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The Baltimore County union, the Towson news. (Towson, Md.) 1909-1912, December 11, 1909, Image 1

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VOL. 60. WHOLE No. 2344
UMLtscellancons.
/ “"I
You Can Have
BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
All Winter, at Christmas, Time, at
Raster Time, also in your Lawns and
Flower Beds
AT THE FIRBT OPENING OF
SPRINGTIME
IF YOU PLANT NOW
BOLGIANO’B FALL BULBS.
Our beautifully illustrated 20-Page
Fall Flower Catalogue will be cheer
fully sent you if you drop us a postal
today.
Plant NSw £
Each Doz. 100
Baby Hyacinths... 8c 30c $2.00
Bedding Hyacinths 5c 35c 2.65
2d size Hyacinths.. 7c 60c 4.60
Ist size Hyacinths. 9c 90c 6.75
Koman Hyacinths. 6c 66c 4.50
Freesia Bulbs, 2 for 5c 15c 1.00
Early Tulips, mix. 2c 10c 75
May Tulips 3c 25c 2.50
Parrot Tulips 3c 25c 1.50
Double Tulips 2c 16c 90
Narcissus, single... 3c 15c 75
Narcissus.paper w. 4c 25c 1.25
Jonquils 2c 10c 60
Double Narcissus.. 3c 15c 75
Snow Drops 2c 150 85
Crocus, mixed lc 6o 40
Oxalis... 2c 10c 60
Easter Lillies 10c SI.OO 7.60
Calla Lillies 8o 90c 7.50
Our famous Self-watering Window
Boxes are especially well adapted to
the successful growth of all kinds of
flowering bulbs, plant tubs, flower pots.
Your local merchant can get from us
wbat Fall Bnr-s you want. If he does
not sell our Fall Bulbs you can send
your order to us and we will see that
they reach you in perfect condition.
J. BOLGIANO A SON
Four Generations in the Seed Business
BALTIMORE, Md.
s———
THE fact that Amatite needs no
painting makes it the most
economical roofing on the]
market.
A roof which requires painting
every couple of years to keep it
tight is an expensive proposition.
It you will stop and figure out the
cost of the paint, you will find it is
frequently more than the roofing)
Amatite is covered with a reat
mineral surface,, which makes paint*]
ing absolutely unnecessary. '
Anyone can lay Amatite. It reSj
quires no skilled labor. Nails and
liquid cement which requires no
heating, supplied free with every,
roll.
Oriffth & Turner Company
Farm and Garden Supplies
>MN. l a£st n st } Baltimore.
J. P. STEINBACH
Maker of
GENTLEMEN’S CLOTHES
PROFESSIONAL BLDG.
CHARLES AND PLEASANT STS.
Both I’honea.
C. A P. TELEPHONE
N. C. HAEFELE & CO.
Gas and Electrical Construction
In all its branches
Up-to-date workmanship and reason
able prices. Let me make an estimate
on installing yonr home with
OAS or ELECTRICITY
I guarantee entire satisfaction in good
work and fair dealing
Office and Show Room:
Bel Air Road, between Overlea and
Maple Avenues,
Overlea P. 0., Baltimore Co., Md.
JARRETT N. GILBERT
(Successor to BAY and GETTY)
GENERAL
COMMISSION MERCHANT
Grain, Wool and Hay
BOURSE BUILDING, Custom House
Avenue and Water Street
BALTIMORE, - - - MD.
DEAL WITH
REITZE
FOR *BEST ® CLOTHES.
We beg to announce the arrival of our
FALL AND WINTER FABRICS, and in
vite your early inspection.
Bults $13.50 up
Pants 5.00 up
Specialists on Full Dress Suits... 30.00 up
J. H. Reitze & Son
643 W. Baltimore Street, 2 doors
west of Arch,
Baltimore, Md.
THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF MARYLAND
BELVEDERE AVENUE,
Near Relsterstown Road, ARLINGTON, Md.
■ O
CAPITAL STOCK, $25,000.
a
NOW OPEN FOB BTJSINBBS.
