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The Baltimore County union, the Towson news. (Towson, Md.) 1909-1912, November 06, 1909, Image 1

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VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2339.
j —>
You Can Have
BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
All Winter, at Christmas Time, at
Easter Time, also in your Lawns ana
Flower Beds
AT THE FIRST OPENING OF
SPRINGTIME
IF YOU PLANT NOW
BOLGIANO’B FALL BULBS.
Our beautifully illustrated 20-Page
Fall Flower Catalogue will be cheer
fully sent you if you drop us a postal
today.
Ptqnt Now '
Each Doz. 100
Baby Hyacinths... 3c 30c $2.00
Redding Hyacinths 5c 35c 2.65
2d size Hyacinths.. 7c 60c 4.50
Ist size Hyacinths. 9c 90c 6.75
Roman Hyacinths. 6c 65c 4.50
Freesta Bulbs, 2 for 6c 15c 1.00
Early Tulips, mix. 2c 10c 75
May Tulips 3c 25c 2.50
Parrot Tulips 3c 25c 1.50
Double Tulips 2c 15c 90
Narcissus, single... 3c 15c 75
Narcisßus.paper w. 4c 25c 1.25
Jonquils 2c 10c 60
Double Narcissus.. 3c 15c 75
Snow Drops 2c 15c 85
Crocus, mixed 1c 6c 40
Oxalis 2c 10c 60
Easter Lillies 10c *1 00 7.50
Calls Lillies 8c 90c 7 50
Our famous Self-watering Window
Boxes are especially well adapted to
the successful growth of all kinds of
flowering bulbs, plant tubs, flower pots.
Your local merchant can get from us
what Fall Bncs you want. If he does
not sell our Fall Bulbs you can send
your order to us and we will see that
they reach you in perfect condition.
J. BOLGIANO & 80N
Four Generations in the Seed Business
BALTIMORE, Md.
V————
U
i/' ROOFING
THE fact that Amatite needs no
painting makes it the most
economical roofing on the
market.
A roof which requires painting
every couple of years to keep it
tight is an expensive proposition.
If you will stop and figure out the
cost of the paint, you will find it is
frequently more than the roofing;
itself.
Amatite is covered with a real
mineral surface, which makes paint-]
ing absolutely unnecessary.
Anyone can lay Amatite. It re
quires no skilled labor. Nails and
liquid cement which requires no
heating, supplied free with every
roll.
Griffth & Turner Company
Farm and Garden Supplies
Sm, n ,s' c ' st } Baltimore.
J. P. STEINBACH
Maker of
GENTLEMEN’S CLOTHES
PROFESSIONAL ELDG.
CHARLES AND PLEASANT STS.
Hot l I'aoues.
C. A P. TELEPHONE
N. C. HAEFELE & CO.
Gas and Electrical Construction
in all its branches
Up-to-date workmanship and reason
able prices. Let me make an estimate
on installing your home with
GAS or ELECTRICITY
I guarantee entire satisfaction in good
work and fair dealing
Office and Show Room:
Bel Air Road, between Overlea and
Maple Avenues,
Overlea P. 0., Baltimore Co., Md.
JARRETT N. GILBERT
(Successor to BAY and GETTY)
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Grain, Wool and Hay
BOURSE BUILDING, Custom House
Avenue and Water Street
BALTIMORE, - - - MD.
DEAL WITH
REITZE
FOR * BEST® CLOTHES.
We beg to announce the arrival of our
FALL AND WINTER FABRICS, and in
vite your early inspection.
Suits." Wj*.so U P
Specialists on Full Dress Suits... 30.00 up
J. H. Reitze A Son
643 W. Baltimore Street, 2 doors
west of Arch,
Baltimore, Md.
Second National Bank
TOWSON, ZMZd-.
(Nth We Invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies, ■
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, Ac.
A — A
No account too large for us to handle with safety, and none too small II II
J{ J |
Collections Made. Loans Negotiated.
Banking in All Its Branches.
