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The Baltimore County union, the Towson news. (Towson, Md.) 1909-1912, October 09, 1909, Image 1

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VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2335
You Can Have
BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
All Winter, at Christmas Time, at
Gaster Time, also in your Lawns aud
Flower Beds
AT THE FIRST OPENING OF
SPRINGTIME
IF YOU PLANT NOW
BOLOIANO’S FALL BULBS.
Our beautifully illustrated 20 Page
Fall Flower Catalogue will be cheer
fully sent you if you drop us a postal
today.
Plant Now ft ■
Each Doz. 100
Babv Hyacinths... 3c 30c $2.00
Redding Hyacinths 5c 35c 2.85
2d size Hyacinths.. 7c 60c 4.50
Ist size rtjacinths. 9c 90c 6.75
Roman Hyacinths. 6c 65c 4.50
Freesia Bulbs, 2 for 5c 15c 1.00
Early Tulips, mix. 2c 10c 75
May Tulips 3c 25c 2.50
Parrot Tulips 3c 25c 1.50
Double Tulips 2c 15c 90
Narcissus, single... 3c 15c 75
Narcissus.paper w. 4c 25c 1.25
Jonquils 2c 10c 60
Double Narcissus.. 3c 15c 75
Snow Drops 2c 15c 85
Crocus, mixed 1c 6c 40
Oxalls 2c 10c 60
Easter Lillies 10c SI.OO 7.60
Calla Lillies 8c 90c 7 50
Our famous Self-watering Window
Boxes are especially well adapted to
the successful growth of all hinds of
flowering bulbs, plant tubs, flower pots.
Your local merchant can get from us
what Fall Bnns you want. If he docs
not sell our Fall Bulos you can send
jour order to us and we will see that
they reach you in perfect condition.
J. BOLGIANO & SON
Four Generations in the Seed Business
BALTIMORE. Md.
8
t/ # ROOFING'
THE fact that Amatite needs no {
painting makes it the most
economical roofing on the]
market.
A roof which requires painting?
every couple of years to keep it
tight is an expensive proposition.l
Ifyou will stop and figure out the;
cost of the paint, you will find it is]
frequently more than the roofing;
Amatite is covered with a real
mineral surface, .which makes paint
ing absolutely unnecessary.
Anyone can lay Amatite. It re?
quires no skilled labor. Nails and;
liquid cement which requires no)
heating, supplied free with every]
roll.
Griffth & Turner Company
Farm and Garden Supplies
SS'iJf" s *} Baltimore.
J. P. STFJNBACH
Maker ol
GENTLEMENS CLOTHES
MMTKSSi HIM. M.OO.
CHARLES AND PLEASANT STS.
■at i iVnh*.
C.ir. TILKPHOHK
N. C. HAEFELE & CO.
(Its and Electrical Construction
in all It* branches
Up-to-date workmanship and reason
able prices. Let me make an estimate
on installing your home with
QAS #r ELECTRICITY
I guarantee entire satisfaction in good
work and fair dealing
Office and Show Room:
Bel Air Road, between Overlea and
Maple Avenues,
Overlea P. 0., Baltimore Co., Md.
JARRETT N. GILBERT
(Successor to BAY and GETTY)
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Grain, Wool and Hay
BOURSE BUILDING, Custom House
Avenue and Water Street
BALTIMORE, - - - MD.
DEAL WITH
REITZE
FOR*BEST*CLOTHES.
We beg to announce the arrival of our
FALL AND WINTER FABRICB. and in
▼ite your early inspection.
Suits *13.50 up
Pants .... 5.00 up
Specialists on Full Dress Suits... 30.00 up
J. H. Reitze & Son
643 W. Baltimore Street, 2 doors
west of Arch,
Baltimore, Md.
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Near Reisterstown Road, ARLINGTON, Md.
. . 0
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
.—.—o—■■■■■
IsTOW OZPEIKr FO R BTTSX3STESS.
* 0— a
Does a general Banking Business in all that Is consistent with safe and careful man
agement. The location of onr Bank makes It the most convenient place for a large
number of residents of Baltimore county to transact their financial business.
