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The Baltimore County union, the Towson news. (Towson, Md.) 1909-1912, December 04, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065091/1909-12-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE towson news "tj
VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2343
SBUscellanccmß.
- ™
You Can Have
BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
All Winter, at Christmas Time, at
Raater Time, alao In your Lawns and
Flower Beds
AT THE FIRST OPENING OF
BPHINGTIME
IF TOU PLANT NOW
BOLGIANO’B FALL BULBS.
Our beautifully Illustrated 20-Page
Fall Flower Catalogue will be cheer
fully sent you if you drop us a postal
today.
Plant Mw
Each Doz. 100
Baby Hyacinths... 3c 30c $2.00
Bedding Hyacinths 5c 35c 2.65
2d size Hyacinths.. 7c 60c 4.50
Ist size Hyacinths. 9c 90c 6.75
Roman Hyacinths. 6c 65c 4.50
Freeaia Bulbs, 2 for 6c 15c 1.00
Early Tulips, ml*. 2c 10c 75
May Tulips 3c 25c 2.50
Parrot Tulips 3c 25c 1.50
Double Tulips 2c 15c 90
Narcissus, single... 3c 15c 75
Narcissus.paper w. 4c 25c 1.25
Jonquils 2c 10c 60
Doable Narcissus.. 3c 15c 75
Bnow Drops 2c 150 86
Crocus, mixed 1c 6c 40
Oxalis 2c 10c 60
Easter Lillies 10c SI.OO 7.50
Calls Lillies 8c 90c 7.60
Our famous Self-watering Window
Boxes are especially well adapted to
the successful growth of all kinds of
flowering bulbs, plant tubs, flower pots.
Your local merchant can get from us
what Fall Bnis you want. If he does
not sell our Fall Bulbs you can send
Sour order to us and we will see that
key reach you in perfect condition.
J. BOLGIANO St, SON
Four Generations in the Seed Business
BALTIMORE. Md.
V————^
1
' >— Jfl
.L
'T'HE fact that Amatite needs no
X painting makes it the most
economical roofing on the
market.
A roof which requires painting
every couple of years to keep it
tight is an expensive proposition.
It you will stop and figure out the
cost of the paint, you will find it is
frequently more than the roofing!
Amatite is covered with a real
mineral surf ace, .which makes paint*]
ing absolutely unnecessary. '
Anyone can lay Amatite. It reJj
quires no skilled labor. Nails and
liquid cement which requires no
heating, supplied free with every,
roll.
Griffth & Turner Company
Farm and Garden Supplies
SSXSff- st } Baltimore.
J. P. STEIN BACH
Maker ct
GENTLEMEN’S CLOTHES
PROFESSIONAL ELCG.
CHARLES AND PLEASANT STS.
Bot'i rhemes.
C. A P. TELEPHONE
N. C. HAEFELE & CO.
Gas and Electrical Construction
in all its branches
Up-to-date workmanship and reason
able prices. Let me make an estimate
on installing your home with
GAS or ELECTRICITY
I guarantee entire satisfaction in good
work and fair dealing
Office and Show Room:
Bel Air Road, between Overlea and
Maple Avenues,
Overlea P. 0., Baltimore Go., Md.
JARRETT N. GILBERT
(Successor to BAY and GETTY)
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Grain, Wool and Hay
BOURSE BUILDING, Custom House
Avenue and Water Street
BALTIMORE, - - - MP
DEAL WITH
REITZE
FOR*BEST*CLOTHES.
We beg to announce tbo arrival of our
FALL AND WINTER FABRICB, and in
vite your early Inspection.
Suits.- up
Pants 5-® U P
Specialists on Full Dress Suits... 30.00 up
J. H. Reitze &. Son
643 W. Baltimore Street, 2 doors
west of Arch,
Baltimore, Md.
Second National Bank
TOWSON, Md.
• We Invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies,
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, Ac.
A —f|\
H No account too large for us to handle with safety, and none too small |l ■
to receive our most careful consideration.
II / {
' x Collections Made. *3# Loans Negotiated.
Banking in All Its Branches.
| EVERY POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOB OCR DEPOSITORS.
-I OFFIOHRSI
THOMAB W. OFFUTT, ELMER J. COOK, l VIOE-PRESIDENTS. THOB. 4. MEADS,
President. Harrison Rider, 1 Cashier.
Thomas w. offutt. . W. Bernard Duke, Henry C. Lononecker,
Elmer J. Cook, Wm. A. Lee, Z. Howard Isaao,
Harrison Rider, Chas. H. Knox, Noah E. Offutt,
JOHN I. YELLOTT, W. GILL SMITH, FRANK X. HOOPER.