—o—*
4* EVERY POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOR OUR DEPOSITORS. 4*
—IOFPICERSI
THOMAB W. OFFUTT, ELMER J. COOK, l VICE-PREBIDENTB THOS. J. MEADS,
President. Harrison Rider, * Cashier
Thom as W. Offutt. W. Bernard Duke, Henry C. Longnecker,
Elmer J. Cook, wm. A. Lee, Z. Howard Isaac,
Harrison Rider, Chas. H. Knox, Noah E. Offutt.
JOHN I. YELLOTT, W. GILL SMITH, FRANK X. HOOPER.
Feb. 6—ly
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Near Reisterstown Road, Arlington, Md.
O
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
NOW OPEN FOE ZBTXSIHSTIESS
, o— —
Does a general Banking Business in all that is consistent with safe and careful man
agement. The location of onr Bank makes it the most convenient place for a large
number of residents of Baltimore county to transact their financial bnsiness.
During the short time our Bank has been open for business the amount of deposits
has reached a success far In excess of our expectations.
We have a SAVINGS DEPARTMENT and pay interest on money deposited there.
Call and see us and we will explain why It will be to your advantage to open an
account with us.
Prompt attention given to all collection business entrusted to us.
■ '■ 0 >
—:OFFICERS: —
CHAS. T. COCKEY, Jr., JOHN K. CULVER, Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH,
President. HOWARD K. JACKSON, 2d Vice-President. Cashier.
:DIRECTORS:
CHARLES T. COCKEY. Jr., HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT H. McMANNS,
ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON, J. B. WAILES, MAX ROSEN,
JOHN K. CULVER, GEORGE W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND,
J. FRANK SHIPLEV, H. D. EASTMAN. Dec. 26—ly
j! T ONE? #
SLJI=?E~ #
WAY *• i|
< J To have money is to save It. The sure way to save it is by depositing it in a, J
] > responsible bank. Vou will then be exempt from annoyance of having It burn <,
< * holes In yonr pockets, and aside from the fact that your money will be safe J >
<! from theft, the habit of saving tends to tlio establishment of thrift, economy, < ]
] ► discipline and a general understanding of bnsiness principles essential to your < ,
< | success. , *
1 > To those wishing to establish relations with a safe, strong bank, we heartily <,
< | extend onr services. 4 *
i;The Towson National Bank,!;
<; TOWSON, IMIID.
;! directohs.
\ ! JOHN CROWTHER, President; D. H. RICE, Vice-President; \\
i' Col. Walter 8. Franklin, Lewis M. Bacon,
% Hon. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway,
]> Hon. John S. Biddlson, Ernest C. Hatch. %
Emanuel W. Herman, _ , . !►
<] W. 0. ORAUMER, Cashier. I;
< ’ nnnnnnfLfLAAfuvuYAAAArir
INSURE TOUR PROPERTY
—xjsr—
The t Home t Insurance * Company
OF NEW YORK,
Which has for the past twelve years paid every loss In Baltimore County'ft
CASH When Adjusted#
Assets—Twenty-Five Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The “Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHEELER & COLE, Towson. WEIDEMEYER & SHIPLEY, Owings’ Mills,
WM. J. BIDDISON, Raspeburg, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
|’WSee that your Policy is in the “Some.” [Junes-6m
J. J. GEORGE & CO.,
PRODUCE COMMISSION
109 MARKET SPACE,
Near Wholesale Produce Market, :o: BALTIMORE, Md.
Red X Chick Starter, Red X Chick Feed, Red X Poultry Feed,
Red X Dry Mash Feed, and Poultry Supplies.
Peerless Hot-Water System Incubators and Brooders, also the Peerless
Lampless Brooder. Portable Poultry Houses and Hennery Outfits.
Iron Age Potato Diggers. Farm and Garden Implements.
The United States Cream Separators. GET OUR CATALOG.
May 29—6 m
S. K. FENDALL <fc CO.,
TOWSON,
AGENTS FOR ALL KINDS
Farm Machinery and Implements
■nuH~ncED>e”aiinrice ! INTERNATIONAL GASOLINE ENGINES,
JUnIV IICEIf W DUUUIEwi 1 The Beat Engine a farmer or manufactor can buy
Repair Parts for All Machines on Hand.