During the short time onr Bank has been open for business the amount of deposits
has reached a snccess far In excess of onr expectations.
We have a SAYINGS DEPARTMENT and pay Interest on money deposited there.
Call and see ns and we will explain why It will be to yonr advantage to open an
account with ns.
Prompt attention given to all collection business entrusted to ns.
,—0 ■■
—:OFFICERS: —
CHAS. T. COCKEY, Jr., JOHN K. COLTER. Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH,
President. HOWARD E. JACKSON, 2d Vice-President. Cashier.
—:DIRECTORB:
CH4KLKS T. COCKEY, Jr., HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT H. McMANNS.
AHTHOU P. NICHOLSON, J. IS. WAILES, MAX ROSEN,
JOHN K. CULVER, GEORGE W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND,
J. FRANK SHIPLEY, H. D. EASTMAN. Dec. 26-ly
Second National Bank
TOWSON, TVtci.
• We Invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies, AWn
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, Ac.
[ No account too large for us to handle with safety, and none too small II ||
| | *——— ) |
Collections Made. Loans Negotiated.
Banking in All its Branches.
kgs EVERY POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOR OUR DEPOSITORS.
-lOPFICEHSi
Thomas w. Offutt, Elmer j. Cook, l Vice-Presidents Thos. j. Meads,
President. Harrison Rider, > ' Cashier.
THOMAB W. OFFUTT. W. BERNARD DUKE, HENRY C. LONGNECKER,
Elmer J. Cook, Wm. a. Lee, z. Howard Isaao,
Harrison Rider, Chas. H. Knox, Noah E. Offutt,
JOHN I. YELLOTT, W. GILL SMITH, FRANK X. HOOPER.
Feb. 6—ly
j: #
sujf=?e: *
1 * WAY * ii
<, To have money is to save it. The sure way to save It is by depositing it in a
! > responsible bank. Von will then be exempt from annoyance of having it burn 4 [
i ‘ holes In yonr pockets, and aside from the fact that yonr money will be safe ] >
< , from theft, the habit of saving tends to the establishment of thrift, economy, ,
J ► discipline and a general understanding of business principles essential to your <[
< ] success. ] >
j i To those wishing to establish relations with a safe, strong bank, we heartily < [
< ] extend onr services. ] >
i:The Towson National Bank,:)
TOWSO3ST, \\
DinECTORS. !;
; > JOHN CROWTHER, President; O. H. RICE, Vice-President; <!
(| Cel. Welter 8. Franklin, Lewis MR. Bacon, ]
1 , Hen. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway, ,
i Hon. John 8. Biddlson, Ernest C. Hatch. [
i ; Emanuel W. Herman, _ . . ! >
'! W. 0. ORAUMER, Cashier. , >
< > OeLMHIy g
Maryland College*
We.tmln.ter> Maryland.
REV T. H. LEWIS, D. D., LL. D„ President.
A high gride College with lew rates, $225 a year for board, furnished
room and tuition.
Tbtee courses leading to degree of A. B. Classical, Scientific, Historical,
and a course in Pedagogy, entitling graduates to teach in Maryland
without examination.
Preparatory School for those not ready for College.
Forty-third Y ear Opens Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1000.
July 17—3 m
INSURE TOUR PROPERTY
IN’
The+Home 4* Insurance Company
or new york;,
SB*Which has for the past twelve years paid every loss In Baltimore County’S!
CASH When Adjusted.
Assets—Twenty-Five Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The "Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHEELER & COLE. Towson, WEIDEMEYER & SHIPLEY, Owings’ Mills.
WM. J. BIDDISON, Raspeburg, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
PW~See that your Policy la in the “Home.” [June s—6m
J. J. GEORGE It CO.,
PRODUCE COMMISSION
100 MARKET SPACE,
Near Wholesale Produce Market, :o: BALTIMORE, Md.
Red X Chick Starter, Red X Chick Feed, Red X Poultry Feed,
Red X Dry Mash Feed, and Poultry Supplies.
