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The Baltimore County union, the Towson news. (Towson, Md.) 1909-1912, October 23, 1909, Image 1

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’ H JHE TOWSON
VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2337.
You Can Have
BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
All Winter, at Christmas Time, at
Easter Time, also in your Lawns and
Flower Beds
AT THE FIRST OPENING OF
SPRINGTIME
IF YOU PLANT NOW
BOLGIANO’S FALL BULBS.
Our beautifully illustrated 20-Page
Fall Flower Catalogue will be cheer
fully sent you if you drop us a postal
today.
Plant /Vow '
Each Doz. 100
Baby Hyacinths... 3c 30c (3.00
Redding Hyacinths 5c 35c 2.65
2d size Hyacinths.. 7c 60c 4.50
Ist size Hyacinths. 9c 90c 6.75
Roman Hyacinths. 6c 65c 4.50
Freesla Bulbs,2for 5c 15c 1.00
Early Tulips, mix. 2c 10c 75
May Tulips 3c 25c 2.50
Parrot Tulips 3c 25c 1.50
Double Tulips 2c 15c 90
Narcissus, single... 3c 15c 75
Narcisßus.paper w. 4c 25c 1.25
Jonquils 2c 10c 60
Double Narcissus.. 3c 15c 75
Snow Drops 2c 150 85
Crocus, mixed lc 6c 40
Oxslis 2c 10c 60
Raster Lillies 10c SIOO 7.50
Calls Lillies 8c 90c 7.50
Our famous Self-watering Window
Boxes are especially well adapted to j
the successful growth of all kinds of 4
flowering bulbs, plant tubs, flower pots. 4
Your local merchant can get from us j
what Fall Bnrs you want. If he does t
not sell our Fall Bulbs you can send 1
your order to us and we will see that*
they reach you in perfect condition. Is
J. BOLGIANO & bON
Four Generations In the Seed Business!
BALTIMORE. Md. Z
n 11
THE fact that Amatite needs no ,
painting makes it the most:
economical roofing on the]
market.
A tool which requires painting
every couple of years to keep it
tight is an expensive proposition.]
It you will stop and figure out the
cost of the paint, you will find it is
frequently more than the roofing]
Amatite is covered with a real
mineral surface,, which makes paint*
ing absolutely unnecessary. "
Anyone can lay Amatite. It reSj
quires no skilled labor. Nails and
liquid cement which requires no
heating, supplied free with every]
roll.
Griffth & Turner Company
Farm and Garden Supplies
2MN.o.ys? c ‘ st } Baltimore.
J. P. STEINBACH
Maker of
GENTLEMEN’S CLOTHES
PROFESS! INaL E.LCG.
CHARLES AND PLEASANT STS.
Bot i l’Hones.
C. A P. TELEPHONE
N. C. HAEFELE & CO.
Gas and Electrical Construction
in all its branches
Up-to-date workmanship and reason
able prices. Let me make an estimate
on installing your home with
GAS or ELECTRICITY
I guarantee entire satisfaction in good
work and fair dealing
Office and Show Room:
Bel Air Road, between Overlea and
Maple Avenues,
Overlea P. 0., Baltimore Co., Md.
JARRETT N. GILBERT
(Successor to BAY and GETTY)
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Grain, Wool and Hay
BOURSE BUILDING, Custom House
Avenue and Water Street
BALTIMORE, - - - MD.
DEAL WITH
REITZE
FOR*BESTCLOTHES.
We beg to'announce the arrival of our
FALL AND WINTER FABRICS, and in
vite your early inspection.
Suite $13.50 up
Pants 5.00 up
Specialists on Full Dress Suits... 30.00 up
J. H. Reitze & Son
643 W. Baltimore Street, 2 doors
west of Arcb,
Baltimore, Md.
Second National Bank
TCTWSOUST, Md.
JML We Invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies,
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, Ac.
A a.„a,a..J=a-a-.- ft
J \ —— H
* Collections Made. Loans Negotiated.
Banking in All Its Branches.
M * EVERT POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOR OUR DEPOSITORS. V
-lOPPICERSi
Thomas W. Offutt, Elmer J. Cook, j. Vice-Presidents Thos. j. Meads,
President. Harrison Rider, • Cashier
THOMAB W. OFFUTT. W. BERNARD DUKE, HENRY C. LONQNECKER,
ELMER J. COOK, WM. A. LEE, Z. HOWARD IBAAC,
Harrison Rider, Chas. H. Knox, Noah E. Offutt,
JOHN I. YELLOTT, W. GILL SMITH, FRANK X. HOOPER.
Feb. 6— ly
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Near Reisterstown Road, ARLINGTON, Md.
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
, a..,o—a a
3STO~W" OPEN POE BUSINESS.
, B a a
Does a general Banking Business in all that Is consistent with safe and careful man
agement. The location of oar Bank makes It the most convenient place for a large
number of residents of Baltimore county to transact their financial business.
Daring the short time onr Bank has been open for business the amount of deposits
has reached a success far in excess of our expectations.
We have a SAVINGB DEPARTMENT and pay interest on money deposited there.
Call and see ns and we will explain why it will be to yonr advantage to open an
aeconnt with ns.
Prompt attention given to all collection business entrusted to ns.
. , o—
—(OFFICERS:—
CHAS. T. COCKEV, Jr„ JOHN K. CULVER, Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH,
President. HOWARD E. JACKSON, 2d Vice-President. Cashier.