If we haven’t them we will get them on short notice and can save you money on our full line.
The Hoosier Cora Planter a Specialty.
SOUTHCOMB’S HATS
Wise Heads Wear Them.
109 E„ Baltimore St.,
between c f B l ™ T s fD N K D , LIOHT BTS - BALTIMORE, Md.
Sept. 4-ly
Envelopes i
ENVELOPES 1
ENVELOPES
for Professional and Business Men,
Furnished in large or small lots, with neatlj
printed corners, at a verysmall advance on their
original cost. LARGE STOCK to select from.
OFFICE OF THE UNION.
Deo. 7.—tf. Towson. Md.
J. MAURICE WATKINS & SON,
DKALIRB IB-
Staple, Fancy & Green Groceries
Fruits in season. Fresh and Salt Meats.
Full line of Tobaccos, Foreign and Domestlo
Cigars, Ac.
Bept. 12—ly TOWSON, Md.
#
TOWSON. MD., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1909
I |
WANTED
-
1000 Orders
From your section
FOR
LUMBER and
MILL WORK
COMPO-BOARD.The
great substitute for
Lath and Plaster
J.L.6ILBERT & BRO. LUMBER CO
East Falls & Eastern Aves.
Baltimore, Md.
I
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
We furnish
WATER
anywhere in
BALTIMORE COUNTY
See us before selecting a loca
tion for a suburban home
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
E. SCOn PAYNE CO.
362 and 364 N. Gay St.
Baltimore, Md.
BOTH PHONES:
St. Paul 1228 Courtland 267
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Bar Iron, Steel, Axles, Springs, Shafts,
Spokes, Rims, Hubs, Wheels, Wheel
Material, Horse Shoes, Horse Shoe
Pads, Horse Shoe Nails, Rubber Tires,
Rubber Tire Machines, Rubber Tire
Channels, etc.; Wheelwright Material.
A Full Line of Builders’ Hardware
HEADQUARTERS FOR
FIELD FENCE, LAWN SWIN6S, LAWN
MOWERS, LAWN SPRINKLERS,
At a big reduction. A postal card will
reach us.
E. Scott Payne Co.
362 and 364 North Gay Street,
Baltimore, Md.
GEORGE W. GRAMMER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
WHEELWRIGHT
and COACHMAKER
Builds and Repairs Carriages and
Wagons of all Kinds
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and EMBALMER
Caskets always on hand. First-class
service at moderate price. Carriages
furnished at the lowest prices and satis
faction guaranteed in every particular.
PUTTY HILL, Bel Air Road,
Fullerton Post Office, BaltimoreCo.,Md.
F. COOK
527 YORK ROAD
TOWSON.
DEALER IN
Boots, Shoes and
Rubbers, also Dry
Goods and Notions
SHOE REPAIRInTnEATLY DONE
jtj m
Dr. J. Wm. Harrower U
jtj :
SURGEON DENTIST j||
j[j Washington and Allegany Avenues jtj
Towson, Md. 1-1
$ Office Hours b
jjj Daily, from 9A.M.t05 P. M.
jfj c. &P. Phone, Towson 131-R Iji
- @
Autumn Days.
(From November Farm Journal.)
Beside tall ricks of corn, the weary year
Reclines in ease, and Autumn's generous hand
Has filled her lap with tributes; bright and clear
The berries gleam like gems of Samarcand.
The predatory wasp, where purple globes
Of haws swing pendulous, is sipping wine;
Or, ’mid the grass, with apple-scented robes.
| Still deeper delves the sly woodpecker’s mine.
The filibustering crows and squirrels break
The brooding calm above the fields of corn;
Old furrowed fields a deeper stillness take,
When die the echoes of thq quail’s far horD.
The brier-clad crests reflect the ashen hues
Of tires that burn their grasses to decay;
The oriflammes are drenched in nightly dews.
And beauty fades with each succeeding day.
All things partake the silence; tangled skeins
Of droning gnats forbear a louder cry;
Or where the dark form of the vulture stains.