Peerless Hot-Water System Incubators and Brooders, also the Peerless
Lampless Brooder. Portable Poultry Houses and Hennery Outfits.
Iron Age Potato Diggers. Farm and Garden Implements.
The United States Cream Separators. GET OUR CATALOG.
May 29—6 m
S. K. FENDALL & CO.,
TOWSON, MD.,
AGENTS FOR ALL KINDS
Farm Machinery and Implements
mu ii ncEn'Cßiiß nice I INTERNATIONAL GASOLINE ENGINES,
slUnli If ECU w DUUUIEOi I The Best Engineafarmerormanufactorcan buy
Repair Parts for All Machines on Hand.
If we haven't them we will get them on short notice and can save you money on our full line.
j The hsjg Corn Planter a Specialty. "
Envelopes i
envelopes i
ENVELOPES
Pur Professional and Business Men,
Furnished in large or small lots, with neatly
printed corners, at a very small ad ranee on thefr
original cost. LARGE STOCK to select from.
OFFICE OF THE UNION,
Deo. 7.—tf. Towson, Md.
J. MAURICE WATKINS k SON,
—DXALXRB IH —
Staple, Fancy & Green Groceries
Fruits in season. Fresh and Salt Meats.
Full line of Tobaooos, Foreign and Domestlo
Cigars, Ao.
Bept.l2-ly TOWSON, Md.
TOWSON. MD.. SATURDAY. OCTOBER 9. 1909
I !
WANTED
1000 Orders
From your section
5
FOR
i
LUMBER,..
MILL WORK
COMPO-BOARDJhe
great substitute for
Lath and Plaster
J.L.6ILBERT-& BRO. LUMBER CO
East Falls & Eastern Aves.
Baltimore, Md.
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
Why swing a pump handle
when you can get
WATER
by merely opening a faucet
in your house
LET US SERVE YOU
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
, 411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
E. SCOTT PAYNE CO."
562 and 364 N. Gay St.
Baltimore, Md.
BOTH PHONES:
St. Paul 1228 Courtland 267
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Bar IroD, Steel, Axles, Springs, Shafts,
Spokes, Rims, Hubs, Wheels, Wheel
Material, Horse Shoes, Horse Shoe
Pads, Horse Shoe Nails, Rubber Tires,
Rubber Tire Machines, Rubber Tire
Channels, etc.; Wheelwright Material.
A Full Line of Builders’ Hardware
HEADQUARTERS FOR
FIELD FENCE, LAWN SWINGS, LAWN
MOWERS, LAWN SPRINKLERS,
At a big reduction. A postal card will
reach us.
E. Scott Payne Co.
362 and 364 North Gay Street,
Baltimore, Md.
GEORGE W. GRAMMER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
WHEELWRIGHT
and COACHMAKER
Builds and Repairs Carriages and
Wagons of all Kinds
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and EMBALMER
Caskets always on hand. First-class
service at moderate price. Carriages
furnished at the lowest prices and satis
faction guaranteed in every particular.
PUTTY HILL, Bel Air Road,
Fullerton Post Office, BaltimoreCo.,Md.
VISIT
The Largest
Sample Shoe House
In the World
Majestic Shoe Company
Ths Great Price Cutters
419 E. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Md
Wm. J. Brady
Buyer and Manager
W. L. Douglas, $3.50 Shoes $2.39
Crawfords, $3.50 and $4.00 Shoes. .$2.49
Burt & Packard’s $4.00 Shoes $2.49
m ' ili
j[j Dr. J. Wm. Harrower jjj
SURGEON DENTIST
jij Washington and Allegany Avenues jij
j|j Towson, Md. ijj
|r! Office Hours ]f]
Daily, from 9A. M. to SP. M. jij
jfj C. &.P. Phone, Towson 131—R 1-1
in ii!
©SSSSSSSS S SSSSiSSSS®
The Old Garret.
(From Good Housekeeping.)
A charming old place was that great dusty attic.
With its dim nooks enlivened with spider and
mouse.
The store room of rubbish, the joy of the
children.
That precious old garret in grandmother’s
bouse!
There were chairs lame and backless, and books
minus covers,
A tiny tin foot-stove, a great spinning wheel.