—(DIRECTORS:
CH ARLES T. COCKEY, Jr., HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT H. McMASNS,
ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON, J. B. WAILKS, MAX ROSEN,
JOHN K. CULVER, GEORGE W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND,
J. FRANK SHIPLEY, H. D. EABTMAN. Dec. 26—ly
j; T one *
WAY * ii
< [ To have money is to save it. Tha sure way to save it is by depositing It In a, >
] > responsible bank. Ton will then be exempt from annoyance of having it burn < [
< 1 holes in yonr pockets, and aside from the fact that yonr money will be safe ] >
< [ from theft, the habit of saving tends to the establishment of thrift, economy, , *
j > discipline and a general understanding of business principles essential to yonr < ’
< ’ success. , *
\ > To those wishing to establish relations with a safe, strong bank, we heartily < ]
< [ extend onr services. , ►
j:The Towson National Bank,;]
TOWSON, I&.JD. J;
<! DIRECTORS. < l
it JOHN CROWTHER, President; D. H. RICE, Vice-President;
i • Col. Walter 8. Franklin, Lewis M. Bacon, ]>
J Hen. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway, <’
;. Hon. John 8. Blddlson, Ernest C. Hatch. <>
[ Emanuel W. Herman, _ __ . ______ _ , . , >
: W. 0. ORAUMER, Cashier.
S
Maryland Colleger
Westminster, Maryland.
REV. T. H. LEWIS, D. D., LL. D., President.
A high grade College with low rates, $225 a year for board, furnished
room aud tuition.
Three courses leading to degree of A. B. Classical, Scientific, Historical,
and a course in Pedagogy, entitling graduates to teach in Maryland
without exapination.
Preparatory School for those not ready for College.
Forty-third Year Opens Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1909.
J July 17—3 m
INSURE TOUR PROPERTY
—msr—
The 4 Home 4 Insurance 4 Company
OF R-RW YORK,
g-Which has for the past twelve years paid every loss in Baltimore Connt;*Cl
CASH When Adjusted.
Assets-Twenty-Five Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The “Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHEELER & COLE, Towson, WEIDEMEYEH & SHIPLEY, Owinits’ Mills,
WM. J. BIDDISON, Haspeburg, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
f3S~See that your Policy is in the “Home.” [June s— 6m
J. J. GEORGE & CO.,
PRODUCE COMMISSION
109 MARKET SPACE,
Near Wholesale Produce Market, :o: BALTIMORE, Md.
Red X Chick Starter, Red X Chick Feed, Red X Poultry Feed,
Red X Dry Mash Feed, and Poultry Supplies.
Peerless Hot-Water System Incubators and Brooders, also the Peerless
Lampless Brooder. Portable Poultry Houses and Hennery Outfits.
Iron Age Potato Diggers. Farm and Garden Implements.
The United States Cream Separators. GET OUR CATALOG.
May 29—6 m
S. K. FENDALL & CO.,
TOWSON, MID.,
AGENTS FOR ALL KINDS
Farm Machinery and Implements
.naa~nrrßuTa'iiao ic c I INTERNATIONAL GASOLINE ENGINES,
JUIM Uttll W DUtSUIEvs I The Best Engineafarmerormanufactorcan buy
Repair Parts for All Machines on Hand.
If we haven’t them we will get them on short notice and can save you money on our full line.
The Haosiei Corn Planter Specialty. - 1
TjINVKLOPKS 1
Cj ENVELOPES I
ENVELOPES
Yor Professional and Business Men,
Furnished In large or small lots, with neatly
printed corners, at a very small advance on theur
original cost. LARGE STOCK to select from.
OFFICE OF THR UNION.
Deo. 7.—tf. Towson. Md.
j. MAURICE WATKINS L SON,
—DEALERS IE—
Staple, Fancy & Green Groceries
Fruits In season. Fresh and Salt Meats.
Full line of Tobaooos, Foreign and Domestic
Cigars, Ao.
Bept. 13—ly TOWSON, Md.
TOWSON, MD., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23. 1909.
fPttscellanexms.
James J. JAndsay, Attorney, 412-14 Equita
ble Building , Baltimore, and Smedley
Bow, Toteson, Md.
PUBLIC SALE
-OF—
VALUABLE REAL ESTATE, IN FEE,
WITH IMPROVEMENTS,
AND VALUABLE STONE QUARRIES,
On the Premises, Hillen Road. Opposite
Arlington Avenue, Baltimore
County,
On Monday, October 25th, 1909,
At 3 o’clock P. M.
The undersigned, owner, will offer at Public •
Auction, ON THE PREMISES, on
MONDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1909,
At 3 o’olock P. M„
ALL HER REAL ESTATE,
IN FEE SIMPLE,
THE SAME COMPRISING ABOUT SIXTY
NINE ACRES OF LAND, MORE OR LESS.
Mjhßituated on the east side of the Hillen JW
llilS road, between the York and Harford —ir*
roads, in Baltimore county, and near the limits
of Baltimore city.
IN FOUR DIFFEHENT TRACIS, WITH THE
BUILDINGS AND OTHER IMPROVE
MENTS ON EACH.
FIRST.—That tract of land fronting about 247
feet on the east side of the Hillen Road, with a
depth of about 838 feet on the north side of. the
Ivy Mill Road, containing
3 7-10 ACHES OF LAND, MORE OR LESS.
Improved by a large, substantial
THREE-STOKY STONE HOTEL,
with basement, the upper part beiog conducted
as a hotel and restaurant, fronting on Hillen
Hoad, and the basement fronting Ivy Mill Road,
Is used for a general store. The other build
ings consist of
STONE DWELLINGS. ICE HOUBES, STA
BLES, WAGON HOUSE. FAIR
BANK SCALES. &c.
SECOND.—That tract of land known as the
SCHUMACKER PROPERTY, fronting on Ivy
Mill Road, containing about
8)4 ACRES OF LAND.