, . o ■■■—
Does a general Banking Business in nil that Is consistent with safe and esrefnl man
agement. The loeatlon of onr Bank mnkee It the most convenient place for a large
number of residents of Baltimore county to transact their financial bnslness.
Daring the short time onr Bank has been open for bnsinoes the amount of deposits
has reached a sneeees far in exeese of onr expectations.
We have a SAVINGS DEPARTMENT and pay interest on money deposited there.
Call and eee ns and we will explain why It will be to yonr advantage to open an
account with us.
Prompt attention given to all collection business entrusted to us.
, ~,—,0-—:
—: OFFICERS: —
CHAS. T. COCKSY, Jr., JOHN K. CULVER, Ist Vice-President. CHARLES E. SMITH, I
President. HOWARD E. JACKSON, *d Vice-President. Cashier.
—rDIREOTORS:
CHARLES T. COCKEY, Jr„ HOWARD E. JACKSON, ROBERT H. McMANNS,
ARTHUR V. NICHOLSON, J. B. WAILEB, MAX ROSEN,
JOHN KV CULVER, GEORGB W. ALT, H. D. HAMMOND.
J. FRANK SHIPLEY, H. D. EASTMAN. Dec.26-ly
Second National Bank
Md.
IMgl Mg we Invite the accounts of Individuals, Firms, Corporations, Societies, ffiRS
Executors, Administrators, Trustees, Ac.
No account too large for ns to handle with safety, and none too small H I
to receive onr most carefnl consideration.
BI —o— / 1
' Collections Made. Loans Negotiated.
Banking in All Its Branches.
| EVERY POSSIBLE ACCOMMODATION FOB OUR DEPOSITORS. V
—1 OFFICERS i
THOMAB W. OFFUTT, ELMER J. COOK, IVIOE-PREBIDENTB.1 VIOE-PREBIDENTB. THOB. J. MEADB,
President. Harrison Rider, > Cashier,
THOMAB W. OFFUTT, W. BERNARD DUKE, HENRY C. LONGNEOKER,
ELMER J. COOK, WM. A. LEE, Z. HOWARD IBAAO,
Harrison Rider, Chas. H. Knox, Noah E. Offutt,
JOHN I. YELLOTT. W. GILL SMITH, FRANK X. HOOPER.
- Feb. 6—lt
st-jpre: *
# ij
< [ To have money Is to save It. The sure way to save It is by depositing it In a, >
] , responsible bank. Ton will then be exempt from annoyance of having it barn < ]
< ’ holes in yonr pockets, and aside from the fact that yonr money will be safe ] >
i [ from theft, the habit of saving tends to the establishment of thrift, economy, , J
] * discipline and a general understanding of business principles essential to yonr <, j
i | sneeees. , >
] To those wishing to establish relations with a safe, strong hank, we heartUy [
< [ extend onr services. , >
|:The Towson National Bank, i>
TOWSON, MID. ];
j I DIRBOTOHB. j *
; I JOHN CROWTHER, President; D. H. RICE, Vice-President; I
] * Col. Walter 8. Franklin, Lewis M. Bacon, ] >
< ] Hon. J. Fred. C. Talbott, Wilton Creenway, .'
; > Hon. John 8. Blddlson, Ernest C. Hatch. •,
<' Emanuel W. Herman, _ _ __ . . , ►
; W. 0. CJRAUMER, Cashier. !;
] > n n n n n n imnjmrLAArLiVTiVLr
INSURE TOUR PROPERTY
—usr—
The # Home+lnsurance+Comp;
OP AIJUW YORK,
43-Which has for the past twelve years paid every loss in Baltimore County®*
CASH When Adjusted.
Assets—Twenty-Fi¥e Million Dollars. FIRE, LIGHTNING AND WINDSTORM.
The “Home” Writes the Largest Business In Maryland.
REPRESENTED IN BALTIMORE COUNTY BY
WHEELER & COLE, Towson, WEIDEMBYER Sc SHIPLEY, Owlngs’ Mills,
WM. J. BIDDISON, Baspeburg, HOWARD M. GORE, Freeland.
