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The Baltimore County union, the Towson news. (Towson, Md.) 1909-1912, October 30, 1909, Image 1

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ilDll'ig MtiMvwJLmuty 0
VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2338
You Can Have
BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
All Winter, at Christmas Time, at
Easter Time, also in your Lawns and
Flower Beds
AT THE FIRST OPENING OF
SPRINGTIME
IF YOU PLANT NOW
BOLGIANO’S FALL BULBS.
Our beautifully illustrated 20-Pasre
Fall Flower Catalogue will be cheer
fully sent you if you drop us a postal
today.
Plant Now
Each Doz. 100
Baby Hyacinths... 3c 30c $2.00
Beddiog Hyacinths 5c 35c 2.85
2d size Hyacinths.. 7c 60c 4.50
Ist size H>aeioths. 9c 90c 6.75
Roman Hyacinths. 6c 65c 4.50
Freesia Bulbs, 2 for 5c 15c 1.00
Early Tulips, mix. 2c 10c 75
May Tulips 3c 25c 2.50
Parrot Tulips 3c 25c 1.50
Double Tulips 2c 15c 90
Narcissus, single... 3c 15c 75
Narcissus.paper w. 4c 25c 1.25
Jonquils 2c 10c 60
Double Narcissus.. 3c 15c 75
Snow Drops 2c 15c 85
Crocus, mixed 1c 6c 40
Oxalis 2c 10c 60
Easter Lillies 10c SI.OO 7.50
Calla Lillies 8c 90c 7.50
Our famous Pelf-watering Window
Boxes are especially well adapted to
the successful growth of all kinds of
flowering bulbs, plant tubs, flower pots.
Your local merchant can get from us
what Fall Hnrs you want. If he does
not sell our Fall Bulbs you can send
your order to us and we will see that
they reach you in perfect condition. j
J. BOLGIANO & SON
Four Generations in the Beed Business
BALTIMORE. Md.
THE fact that Amatite needs no
pointing makes it the most
economical rooting on the.
market.
A roof which requires painting
every couple of years to keep it
tight is an expensive proposition.
If you will stop and figure out the
cost of the paint, you will find it is
frequently more than the roofing'
itself.
Amatite is covered with a real
mineral surface,, which makes paint-|
ing absolutely unnecessary.
Anyone can lay Amatite. It re*
quires no skilled labor. Nails and
liquid cement which requires no
heating, supplied free with every
roll. ' i
Griffth & Turner Company
Farm and Garden Supplies
2MN. l a£' c * st } Baltimore.
J. P. STfciNBACH
Maker of
GENTLEMEN’S CLOTHES
profess: l ll: g.
CHARLES AND PLEASANT STS.
Bot , Ph-inca.
C. A P. TELEPHONE
N. C. HAEFELE & CO.
Gas and Electrical Construction
in all its branches
Up-to-date workmanship and reason
able prices. Let me make an estimate
on installing your home with
GAS or ELECTRICITY
I guarantee entire satisfaction in good
work and fair dealing
Office and Show Room:
Bel Air Road, between Overlea and
Maple Avenues,
Overlea P. 0., Baltimore Co., Md.
JARRETT N. GILBERT
(Successor to BAY and GETTY)
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Grain, Wool and Hay
BOURSE BUILDING, Custom House
Avenue and Water Street
BALTIMORE, - - - MD.
DEAL WITH
REITZE
FOMESMLOTHES.
We beg to announce the arrival of our
FALL AND WINTER FABRICS, and in
vite your early inspection.