Improved by a large
TWO-STORY FRAME DWELLING, AND
OTHER BUILDINGS AND
IMPROVEMENTS.
THIRD.—That tract of land known as the
“LAKE FARM,” containing
29 6-10 ACRES OF LAND, MORE OR LESS,
nearly all of which is situated east of Herring
Run and on the north side of the said Ivy Mill
Road and adjoining Lauraville, and within 3 or 4
minutes’ walk of the Harford Road cars. Im
proved by a large
TWO STORY STONE DWELLING.
This tract of land is especially adapted for
building and development purposes and co
grading virtually necessary, and has streets and 1
avenues laid out on the east of same, running
up to the western limits of said property.
FOURTH.—AII that tract of land known as >
the “HOME PLACE,” and fronting on the east
side of the Hillen Road about 924 feet and ex
tending easterly an irregular shape, containing
27 2-10 ACRES of LAND, MORE OR LESS.
Improved by a large and commodious
SUBSTANTIAL STONE MANSION,
of 26 Rooms, Steam Heat, running Spring Water
through the bouse (hot and cold), Electric
Lights and Broad Verandas. There are also on
this tract several other large and commodious
Stone Dwellings, Barns, Stables, Warehouses, 1
Stone Water Tower, and other necessary out
buildings of every kind, all built of Stone with
Slate roofs, and all in first class condition.
This is one of the most beautiful country seats
in the suburbs of Baltimore, and is not only ad
mirably adapted for that purpose, but is an ideal
location with the large mansion and many other
dwellings and buildings for a college, seminary,
retreat or sanitarium. i
The large Stone Quarries, formerly conducted 1
by the late Mr. Walter H. Thorne, are located on <
this tract of land and are so situated as not to I
in anywise interfere with the property for the 2
various purposes above enumerated or in the t
development of the greater portion of this tract 2
of land for building purposes. The stone in (
these quarriers is almost inexhaustible and is
unexcelled for either building or road purposes
and will be the source of continual substantial
income to the purchaser in this progressive era
of house and road building.
BF“The location of all of said property is high *
and elevated, and as a result healthy, with the 8
beautiful Herring Run gently meandering ;
through it. The scenery is unexcelled and pic- 1
turesque. It is within one-eighth of a mile of 8
Baltimore city and only a few hundred yards c
from Lake Montebello, and is easily accessible _
by either the York Road or the Harford Road J
cars. FIVE CENT FARE.
BF”The sale of all the above propertv will
take place at the MANSION HOUSE, Hillen
Road, opposite Arlington Avenue, at 3 o’clock
P. M. MONDAY, OCTOBER 25th 1909, as afore
said. The different tracts will be offeied sepa
rately and the bids reserved, and will then be
offered as a whole, and whichever way it brings .
the most money will be sold. f
TERMS OF SALE.—One-half cash within one {
month of sale, balance in six months from day '
of sale, or all cash, at the option of the purcha- 1
ser; credit payments to bear interest from day 0
of sale, and to be secured to the satisfaction of {j
the undersigned. A deposit at time of sale of *
S3OO will be required on each tract, or $1,200 on 1
the whole, as the case may be.
*-A plat of the above property can be seen '
or any other information had, at the offices of n
JAMES J. LINDSAY, 412-14 Equitable Build- 1
ing. Baltimore, Attorney for tbe undersigned,
or at the offices of PATTISON & GAHAN, 7 E.
Lexington street. Baltimore.
ALICE E. THORNE.
PATTISON & GAHAN, Auctioneers.
Oct. 2 ts 1
e
Edward U. Burke, Solicitor, Towson, Md, C
TRUSTEE’S SALE |
—OF—
TWENTY HOUSES AND LOTS,
1
VALUABLE LEASEHOLD PROPERTY,
Situated on the Northwest and Southeast
Sides of Woodland Avenue, Near
Park Heights Avenue, in
the Third Election
1
District of
Baltimore County, Maryland.
By virtue of a decree of the Circuit Court for
Baltimore county, in Equity, passed in the case
of the Potee Brick Company of Baltimore city ,
4*Svs. Woodland Avenue Building Com-XgA
fllii pany of Baltimore city et al., on the 4th ZTZ
day of October, 1909, the undersigned. Trustee, .
will offer for sale by Public Auction, ON THE ;
PREMISES, on
Monday, November Ist, 1909, 1
At 12 o’clock M„ <
ALL LOTS OF GROUND IN BAL- f
THOSE TIMORE COUNTY,
Ten of which are situated on the northwest side I
of Woodland avenue, and ten thereof on the J
southeast side of Woodland avenue, near Park
Heights ave Due; each ol said lots on the south- 1
east side of Woodland avenue have a front of
fifteen feet on said avenue and a depth of one
hundred and twenty-five feet and three inches. 1
and each of said lots on the northwest side of
Woodland avenue have a front of fifteen feet i
on said avenue and a depth varying from one i
hundred and twenty-three feet to one hundred i
and fifty feet. Each of the twenty lots is im
proved by a
TWOSTORY BRICK DWELLING- i
HOUSE, NEARLY COMPLETED. <
AND EACH OFSAID HOUSES HAVE I
A FRONT OF FIFTEEN FEET ON
WOODLAND AVENUE, AND EACH <
IS SUBJECT TO AN ANNUAL I
GROUND RENT OF $75.00. |
%3g~ For further and more detailed description !
of said lots see lease dated November 7th, 1908,
between the Owners Realty Company of Balti- 1
more city and the Woodland Avenue Building
Company of Baltimore city, recorded among the
Land Records of Baltimore county, in Liber W.