21" Feb. 6—lv
|! #
SURE *
* i;
i [ To have money Is to save It. The sure way to save It Is by depositing It In a
' > responsible bank. Yon will then be exempt from annoyance of having it barn < ,
, 1 holes in yonr pockets, and aside from the fact that your money will he safe t '
< | from theft, the habit of saving tends to the establishment of thrift, economy, , [
| discipline and a general understanding of business principles essential to yonr J ,
< ; success. < *
] i To those wishing to establish relations with a safe, strong bank, we heartily < ,
< | extend oar services. < ’
|;The Towson National Bank,:;
TOWSON, IMIID- \\
DIHUCTOHB. !
JOHN CROWTHER, President; D. H. RICE, Vice-President; < \
<' Col. Walter S. Franklin, Lewis M. Bacon, ; >
<; Hon. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway, \
; - Hon. John 8. Blddlson, Ernest C. Hatch. ;,
(f Emanuel W. Herman, „ _ . 1'
W. 0. ORAUMER, Cashier. ,;
< ..................fLnJtAAirftAAAAAAAAAAAAAFU ’
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
.'BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Heir Reisterstown Road, ARLINGTON, Md.
. , , a
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
■ ' 9 B——
NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS.
■ <.-B—■—*
Does a general Banking Business in all that is consistent with safe and careful man
agement. The location of our Bank makes It the most convenient plaee for a large
number of residents of Baltimore connty to transact their financial bnsiness.
Daring the short time onr Bank has been open for business the amount of deposits
has reached a success far In excess of onr expectations.
We have a SAVINGS DEPARTMENT and pay Interest on money deposited there.
Call and see ns and we will explain why it will he to yonr advantage to open an
account with ns. .
Prompt attention given to all collection bnsiness entrusted to ns.
. s 0 *
—: OFFICERS: —
CHAS. T. COCKEY, Jr., JOHN K. CULVER, Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH,
President. HOWARD E. JACKBON r *d Vice-President. Cashier.
—:DIREOTORB:
CHARLES T. COCKEY, Jr., HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT BLMcMANNS,
ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON, J. B. WAILES, MAX ROSEN, _
JOHN K. CULVER, GEORGE W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND,
J. FRANK SHIPLEY, H. D. EASTMAN. Deo. 26—ly
INSURE YOUR PROPERTY
T3ST
The + Home * Insurance+Company
op rrsw youk,
AS-Which has for the past twelve years paid every loss In Baltimore County-®*
CASH When Adjusted.
Assets-Twenty-Fiye Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The "Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHEELER & COLE, Towson, WEIDEMEYBR St SHIPLEY, Owings’ Mills,
WM. J. BIDDIBON, Raspeburg, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
| yNee that your Policy is in the “Borne.” [June s—Bm
S. K. FENDALL & CO.,
TOWSCDIDT, JS&U-,
AGENTS FOR ALL KINDS
Farm Machinery and Implements
■nuu nccb'c Biicaicc I INTERNATIONAL MINE ENGINES,
lIUIM UEEIt w DUUUIEvi I The Best Engine a farmer or manufaotor can buy
Repair Parts for All Machines on Hand.
If we haven’t them we will get them on short notice and can save you money on our full line.
The Heesier Cora Plants a Specialtj. x'SSr,*"*"
SOUTHCOMB’S HATS
Wise Heads Wear Them.
109 E. Baltimore St.,
BETWEEN CALVERT AND LIGHT STS.. BALTIMORE Md.
(SOUTH SIDE.) „ , , 1 '"'vnt, IVIU.
Sept. 4—ly
BUSICKr’S * CAPD
Formerly Urban’s,
York Road and Pennsylvania Ave.,
Dealer In BONDED "WHISKIES AND IM
PORTED WINES AND BRAN
DIES
prThß best Beer on Draught and in Bottles
and a large Assortment of Imported and Do
mestic Cigars always on band.
ALSO R.
Breeder of Baff Rock
Chickens. Roor
Stock and Eggs for Sale \MEMBEn/
in Season. v
HARRY D. BUSICK, Proprietor.
July 4—ly Towson. Md,
1. MAURICE WATKINS 4 SON.
DBALSBB IN—
Staple, Fancy 4 Green Groceries
Fruits in season. Fresh and Salt Meats.
Full line of Tobaooos, Foreign and Domeetlo
Cigars, Ao.
Sept. 18—ly TOWSON, Md.