Suits $13.50 up
Pants .... 5.00 up
Specialists on Full Dress Suits... 30.00 up
J. H. Reitze & Son
643 W. Baltimore Street, 2 doors
west of Arch,
Baltimore, Md.
j; T ONE 4 *
SURE f
* ij
4 , To have money is to save it. The sure nay to give it is by depositing it in a
! > responsible bank. Yon will then be exempt from annoyance of having it burn < !
i | holes in yonr pockets, and aside from the fact that yonr money will be safe ] i
* i from theft, the habit of saving tends to the establishment of thrift, economy, <'
, ► discipline and a general understanding of business principles essential to your < |
< * success. ’ ►
( > To those wishing to establish relations with a safe, strong bank, we heartily <,
i [ extend onr services. J
j:The Towson National Bank,!;
TOWSON, DVE3D
;t mnECTons. <;
]> JOHN CROWTHER, President; D. H. RICE, Vice-President; 3]
Col. Walter S. Franklin, Lewis M. Bacon,
4 , Hon. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway, , •
’ > Hon. John S. Blddison, Ernest C. Hatch. 4 [
Emanuel W. Herman, _ _ _____ . !>
4 ! W. 0. ORAUMER, Cashier. , 1
4 Oct. lfr-ly < |
Second National Bank
TOWSON, IMlci
fttik We invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies, fcSjj
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, &c.
A m ft
j V —— / \
* Collections Made. Loans Negotiated.
Banking in All Its Branches.
■■ o
EVERY POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOR OCR DEPOSITORS.
—! OFFICERS I
THOMAB W. OFFUTT, ELMER J. COOK, l VICE-PRESIDENTS THOS. J. MEADS,
PRESIDENT. HARRISON RIDER, > CASHIER
THOMAS W. OFFUTT. W. BERNARD DUKE, HENRY C. LONGNECKER,
Elmer J. Cook, Wm. a. Lee, Z. Howard isaao,
Harrißon Rider, Chas. H. Knox, Noah E. Offutt,
John I. Yellott, W. Gill Smith, Frank X. Hooper.
Feb. B—ly
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Near Reisterstown Road, ARLINGTON, Md.
*——o
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
——o—> —■
2STOW OFEIST FOR BUSINESS.
Does a general Banking Business in all that is consistent with safe and careful man
agement. The location of our Bank makes it the most convenient place for a large
number of residents of Baltimore county to transact their financial business.
During the short time onr Bank has been open for business the amount of deposits
has reached a success far in excess of our expectations.
We have a SAYINGS DEPARTMENT and pay Interest on money deposited there.
Call and see ns and we will explain why it will be to yonr advantage to open an
account with ns.
Prompt attention given to all collection business entrusted to us.
——o——-
—IOFFICERS:
CHAS. T. COCKEY, Jr., JOHN K. CULVER, Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH,
President. HOWARD E. JACKSON, 2d Vice-President. Cashier.
DIRECTORS:
CHARLES T. COCKEY, Jr., HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT H. McMANNS,
ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON, J. B. WAILES, MAX ROSEN,
JOHN K. CULVER, GEORGE W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND,
J. FRANK SHIPLEY, H. D. EASTMAN. Dec. 26—ly
INSURE TOUR PROPERTY
I2ST
The+Home+lnsurance 4 Company
OF NEW YORK,
A#-Which has for the past twelve years paid every loss in Baltimore County-®*
CASH When Adjusted.
Assets—Twenty-Five Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The “Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHEELER & COLE, Towson, WEIDEMEYER & SHIPLEY, Owings’ Mills,
WM. J. BIDDISON, Raspeburg, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
$3 that your Policy is in the “Home.” [Juno 5- 6m
J. J. GEORGE & CO.,
PRODUCE COMMISSION
109 MARKET SPACE,
Near Wholesale Produce Market, :o: BALTIMORE, Md.
Red X Ghick Starter, Red X Chick Peed, Red X Poultry Peed,
Red X Dry Mash Feed, and Poultry Supplies.
Peerless Hot-Water System Incubators and Brooders, also the Peerless
Lampless Brooder. Portable Poultry Houses and Hennery Outfits.
Iron Age Potato Diggers. Farm and Garden Implements.
The United States Cream Separators. GET OUR CATALOG.