P. C., No. 336, folio 68. F.ach of said twenty
leasehold lots, with improvements, will be
offered separately, lot by lot. These bids will
be reserved, and then these twenty lots will be
offered as an entirety and will be sold in the
manner producing the largest amount. These
leasehold lots will be sold free and clear of in
cumbrances.
TERMS OF SALE.—One-third cash on final
ratification of sale, one-third in six months, one -
third in twelve months from day of sale, or all i
cash at the option of the purchaser or purcha
sers ; credit payment to bear interest from day
of sale and to be secured to the satisfaction of
tbe undersigned. Trustee. Taxes and ground
rents and all other charges will be adjusted of
the day of sale.
*A deposit of SIOO will be required of the
purchaser at the time of sale on each of said
lots if sold separately, ora deposit of SI,OOO It
sold as an entirety.
ELMER J. COOK, Trustee.
WM. M. RISTEAU, Auctioneer. [Oct. 9—ts
In pursuance of an order of the Circuit Court
for Baltimore county, in Equity, passed in the
above entitled cause, on the 11th day of October,
1909, the undersigned, Trustee, will sell at Pub
lie Auction at the same time and place as the 20
houses and lots above described, all unused
building materials of tbe said The Woodland
Avenue Building Company of Baltimore City.
This includes SAND, LIME. NAILS, FLOOR
ING, POSTS, RAILINGS, PIPES, SASHES, Ac.,
and a work shop or shed erected upon the
premises.
TERMS OF SALE-CASH.
ELMER J. COOK, Trustee.
WM. M. RISTEAU. Auctioneer. [Oct. 16—ts
TJIOR SALE.
A FINE FARM OF FORTY ACRES. IN
HIGH STATE OF
CULTIVATION, HIGH, HEALTHY LOCA
TION, SITUATED ON THE MD. Sc
PENNSYLVANIA R. R., 16 MILES FROM
BALTIMORE.
Apply to Mbs. M. SCHAFER,
Sept. 25—5t*j Hydes’ P. 0„ Balto. Co.. Md.
Jjattscjellatu on u
Charles H. Isennock, Auctioneer,
Phoenix, R. F. D„ Md.
PUBLIC SALE
-OF
HORSES, COLTS, COWS. HEIFERS,
BULLS, HOGS,
Wagons, Fanning Implements, Ac., Ac.
—Also, a Very Desirable Farm.
The undersigned, intending to abandon farm
ing, will sell at Public Salo.ON THE PREMISES,
at Baldwin Station, Maryland and Pennsylvania
Railroad. Long Green Valley, on
Wednesday, October 27, 1909,
At 10 o’clock A. M.. if raining the next fair day,
ONE BAY DRIVING MARE. 3 years old, well
broken and safe for ladies; 2 WORK MARES, 2
A YEARLING COLTS, sired by EOtmt
Tfe-it-S Admiral Kuser; 3 MILCH
COWS. 3 YOUNG BULLS,
Ul 1 HEIFERS, one nearly thoroughbred
Jersey, will be fresh by day of sale; 1 Brood
Sow, 1 Barrow, 7 Shotes, 1 two horse Spring
Market WagOD, 1 two-ton Road Wagon, broad
tread ; 1 Wagon Bed. new: 1 Top Buggy, 1 Sur
rey, 1 McCormick Mower, 1 Superior Drill, Horse
Rake, 1 Hay Carriage, 1 Evans Double-Row Corn
Planter. 1 H. and D. Double Corn Worker, 1
Single Worker. 1 Spring-tooth Harrow, 1 Syra
cuse No. 66, right-hand; No. 40 Plow, Oliver
Chilled, left-hand; 1 Wheelbarrow.l Buggy Pole,
Wagon Poles, Single and Double Trees and small
Farm Tools of all kinds. Most of these articles
are in excellent condition, having been used but
a short time: 1 set Single Harness, new; 2 sets
Lead Harness, new ; 2 sets Breechbands. Bridles,
Chains, Robes, lot of Shingles, lot of Lumber,
Ac. Also, about 15 tons Timothy Hay, lot of
Wheat Straw, lot of Oat Btraw, 75 bushels Oats.
100 barrels of Corn, 15 bundles of Fodder. 100
bushels of Potatoes, lot of young and old Chick
ens, and 5 pedigreed White Wyandottes.
HOUSEHOLD and KITCHEN FUR
NITURE, including 2 Bedroom Suits, 2> Jf lr
Parlor Suite, 1 Extension Table, 1 Up- SL.
right Piano, new; Chairs. Tables, 3&E9ES
Kitchen Btoves, 9, 8 and 6; 3 Chunk Stoves, 1
Oil Stove, three-burner; 1 Kitchen Safe, 3
Kitchen Tables, Carpets and Matting, Lamps of
all kinds. Window and Door Screens. Window
Shades, 4 Ladles’ Coats, 2 Overcoats, 1 Man’s Suit
and other clothing, all good as new. and a large
collection of other articles unnecessary to
enumerate.
TERMS OF SALE.—AII sums of sloand under,
cash ; on sums over that amount a credit of ten
months, purchasers giving notes, with approved
security, bearing interest from day of sale.
Notes payable at the Second National Bank of
Towson. Nothing to be removed from the prem
ises until the terms are complied with.
RICHARD SWORMSTEDT, Jr.
At 12 M. on the above date the under- £E
Kasigned will offer at Public Sale
FARM upon which the above sale will take place.
It contains 132 ACRES, more or less, 100 acres
cleared and In a good state of cultivation. Tbe
improvements are ample and in good condition;
excellent water. The location of this farm pecu -
liarly fits it for either dairying or trucking. The
neighborhood is one of the best in Baltimore
county.