’ Geo. W. Kirwan & Co.
13 N. CHARLES STREET-
Between Baltimore and Fayette Streets,
BALTIMORE, Md„
! HABERDASHERS 1^
I SHIRT HAKERS.
SHIRTS TO MEASURE—
I ed special care. All shirts are made on our own
premises and our FIT AND FINISH have made
us well known as a SHIRT HOUSE. If you
have not tried us, do so by ordering a Sample
Shirt.
Cartwright St Warners’ English Unshrinkable
Underwear has been the best for over a hundred
years and will be for a hundred yean to come.
HTBOTH PHONES. [July 10-ly
TO LOAN.
I have on hand TO LOAN ON MORTGAGE
1 SECURITY the followingsuma of moneys2Bo,
E, $530, S7OO. SI,OOO, slj. $1,600, sl,jO. $2,600,
10 and $5,000. Bome of the above will be
ed at 6X per oent.
W. GILL SMITH.
Mob. I.— tf . Towson, Md. 1
TOWSON. MD., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1909
WANTED
1000 Orders
.
From your section
* FOR J*
LUMBER and
MILL WORK
COMPO-BOARD.The
great substitute for
Lath and Plaster
J.L.6ILBERT & BRO. LUMBER CO
East Falls & Eastern Aves.
Baltimore, Md.
The Balto, Co. Water & Elec. Co.
4! 1 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
When you need
WATER
its a long road from
the kitchen to the well
Why not have a faucet in
your kitchen and save
time and worry
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
E. SCOn PAYNE CO.
362 and 364 N. Gay St.
Baltimore, Md.
BOTH PHONES:
St. Paul 1228 Courtland 267
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Bar Iron, Steel, Axles, Springs, Shafts,
Spokes, Rims, Hubs, Wheels, Wheel
Material, Horse Bhoes, Horse Shoe
Pads, Horse Shoe Nails, Rubber Tires,
Rubber Tire Machines, Rubber Tire
Channels, etc.; Wheelwright Material.
A Full Line of Builders' Hardware
HEADQUARTERS FOR
FIELD FENCE, LAWN SWINGS, LAWN
MOWERS, LAWN SPRINKLERS,
At a big reduction. A postal card will
reach us.
E. Scott Payne Co.
362 and 364 North Gay Street,
Baltimore, Md.
If the Egg Sac of the Hen is not supplied
with pure, rich blood, the Embryotic eggs it
contains cannot develop properly. Fairfield’s
Blood Tonic and Egg Producer purifies the
blood and furnishes it with the materials from
which eggs are made. Sold under written
guaranteeby A. M. Weis,Towson; L.Kellum
& Co., 1053 Hillen street, Baltimore; A. H.
Uhler, Reisterstown.
GEORGE W. GRAMMER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
WHEELWRIGHT
and COACHMAKER
Builds and Repairs Carriages and
Wagons of all Kinds
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and EMBALMER
Caskets always on hand. First-class
service at moderate price. Carriages
furnished at the lowest prices and satis
faction guaranteed in every particular.
PUTTY HILL, Bel Air Road,
Fullerton Post Office, BaltimoreCo.,Md.
Yon have been experimenting with the old
fashioned ‘•Cure-all” Condition powder long
enough. It’s time you were using the Modern,
Sensible and Scientific kind, the Fairfield Blood
Tonics. A separate and different Conditioner
for each kind of animal. (Ask for Fairfield’s
Free Book.) Bold under written guarantee by
A. M. Weis, Towson ; L. Kellnm & Co., 1053
Hillen street, Baltimore; A. H. Uhler, Reis
teratown.
F. COOK
527 YORK ROAD
TOWSON.
DEALER IN
Boots, Shoes and
Rubbers, also Dry
Goods and Notions
shoe repairlnbleatly done
Old Hoss.
(Charles C. Jones, in the New York Sun.)
Old hoss, your race is nearly run, *
You’re no account, it’s plain to see;
I reckon I must take my gun
And put you out o’ misery.
That crooked nigh hind leg that you're
Always a-favorizin’ so
Jest won’t admit of any cure—
Old hoss, I ’low you’ll have to go!
I mind when you and me was young.
Come twenty year this next July;
I mind the nights the old moon bung
A golden glory in the sky;
We hitched the ribbons ’round the whip.
My Jane and me, and didn’t care;
’Twas us that needed guardeenship,
’Twas you that exercised it there.