In circled flight, the autumn-painted sky.
It seems I see some ghost of that fair day.
In golden raiment, wander from beneath
The drifted leaves, and down the distance stray.
As Lear once did upon his cheerless heath.
The Price of Jonathan.
(From Pearson’s Magazine.)
With continuous resounding stamp
and thunderous reverberating rush,
the plain shook under twice five
thousand hoofs. Six cowboys, even
though each was absolutely as one
with his broncho, seemed preposter
ously insufficient to control this heav
ing, bellowing, wildeyed, sharp
pronged, tumultuous herd of beasts.
But with trained skill and experience,
quick eye and wrist, a shout here, a
crack of the whip there, a spurring
hither and thither, the round-up was
progressing steadily, and the coming
morning should find them safe in
Golden Rod valley.
“They’re runnin’ straight enough
so far,” called the foreman, reining
in after a hurried, sidewise scamper.
When he saw which of his aides he
had addressed with inadvertent geni
ality, he frowned, wavered, and had
nearly swung away again. His mouth
hardened and the frown deepened,
darkening his frank face. He twisted
around in the saddle, putting a sinewy
hand on thigh, to face the tall, lean
young fellow who rode nearest. “See
here, Heath,” he said curtly, “the
boys bein’ a little way off, now’s my
chance for a word with you. 1)’ you
know why I picked you to come with
this gang ?”
“Pleasure of my company?” sug
gested the other, with an exasperating
lift of the eyebrow such as few would
have ventured with Dave Burt.
“No, blast you, you know it ain’t.
But first and foremost, I wasn’t goin’
to leave you behind to go ridin’ down
to Talola postoffice, singin’ and
smilin’ and talkin’ your highfalutin’
talk to Annulette Stubbs. She’s
wearin’ my ring; and I allow no man
to interfere with me.’’
“Very considerate of you to let me
know,” said Heath gravely. “But
you see, I generally leave those mat
ters with the lady, and in this case
n
“In this case,” said Dave, in the
deepest tone of a deep voice, “you
mind me ”
“A bit rash, isn’t it,” asked the
college-bred man, “to be so cock
sure?”
“Or else,” went on Dave, breathing
heavily, “we settle it before we go
back to the ranch; and that’s the
second reason you’re with the round
up.”
“Ah?’’ said Heath, always with
irritating coolness, “do we then leave
the cattle to their fate while we
scrap ?”
“No,” replied Dave sternly, “I
don’t desert my duty for either love
or hate. But when the steers are
safe in the valley and we’re goin’
back, we’ll try a shot or two—one of
Che boys bein’ along to see fair.
That’s,’’slowly, “if—you’re—game.”
The last phrase forced a quick color
into the Easterner’s smooth cheek.
“To a finish, if you like, he agreed,
easily.
“That suits me,” said the frowning
ranchman, and pricked to the left,
where some unruly beasts needed
management.
The blood receding from Heath’s
head left it clear again. He looked
after the foreman. “How he rides!”
he thought. “The ease of strength
controlled. What dexterous hand
ling of the cattle! Good-tempered,
usually. The hands all like him.
Fine-looking, too —I never admired
any class athlete as I did him when
he won, in less than a minute, the
steer-roping championship. Might
have put me out of his way before
now by having me fired from the
ranch; but he wouldn’t think that
square. And, now, for sheer tom
foolery, two pretty decent fellows
must look into each other’s revolvers
—and be destroyed, most likely, for
he’s a dead shot and I’m a lair one.
Why the deuce have I enjoyed baiting
him? Not, surely, because of the pin
prick of his calling me ‘tender-foot’
down at Talola! As for his pretty
little flirt of a post-mistress—” he ran
his hand absently into a breast
pocket, touching a photograph there
—“Good Lord! What do I care for
any girl on earth but one! Still a
man with sand can’t let himself be
warned off like that ”
And Dave Burt coming again with
in earshot, he was perversely im
pelled to lift up his voice and troll
out flippant words set to a melody
better than they deserved. The
foreman raged, remembering, as was
intended, Annulette’s mirth in her
little Talola office at the pretended
application to herself of this same
“Lay of the Fourth-Class Post-mas
ter,” Sang Heath, high and clear:
“I calculate, from wbat they say. that every
critter feels . , . . .