0T Terms will be made to suit purchaser.
EP“A deposit of $250 will be required at the
time of sale, or all cash, as the purchaser may
elect.
RICHARD SWORMSTEDT. Sr.,
Oct. 16—te] Owner.
Harry E. Mann, Solicitor, 100 East Lex
ington Street, Baltimore, Md.
Tl/TORTGAGE SALK
VALUABLE LEASEHOLD
BUSINESS AND DWELLING PROPERTY,
Nos. 400 and 404 South Fifth Street,
Highlandtown, Baltimore
County.
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a
mortgage from George M. Sehroeder, Sr., and
Louisa Sehroeder, his wife, to the Germania
Permanent LoaD and Savings Associa- JtMt
■nation of Baltimore county, dated June*jT
2571907. and recorded among the Mortgage Rec
ords of Baltimore county, in Liber W. P. C., No.
286, folio 146. &c„ I will sell, at Public Auction,
ON THE PREMISES, on
Thursday, November 11, 1909,
At 4 o’olock P. M.,
THE FOLLOWING PROPERTY:
1. Beginning for the same at the corner form
ed by the intersection of tbe south side of Bank
street and the west side of Fifth street, running
thence southerly on the west side of Fifth street,
15 feet to the centre of the partition wall there
Bituate,and extending westerly for depth and
of even width 60 feet, improved by a
TWO STORY BRICK STORE AND DWELL
ING, KNOWN AS NO. 400 SOUTH
FIFTH STREET. Subject to an an
nual ground rent of $26.
2. Beginning for tbe same on the west side of
Fifth street, at the distance of 27 feet and 6
inches southerly from the corner formed by the
intersection of the west side of Fifth street with
the south side of Bank street, and in the centre
of an alley 2 feet 6 inches wide there laid out,
running thence southerly on the west side of
Fifth street 12 feet and 6 Inches, more or less, to
the centre or tbe partition wall there situate,
and extending westerly for depth and of even
width 60 feet, improved by a
TWO-STORY BRICK DWELLING, KNOWN
AS N 0.404 SOUTH FIFTH STREET. Sub
ject to an annual ground rent of S2O. Taxes,
ground rent, &c., paid to day of sale.
TERMS OF SALE—One-third cash, balance
in 6 and 12 months, or all cash as purchasers may
elect; credit payments to bear interest from
day of sale and to be secured to the satisfaction
of the undersigned.
49~Tbe purchaser of each lot must deposit
SSO at the sale. HARRY E. MANN,
Attorney named in the Mortgage,
100 East Lexington Street. Baltimore, Md.
PATTISON & GAHAN, Auctioneers.
Oct. 16—ts
T. IF. Meads , Attorney, Piper Building,
Towson, Md.
PUBLIC SALE
—OF—
PERSONAL PROPERTY.
The Undersigned Will Sell on the Premises,
at Corbett, Md., N. C. R. R„
Wednesday, October 27, 1909,
At 12 o’clock noon.
THE FOLLOWING PERSONAL PROPERTY:
One practically now Trappe, 1 Runabout. 1 new
Cutter, all three made by John Arthur ; 1 light
Express Wagon, Cultivators, Harrow, JKSR
Shovels, Forks, Hoes, Rakes, Corn
Shelter, Cider Press, etc. Lot of Harness, in
cluding set Double Carriage Harness, set Single
Carriage Harness, set Wagon Harness, set new
Sleigh Bells, Riding Saddle and Bridle, Collars,
Halters, etc. Lot of seasoned Chestnut Boards,
lot of Chestnut Posts, 1 one-horse Lawn Mower,
1 hand Lawn Mower, Carriage Tongue. 1 heavy
Lap Robe, lot Terra Cotta Pipe.lot Chicken Wire.
Many articles of HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE.
/Wgaconsisting of Walnut Bedroomfft
LmSSBSE Suit, Cherry Bedroom Suit.
Oak Bedroom Suit, White Enam-|TI
ESSSeled Iron Bedstead, Oak Dining- *
room Set, consisting of Buffet, Extension Table
and 8 Chairs, Chiffonier, Lady’s Writing Desk,
Bamboo Bookcase. Piano Stool, small Stand, 3
China Chamber Sets, lot of Pictures. 5 Druggets,
2 Carpets, Rugs. Stairstep Carpet, Linen, Rods
and Pads, lot Bathroom Linoleum. Rocking
Chairs, Porch Chairs, Brass Stands, Chandelier,
lot Blinds, Curtain Poles and Brackets, lot of
Portieres, Hanging Lamp, Leather Couch, large
Oak Hall Rack, Oak Library Stand, Marbletop
Stand,Sewing Machine, Walnut Extension Table
and Chairs, Refrigerator, lot Dishes and Glass
ware, Clock, Cooking Utensils, Lamps, window
and door Screens, Kitchen Tables, Kitchen
Range, Parlor Coal Stoves. Coal Oil Stoves, Cur
tain Stretchers, and other household articles.
Lot of Thoroughbred Plymouth Rock Chickens.
TERMS OF SALE-CASH.
S. GRACE R. SLADE.
Executrix Estate of John V. Slade.
®On tbe same day, at 3 P. M., I will JM
offer on the premises.my home, consist-•JE?
ing of FOUR ACRES OF LAND, improved by a
LARGE FRAME DWELLING HOUSE,
Modern Barn and other outbuildings. All the
improvements are in first-class condition.
TERMS OF SALE.—A cash deposit of S2OO
will be required on day of sale, the balance of
purchase money to be paid within thirty days.