9~Jee that your Policy it in the “Some.” [June 5-6 m
S. K. FENDALL & CO.,
TOWSON, ZMHD-,
AGENTS FOB ALL KINDS -
Farm Machinery and Implements
inuH nEED^miftfti c c I INTERNATIONAL GASOLINE ENGINES,
(lUlln lIC bit O DUUUICd. I The Best Engine a farmer or manufaetor can buy
Repair Parts for All Machines on Hand.
If we haven't them we will get them on short notloe and can save you money on onr full line.
The Hoesier Com Plaster a Specialtr. r r P ,'7£r,
SODTHCOMB’SH ATS
Wise Heads Wear Them.
t
109 E. Baltimore St.,
"*•' BALTIMORE, Md.
Sept. 4-ly
BVSICK’S • CAPB
Formerly Urban’s.
York Road and Pennaylvanla Ave.,
Dealer In BONDED WHISKIES AND IM
PORTED WINES AND BRAN
DIES
par The beat Beer on Draught and in Bottles
and a large Assortment of Imported and Do
mestic Cigars always on hand.
ALSO
Breeder ef Biff Rock
Chickens.
Stock eed Eggs for Sale
in Season.
HARRY D. BUSICK, Proprietor,
July 4—ly Towson. Md,
J. MAURICE WATKINS L SON,
DSALBBB IP-
Staple, Fancy & Green Groceries
Fruits In season. Fresh and Salt Meats.
Full Une of Tobaooos, Foreign and Domestic
Cigars, Ac.
Sept, 18—ly TOWSON, Md.
Geo. W. Kirwan & Co.
18 N. CHARLES STREET-
Between Baltimore and Fayette Streets,
BALTIMORE, Md„
I HAfHEWIASHKBS I
SHIRT JOKERS.
SHIRTS TO MEASURE—^^^rtment
ed special care. All ahirta are made on our own
premises and our FIT AND FINISH have made
ub well known as a SHIRT HOUSE. If you
have not tried us, do so by ordering a Sample
Shirt.
Cartwright A Warners’ English Unshrinkable
Underwear has been the best for over a hundred
years and will be for a hundred years to come.
PHONES. [July 10-ly
TO LOAN.
I have on hand TO LOAN ON MORTGAGE
SECURITY the following aumaof money :—s2so,
$360. $530, S7OOjJM,OOO, $1,200, SIJSOO, $1.8*J2,500,
$3,000 and $5,000. Some of the above will be
loaned at 6X per cent.
W. GILL SMITH.
I Moh. l.—tf. Towson, Md.
TOWSON, MD., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1909.
MULLER* JUYEARLEY
HARNESS,
TRUNKS
AND BAGS
343 North Gay St.,
BALTIMORE, Md.
***<>*******
Christmas Suggestions.
eM*eeeo*e*e**
A HORSE BLANKET, LAP ROBE,
SET OF HARNESS,
WHIPS, SUIT CASE, SATCHEL,
POCKET BOOK,TRUNK.
IS’-WE HAVE A LARGE AND BEAUTIFUL
Of~ASBORTMENT OF THESE GOODS AT
-.REDUCED PRICES *-
FOR HOLIDAY TRADR
IT WILL PAY YOU TO BUY YOUR CHRIS
MAS PRESENTS OF ÜB. V V *•*
ear we pay freight on all orders
•5.00 OR OVER.
B®”CALL EARLY.
EDWARD B. BURNS. FRANK BURNS
JOHN BURNS 7 SONS,
FUNERAL
Dins ill iIIBS,
TOWBON, Md.
C. ft P. Phone—TOWSON. 192-F.
Mcb. 13—ly
TREES, SHRUBS
- —AND
Ornamental Plants.
VEGETABLE PLANTS
IN SEASON.
Bmton Floral and Nursery Co.
RIDER P. 0., Md.
June 20—lv
ROBERT CLARK. A. W. CLARK
LUTHERVILLE
STEAM * LAUNDRY,
ROBERT CLARKi SON, Prop’rs.
NEWLY FITTED THROUGHOUT AND NOW
RBADY FOR BUSINESS.
6ood Work, Moderate Charges
Public patronage respectfully solicited.
GOODS CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED.