I ought to stay there, day and night, and go
without my meals.
I cannot be a lark by day, and be an owl by
And blamed if I can take a stone and dull my
appetite.”
A hasty detour of the foreman
brought him back to hear :
“They think I read the postal cards if secrets
trickle out, _ „ „
They think that I’m the guilty one and flail me
good and stout.
And if a letter doesn’t come as quick’s they
think It ought,
They intimate I’ve eaten it, with loud and
scornful snort.’’
“Here, broke in Dave roughly,
“you maybe don’t see those clouds
gathering. Ride around and tell the
boys we want to camp before the
storm. We’ve got to hustle through
the pass.” Heath made off, his
voice repeating, “With loud and
scornful snort —with loud and scorn
ful snort—” until he disappeared.
Very soon all furious thought of
song and singer was swallowed up in
the foreman’s mind by anxiety; for it
grew dark much faster than the end
of day warranted, and an ominous
muttering made itself heard overhead.
Not he alone, but every man in the
outfit bent every effort for the next
hour toward getting the herd through
the pass. Pounding, lowing, rearing
and pitching, locking and unlocking
horns, the animals trooped and
crowded through, with such a pillar
of dust rising over them as went by
day with the Israelites of old. Not
until they poured through the farthest
opening, and broke and widened out
in places over the plain beyond, did
Dave Burt breathe freely.
“Halt here,” he ordered, “and
camp, Sage Brush Mesa’s a little
too high up to wander on in the dark.
I guess we’re all ready for supper.”
But not with his usual plainsman’s
hearty content did he sup; for, still
possessed by the demon of mockery,
Heath over coffee-pot and frying pan
kept humming:
“I’m at work for Uncle Sam,
And a man must be a lamb.
For tu run a fourth class office without getting
so's to dam-
Age his soul beyond repair.
For the things I have to bear
Are tough enough, by Judy, for to make a
deacon swear.”
The men, after supper, relaxed
into rough banter, and sucked at
short pipe or long cigar, while Heath
broke out reflectively, now and then,
with “Tough enough, by Judy, for to
make a deacon swear.” On high,
the storm lowered and drew itself to
gether, and growled and spat. The
cattle in the darkness began to moan
nervously and push one another.
Then, in an instant, came a great
blast of wind from the mountain-tops.
The foreman sped toward the teth
ered bronchos, calling, “Mount all,
as quick as you can. We’ll have hell
with the beasts.” Riding, they went
’round and about, watching the un
easy, excited steers; the wind paused
for an interval and in it there fell
upon Burt’s tense ear the chanted
words:
“I cannot be a lark by day, and au owl by night.”
“But you can always be a fool !”
shouted the enraged foreman, “Shut
up, you infernal idiot! Is this the
time for a song and dance ?”
“How dare you!” raged Heath in
turn. “You great, hulking brute!
You’re not fit to be a target for a gen
tleman!” A long, jagged streak of
lightning split the black dome above;
again and again it flared, followed by
an appalling crash, whose roar the
mountain recesses gave back con
tinuously.
“They’re off!” yelled the ranchman.
“To the front! To the front!” and,
followed by Heath, he dashed around
the flank of the stampeding herd,
circling to the front in desperate at
tempt to turn the maddened steers,
now headed north. Less than ten
miles that way, Sage Brush Mesa
ended in a sudden drop of three hun
dred feet. With yells and whoops
and pistol-shots the cowboys vainly
tried to check the rushing mass of
horns and hoofs, or to swing them
eastward. The foreman, well in the
van, shouting, wheeling, flying, firing,
exhausted every effort; then suddenly
his horse slipped and, his foot in a
gopher hole, went down in a heap
with a broken leg. Heath’s broncho,
close behind, stumbled over the
leader’s horse and fell also, crashing
and rolling, then scrambled up and
was off, leaving his rider still and un
conscious. Burt’s horse was useless.