I mind the night my little Jane
Took down with croup—old hoss, I mind
How you went tearin’ through the rain,
The buggy rockin’ on behind;
I've not forgot that two-mile climb
You took without a minute’s loss—
I beard the Doc say, “Just in time!”
Old hoss, I can’t! It ain’t no use
For me to talk o’ killin’ you;
I just can’t give you that abuse.
Account o’ things you used to do.
That leg o’ your’n has run its race.
But right here now is where we jine;
I’ll keep you hobblin’ ’round the place
If I must loan you both o’ mine!
A Primitive Fight With Satan.
(Written for The Union-News.)
It was late afternoon and near the
close of a beautiful November day—
one of those rare days which occur
sometimes between late summer and
early fall—when I crossed a sedge
field thickly studded with briers and
jimson weed, in a secluded bit of
rough, hilly country down in old Vir
ginia near what is generally termed
in that section as the Cross Roads.
There was a tinge of frost in the air as
the sun slowly sank in the west like a
great golden orange behind a bank of
slaty-colored clouds. I hadhada long,
weary tramp through scrub pine,
‘‘ beggar lice, ’’ milk-weed and sumach,
and I was about as tired as my two
dogs which followed at my heels and
which had nosed out every covert and
thicket in search of birds. A short trip
across an abandoned field, and over
a gentle rise lay the old farm house at
which I had put up for a week’s
shooting. As I was about to crawl
from the top rail of an old-time worm
fence upon which I had perched for a
brief spell to rest my weary limbs I
saw an odd figure approaching from a
bend in the road, a full view of which
had been partly screered by a clump
of naked alders- It proved to be an
old colored man, who was moving in
an aimless fashion, and as his feet
moved forward in a shuffling gait they
raised from the sandy road a c’oud of
powdery dust. He was about the
time in life when the proverbial dar
key gives his age as “mos’ er hun’red.”
His face was covered with a gray, kin
ky beard, and between his lips he
held a short-stemmed corn-cob pipe,
much colored by long usage- A short
distance in his wake followed a di
minutive little chap, probably the old
man’s great-grandchild. The sorrows
and perplexities of nearly a hundred
years lay between the couple.
“Evenin’, Boss,” said the old fel
low with a wide flourish of a battered,
rimless hat. His voice was drawling
and childlike in its modulations.
“How-do,” I replied, as the old pa
triarch came to a full halt. He seemed
to have gotten up for a special occas
ion. Seeing an opportunity to learn
a little local history of the place and
knowing the reputed fondness of
some of the colored folks for dealing
out this bit of information, I asked
“uncle” where he might be going at
that time in the evening.
“Why, whar you all been livin’,
Captain ? Hain’t yer heerd o’ de big
times we all’s been havin’ at ’Siir mon
Swamp Mefodis’ Church? Yes-sir
ree bob-ree! ’Tain’t nothin’ been
like hit in dese parts since Cindy and
I tuk up housekeeping’. En cou’se
we done hit regular—jes’ like quality
folks. Yes-sir-ree bob-ree I”
I at once saw that the old man was
preparing for a long and elaborate
explanation. He had a peculiar
fashion of interjecting between his
words a low “uh-huh,” as if he ex
pected his audience to sanction his
utterances of “yes-sir-ree bob-ree!’’
which he accompanied with a know
ing sideways shake of his head.
When I asked for some informa
tion on the subject of the wonderful
doings of which “you all’s” were in
total ignorance, the old fellow said,
with a gleam of satisfaction in his
wrinkled face:
“Well, hitß erbout de big contracted
meetin’ we all’s been havin’, an’
I mought as well mosey right erlong.
Dey’s been a pow’ful ’vival in dese
yere parts, an’ you all mus’ sho’ly uv
heerd uv it.”
When I told him I was a stranger
in these parts and had not heard of
the meeting it caused the old man to
look up with a quizzical air.
‘‘Well, well; now dat jes’ bents
buck! ’Deed hit do. Yes-sir-ree
bob-ree ! Some ob ’em do allow hit
am a sham battle wid some ob dem
converts, do’ dey had a mons’rus time
er gittin’ thro’. ’Deed some on ’em
say dat dem was hard caseß w’at
’xesses ’ligin’ an’ dey’ll be done gone
frum de chu’ch quick’rn molly-cotton
kin git erway frum yer on de jump.
But de Lawd knows, an’ I ’spec’ he
won’t tell. Yes-sir-ree bob-ree!
“Ef you all wants ter heah er pow’-
full sermon, jes’ come ter de meetin’
ternight. Br’er Andronicus Spencer
’ll hev de boys footin’ it ternight,
sho’s yo’s bawn!”