S. GRACE R. SLADE.
WM. M. RISTEAU, Auctioneer. [Oct. 16-te
TO CREDITORS.
THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE, That the sub
scriber has obtained from tbe Orphans’ Court
of Baltimore county, letters of administration
c. t. a. on the estate of
MATTHIAS SCHAEFER,
late of said county deceased. All persons having
claims against the said estate are hereby warned
to exhibit tbe same, with the vouchers thereof,
to the subscriber.
On or before the 7th day of April, 1910;
They may otherwise by law be excluded from all
benefit of said estate. Those indebted to
said estate are requested to make Immediate pay
ment. Given under my hand this 28th day of
September. 1909. HELENA C. SMITH,
Oct. 24t] Administratrix c. t. a.
TO CREDITORS.
THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE, That the subscri
ber has obtained from the Orphans’ Court of
Baltimore county, letters of administration on
tho estate of
WALTER H. VINAL,
late of said county deceased. All persons having
claims against the said estate are hereby warned
to exhibit the same, with the vouchers thereof,
to the subscriber,
On or before the 14th day of April, 1910 M
they may otherwise by law be excluded from all
benefit of said estate. Those Indebted to said
estate are requested to make immediate pay
ment. Given under my hand this 7th day of
October, 1909. MAY IRENE WHITEFORD,
Oct. 9—4t*] Administratrix.
I The Old Road.
(Victor A. Hermann, in the New Voi k Sun.)
Oh, come out from the city to this wide old
l’asbioned road
Where the apple cart is creaking with the red
and yellow load:
And the driver’s merry whistle as he rumbles
down the bill
Mingles with the dreamy churning of the far off
cider mill;
The bluejay’s saucy challenge in the beech trees
overhead.
The cricket’s cheerful “chirrup” by the hill
spring's mossy bed
Are sounds that soothe the townsman and drive
away the gloom
Down the old road in autumn when the golden
rod’s in bloom.
Like a million tiny soldiers in their uniforms
of red.
The dogwood leaves are forming in the old
road’s sandy bed;
Then a fresh breeze through the thicket and
they’re off to meet the foe,
The maple men in yellow in their grass fort
lust below*
Charge! Retreat! then forward, first the crimson
then the gold.
So the leafy battle wages ’till the soldiers brown
and mould;
Now they’re in their color glory—like some ori
ental loom—
Down the old road in autumn when the golden
rod’s in bloom.
Then it’s Bob White whirring upward and Br’er
Rabbit on the run.
And the farm boy’s in bis glory with his game
dog and his gun;
Over fences, over hedges, crawling snakelike
through the grass.
And the gun’s as tall as be is you will notice as
he’ll pass—
Pa’s old army musket. Now you watch him
taking aim—
There’s a mighty puff of powder and a lurid jet
of Hame;
And he leaps up like the rabbit each reverbera
ting boom.
Down the old road in autumn when the gol den
rod's in bloom.
Old Garrison Fort.
(By Charles L. Shipley.)
Two miles northeast of Pikesville
lies the estate known as Fort Garri
son Stock Farm, belonging to Mrs.
Charles J. Moore. The name seems
a peculiar designation for a country
estate, but when its origin is explained
and one becomes acquainted with
the story concerning the old stone
building upon the estate, and which
gives to its appellation, the mystery
is cleared away and there stands
forth instead a colonial story which is
well worth the study of everyone in
terested in Maryland history.
At the accession of William and
Mary to the throne of England, in
1688, a war broke out between Eng
land and France, followed by an
invasion of Ireland by James II
(father of Queen Mary, against whom
and Catholic supremacy his son-in
law, King William, was fighting),
aided by France. This war extended
to the colonies in America, both
nations struggling for their possess
ions.
One of the most noted partisan
leaders in the colonies on the part of
France during this conflict was
Baron Vincent Castine. Baron Cas
tine left his home on the Pyrenees,
came to Quebec, raised the French
flag on the St. Croix, and commenced
a relentless warfare on the border
settlements of New England to reach
an extent as to cause Governor Andros
to offer a large reward for the capture
of the doughty Frenchman, who, es
caping to the Penobscot region in
Maine, settled among the Abenaki
Indians, where he married an Indian
wife and gained great influence among
the savages, exciting the tribe by
religious and political motives against
the English. So much was the
prowess of the Baron feared that a
letter was sent by one Captain James
of Cecil county to Governor Copley
in 1692 stating that he was informed
that Castine with 800 Indians was
encamped upon the manor of Colonel
Herman, with hostile intentions, and
that he forwarded the testimony of
one Drury, who had visited the manor
of Colonel Herman, and being ac
quainted with the Penobscot Indians
and the wife of Castine, identified
them as the same.
Becoming alarmed at these rumors,
on March 9, 1692, the Council of
Maryland ordered three forts to be
built, in each of which was to be a
dwelling house sufficient to accommo
date a captain and nine soldiers, with
a cabin for four friendly Nanticoke
Indians. One fort was in Charles
county, then including Prince George
county, under the command of Capt.
John Addison; one in Anne Arundel
county, including Howard county,
under the command of Colonel Nich
olas Greenbury, and the other (Garri
son Fort) about the Falls of the
Patapsco, toward or near the Sus
quehanna river, in Baltimore county.
An assessment of 50,000 pounds of
tobacco was laid on the inhabitants
to meet this emergency, and a vessel
was sent to conciliate Castine, or, fail
ing in this, to arrest and bring him to
St. Mary; but on March 17, 1692,
Drury testified that he was mistaken
in identifying Castine, who was not
on the manor, though his wife was.
This false alarm, however, did not
stop the Council’s order. The three
forts were built, and very properly, as
the frontiers were continually exposed
to Indian raids, especially on the
high ground between the Patapsco
and the Susquehanna.