A swift flash of lightning showed
him how impossible was escape by
either side, for the resistless, deadly
rush of tumbling, wild-eyed beasts
reached a hundred feet each way.
“God!” breathed the big ranchman
between his teeth, and perhaps it was
acceptable as a prayer. First his
own, and then Heath’s, revolver he
snatched and emptied into the centre
of the on-coming herd, cutting an
opening in front. Then he drew
Heath’s inert figure over his shoulder
and awaited his chance. As one of
the foremost steers passed close, he
sprang alongside, swung Heath across
its broad back and leaped astride.
The frightened creature bounded and
plunged; but with legs tightened and
spurs driven well in, Burt held on.
Bellowing, pricked with pain and
rage and terror, the animal, in spite
of its double load, kept well ahead
and, veering gradually to the right in
its wild race, carried its riders at last
out of the path of death.
When later the cowboys turned the
cattle on the yery brink of the can
yon and rode back in search of the
missing men, they found both lying
unconscious on the ground near the
panting, exhausted, blood-covered
steer.
A week from that night, in a cot up
at Windy Row, when Heath opened
his eyes and let them wander vaguely
about the strange surroundings, they
fell on the bronzed face of Dave Burt.
“How did I get here?” queried
Heath.
“Shut up, at once,” answered the
foreman, “you ain’t to talk.”
The words sounded familiar, but
the tone did not, and Heath went to
sleep again.
“He’s starting for Talola on this
train,” replied the doctor to his chief
patient’s inquiry for Burt one day.
“Couldn’t let him ride yet, on a
horse, you know. Pretty well
knocked up himself, and ligament
strained.”
“Can’t I go too?”
“Ye-s. You’re a bit weak, though,
and must be careful with the arm.”
The ranchers had the primitive
little car to themselves, and as the
train moved off, Heath left his place
and seated himself opposite the fore
man. Burt winced. “That there
settlement ain’t off, unless you wish
it,” he said forbiddingly.
“Was it for that you saved me?
Why.” said Heath, with a smile such
THE UNION ESTABLISHED
THE NEWS ESTABLISHED 190.-5 |
as he might have given a woman,
“you would never kill me now, and
you know it! As for me ” he
drew a photograph from his breast
pocket—“l have told no one else in
the world ; but here is the only girl I
should be willing to die for.’’
The foreman looked long at the
pictured face. “Worth dyin’ for ; or
livin’ for, sure,” he said.
The train slowed down at the sta
tion. Drawn up in line on their
horses was the entire outfit from the
ranch. When Burt reluctantly ap
peared on the platform cheers for
“Old Dave” swept over Talola, under
cover of which a cow-puncher spurred
near Heath to say, “You’d best break
the news that his girl’s gone back on
him. Went down to her sister’s to
get married, and cornin’ in presently
on the up-train. It’s a damn shame !”
A train came puffing in, and from
its single passenger-car came forth the
Talola post-mistress followed by a
lanky, light-haired, loud-talking
youth. The girl, with eyes and
cheeks aflame, looked startlingly
pretty. At sight of Dave Burt she
stopped, then came on with a little
toss of the head and a resumption of
her habitual coquetry.
“Why, this is quite a surprise, Mr.
Burt! You chose to stay away so
long—not much hurt, either, I heard
—that—that I thought you were nev
er cornin’ back. You—you certainly
didn’t hurry any on my account!”
Heath need have felt no apprehen
sion, for the big ranchman’s touch on
his belt was purely accidental. He
stood still, as though stunned for a
moment, then drew a long breath, as
he had in the dark that night on the
mesa. “No. No, I didn’t huiry
back, Annulette,” he said gently. “I
didn’t know there was any call ”
His eyes traveled to the bridegroom.
“Let’s see. Don’t I remember you
somewhere ? Oh, yes, they had you
locked up once at Windy Row for
bein’ found on the highway with a
suspicious lot of shootin’ irons and
things. Found out afterward that
you were as harmless as you looked.