C. Sc P. Phone. Mch. 13-ly
R. Q. TAYLOR & CO.
* HATS *
UMBRELLAS,
OANES, HAND BAGS,
STEAMER RUGS.
09- AGENTS FOR
DUNLAP & CO., CHRISTY & CO.,
New-York. London.
f I North Charles Street.
HEAT WORK. PRICES RIGHT.
ANDREW m REMMEL
Wholesale and Retail Manufacturer of
MACHINE AND HANDMADE
-•* HARNESS
Importer and Dealer in
GENERAL HARDWARE. FULL LINE OF
HORBE BLANKETS.
1059 Hillen St., Baltimore, Md
St. Paul-5915.
WM. J. BIDDISON,
FIRE INSURANCE AGENT
Fire, Tornado and Windstorm Poli
cies Issued.
XSTO ASSESSMENT.
—MPMBKNTING—
HOME FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF N. Y.,
Assets $20,000,000.00:
GIRARD FIRE & MARINE INSURANCE CO.
OF PHILA., Assets $2,141,263.79.
Ofllee—Belnlr Road and Maple Avenue.
Raspebnrg P. 0., Baltimore County, Md.
C. Sc P. and Maryland Phones.
W"A share of patronage will be appreciated.
Jan. 2—ly
•FARMS FOR SALE.
Bt. Mary’s Co.—loo acres, plenty buildings.. 1,000
Charles C 0.—340 acres, near railroad 2,100
Bt. Mary’s C 0.—250 acres, IX million ft. pine 3,000
Baltimore C 0.—186 acres. Second district... 3.250
Baltimore C 0.—25 acres, near Timoclum... 3,500
Harford C 0.—92 acres, on railroad, SSOO cash 4 200
Harford C 0.—160 acres. Dairy Farm 4,600
St. Mary’s C 0.—400 acres, on Patuxent 5,000
Baltimore C 0.—143 acres, on N. C. R. B 5.500
Harford C 0.—200 acres, Dairy Farm 6,000
Harford Co.-260 acres, fine dwelling 12,000
J. LBLAND HANNA,
Jan. 23—ly Baltimore, Md.
ESTABLISHED 1876. BOTH PHONES
DANIEL - RIDER,
100 l GREENMOUNT AVENUE,
BALTIMORE, Md..
COMMISSION * MERCHANT
For the Sale of Hay, Grain and Straw.
Orders for Mill Feed, Gluten Feed. Cotton
Seed Meal. Oil Cake Meat. Salt, Ac., will receive
prompt attention. TApl. 3—ly
♦RASPEBORG POULTRY YARDS*
SAtTL D. BARKLEY, 13SK3?!
BLACK MINOBCAB, BARRED
PLYMOUTH ROCK, ROSE
COMB RHODE IBLAND RED.
COCKERELS F S AUE. [Feb. 27—ly
mi 11 r
I GILBERT’S
iiiir
* LUMBER*
Mill
| MILL WORK
COMPO-BOARD, The
great substitute for
Lath and Plaster^
J.L.6ILBERT & BRO. LUMBER CO
East Falls & Eastern Aves.
Baltimore, Md.
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 E. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
When you need
WATER
its a long road from
the kitchen to the well
Why not have a faucet in
your kitchen and save
time and worry
The Balto. Co. Water & Elec. Co.
411 B. Baltimore St.
Both Phones Baltimore
1. SCOU PAYNE CO.
362 and 364 N. Gay St.
Baltimore, Md.
both phones:
St. Paul 1228 Courtland 267
HEADQUARTERS FOR
Bar Iron, Steel, Axles, Springs, Shafts,
Spokes, Rims, Hubs, Wheels, Wheel
Material, Horse Shoes, Horse Shoe
Pads, Horse Shoe Nails, Rubber Tires,
Rubber Tire Machines, Rubber Tire
Channels, etc.; Wheelwright Material.
A Full Line of Builders’ Hardware
HEADQUARTERS FOR
FIELD FENCE, LAWN SWINGS, LAWN
MOWERS, LAWN SPRINKLERS,
At a big reduction. A postal card will
reach us.
E. Scott Payne Co.
362 and 364 North Gay Street,
Baltimore, Md.