May 29—6 m
S. K. FENDALL & CO.,
TOWSON, IS/LID.,
AGENTS FOR ALL KINDS
Farm Machinery and Implements
inuunccD’CDiinr ice I INTERNATIONAL GASOLINE ENGINES,
lIUHn Kit til W DUllUltd. I The BcstEngineafarmerormanufactorcan buy
Repair Parts for All Machines on Hand.
If we haven’t them we will get them on short notice and can save you money on our full line.
The Met Core Planter a Specialty. ” 9 ""“
SODTHCOMB’S]-[ ft TQ
Wise Heads Wear Them.
109 E- Baltimore St.,
BETWEEN CALYERT B AND LIGHT BTB. BALTIMORE, Md.
Sept. 4-ly
Envelopes i
ENVELOPES i
ENVELOPE!!
Cor Professional and Bnslness Men.
Furnished In large or small lots, with neatly
Minted corners, at a very small ad vanceon their
original cost. LARGE STOCK to select from,
original cost. QFFICB 0F THB UN i O N,
Deo. 7.—tf. Towson. Md.
]. MAURICE WATKINS & SON,
-DEALKRB IW-
Staple, Fancy & Green Groceries
Fruits in season. Fresh and Balt Meats.
Full line of Tobaccos, Foreign and Domestic
Cigars, &o.
Bept. 12—ly TOWSON, Md.
TOWSON. MD., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30. 1909.
■■■ ■ ■
WANTED
1000 Orders
From your section
FOR £>
LUMBER and
MILL WORK
COMPO-BOARD.The
great substitute for
Lath and Plaster
J.L.6ILBERT & BRO. LUMBER CO
East Falls & Eastern Aves.
Baltimore, Md.
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
Why swing a pump handle
when you can get
WATER
by merely opening a faucet
in your house'
LET US SERVE YOU
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
E. SCOTT PAYNE CO.
362 and 364 N. Gay St.
Baltimore, Md.
BOTH PHONES:
St. Paul 1228 Courtland 267
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Bar Iron, Steel, Axles, Springs, Shafts,
Spokes, Rims, Hubs, Wheels, Wheel
Material, Horse Shoes, Horse Shoe
Pads, Horse Shoe Nails, Rubber Tires,
Rubber Tire Machines, Rubber Tire
Channels, etc.; Wheelwright Material.
A Full Line of Builders’ Hardware
HEADQUARTERS FOR
FIELD FENCE, LAWN SWIN6S, LAWN
MOWERS, LAWN SPRINKLERS,
At a big reduction. A postal card will
reach us.
E. Scott Payne Co.
362 and 364 North Gay Street,
Baltimore, Md.
GEORGE W. GRAMMER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
WHEELWRIGHT
and COACHMAKER
Builds and Repairs Carriages and
Wagons of all Kinds
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and EMBALMER
Caskets always on hand. First-class
service at moderate price. Carriages
furnished at the lowest prices and satis
faction guaranteed in every particular.
PUTTY HILL, Bel Air Road,
Fullerton Post Office, BaltimoreCo.,Md.
F. COOK
527 YORK ROAD
TOWSON.
\ DEALER IN
Boots, Shoes and
Rubbers, also Dry
Goods and Notions
SHOE REPAIRING - NEATLY DONE
ifi jfi
\ I Dr. J. Wm. Harrower
ft J?
J[J SURGEON DENTIST 1J
jtj Washington and Allegany Avenues jtj
j|i Towson, Md. iji
|r] Office Hours ]h
Daily, from 9A. M. to SP. M. jfj
jfl C. &P. Phone, Towson 181—R i-j
City Vespers. <
(Edith Wyatt, in Collier’s.) i
Come home, my child, come home. The fogs
are falling:
Along the blue-walled street the whistles
calling:
Along the street ten thousand footsteps falling, ’
Through steam and smoke-wreath’s foam.
Bells cry afar: afar the darkness winging. ,
Soars throbbing with the chimes ana whistles 1
ringing, |
The breath of night, the twilight city. Ringing:
Come home, my child, come home.
Lock fast the locks, drop down the shutters
shading.