And another much smaller that went by a
treadle,
A pair of wool cards and a queer little reel.
There were bunches of odorous herbs on the
rafters,
"Much better than drug stuffs,” grandmother
would say;
And we daintily tasted of mint and of catnip.
As we spent in the garret some long rainy day—
Going up the steep stairs with our clatter and
laughter
While grandmother’s chiding u p after us steals:
“No w,children,be 9ure aDd not get into mischief,
And whatever you do, pray, dont’t trouble the
wheels!”
But how could we help it, when there they were
standing.
Just longing for some one to give them a twirl!
So out of sheer pity wo patted them lightly,
And sent them a-swing in the dizzy old whirl.
Then there was a cradle, the quaintest of cradles,
With a roof o’erthe head, and with red painted
sides;
How many dear babies had slept in its shelter,
And cooed as they went on tnelr lullaby rides.
There were roomy old chests that were filled to
o’erflowing
With treasures and relics of years long since
gone;
We dressed in the garments of obsolete pattern.
And made the place ring with our chatter and
song;
No zest of the pilgrim in search of rare relics
In old moldy ruins or catacomb’s gloom.
Can equal the eager and patient ransacking
Of children let loose in an old attic room.
We made believe visits and parties and weddings;
Wo sewed for the dolls, assumed housekeemug
cares.
And had circuses gay with the dogs and the
kittens
We carried or coaxed up the steep narrow
stairs;
Alas for the children, the poor little children,
Who never in such an old garret may play!
A garret stored full with its treasures of rubbish,
The dearest of dens on a long rainy day!
When the Winner Lost.
(From the New York Sun.)
Full of the joy of living, tingling
with the satisfaction of assured pros
perity, exhilarated with the sense of
youth and health, deeply grateful and
inordinately happy that he had
triumphed over his numerous rivals
in the affections of the girl he loved,
Aleck Hurd strode down the street
humming a merry tune, neither
knowing nor caring whither he was
going. A brief hour with his sweet
heart had passed early in the evening,
and when she pleaded fatigue after a
journey and promised to spend the
morrow with him he left her with the
feeling that life had few greater prizes
than he had already captured. A
happy man indeed, he saw no cloud
over his future.
Suddenly he saw under the electric
light nearly a block ahead of him her
brother, a captivating young fellow
whom Hurd had learned to like
extremely well, first on her account
and afterward on his own.
Quickening his steps, he had
almost overtaken him when young
Ryder turned abruptly in at a shel
tered doorway, rang and was admitted
so quickly that the door was shut be
fore Hurd reached it.
The aspect of the house puzzled
him at first, but a glance at the
number reminded him that it was a
notorious place —none other than
Marsters’s gambling hell, known ot
all men but immune from police
interference, rumor said, because of
“ political influence.
He was no Puritan but a sane,
healthy man to whom vice offered no
special attraction, and never having
entered a house of the kind himself,
he felt a shock more of surprise than
horror when be realized that Ryder
had been addmitted so readily as to
indicate that he was an habitual
visitor.
After a moment's hesitation, how
ever, he rang the bell and a little
wicket in the door was instantly
opened. Then, almost as quickly,
the door itself was opened, and an
obsequious darky, bowing low,
exclaimed “Come right in, Marse
Aleck. Yo’ sho’ is welcomel’’
“Why, Rastus, you old rascal,
how do you come to be here?’' asked
Hurd, who recognized immediately
an old family servent of his father’s,
who had disappeared a year before.
The darky grinned in delight.
“Dis yere sutt’nly is de place fur
easy money, Marse Aleck. ’Tain’t
’zackly high toned, like fambly wu’k,
but dar’s a heap mo’ money hyah.
Walk right in, suh, an’ mek yo’se’f
to home.”
Then having barred the street door,
he ushered the new arrival to the
parlor and turned back to his post
with a hearty “Wish yo’ luck, Marse
Aleck.”