Worms and indigestion invariably cause your
horse to be nervous and throw his bead from
side to side continually. Fairfield’s Blood
Tonic for Horses only, fed regularly, perfects
digestion, removes worms and cures most
causes of nervousness. Ask for Fairfield’s Free
Book on Horses. Sold under written guaran
tee by A. M. Weis, Towson; L. Kellum & Co.,
1053 Hillen street, Baltimore; A. H. Uhler,
Reisterstown.
GEORGE W. GRAMMER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
WHEELWRIGHT
and COACHMAKER
Builds and Repairs Carriages and
Wagons of all Kinds
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and EMBALMER
Caskets always on hand. First-class
service at moderate price. Carriages
furnished at the lowest prices and satis
faction guaranteed in every particular.
PUTTY HILL, Bel Air Road,
Fullerton Post Office, BaltimoreCo.,Md.
Fairfield’s Blood Tonic and Egg Producer
makes hens lay better, causes young chicks to
mature earlier and old fowls to fatten quicker,
• by perfecting digestion and enabling fowl to
secure the fall amount of nourishment from
their food. Ask for Fairfield’s New Poultry
Book. Sold under written guarantee by A. M.
Weis, Towson ; L. Kellnm & 00., 1068 Hillen
street, Baltimore; A. H. Uhler, Reisteratown.
F. COOK
527 YORK ROAD
TOWSON.
DEALER IN
Boots, Shoes and
Rubbers, also Dry
Goods and Notions
shoe repairinTneatly done
The Jag of Whiskey.
(From the London Star of July 12, 1792 )
Within these earthen walls confined
The ruin lurks of hnmao kind ;
More mischiefs here united dwell.
And more diseases haunt this cell
Than ever p'agued Egyptian flocks.
Or ever cursed Pandora’s box.
Within these prison walls repose
The seeds of many a bloody ncse.
The chattering tongue, the horrid oath.
The fist for fighting, nothing loath.
The nose with dlemonds glowing red.
The bloated eye. the broken hea l.
Forever fastened be this door—
Confined within, a thousand more
Destructive fiends of hateful shape
E’en now are planning an escape.
Here only by a cork controlled.
And slender walls of earthen mold.
In all the pomp of death, reside
Revenge, that ne’er was satisfied;
The trees that bear the deadly fruit
Of maiming, murder and dispute;
Assaults that innocence assails;
The Images of gloomy jails:
The giddy thought on mischief bent;
The evening hour in folly spent.
All these within this jug appear.
And Jack, the hangman, in the rear!
Thrice happy he, who early taught
By nature, ne’er this poison sought;
He, with purling scream content.
The beverage quaffs that Nature meant;
In reason’s scale his actions weighed.
His spirits want no foreign aid.
Long life is his, in vigor passed.
Existence welcome to the last—
A goring that never yet grew stale:
Such virtues lie in Adam's ale.'
Ordered Up Into Nineveh.
(From Ainslee’s)
The pack train crawled upward
with great labor, for the day was end
ing and there had been eight hours
of work for the mules, with close to
three hundred pounds in the packs-
The beasts were carrying crude ore,
in which the gold nestled, to the great
crushing machines of Nineveh, high
in the Cordilleras of South America,
Silent in the dusk above, the town
lay like a lizard curled about a hot
rock- All was heat, all stillness there,
but the rocky trail rang with the slip
ping and the sliding of the mules.
A woman rode the bell-mare. She
had no saddle, but sat upon a blan
ket cinched about the cross old gray
leader. The woman was not used to
horses, but she had missed the stage,
and she was getting up into Nineveh
—the thing for her to do- She scarcely
felt the blasts of heat in the gloom,
nor heard the words of the crude but
excellent men about her.
She was looking for a man in Nine
veh —a man whom she had once loved
and married. She alone had received
the clue of his hiding place; and it
was her purpose now to bring him
back to the States, to the laws of men,
and to those of God afterward.
The boss packer reined up beside
her on his saddle mule, dismounted,
caught her foot and arm, lifting her
down as easily as a sack of grain.