Your folks advertised for you. Had
just been a-readin’ dime novels and
goin’ to Wild West shows till they
went to your head, and you’d run
away from home to be a stage-robber
and a‘bad man,’ Good Lord !” He
broke into a short laugh, more pain
ful to Heath than a groan would have
been. “How old are you ?”
“None of your ’’began the boy,
and changed it to a reluctant—’’eigh
teen.”
“And she’s twenty-one. Well,”
laying a hand on the bridegroom’s
shoulder, “don’t you be afraid, son
ny.” A crimson flush burned under
the youth’s freckles. “You just be
have yourself and be good to her, and
I’ll take care of you.”
But Heath saw a contraction of
pain across his face, which seemed
suddenly gray and haggard. He re
membered all the ranchers’ stories of
the foreman’s devotion, lavish and
single-hearted, to this girl, and an old
phrase went through his mind: “I
am distressed for thee, my brother !’’
yet he dared offer no comfort. Then
he turned and faced the ranchman.
“If you hadn’t saved me on the mesa
and nursed me afterward,” he said,
“this might not have happened. You
will not let me thank you ; but what
you did remains with me, and such
as I am, Dave Burt, I am yours.”
The two men looked steadily and
deeply into each others eyes. Then
Burt stretched out a hand and took
the other’s into his. “It’s worth the
price,” he said simply ; and the souls
of these two were knit together.
Took Her at Her Word.
(From the Milwaukee Journal.)
A woman came into the general
store with a jar of butter. She de
sired to exchange it for another jar of
butter. In churning her butter she
had discovered a mouse in the churn.
“It didn’t injure the butter,” she
said to the store keeper, “and to any
one who did not know the circum
stance it would taste all right.”
“Taking the woman at her word,
the merchant carried her jar into the
back room, transferred her butter to
another jar, and the gratified customer
took back her mouse butter with a
thousand thanks for the accommo
dation.
There is a great deal of needless
trouble in the world on account of
squeamish sentiment.
He Explained.
(From the American Veterinary Review.)
At a school one day a teacher, hav
ing asked most of his pupils the dif
ference between an island and a pen
insula without receivinga satisfactory
answer, came to the last boy.
“I can explain it, sir,” said the
bright youth. “First get two glasses.
Fill one with water and the other with
milk. Then catch a fly and place it
in the glass of water. That fly is an
island, because he is entirely sur
rounded by water. But now place
the fly in the glass of milk, and it
will be a peninsula, because it is near
ly surrounded by water.”
The boy went to the top of the
class.
A Double-sided Hole.
(From the Argonaut)
The latest story of German “thrift”
is told at the expense of the proprie
tor of a circulating library, who
charged for the wear and tear suffered
by his books at the hands of his pa
trons. One volume came back to his
scrunity. “See here, - ’ he exclaimed,
“there is a hole on page nineteen of
my beautiful book. And see here,”
he went on, turning over
“there is another one on pa££*hventy.”
The Saturday Evening Post de
scribes a young lady who was so ar
tistic that one day when one of her
peekaboo shirtwaists she had made
herself fell into the pianola they
played two Beethoven rhapsodies
with it before they discovered their
mistake.
Oonsoliclatetl 1909
A Memory.
(Written for The Union-News.)
October was well on the ebb and
was fast slipping into its twin month
of November. A ceaseless rain had
been falling for several hours, which
kept up a continual patter on the
window panes. But there was a rift
in the clouds and only an occasional
dash occurred at intervals, which
made tiny rivulets as they trickled
down the sash and disappeared over
the heavy stone sill. The gutters at
the curbs, which had run flush for
several hours, showed their clean stone
flagging, and the brilliant colored
leaves in the park-like plot in the
heart of the city were sodden and
drenched in the tangled grass, and
had not been raked together by the
keeper of the park. Groups of hardier
flowers were making a show of color
here and there and laughing at the
leaden skies, making a brave pretense
of perpetual summer.
Across the street at a second-story
window a white face, which spoke of
weeks of suffering and confinement,
was pressed against the pane in an
endeavor to catch a break in the low,
swiftly-flying clouds which had begun
to tarnish the east with a golden glow.