Half laughing and half indignant,
Hurd started to say something in
explanation, then thinking better of
it, he went on in. Ten or twelve
men were clustered around a long
table in the rear of the spacious room,
and he saw Ryder walking toward
them, but finding himself alone and
unnoticed in the doorway, he paused
and looked about curiously.
The appointments were luxurious.
A few pictures hanging on the walls
were, he saw at a glance, costly and
choice, but the furniture seemed
strange to his unaccustomed eyes. A
handsome roulette wheel, two faro
tables and a table marked for rouge
et noir were the most prominent
features of the furniture excepting
a huge buffet, on which was a lavish
display of cut glass with all the para
phernalia of a modern bar. Near
this stood another negro of jovial
aspect who, when he saw Hurd look
ing around, waved his hand courte
ously toward the buffet with obvious
hospitality.
Hurd shook his head smilingly and
continued his inspection. Attractive
as the place certainly was to the eye,
there was something sinister in the im
pression it made upon him, and he
was at a loss at first to understand
why this was so. The mere fact
that it was a gambling house did
not explain it, for though he had
never gambled extensively he had
played poker with his friends, had
occasionally bet on a horse and once
or twice had taken a modest flyer in
the Street, but these things had never
inoculated him with the gambling
fever, and he had not learned either
to love or to dread the “hell.”
Unused to the etiquette of such
establishments, he was more or less
I embarrassed by the fact that his
presence seemed to be absolutely ig
nored by everybody excepting the
two darkies, but assuming an ease
j which he did not feel he sauntered on
e toward the group of men around the
8 table.
When he reached them he saw
8 that Ryder was taking a seat, having
* bought a stack of chips, and was
* already joining in the play that was
going on and apparently blind and
2 deaf to everything else. Still no one
r spoke to or even looked at him, and
he stood with the others who were
| watching the game that some seven
or eight were playing at the table.
: What the game was he did not
i know. He saw the dealer give each
| player three cards, one at a time,
* and he saw the cards played, a trick
! going to one or another after each
. round, but he could not even deter
| mine the value of the cards as they fell,
nor tell the winner till he took in his
. trick. Hardly a word was spoken,
( and what little was said, being in the
language of the game, he did not
’ understand.
[ After some moments he touched
Ryder’s shoulder and said:
“Good evening, Dick.”
The young fellow started nervously
and looked up as if apprehensively,
j but seeing who it was that spoke he
) merely nodded and said “Hello,
Aleck,” and drawing away from the
’ latter’s touch he turned back to his
game.
, “What are you playing?” asked
Hurd, pleasantly, after another pause,
“Loo,” said Ryder, curtly.
“How do vou play it?” continued
Hurd.
, “Why don’t you buy some chips and
! find out?” said Ryder, impatient at
f being disturbed.
\ The unexpected rudeness of reply
1 stung the inquirer, and seeing that
5 one or two of the bystanders and the
dealer as well glanced at him some
t what curiously and as if more or less
r amused he pulled out his money and
3 taking a sio bill from the roll asked
. for chips.
Room was made for him immedi
[ ately at the table and in the next
> deal he too received three cards.
| These he played at random, one at a
5 time when his turn came, not know-
L iog whether he played correctly or
I not, but to his surprise each of the
three tricks was pushed over to him
; and at the conclusion of the deal the
r pot, to which he had contributed as
, the others did, was also shoved over
> to him.
“Do I win this?” he asked in
considerable surprise.
[ ‘ ‘Sure, ’’ said the banker, and Hurd
saw that some of the others smiled
openly.
I “Then,” he said not a little em
barrassed, but trying to pass it off
with a jest, “I think I’ll quit. It’s
the only game I’m ahead of and I
reckon it would’nt be a bad idea to
stay ahead."
This time there was no smile, bat
the banker paid him over 835 in
money for his chips without the
slightest hesitation and Hurd rose
from the table more embarrassed than
ever. As he stood irresolutely consider
ing whether to walk out as he had
come in, three of the bystanders
walked over to the roulette wheel
and two, buying chips, placed bets,
while the third spun the wheel and
threw a little ivory ball upon it.