From shop and counter, counting-house and
trading. |
From dock-yard, stock-yard,derrick, crane, and
lading, I
From caisson, clay, and loam.
Come home, my child, come home, in many
cbording
And rushing voice, the city sings.f rom hoarding.
From spending, grudging, judging, and re- :
cording,
Come home, my child, come home.
Come from disgrace and honor, craft and
scheming, i
From work and shirking come, from deed and
dreaming.
Success and failure where the lights are
streaming
Azure and chrysolite,
i Yellow and crystal, where the mists are falling,
| The yard-bells ringing, engine whistles calling,
j Along the street ten thousand footsteps falling,
Come through the dark-blown night.
| Where tall-piled height and dusky cornice lower
On storied citadel and tall-crowned tower,
; Corner and curb a million arc lights flower
i Full in the twilight air.
i If all the footfalls spoke the destinations
Of ail the dreams of all the generations
I. Upon their way, all shames, all aspirations
Would And their kindred there.
Here steps your fate, my child, your generation
That walks through time to some far consum
mation
Unknown along the blue street’s destination
Through fog and smoke-wreath’s foam.
Here flies your life, for worse or better winging
And pulsing with the bells and whistles ringing.
The heart of night, the full-thronged city
swinging:
Come borne, my child, come home.
Self-Abnegation.
(From the Outlook.)
Nothing could have been more com
plete than the contrast between Susan
Somerset’s old life in her brother’s
! home and the new life in her hus
band’s. It sometimes seemed to her
that the whole thing was incredible,
as if she must have changed places
with her brother, she received from
her husband so exactly the same ser
vices she was used to giving Peter.
She ascribed it to the difference in
theirtraining. Peter had always been
the only man in a New England
household of women, and he expected
as matter of course to be considered
first and waited upon by whatever
petticoated creature happened to be
nearest him.
One by one the aunts had died, the
cousins had married or gone away,
! and Susan and Peter were left alone
| in the big house, so that it fell natur
: ally to Susan’s lot to make up to
Peter for the absence of the others.
She had never thought consciously
of it, taking it as the inevitable
course of nature that everything
should be as Peter wished it, with
no regard for her. Peter did not
like onions, and so she never cooked
them, although she was very fond
of them. Peter did not like the
sun shining in the windows, his eyes
not being very strong, and so the
shutters were always closed, although
to Susan, alone day after day, the
yellow glow would have been a cheer
ing companion. Once in a while,
when Peter was at work in a field far
from the house, she ventured to throw
open the shutters and bask in the
warmth, but she always took pains to
close them before the time for his re
turn, lest he cast one of his sharp
words at her. Peter liked “boiled
dinner,” and they had it always for
Thursday, although Susan disliked the
smell of boiling cabbage so that she
never could eat anything on that day.
Peter took pride in the fire and spirit
of his young horses, and they always
drove to church behind a prancing,
curvetting pair whose antics made the
timid Susan sick with apprehension,
while the staid old farm-horses, whose
quiet jog would have been so inex
pressibly Boothing to her, ate their
hay in the barn.
It must not be supposed for a mo
ment that Susan resented any of this ;
she never once even thought of it, in
her entire devotion to her brother and
in her absorbing desire to do her duty
by him. She accepted the terrors of
the ride to church quite as she ac
cepted the horrors of a thunder-storm
when she found herself alone in the
big house. There was as little
thought in one case as in the other of
rebelling against the inevitable.
It was a perpetual amazement to
her to see how differently her husband
looked at things. During their brief
engagement she had not noticed the
change so much ; but he could sfay
but a short time on his visit East, and
insisted on marrying her and taking
her back to Montana with him. On
the way there Susan was like one in
a dream. Jack was so surprisingly,
so overwhelmingly kind to her ! She
was almost afraid to express a wish,
it met with such an instant compli- 1
anee ; but the whole journey was so 1
new an experience to the untraveled
New England girl that she hardly
realized that any of it was real.