How the Man envied the glow of
health in the ruddy cheeks and the
quick, elastic step of the passersby !
This little spot of greenness, hidden
away in the heart of the city like some
gladsome oasis in a parched desert,
furnished the Man with many hours’
enjoyment as he watched the busy
throng pass beneath the grateful shade
of maple and linden. The little chil
dren were an inspiration as they
played about this bit of countryside
far removed from its kindred of open
field and wooded hillside. He caught
a new vision of life as their childish
laughter rose above the noise of toil
and traffic in the busy street and
floated into his room. It was grate
ful and pleasant to his ears and lulled
his impatience with soothing effect.
Far down the street a lumbering ob
ject, drawn by two husky-looking
chaps, was seen approaching over the
uneven cobblestones and ruts in the
street bed, careening like a vessel in
a strong wind. The two men came
to a halt directly beneath the Man’s
window ; a handle was put in motion,
and as “Annie Laurie” floated out
upon the clear October air the sweet
melody thrilled the Man and a tear
trickled down his cheek and splashed
against his wan hands. The old
familiar strain carried him back to
his early haunts in the country village,
years before he began the battle for
wealth and fame in the city’s crowded
throng, It was to him the memory
of a summertime, musical with bird
songs, golden with sunshine, and fra
grant with the breath of bloom and
flowers; he saw a long lane, the
fences of which were festooned with
fragrant honeysuckle and wild rose,
crossed by a shallow brook of crystal
water. As the street musician
switched off into a rollicking air it
brought the Man back from his day
dreaming. The tune set the feet of
the street urchins in motion and an
impromptu quadrille was formed and
carried through with the precision of
skilled dancers. The Man’s tears
were replaced by smiles. After the
hat had gathered in a supply of pen
nies the two men and their lumber
ing instrument disappeared down the
street to repeat their repertoire to a
new audience. Up the street at a
brisk pace came a husky young chap
to his day’s labor. Evidently he had
stored away in his makeup consider
able musical talent. He was whist
ling “You’ll Remember Me.” The
notes were low and sweet, like those
made by a skilful performer on a low
pitched fife as he draws, with his fin
gertips, silvery notes from out their
little cavernous depths. The Man
pressed his face against the pane and
gave a sigh as the whistler passed up
the street and beyond his range of
vision. So engrossed had hapbeen
with the entrancing strain that ne had
not noticed the nurse who had en
tered noiselessly and held out to him
his medicine on a silver tray.
High Priced Horseshoeing.
(From the Philadelphia Times.)
Gen. St. Clair Mulholland, veteran
and historian of the Civil War, tells an
incident showing the utter worthless
ness of Confederate paper money at
the close of the war.
“Shortly after Lee’s surrender,”
says the General, “I was a short dis
tance from Richmond. The Confed
erate soldiers were going home to be
come men of peace again and were
thinking about their farms.
“One had a lame, broken down
horse, which he viewed with pride.
‘Wish I had him, Jim,’ said the other,
‘What’ll you take for him ? I’ll give
you $20,000 for him.”
“ ‘No,’ said Jim.
“ ‘Give you $50,000.’
“ ‘No,’ said Jim.
“‘Give you $100,000,’ his friend
said.
“ ‘Not much,’ replied Jim. ‘I just
gave $120,000 to have him shod.’”
A Spendthrift.
(From the Literary Digest.)
Publican—“ And how do you like
being married, John?”
John— “ Don't like it at all.”
“Why, what’s the matter wi’ she,
John?”
“Well, first thing in the morning
it’s money ; when I goes ’ome to my
dinner it’s money again, and at sup
per it’s the same. Nothing but mon
ey, money, money 1”
“Well, I never ! What do she do
wi’ all that money?”
“I dunno- I ain’t given her any
yet.”
The Best Insurance.
(From the Farm Journal.)
There are life insurance, fire insur
ance,storm insurance and stock insur
ance, all of them good enough so far
as they go, but none of them quite
equal to the industry that insures
against unhappiness and want in
old age.

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