Not suspecting that the game was
started for his benefit, Hurd followed
them and looked on till the ball fell
in 27 and the dealer raked in the money
on the table. Then it occcured to him
that this would be a good way to get rid
of the winnings which he already re
gretted having made and he threw a
810 bill on the table, not caring where
it fell.
The croupier looked puzzled, for
the bill lay across several lines and
touched several numbers. “What is
your bet, sir?” he asked, politely,
and Hurd said, “Oh, I’m not particu
lar.” Then bethinking himself that
the same number was not likely to
come twice in succession he added:
“Put it on 27.”
This was done, and the ball fell
again in 27. Thereupon the croupier
placed thirty-five blue chips on his
bill and again raked in the chips the
other two had placed.
“Looks like it was your night out,
sir,” he said pleasantly, and at the
word several others left the 100 table
•and came over to the wheel. Among
these was young Ryder, who had lost
every bet he had, made and was curs
ing his luck.
Seeing him, Hurd drew down his
pile, but leaving it on the table turned
away and drew Ryder to one side.
“Dick,” he said in an undertone,
“this is devilish disagreeable. I
don’t mind telling you that I followed
you in here to do the elder brother
act and try to get you to come out.
I was fool enough to allow myself to
be bantered into playing a game I
never saw, and then when I tried to
get rid of my winnings I won I don’t
know how much more. How can I
get out of this gracefully?”
“It’s easy enough to get out,” said
Ryder laughing, “but I don’t know
about the graceful part. Cash in
and leave if you don’t want to play.”
“I certainly don’t want to play,”
said Hurd, “but I don’t feel like tak
ing the money. I tell you I came in
10 try to stop you from gambling,
and here I am setting you a horrible
example.”
“Don’t be a fool,” said the young
er man, impatiently. “Either take
your money and go or back your
luck. I know what I’d do quick
enough.”
“I suppose you’d play on,” said
Hurd, doubtfully.
‘ ‘Bet your life I would, ’ ’ exclaimed
Ryder.
Hurd wondered many times after
ward why he made the decision he
1 did, but the only thing he could think
■ of at the moment was how best to
lead young Ryder out of a habit that
would surely ruin him, and the
thought came that by losing his
i money he could at least frame an ar
i gument that might have some effect,
3 so he turned back to the wheel.
THE UNION ESTABLISHED 1850 i
THE NEWS ESTABLISHED 1905 \ ConsoMated 1900
It had been spun two or three
2 times while he was talking, but bis
i stack was still there, and he began
1 playing again, utterly at random.
2 He had heard much talk of the folly
of trying to beat the wheel, and felt
1 sure he would lose if he continued.
; To his great surprise he won, not
5 every bet, of course, nor every fourth
i or fifth bet, but often enough to swell
> his pile from hundreds to thousands.
: Betting the limit each time, he would
t strike the right number every five
: minutes, so that the odds when he
1 won made up for many losses.
Before he realized it the deadly
fascination of the game possessed
1 him and his first desire to lose was
gone. The little fortune that was
piling up in front of him aroused his
1 greed. The excitement of the game
grew intense. He found himself
trembling as he watched the little
i ivory ball as it danced merrily around
and exulting when it fell into the
compartment of the number he had
selected.
As his strange run of luck con
l tinued his excitement was shared by
the others around him. Several
players follo wed him in their betting,
’ hoping that his run would continue,
, and among these was young Ryder,
: though Hurd was soon so absorbed
, in the game that he did not notice
: this. If he had noticed it would
> hardly have stopped him, for all
thought of his original errand had
1 left him for the time, and he had no
, interest in anything but the play.
He had not even a notion of how
1 much he had won. He knew that
they were paying him in yellow chips
1 and that he had many stacks of them
t in front of him, but he did not stop
to count them. All he thought of
was to put the limit bet on some
t number each time the ball was thrown
: and to watch that number till the ball
fell. He did not even know that the
! proprietor of the place stood looking
l on gravely but utterly impassive in
I expression. His excitement was too
great to allow him to observe any
thing but the game.
r At length he was aroused from
. what seemed then and afterward to
l be a delirious dream by the words:
“No more tonight, gentlemen. The
• bank’s broke.” He saw the croupier
! placing a cover over the wheel.