After they had settled down in the
bright new Montana town, in the com
fortable house Jack had bought, and 1
the familiar business of housekeeping
began, the reality of the difference be- i
tween her husband and her brother
was borne in on her. Jack had i
grown up on the frontier among men, i
and it seemed like a daily miracle to i
his superstitious admiration of women
that he had been able to persuade the i
shy and flower-like Vermont girl to i
share his life. He looked at her <
adoringly as she moved about the
pretty rooms, occupied with her care
ful reproduction of New England 1
housekeeping, and felt a passionate 1
desire to think of more services he i
could do her. Her surprise at his 1
kindness touched his tender heart, I
and stirred him to wrath against <
the absent Peter. “Great Scotland ! 1
Your brother mußt be a hog and no
mistake 1” he exclaimed, in the unre
served Montana fashion which Susan i
found so disconcerting.
This was apropos of a conversation i
on the subject of boiled dinner. Su- 1
san had prepared one for him, and he i
enjoyed it vastly, as he did all of her
cooking, although he was disturbed 1
by her eating nothing. Little by lit
tle he extracted from her the confes
sion that it made her sick to cook cab- i
bage. In a fury of indignant tender
ness, he cried out, “Why in thunder
did you cook it, then?’’ And Susan,
as a matter of course, “I thought you
might like it. Peter does, and we
always had it Thursdays.” Jack
jumped up from the table, snatched
the dish of cabbage and bore it out
side to the chicken-yard, where he
scattered it far and wide. On his re
turn he said, with mock roughness,
“If ever I see another bit of cabbage
in this house, I’ll get out my gun and
shoot the dishes off the table.” Later,
as he smoked his pipe on the
veranda, he gave vent to the senti
ment on Peter’s character recorded
above.
After that he took to investigating
his brother-in-law, and was always
discovering new horrors. “Say, a
man like that would get strung up to
the first tree handy if he lived out
here.” This was his final verdict.
At first Susan defended Peter, but so
quickly do ideas change and so rela
tive are all values that she soon fell
into Jack’s way of thinking of him as
some sort of dreadful domestic tyrant,
and remembered her life in West Mil
ton as an experience in purgatory.
All but the climate! The New
England girl, used to fresh mountain
air and frequent rains, pined and
faded in the parching alkali winds of
Montana. Her pretty color left her
and her springy step. She had fre
quent and terrible nervous headaches,
grew listless, and sometimes peevish.
Her husband was in an agony of ap
prehension and remorse, and devoted
himself to her night and day, absent
ing himself from his business to wait
on her and shield her from every care.
In her nervous condition her fear of
thunder-storms increased to a morbid
dread, and at the least cloud in the
sky Jack would close his office, leap
on his horse, always standing ready,
and gallop madly to his house, to be
there and comfort Susan. He tried
in his rough and blundering way to
keep the cares of housekeeping from
her, and often tied an apron about his
big square body and washed the
dishes, taking great pains not to rattle
them and disturb the restless and
fretful woman in the next room.
It was, indeed, in an effort to
achieve the impossible—to secure a
servant in that frontier country—that
he undertook the expedition which
proved fatal to him. He had heard
of a Chinaman, forty miles away, who
was said to know how to cook, and
he had ridden furiously in that di
rection with the determination to
“bring the Chink home if it took a
gun.” No one ever knew what hap
pened—perhaps simply that accident
incredible to Western horsemen, a
fall from horseback ; but his broncho
came back to town with an empty
saddle, and the searching party found
his body lying at the bottom of a
gully.
Susan was completely prostrated
by the blow, and was scarcely con
scious of what was done for her. Of
the funeral, of the long drive to the
railway station, of the interminable
journey back to West Milton, she re
tained only the vaguest impression of
misery. She did not even notice that
when Peter met her at the station it
was with the steady old farm-horses,
or that the shutters throughout the
house were thrown wide open to ad
mit a flood of sunshine.