In August, 1699, Governor Nichol
son called on Capt. John Oulton, then
commanding ‘the Garrison,” for a
report of its location. Capt. Oulton
replied as follows: “An account of
the roads made back of the inhabitants
by the rangers of Baltimore county,
is as follows: Northeast from the
Garrison to the first cabin, 15 miles;
northeast to the second cabin, 15
miles or thereabouts; then 10 miles
further from the same course to an
other cabin on the north side of Deer
Creek; likewise between Gwynn’s
Falls and the main falls of the
Patapsco, 10 miles; which said road
being marked and duly and weekly
ranged by me and my lieutenant,
according to order of Council,”
Capt. John Oulton, appointed com
mander in 1696, was from that part
of Baltimore county which is now
Cecil. His name is variously spelled
Oulton or Olton. While captain, he
in June, 1696, obtained a patent for
340 acres, including all the surround
ing property and also the fort, or
garrison. Here he built a house,
one hundred feet south of the Garri
son, and in 1699 conveyed the prop
erty to Thomas Cromwell and James
Murray. In 1700 Murray became
the sole possessor, and in 1701 sold a
part of it to Wm. Talbott; his widow
mareird Capt. John Risteau; thence
THE UNION ESTABLISHED
THE NEWS ESTABLISHED 1905 j
itdescended tohis son Thomas; thence
to George Carnan, a nephew; then it
was bought by Robert Carnan, father
of George; thence it went to a Mr.
Metcalf; thence to John Lloyd; thence
to Cardiff Tagart; thence to Samuel
Tagart, his brother; thence to the
trustees of McDonogh Institute, and
then to the late Charles J. Moore,
whose family still retains possession.
The question now presents itself,
why was so little known of the Garri
son Fort, so near the most populous
portion of the county and easy of
access? The question is not hard to
answer by any one familiar with
Maryland history. Two hundred
and seventy-five years have passed
since the colonists came to St. Mary,
and for 200 years, or until the forma
tion of the Maryland Historical
Society, no organized effort was made
to preserve the records of the past,
except by legislative and ecclesiastical
proceedings.
This Garrison Fort has a peculiar
value in that it is the oldest (if it
can be proven by a rigid inspection)
permanent fort in Maryland. Fort
Cumberland’s site is occupied by a
church. Fort Frederick, built in
1756, still exists in ruins, but no
traces remain of the forts in St. Mary
City, or Mattapony, Piscataway, or
the Indian fort on Spencer’s Island.
The old building which is the sub
ject of our article is hard to find, al- 1
though situated in a populous and
flourishing neighborhood, and the
enthusiast who starts on an eager
tramp across the country to search
for the old post needs patience and
perseverance. Hardly one person
out of five, or within a radius of three 1
miles of its location, seems to be 1
aware of its existence, and to every '•
question concerning it one will very 1
likely receive the stereotyped answer,
“I never heard of it.” Thoughnearly '
every one in the neighborhood knows
of the location of “Garrison Stock 1
Farm,” belonging to Mr. Charles T.
Cockey, Sr., and Garrison Forest, '
and the Garrison road, yet few of them
know why they are so called, or are *
aware of the location of the Garrison, (
from which these places derive their
respective names. 1
Any one wishing to visit this old f
fort, can very easily find it by taking <
the Old Court road through the
village of Pikesville, and following
the same until they reach the Green (
Spring Valley road, that leads off (
to the left from the Old Court road, ?
about 400 yards below the old Baptist
church. A walk or a drive along <
this beautiful country road for about 1
a mile and a half, brings one to the <
estate of Mrs. Moore, lying, south of
the road, and joining “Dumbarton,” 1
the handsome estate of Mr. John '<
Waters on the west. Here is situ- *
ated the venerable relic, the subject J
of our sketch. 1
It is a quaint stone structure, 20 by i
50 feet, its massive walls punctuated <
by embrasures. Heavy oak posts
and beams or sills show the great 1
strength of the structure which served 1
its purpose well in the dim and <
misty past. Its walls have been 1
color washed, and its interior is (
coated with dark brown calcimine. '
A gentleman who visited the old
structure about fifteen years ago t
gives a vivid description of it, and in
concluding, says: “A hen had made
her nest in an embrasure from which
many a sturdy settler pointed his
gun at an Indian foe- In its gables :
pigeons cooed,and a great shrub bush i
by its door was fairly weighted down \
with fragrant blossoms.”
Thursday afternoon, July 9, 1755, I
occurred the crushing defeat of Maj. \
Gen. Edward Braddock, on the banks i
of the Monongahela river, eight miles
from Fort Du Quesne, now the site of i
Pittsburg. Within three days swift i
mounted messengers despatched from i
the camp of Colonel Duubar, second i
in command of the British forces, and
where the mortally wounded com
mander had fallen back with the rem
nant of his demoralized force, spread
the news far and wide through the
provinces of Pennsylvania, Maryland
and Virginia, causing terror and dis
may to hundreds of frontier families.
An immediate advance of the French
foe and their redskinned allies was
now expected, especially by the
settlers of Maryland.
A report having spread that a body
of French and Indiane were within a
30-mile march of Baltimore Town,
having reached the site of what is
now the town of Westminster, Carroll
county, the settlers of Garrison Forest
and Soldier’s Delight caught the in
fection of alarm, and a body of the
county militia was quickly collected
and thrown into the old fort, under
the command of Capt. John Risteau,
Sheriff of the county.