1 At the same moment he felt a tre
! mendous slap on his back, aud beard
1 Ryder exclaim: “By , Aleck,
you’ve broke the bank!”
Half dazed he looked around un
-1 comprehendingly, while a loud buzz
of conversation arose in the room
> that had hitherto been so quiet.
I Sinking back in a chair he watched
Ryder while he cashed in the chips
and handed over a huge roll of bills.
It was perhaps well for him that the
1 younger man was more self-possessed
than he, for there were covetous eyes
cast upon him, and news travels fast
among those who frequent the streets
at night.
Young Ryder, however, knew
: enough of the half-world to be cau
tious, and taking Hurd by the arm
he held him while he sent for a car
riage, and when that was at the door
the two entered it and were driven
straight to a hotel of the highest re
pute. There the money was placed
in the office safe and a receipt duly
taken. Then the two men went
home. Ryder was for celebrating
with a supper, but Hurd, who was
almost wholly unnerved, begged off.
Before noon of the next day, so
rapidly does news of that sort spread,
Hurd’s exploit was known to a mul
titude. One of that multitude, as
was to be expected, went to the elder
Ryder with the story and he sent
forthwith for Hurjl.
After he had listened gravely to
the whole account which Hurd gave,
extenuating nothing, he said, “I am
more grieved than I can to learn this.
My eldest son is a fugitive from jus
tice because of gambling. His name
is never mentioned in my home, and
I presume you know nothing of it,
but I assure you my daughter would
rather die and I’would rather see her
dead than married to a man who could
give way to that passion as you have
done. What I shall do with Dick I
do not know, but you shall never see
Mabel again. I know she would not
wish it.”
He never did.
Beavers Inspire Respect.
“I have yet to meet the man who
can walk for the first time through a
beaver works, as the range of a col
ony of beavers is called, and not feel
something of the sentiment of human
association,” says a writer in Baily’s
Magazine.
“It is a sensation very similar to
what we feel when we come out un
expectedly into a woodland clearing
after a long day spent in the unbrok
en solitudes.
“I once stood with a learned pro
fessor of Columbia College on the
bank of a stream in eastern Canada
and looked down on a freshly made
beaver dam —one of the best in point
of construction that I had ever seen.
It was indeed a really stupendous af
fair for a beaver to have made. Built
of alder poles and brush, weighted
with mud and small stones, it was
fifty feet long, six feet high and
raised the level of the water by about
sixty inches.
“Seen from the upstream side it
presented the appearance of a more
or less evenly disposed array of short
sticks protruding from a long mound
of mud just level with the surface of
the restrained water ; from below the
brushwood supporting the dam proper
was plainly visible and the ingenuity
of its placing at once apparent.
“There was of course none of that
‘pile driving’ or ‘basket weaving’
which at one time played so large a
part in the picturesque description by
fanciful writers, but despite its rough
-1 ness it was a really remarkable piece
of animal engineering. My compan
: ion inspected it for several minutes in
i impressed silence.
“ ‘I should be afraid to kill a thing
that knew so much,’ he said thought
fully.”
Fish That Have Gone West.
The fish of the Atlantic carried
across the Rockies in milk cans some
forty years ago have thriven and mul
tiplied all along these shores.
From 1871 to 1880 Seth Green and
Livingstone Stone between them
toted 600,000 young shad from the
Hudson across the continent and re
leased them in the Sacramento and
Columbia rivers.
In 1873 fishermen in San Francisco
harbor caught them ; in 1882, says
Harper’s Weekly, they had reached
Puget Sound, and in 1890 were found
among the catch in Fraser River and
the streams of Alaska.
Five years ago shad were taken
away up at Cook’s Inlet, and now
the coast rivers teem with them.
The clean, cold Pacific waters were
to their liking. The annual catch
of shad on the west coast so far as
traceable is now a little more than
1,500,000 pounds, and even these are
taken in nets set for other fish.
If there were a demand—which is
merely to say if somebody would
start the business and get the fish to
inland markets—the catch of shad
could be quadrupled without difficulty.