Peter was shocked to see his sister
so changed and broken. Living
alone had done much to alter his
ideas of things, and all the kindness
and affection lying in the depths of
his nature were stirred to life at the
sight of the pale, languid woman, who
had gone away from him a blooming
girl. Indignation at the West in gen
eral, the arid, blighting West, and at
Jack in particular for taking her there,
glowed in his heart. Moreover, he
was moved by the despairing sorrow
of the widow to try and stand in her
husband’s place. And so it happened
that Susan scarcely realized that
Jack’s boundless devotion was no
longer about hen She was very ill
for a long time, when Peter nursed
her incessantly, learning to know the
absorbing interest of combating ill
ness. Then during her convalescence
she was so weak that he was obliged
to do everything for her. It was quite
as hard in the little New England hill
town to get any “help” as it had been
in Montana, and Peter put to good
use the knowledge of housekeeping
which his solitary life had given him.
He took pride in showing Susan hov/
well he could cook and wash dishes,
and one day he brought in on her
tray a dish of boiled onions—an act
which a white-winged angel could
scarcely have surpassed in disinterest
ed devotion. Susan was suffering
from one of her “nervous spells” at
the time, however, and only noticed
them to remark, fretfully, that there
was too much salt on them.
That little scene came up before
her with remorseless distinctness a
few months later as she stood, hag
gard and anxious, with a crowd of
village women waiting for the news
from a wrecked train on which a num
ber of West Milton men were return
ing from the county fair. “If only
I’d thanked him for the onions !”
she cried aloud again and again,
straining her eyes down the track,
ominously black in a starless night.
No one noticed the grotesque excla
mation, each one being absorbed in
her dismay and woe. Indeed, when
the station-master drew her on one
side, and told her that he had just
heard by telegraph that Peter’s dead
body had been found, there was no
one to support her or go back with
her to the desolate house. The whole
village was desolate and filled with
the sound of weeping. Not a person
felt the impulse or had the strength
to seek out the woman they had
come to know as selfish and self-cen
tered. Those who thought of her
said it was a deliverance for Peter
from the life of ceaseless self-abnega
tion he had led since his sister’s return
from the West.
No one said that more constantly
or more severely than Susan herself
as she sat in the silent rooms of the
big house. Her isolation and the
THE UNION ESTABLISHED 1850
THE NEWS ESTABLISHED 1905
shock of her grief swept away all i
minor considerations, and she faced <
the facts of her life with a vision
wonderfully purified and discerning. ’
She went over to herself the history of i
her relations to Peter, and puzzled
herself sick in the endeavor to see the i
true meaning of them. She remem
bered what he had been before her i
marriage—the thoughtless an d in
credibly selfish recipient of another’s
very life ; and she saw that she had
made him so ; that in her way she
had been as utterly selfish as he, fos
tering every evil quality in him to
feed her own mistaken and self
righteous passion of devotion. She
remembered what he had been since
her return; the boundless wealth of
kindness and entire self-forgetfulness
which her incessant and exacting de
mands had uncovered in him; she
saw again the contrast between her
own fretful and discontented face and
his, glowing for the first time in his
life with the joy of self-sacrifice—and
she wondered at the meaning of hu
man relationships. She realized that
she had made both Peters what they
had been. The first one she had
shut into an intolerable prison of self
seeking while sho reveled in her own
debauch of self-abnegation. The
second she had set free into the joy
ous world of forgetfulness of self and
she discovered to him the inestima
ble pleasure of service.
But her own life ! What that had
been in this second phase! She
thought o f herself with horror.
Drearily she went over and over the
times when she had not thanked
Peter, when she had taken his loving
care, ungratefully, for granted. And
yet, by that very means . . . She sat
lost in a maze of speculations as to
the astonishing ways of this world.
A knock sounded on the door.
After all these days of solitude, she
was startled by a summons from the
outside. Some one tried the handle
and pressed on the locked barrier.
She turned the key, opened the door,
and confronted her brother Peter,
pale, with a bandage about his head,
but alive and in the flesh. He looked
at her with the strange eyes of one
who has gone to the gate of death.
“Here I am, Susy,” he said, with a
little smile that quavered off at the
sight of her shocked and amazed face.
