
the whiskey business has about kept
pace with the growth of the country.
It sells as it did forty and fifty years
ago, a little less than three quarts of
pure alcohol yearly for each person
in the United States.
In the same period the amount of
alcohol sold iti beer has grown from
practically nothing to a quantity
greater than is sold in distilled liquor.
In iB6O the sale of beer in the United
States was 3.22 gallons a head; in
1908 it was 21 gallons—two thirds of
a barrel. The alcohol sold in this
form was a little less than a pint a
head in i 860; in 1908 it was a little
more than three quarts.
Since 1850 the volume of this re
markable new industry has increased
fifty times; it is eighteen times larger
than it was in iB6O. The growth of
the American beer trade had consti
tuted one of the wonders of the liquor
business —commented on in trade
circles all over the world. The capi
tal invested in it is over ten times that
invested in distilleries, the value of
its product two and a-half times as
great.
Four-fifths of the 55,000,000 bar
rels of beer made in the United States
is consumed in cities and at least
three-quarters of it by the population
of cities themselves. The brewing
trade statistics show that every man,
woman and child in cities of over
25,000 can safely be credited with
drinking a barrel and two-thirds of
beer a year. Largely by this means
the population of American cities drink
at least eleven quarts of pure alcohol
a head every year, while the popula
tion of the rural districts does not
drink more than four quarts a bead.
If there is a liquor problem in America
—which every one seems to concede
—it is obviously of the city, and al
most as obviously the brewery trade
is connected with it.
SPENT 24 HOBBS IN A CEMETERY VAULT.
(From the Ottawa Evening Citizen.
There came near being a tragedy
at a funeral in Sydenham.
William 'Lawson, justice of thg
peace, Elginburg, was examining a
vault at the cemetery. Another gen
tleman who was in at the same time
went out and closed the door after
him, and as it had a spring lock Law
son was made prisoner. He shouted,
but owing to the thick wall his cries
could not be heard. He was forced
to stay in the vault all night and un
til the next afternoon, when it so hap
pened there was a funeral to the vault.
When the mourners opened the
door they were terrified to see Law
son stagger out. He was in a terri
ble condition as a result of his twenty
four hours’ confinement, being almost
famished.
COINS OF ALUMINUM.
(Paris correspondence London Telegraph.)
In a few years coppers will no long
er weigh down man’s pockets in this
country. As it is, no more bronze
money is now coined, and the short
age is being felt. Aluminum will be
substituted, and it is hoped that the
new coinage will have been begun by
the end of the year.
The metal, or rather an alloy of it,
will be used only for penny and half
penny pieces, which will be about
the diameter of but both, much thicker
and lighter than francsand half francs,
and thus easily distinguishable from
these coins. The recent quarter franc
piece in nickel has proved a failure,
because it is constantly being taken
for a franc, as tourists here know to
their cost. Besides lightness, clean
liness is another advantage of alumi
num, which does not oxydize in air.
A LIVELY SQUIBBEL.
(From the Housekeeper.)
An old negro who lives in the
country came into town one day and
saw an electric fan for the first time
in his life. The whirling object at
once attracted his attention and after
intently gazing at it for several min
utes with the greatest astonishment
and curiosity be turned to the proprie
tor of the shop and said : “Say, boss,
dat suttenly is a lively squirrel you
got in dis yeah cage, but he’s sbo’ly
goin’ to bus’ his heart if be keep on
makin’ dem resolutions so fas’ !”
HE WAS QUALIFIED.
(From the Youth’s Companion.)
At a public school the children were
training for the annual flag day cele
bration. One boy, in order to show
good reason why he should take a
prominent part in the ceremonies,
said that he had a real gun ; another
had a pistol; a small girl had a flag,
and so on.
Finally, one tow-haired lad of six
came up to the teacher, and stood
waiting for her to see him.
“Well, what is i>?” she asked.
“I has a union suit,” he said.
There seems to be no one so hard
to discourage as the person who can’t
sing.—Atchison Globe.

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