“Where is the church ?” I inquired
■ I had often heard of the exclamatious
! fervor of the colored folks and wished
[ to verify the statements as to the ac
\ curacy of reports.
. ‘ ‘See whar dem ’simmon trees hud
-1 die ..ergether over in de grove ? Well,
hits right dar.”
As I followed the direction indicat
ed by the old man’s finger I saw, a
short distance away, a light-blue curl
of smoke rising straight above the
tops of the tall persimmon trees,
which, when it reached the upper air,
spread out in fan-shape and floated
off and finally dissolved into a filmy
cloud. From the branches of the
trees clusters of topaz globes were
suspended, which had been ripening
in the mellow November sunshine,
and only awaited the nipping frosts
to bring them to perfection and
fill their rich golden Bkins with pulpy
sweetness. In the rear of the charch
was a tangled mass of tall, thorny
green brier and wild grape, knotted
and woven together like a piece of
fabric. From the foot of a spreading
beech nearby a noble spring trickled
over a bed of yellow pebbles, and
upon a stake at the side of the spring
hung a long-necked gourd for the
convenience of thirsty passersby.
Already a number of the congrega
tion had assembled, while others were
straggling down the narrow path from
the main roadway in groups like a
flock of grazing sheep. The worship
pers were made up of all ages and
sexes, but all seemed to be on one
footing as to their standing in the
community. The church was a primi
tive affair, but was fast going to de
cay. A swarm of bees had taken up
their quarters in one end beneath the
gable, while the chickarees had made
a den in another portion of the nar
row confines between ceiling and roof
and scampered about with much
rustling.
Low, hard benches, highly polished
from the constant weaving of the
bodies of the occupants were scat
tered here and there with some at
tempt at order. The floor was un
adorned by any covering, and was
worn by the shuffling of many rough
shod feet, the wearers of which had
frequently been aroused to ardent
fervor by the eloquence of the speaker.
On one side of the building was
an open hearth, with wide, stone
flagging, upon which a light blaze
was burning. As the chunks of the
burning embers were turned a shower
of glowing sparks went soaring up the
yawning black throat like fireflies on
a sultry night in August. The flicker
ing light cast dancing shadows across
the stained ceiling and in the dark
ened recesses of the room. From the
window-frames jutted out rough iron
brackets, the handiwork of a local
smith, which displayed more durabil
ity than beauty, and these held square
tin lamps, which cast a pale, sickly
glare over the assemblage.
The fragrant odor from the burning
pine, which filled the room with in
cense, and the general warmth from
the fire were soothing to my tired
body after the long day’s tramp, and
as I lolled back into one of the hard
benches I scanned and studied tbe
mahogany-colored r aces of the duoky
audience.
There was a low hum and a corres
ponding “sh-sh-sh,” which an
nounced that an important personage
was about to make his appearance,
like that which usually precedes the
arrival of a bridal party previous to
its march up the aisle. Up the un
carpeted strip betweeh the rows of
rough beeches strode Brother An
dronicus Spencer. He was tall and
angclar and was arrayed in a suit of
rusty-black broadcloth ; the coat was
cut “shadbelly,” while the trousers
were fashioned after the style of
broadfalls. The outfit had probably
been worn at some time by one of the
proud scions of a F. F. V. An im
mense watch-chain of heavy work
manship dangled from the lower pock
et of his waistcoat. In one hand he
carried a tall, stove-pipe hat, which
had seen considerable service and
likewise hard usage ; the nap was
frayed and stood out like the fur on
the back of a cat which has been
stroked in the wrong direction. In
the other hand he carried a greasy
backed Bible and a stout hickory cane
ornamented with an antler tip. As
the preacher placed his cane and hat
upon the floor he withdrew from the
depths of his coat-tail’s pocket a pair
of big-rimmed spectacles, the lenses
of which he began to polish with his
flaming red bandana handkerchief.
He lined out a hymn from memory,
which was sung in a high-pitched,
quavering voice by the congregation,
and after a prayer of much unction
Rev- Andronicus Spencer took his
text from Ezekiel and played upon
the feelings of his hearers when he
dwelt upon the dry bones in the val
ley. The discourse was in kind and
followed oat the usual theme of the
White Horse and its Pale Rider. The
speaker labored nnder a stress of
tempestuous delivery and his exer
tions made his face shine like high’y
polished mahogany. In thrilling
tones he made his hearers rock their
bodies to and fro, accompanied by a
constant pat upon the floor from their
heavy brogans when he depicted to
them in figurative speech the tortures
of the lower regions and the glories of
the kingdom of the ransomed. Ever
and anon as his zeal stimulated him
to further effort he stepped from side
to side of the pulpit and vigorously
slapped the Book, turning and peer
ing into the leaves in a nervous fash
ion, and telling what “I John saw.”