In Seattle in November I have-eaten
shad that brought back the good old
hungry days on Staten Island.
Striped bass from Jersey waters,
brought across in 1882, were ances
tors of the 2,000,000 pounds that are
now taken every year almost without
an effort along the Pacific coast from
Los Angeles away to British Colum
bia.
The Western waters have oysters of
their own, coppery little things, one
of which might fill a thimble, but
the sloops bring into North River no
bivalve more tempting in quality
than the Toke Point or the Drayton
Harbor oyster, which, born in Long
Island Sound or along the Rocka
ways, makes the journey in carloads
across the continent in his infancy
and at maturity finds his fate on the
tables of Portland, Tacoma, Seattle
and Spokane.
Within the last few months for
the first time in history several small
catches of mackerel have been made
by the Seattle fishermen. It has
been steadfastly set forth by the
people who are supposed to know
that there were no mackerel on this
coast, yet here they are, bigger, finer,
if possible, than their cousins of the
Atlantic banks, and the transplanted
Yankees who make up a large part
of Washington population have
snapped them up at a price that
would have abashed Lucullus.
When to the Dungeness crab,
which covers a platter, the many de
licious fishes of California, the almost
fabulous rock oysters of Yaquina and
the spicy Columbia River crawfish,
which is first and noblest cousin to
him ot the Black Sea, the Govern
ment fish culturists shall have suc
ceeded in adding permanently
Channel, sole the Pacific coast will
have on its bill of fare a list of sea
foods unequalled throughout the
world. And it will be so until the
dire day when the coast population
shall have multiplied and the waters
of the Columbia, now so clear and so
sapphire blue, shall flow heavy with
mill refuse and city sewage to the sea.
Cost of Living Gimbs.
The cost of living, which has been
increasing so rapidly for most of the
last thirteen years is again advancing
from the slightly lower levels brought
by the depression of 1908. All
through the past summer the prices
of the necessaries of life have been
slowly advancing, reaching on Aug
ust 1 the highest figure reported for
that date save one in 1907.
The average cost of the supplies
practically every household must buy
has increased over 49 per cent, since
1896, but the Review of Review re
marks that it is “rather interesting”
to note in the Bradstreet statistics
that the commodities controlled by
the trusts have generally shown a
smaller increase in price than the
average.
Thus refined petroleum sold in 1896
for 7.8 cents a gallon and the whole
sale price now is cents. Sugar
cost in 1896 cents a pound and
costs now 4.85 cents. Anthracite
coal in 1886 cost $4.25 a ton and is •
now $4.90.
The Bradstreet agency has selected
xo6 articles of domestic consumption
and has kept a careful record of their
prices month by month for seventeen
years. The highest point ever reached
was in March, 1907, after which came
the moderate slump caused by the
financial disturbances of that year.
We are now marching steadily back
toward this high record and the
August figures are only 6.8 per cent,
below it.
Some of the individual cases of in
creased costs are much more impres
sive than the average. Rubber has
advanced from 81 cents a pound in
1896 to $1.98 a pound now; pork
from $8.25 a barrel to $21.75; eggs
from 12 cents a dozen to 28 cents;
mutton from sj£ cents a pound to r 1
cents; corn from 34 cents a bushel to
80 cents; wheat from 64 cents a
bushel to 81.20, and so forth. The
figures given are wholesale prices and
as a rule the advance to the ultimate
consumer has been decidedly greater.
Street Car Manners Test of Christian.
You can tell a genuine Christian
by his street car manners, Bishop W.
A. Quayle told a large audience at
the Methodist camp meeting at Des
plaines, 111. “If you are hanging on
a strap in a crowded street car,” he
said, “and the conductor calls ont
‘step forward, please,’ and there is no
place in front where you can step for
ward, the way you act will be a test
of your religion. If you are a woman
and a man gives you his seat and you
act as if you thought it was your right
and not his kindness that gave you
the seat, the way you act will test
you more than answering questions
in theology. It is not how you treat
some big" body, but how you treat
a little urchin, dirty and in tears,
that tests your religion.”

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