“The doctors thought it was all up
with me, but I guess I’m a pretty
tough nut to crack.” He swayed un
certainly, and put out his hand to the
side of the door. Susan did not stir
to help him, in spite of the wild burst
of joy at seeing him which swept over
her. A feeling deeper even than that
held her motionless. Confusion and
perplexity unutterable looked from
her white face. “Oh! oh!’’ she
cried, “what shall Ido now !” And
she stood gazing at the man, with a
problem centuries old clouding her
eyes.
Three Hundred Years Ago.
(By a 13-year-old pupil in Towson High School.)
“It is 9 o’clock, now, and you must
go to bed. You may read your book
tomorrow, after school.”
“O, bother it! I just hate to go to
bed ; wonder who invented beds, any
way ? I’m sure I wish they’d never
done it,” I exclaimed, as my mother,
for the third time, repeated her usual
9-o’clock command. Like most child
ren of 8, I detested the 9 o’clock
rule.
“It’s just awful, when I had gotten
to a real interesting part of the
book, too.’’
I reluctantly put my book away
and went to bed. The book was
called, “A Little Puritan Maid,” and
from the title you can imagine what
it was like.
The lights burned low and every
object in the room became indistinct.
Slowly the room seem to fade away
and out of the gloom there appeared
a street, or road. It was not the
street on which I lived, for it was nar
row and very crooked.
“I wonder where that road leads,
anyway?” I said to myself.
“I’m going to walk down, just a
little way ; I won’t get lost.”
It was very rough, and rocks were
scattered oyer it
“O, this is awful ; wish they’d fix
this road. It’s dangerous,” I ex
claimed, as I stumped my toe on an
extraordinary large stone.
“O, look at that lady across the
street! She is dressed like Dame
Fisher, in my book. Why, every
one’s staring at me. I wonder what’s
the matter ?”
1 looked down at my reefer. Surely
it was all right. Didn’t Dorothy have
one just like it ?
“Then, maybe it’s my hat. I guess
it’s on crooked,” I continued, to my
self.
I felt all around it. “No, it isn’t
my hat; for a wonder it is on
straight.”
Finally, more people passed, and
to my astonishment they, too, were
dressed like the characters in my
book. I approached a little girl and
said:
“Do you know where this old
rough road leads? If you do, please
tell me.”
“It leads to the village. It is only
a five-minutes’ walk. I am going
there, and if you wish me to I will
show you the way,” answered the
little girl.
“Thanks! Think I'll go. What’s
your name ? Mine’s Jerusha. Funny
name, Isn’t it ?”
“Mine is Mercy.”
“Gee —ee —ee !”
I drew out the forbidden word, as
if to make it last as long as possible.
“I am going to church. Would
you like to go ?”
"You bet I would ! You can call
me ‘Rusha’ if you want,” I added,
graciously.
“What a funny cap you’ve got, and
why do you wear aprons, Mercy ?”
Mercy turned her head and said, “I
am sure Ido not know. I suppose
because mother does.”
“I forgot you were almost three
hundred years behind the timeß,’’ I
j- Consolidated 1909
said byway of apology for my appar
ently pointed question.
When we reached the church it
was nearly full of people. Before the
service was over I "began to get rest
less. Two whole hours more ! How
could I endure it ?
There was a man with a bald head
seated near us. A fly had settled on
his nose. It crawled slowly upward,
and I was hoping it would reach the
bald spot, upon which was reflected
variegated tints from the heavy lat
ticed windows. The fly was about to
begin its ascent of that shining dome;
it was interesting to watch its pro
gress, more so than to listen to the
minister, because he talked in a nasal
tone and drawled out the long, hard
words, which he frequently used, in
a monotonous way.
I told Mercy to watch that fly, but
she looked shocked and said, “Sh!
Sh ! That’s Deacon Elder.”
When I took another look at the
little man a sour-faced lady, who sat
next to me and who wore a pair of
big-rimmed spectacles on the very
tip-end of her nose, pinched me and
told me to be quiet.