The parishioners of St. Thomas’
church, about four miles north of
the fort, burnished up their arms
and prepared their ammunition,
carrying their gunß with them on
Sunday and placing them in the
corners of their pews, not knowing
at what moment their devotions
would be interrupted by the war
whoop of the savage enemy.
Such is a brief review of this his
toric structure and the stirring events
that led to its erection. There has
been some controversy as to whether
the old stone edifice is the one first
erected, or whether it was erected
later to take the place of the original
building. Upon this point of dispute
we will advance no argument, as it
always dispels the romance of any
historical subject, no matter how
interesting or conclusive in its evi
dence. to make it the subject of con
troversy.
A committee of the Maryland His
torical Society, who 16 years ago paid
a visit to the old fort for the purpose
of investigating its history, concluded
their report as follows;
“The committee having thus pre
sented for the consideration of the
Historical Society all facts obtainable
so far, make no specific recommen
dations at present, hoping, however,
that such convincing light may be
thrown upon this building that it may
Consolidated 1909
become not only a memorial of
momentous events in the past history
of Maryland, but utilized for the pre
sent dispensation of that historic
knowledge which is greatly con
spicuous by its deficiency.”
Pikesville, Md., Oct. 16, 1909.
Joggling the Alphabet.
Many attempts have been made
by ingenious writers to put the whole
alphabet in a single sentence with
out duplication of letters.
Prof. De Morgan, the famous
mathematician tried to juggle the
alphabet into one sentence, each
letter being used but once. After
many fruitless attempts he decided to
compromise exactness by using i for
j, and further by regarding u and v
as the same letter. Then his final
accomplishment read a follows :
“I, quartz pyx, who fling muck
beds.”
At first he did not appreciate the
full significance of his accomplish
ment, says the Housekeeper. “At
last,” he says, “I happend to be
reading a religious writer, who threw
aspersions on his opponents thick
and threefold. Heyday! came into
my head, this fellow flings muck
beds. He must be a quartz pyx.
“Then I remembered that a pyx is
a sacred vessel and quartz is a hard
stone, as hard as the heart of a relig
ious foe curser. So that the line
is the motto of a ferocious sectarian,
who turns his religious vessels into
muck holders for the benefit of those
who will not see what he sees.”
The professor published his sen
tence and called upon others to outdo
him if they could. The follov/ing
are samples of the efforts which re
sulted:
“ Quiz, my whigs, export fun
back.”
“Dumpy quiz, whirl back fogs
next.”
“Get nymph; quiz sad brows; fix
luck.”
The professor awarded the palm of
the competition to this last sentence.
“It is good advice,” he explains,
“to a young man, very well expressed
under the circumstances. In more
sober English it would be ‘Marry, be
cheerfull, watch your business.”
Even when the duplication of
letters is permitted the crowding of
the entire alphabet into a single
coherent sentence is not an easy task,
and such examples as “John T.
Brady gave me a black walnut box of
quite small size,” which is perhaps
the best known, are neither numer
ous nor important.
There is one verse in the Bible
which contains all the letters of the
alphabet except j; this is the twenty
first verse of the seventh chapter of
Ezra, and as the verse contains some
forty words the collocation is only
noteworthy because it occurred with
out previous desicn.
None of the examples here given is
perhaps as good as: “Pack my box
with five dozen liquor jugs.” This
contains the entire alphabet, is a
perfectly coherent sentence and has
only thirty-two letters, in comparison
with forty-seven letters in the “John
T. Brady” example. So it would
seem to hold the palm.
Army Mules Obey Orders.
(From the Kansas City Times.)
Horse and mule men at the stock
yards stood in admiration yesterday
afternoon while the soldiers of Bat
tery A and B, Second U. S. Artil
lery, under Lieut- R. O. Mason,
loaded thirteen cars of mules in
twenty-five minutes. It was a new
record on the loading docks, and it
wasn’t accomplished by any unusual
methods either. Nor was the mule
driver’s vocabulary resorted to. How
did they do it? The lieutenant
simply called the roll and the mules
responded to their names.
“Nigger,” called an officer, and a
little black gun mule ambled up.
“Now, Mollie, you’re next; now
Cyclone,” and Cyclone came like a
cyclone.
If a mule was refractory a few men
in khaki took hold of him and pushed
and shoved him into place.
“No wonder,” said an envious
mule driver, “ they know their
mules; they couldn’t do them all that
way.”
“That so?” said a noncommis
sioned officer. “I guess we could.
It’s all in knowing how. You never
want to flinch around a mule. Never
look back when you leave him.
After you know how mules are easier
to handle than horses.’’
An Antique Joke.
(LondoD correspondence New York Bun.)
During the repairing of an old
tower of the Little Sampford Church
near Saffron Walden, in the south of
England, the workmen were suprised
to find a small piece of black felt in
the masonry. When unfolded it
proved to be a little boy’s hat of the
kind worn in the fifteenth century—
a very smart little hat of glossy black
felt and gold corded and laced.
The tower was built in 1450 and
has only been repaired on the outside
since that time. This is the first
occasion when it has really been
torn down and rebuilt, so the little
hat remained securely hidden all
these years.
Local antiquarians think that some
surly stonemason goaded by the
pleasantries of a fifteenth century
small boy snatched up the young
humorist’s hat and walled it up in
the tower as a punishment for his
naughtiness. The hat will beplaced
in the local museum and labelled.
“The Echo of a Forgotten Joke.”
Obeying Orders.
(From the Catholic Standard and Times.)
“Now,” said the magistrate, “you
must testify only to what you know,
no hearsay evidence. Understand?”
“Yes, sir,” replied the female
witness.
“Your name is Mary Bright, I
believe. Now, what’s your age?”
“I won t tell you. I have only
I hearsay evidence on that point.”

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