Tiie se.’iron was delivered in a sho at,
accompanied by thunderous stamping,
which made the loose boards rattle
and ra’sed a cloud of dust, and when
the speaker sought for a word as a
fitting climax to a telling sentence he
prolonged the preceding tone with
“er-rer.”
The congregation was responsive to
the rising storm. A low hum of ap
proval swept over them, which occas
ionally broke forth in "Lawd help,”
“Uh-huh,” “O-m-m-m ! “Dat’s so !”
“Y-a-sl”
One old fellow who sat near me ap
peared to be nnder deep conviction,
but as yet had made no move to join
those who were already seeking the
light a:ourd the mourners’ bench.
He joined lustily in the singing with
a low, rich, rolling bass, like that of a
pipe organ. His voice was full of
irelody, and if trained would have
made its possessor a fortune.
With renewed vigor Rev. Spencer
returned to the attack. “Y-a-sl de
valley full er dry bores. Sinner, wa’t
yer gwin ter do w’en de jedgment
cum? Dese yere bones a-gwine ter
rise. Y-a-s!”
“Torm,” pointing his finger to one
of the “pillars” on the front row,
“dem bores o’ your’n gwine ter rise
w’en de great day come ?”
“Uh-huh! Y-a-s’r, I’ll be dar.”
“You Aleck, dey’re ’ll be great days
THE UNION ESTABLISHED 1850 i
THE NEWS ESTABLISHED 1005 j
ercomin’ w’en de bones ’gin ter rattle
an’ de bref am blowed on ’em an’ de
jints knit tergedder. Halleluja!
Will you be dar?”
“Y-a-s, sir! Y-a-s, sir!” And
Alec’s promise was voiced from every
part of the little frame building.
“Sis’ Tilly, whar yer gwine ter be?
In de lowlands er sin an’ sorrer, or on
de high plains er C’ristin’ ’sperience ?’’
Sister Tilly shook her two hundred
odd pounds of flesh, and with ve
hement nodding of her plaited kinks
announced her determination to be
present when the day of jubilee should
dawn.
Lapsing into a tone of severity,
Brother Andronicus began to admon
ish his hearers that to gain the eternal
reward more vigilance would be re
quired by those whose daily walk in
life must bear closer inspection
“l ’spec’ dey’re ’ll be mo’ marryin’
an’ mo’ givin’ in marriage in dese
yere parts ob dish yere moral vin’-
yahd ef yo’ all’s ’tends ter fill yer
contrac’s wid ole Gabril. Dese yere
long cou’tships boun’ ter stop, even
ef de cabin am filled wid pick’ninnys.
Y-a-s-’r, dey ’ll hev ter start dey’s
cou’tships over an’ be ’nited in de
bon’s er wedlock, ’cawdin’ to de
Scripters!
“Dey’s ’Lige an’ Solomon an’ Isrel
w’at lay down dere atde Cross Roads
sto’, whar dey keeps de cheep whisky
an’ beer —de debbil’s own tools fo’ to
make no-’count niggahs—er lappin’
up all de suds an’ gin an’ strong drink
dey can lay dey’re han’s on twell
dey’s soused terde gills, J stid o’ bein’
in de ’tater patch and cohn-fiel’-
’Spec’ dey gwine ter put on de shinin’
robes an’ wing dey’re flight to glory ?
N-o-o-o ! M-m-m ! Angel’terial not
made ob sich stuff. ’T ain’t gwine
ter he’p ’em ef dey shouts ‘Amen !’
an’ ‘Bless de King!’ an’ ‘He’p Lawd!’
loud’n ennyboddy else. Sinner, yo’
heah me ! Oh, w’at es sech er sinner
like ?
“You Lazzyrus I Ef yo’ ’spec’ to
lay yo’ head on Abrum’s buzzom,
you’se got ter git dem ugly temper
wrinkles out’n yo’ fuzzy-whiskered
face an’ giro some civil remarks w’en
yo’ am addressed.”