‘‘Stop pinching me ! If you do it
again I’ll scream,” I said, in an irrit
able voice, for my arm hurt.
When 2 o’clock came I was the
happiest person in the world. I took
Mercy’s hand and fairly dragged her
outside the church to the forest.
It was autumn and the trees, from
the king of that particular forest to
the smallest and most insignificant
sapling, had arrayed themselves in
their cloaks of brightest scarlet and
gold. Great piles of dead leaves lay
on the ground, where they had been
swirled by the autumn breeze. I
longed to run through them just to
hear them rustle and crackle under
my feet, When I asked Mercy to run
and jump with me she shook her
head sadly and said :
“No, I must not run. Only boys
run.”
I looked at her pityingly. It was
the way Dick looked at me when I
shamefully confessed that I could not
play football.
“Good-bye, I’m going home,” I
called, and in a second I was off, the
leaves rustling merrily under my feet.
Which way was I to go? I could
not remember the way I came. I sat
down on a stone and tried to solve
the problem.
“O, I wish I hadn’t come. I’m not
going to stay here any longer. I hate
it and I’m going home,” I cried, for
when one is 8, one has not much re
gard for one’s grammar.
While I was still groping in my per
plexity as to the right road, I felt a
cold, clammy touch on my bared arm
as it was thrust from the bedclothing.
“O—l—O—why, its Billington !
You darling old dog ! I’m so glad I
didn’t live a couple of hundred years
ago, ain’t you, Billie?”
But if Billington thought so he did
not say it. He just sat there and
blinked his brown eyes and wagged
his brush-like tail.
I dressed and went to school in a
hurry, so I could tell Dorothy and
Dick my dream about Mercy. We
wished that we might meet her just
once again, and this time not in a
dream.
Clouds of Pigeons,
What is said by the owners to be
the largest pigeon farm in the world
is at Los Angeles, Cal. There are
cotes for more than 100,000 of the
birds and every nest is occupied, with
numbers of the birds roosting on out
buildings and in temporary nesting
places.
The birds eat two tons of wheat
each day, says the Technical World,
with large quantities of green stuff
and other foods of which a regular ac
count is not kept, as it is obtained
from surrounding farms in exchange
for fertilizer from the pigeon ranch.
When the birds are disturbed at their
eating they rise from the ground in
huge white clouds, spotted here and
there with patches of blue and rufous
coated pigeons- Of late years the
colored birds have been gradually
weeded out, until now the popula
tion of the place is practically all
made up of snow white birds.
In the nesting season, when the
cotes are full of young and eggs, the
pigeons stay close around the farm,
but at other times of the year they
gather in great white clouds over Grif
fith Park, the largest city park in the '
world. At feeding time they fly about
the three men constantly employed
to care for them, settling on their
shoulders, heads and arms, even try
ing to get into the feed sacks, from
which the wheat is thrown in great
scoopfuls.
The products of the farm, squabs,
young birds and adults, goes entirely
to the large hotels of Los Angeles and
surrounding resorts.
Old Skates, These.
(From the London Globe.)
The English chronicler has record
ed that the youth of London in the
twelfth century understood the art of
flying over the ice like birds in the
air, but the fashion of skating is far
more ancient. An Icelandic saga re
lates how the Norweigian hero Frith
joy not only traced verses upon the"
polished mirror, but also carved the
dear name of Ingebord.
Skates have been discovered near
Spandan in Germany, which those
competent to express an opinion at
tribute to a period of 3,000 years ago.
These skates were made from bones
of horses, figured and perforated to
attach to the sandal. Similar skates
have been found at Moorfields in Fins
bury, and like discoveries have been
made in Berlin in the bed of the Spree.
"Woodman, Spare the Tree.”
(From November Farm Journal.)
Save the beautiful things in nature.
Don’t cut down a shapely pine or
poplar just to see if the axe is sharp ;
and when grubbing out fields, set the
fine, straight hardwood shrubs in
some forest tract for future use.

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