Pausing for a moment or so to re
gain his breath, which had reached
an asthmatic and wheezy tone ar.d
had become exhausted by his violent
denunciation of sin andtberecounting
of the shortcomings of the male por
tion of the elect of his flock, Brother
Andronicus turned his attention to
the female portion of his congrega
tion, which came in for a vigorous
share of the lash- Addressing one of
them who occupied a front seat and
who had been especially loud in giv
ing approval to the speaker’s words,
he said :
“An’ heah’s ole Aun’ Priscilla-
Aun’ Priscilla, wa’t yer tink gwine ter
happen w’6n dem bones an’ jints ’gin
ter rattle ? I reckin’ Aun’ Priscilla
know de bull Bible clear through
from de Gyarden of Eden to de New
Jerus’lum,” continued Brother An
dronicus, with an appreciative look
at the dusky faces before him. “But
I tells yer all dat Scripter’ not gwine
ter save her ef she doan’ quit her
naggin’ Unkle Eph an’ er scoldin’.
Ole debbil-sarpint slick an’ boun’ ter
fool her, same as he done Mudder
Eve w’en he gib her one of dem yaller
pippins.
“Heah’s Sis’ Mandy, too- W’en
she got ’ligin’ she happer ’n de man
w’at done foun’ er gol’ mine. , But
fear w’en de dry bones ’gin ter rattle
hit ’ll give her er heap o’ trubble w’en
dat White Hoss an’ he Pale Rider
come er clompin’ erlong ef she doan’
quit runrin’ ’roun’ tellin’ tales on
oth’r wom’n’s husbun’s’ an’ caus’n
’em ter tell mo’ lies dan ’Nias an’
Sofiry.
“Ann’ Laura, ef yo’ doan’ quit yo’
lallygaggin’ roun’ ’bout oth’r peepul’s
bizness yo’ ’ll sho’ly fall sho’t o’ de
kingdom-cum. W’at yer want ter do
am ter keep yo’ two han's in de wash
tub, an’ w’en de han’s not bizzyin de
wash tub yo’ want to have ’em bizzy
like dat Darcus ooman a-sewin’ but
tons on de trousers of de heathen an’
er makin’ skirts an’ shirt-wais’es fo’
yo’ sisters in Afrika- Yo’ heah muh
proclamat’n ma’am ? Dat grabe
yahd in de valley gwine ter git er big
rustle on hitse f w’en ole Gabril toot
his hohn, an’ yer want ter git ready
ter ’company him.
“De Lawd piomis’ dey’s gwine ter
be no mo’ sickness, no mo’ pain, no
mo’ sorrer, an’ heah set ole Aun’
Caroline wid her knee jints an’ her
ole han’s all crippl’d wid rumatism.
But de King gwine ter make ’em ole
black han’s all rite an’ straiten out de
jints w’en dem dry bones rattle an’
’gin ter hop erbout ef she kep’ de
fa’th. Has yer done hit ?”
Aunt Priscilla gave a low chuckle
of delight and with uplifted arms
and swaying body declared she was
now ready to 1 j‘.ne de shinin’ ahmy
w’en dey cum a-ma’chin’ erlong.”
Turning to his audience and ad
dressing them collectively, Brother
Spencer expatiated at some length
upon the temptations of sin and how
easy it was to fall into the snare of
the tempter.
“Dey’s peepul all erbout yer w’at
am sinners an’ you all done know hit-
Dey’s all er eatin’ at de same table
like de flies on de paper w’ats sot fo’
ter ketch ’em. Dey’re dey are ketched
by dey laigs an’ dey’re wings. Dey
make a mi’ty loud buzz w’en ’nother
one in de trap; but ’tain’t no use,
dey’s held fas’. Erlong come emnther
fly; he think hisse’f so bol’ an’
stronger dan de others ; he buzz little
nearder de paper an’ fust ting ole
sassy fellah kno’ he kotched. ’Tells
yer, trifle wid sharp tools, youse boun’
ter git cut!”
The sermon was finished and
Brother Andronicns called upon one
of the brethren to lead in prayer. In
a faltering voice the petitioner began
and by degrees reached a higher note
as he preceded, and when about half
through with his petition lapsed into
a sing-song tone, which was frequent
ly interrupted by others in giving
voice to their needs- “Lawd, cum
jes’ now in mi’ty power; sarch my
Consolidated 1900
h’art, sarch my brudder’s h’art, earch
my sist’r’s h’art, an’ doan’fergit ter
sarch ole Abe’s h’art. Bring us out’n
de slough o’ nickerty an’ despon’ in
which we all’s been uh-wallern’ for lo
dese many yeahs- Lif’ up yo’ heads,
0 ye gates; an’ be yo’ lif’ed up, ye
everlas’n do’s an’ de King ob glory
shall come in,” continued the suppli
cant in a sublime strain, which thrilled
and inspired his impassioned utter
ances, like the vibrations of harp
strings long after the player has ceased
to thrumb his instrument.
It was at the height of one of these
wild paroxysms that I noiselessly
slipped from the church and made my
way homeward- As I reached the
crest of the hill in the adjoining field
the lights from the windows in the
little church in the swamp gleamed
faintly through the now naked limbs
of the treeß, but the shouts of the pe
titioner and those who had mingled
their voices with his were almost as
distinct as if I had been standing at
the building. A blatant rooster in a
neighboring farm-yard crowed lustily
and was answered with a stentorian
note upon every side- Up from the
creek bottom came the low, melodious
note of a fox hound or beagle giving
tongue as they chased their quarry.
It rose in rippling cadences—faintly
at first and then dying away altogeth
er. It was some time after I had
reached the old farm house and was
about to stretch my tired limbs for a
night’s repose when there came float
ing upon the clear November night
air into my open window the sweet
chorus of “The Gospel Train am
Cornin’ 1”
His Work and Hers.
(From the New York Sun.)
“Now, Will,” said Josephine, “it’s
time you began to get ready.”
“Ready for what?” sighed William.
“Ready for what?”
And he rolled his head against the
back of his chair in a helpless sort of
away that was only equalled by the
degree of languor with which he batted
his eyes.
“Why, we have an engagement to
call on the Olivers,” she answered.
“Come now ! Hurry up 1”
“I’m so tired,’’ he murmured.
And his antics were such that
Josephine was really alarmed, not yet
having found out what a monster of
deceit man is, and she ran to him
and knelt by his chair with an anxious
little cry.
“Poor boy I” she exclaimed, “you
should not work so hard !”
He made a helpless motion such as
a victim at the stake might make
when asked to come to take a walk.
“Ah, that wicked, wicked Wall
Street,” she cried. “Will, I wouldn’t
do it- It isn’t worth it!”
He rolled his head again.
“Will, you mustn’t work so hard !’’
she entreated. “Oh, dear, oh, dear 1
Whatever would become of me if you
had to go to a sanitarium ?”
“Hush,” said William.
“I won’t hush,” she cried. “I am
your wile, and it’s my duty to take
care of you. What’s the matter?’’
He was rubbing the fingers of his
right hand, his expression that of a
man who is undergoing torture
“ Cramped,” he said, “I had 170
letters to sign this afternoon.”
“One hundred and seventy letters!”
she repeated in awe, and, as she lifted
her voice in lamentations again, I
will give a few statistics concerning
Josephine-
When she swept the room that
morning she made 420 motions with
her broom-
When she dusted the bric-a-brac
she drew her dusting cloth backward
and forward 510 times-
She walked in and out of the kitch
en 270 times-
She made three apple pies, and she
cut the apples into 180 pieces-
She also made a cake, and, in mix
ing the latter, she brought her spoon
against the side of the bowl 760
times-
Waen she made the hash she
brought the chopper down 1,500
times.
She washed one of her aprons, rub
bing it up and down the board 180
times-
She ironed for an hour, pushing an
eight-pound sadiron backward and
forward 2,150 times.
For a rest she did a little needle
work, her crochet needle going in and
out 3,470 times
“ One hundred and seventy letters
to sign 1” she wailed ; “170 letters to
sign ! Will, do you want to kill your
self ?”
No Colds in Antarctic Region.
(From tbe Scotsman.)
‘ Lieut- Shackleton tells of a curious
phenomenon of life in the Antarctic
regions- The daily journey is of
course taken under atmospheric con
ditions involving the extremes!, cold.
The danger of what is called “catch
ing cold,” is increased by the fact
that the toil of dragging sledges over
miles of snow and broken ice lands
the workers at the end of the day in a
condition of profuse perspiration-
Nevertheless, during the whole of
their stay in the Antartic regions not
a single one of the adventurers suffer
ed from bodily infirmity ordinarily
following on exposure to extreme
cold- The peculiarity was the more
marked in view of the fact that at the
first port their vessel touched on the
homeward voyage nearly every man,
including the commander, had
catarrh.
Not Permanent Residents.
(Western Christian Advocate.)
“Have you any children?” de
manded the landlord.
“Yes,’’replied the would-be tenant,
solemnly, “six—all in the cemetery.”
“Better there than here,” said the
landlord, consolingly; and proceeded
to execute the desired lease-
In due time the children returned
from the cemetery, whither they had
been sent to play, but it was too late
to annul the contract.

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