“Your blanket’s cornin’ apart a bit,
lady,” he said. “The old mare light
ens up in a long hike like this. We
all do- She needs cinchin’again, It’s
only a mile up to the town, but we
don’t want you hurt—after takin’ care
of you all day.”
He chucked her on a freshly folded
blanket. She thanked him—a tired
woman with her heart full of miser
able storms and no dawnings.
Nathan Reeder had made the world
call him a wolf- He had even, at the
last, estranged himself from the wom
an who had loved him, and left her
in shame and poverty. He was
young; a man who had lived beauti
ful and desperate moments in a sin
gle hour. In one of the latter, he had
forged and fled to this American min
ing colony in the Andes. Only the
woman knew where he had gone.
There was a big reward for him. In
the anguish and rebellion of the first
hour, in the pressure of actual hunger,
she had taken a commission from a
detective agency to bring him back-
And so she went up into Nineveh.
It was like a Western mining town,
save for the Spanish touch upon the
meagre buildings, and the white coat
ed natives in the streets, and the ser
vice and the slavery. She found a
house in which there was no bar; but
the bars and the gambling houses
were all about- From across the
street, voices reached her as she sat
in her room that night. At last she
heard his voice, the voice of the man
she wanted. She sat listening, a
mighty beating in her heart.
“Talk as you want, Jim; but there’s
nothing like a sweet woman to go to,
when you’re tired and hungry—not in
the stomach, but in the heart ”
He spoke in a quick, careless way,
which she knew well to mean that he
was desperate unto mania.
“You win, Ji m- The money’s
yours. As I was saying, we’re a lot of
Ishmaelites out here, making beastly
cash. Tell me any good of money
without a lady? Not a lady, but the
lady ? There’s only one for any man
that lives. I murdered the heart of
mine- The money’s yours, again-
You’d better quit, now, because I’ll
get it all back- You’ll have to go a
long way to break this bank. I’m
rancid with money-”
The other answered, but his voice,
though heavier, did not penetrate-
The woman heard her own again :
“When we get money, we import
champagne, Jim. Beer is just as
good- Water is better still. What
kids men are when they are left alone
—babes with toys they tire of, one
after another, and all futile aB hell I
Why, once, Jim, up on the prairies of
the better continent, there was a
morning when a drink of red liquor,
charged with a vitriol that would burn
the nap off your coat sleeve, was
[ worth more to me than anything
, money can buy in Nineveh this night.
And now I’ve got nothing but money,
r and I’ll get yours. Painted paper
• and stamped metal! We need a
\ woman three times a day to keep
* sweet, and then we throw them up-
Look at the men about, Jim—isn’t it
so ? I told you I’d take your money,
Jim, if you kept on !”
There was just the murmur from
the faro outfit for many seconds, and
then a scornful laugh from Nat Reeder
that pierced the way to the woman’s
heart.
“Painted paper and stamped metal
—and I lost my sweetheart and my
soul to get it! You’re a friend of
mine, Jim Smallidge, and may never
learn this leßSon of mine. But if you
ever get the one woman that Mammy
THE UNION ESTABLISHED 1850 i
THE NEWS ESTABLISHED 1905 j
Earth plucked for you, stick to her !
with the last clutch of your hand and
the last twinkle of your brain- The
face of God goes away in a black
cloud if you don’t, and leaves you an
empty tin cup in a desert. That’s
about all from me, Jim- I’m getting
maudlin, but I’ve won again-’’
The woman leaning out of the win
dow knew that his mind was filled
with suicidal horrorp when he talked
that way- She felt his heart calling
for her, and there was something im
perious, something that fought with
her destroying memories-
Though the activities of the faro
outfit went onfor hours, Reeder talked
no more. Words seemed dead within
him—save those which concerned the
blacks and reds of the layout.
The woman couldn’t think of sleep.
She was taking her bread from the
law to bring him in. The man to
make the arrest awaited her call, but
did not know the face of his prey.
She felt that Reeder’s bigness was
still unfettered, though his evil was
abroad ; that his fineness was still
proof against the poison of his baser
actions- And he wanted her bo 1 It
came to her that there is a wolf in
every man, but that some of the
wolves are more daring. His desper
ate need was for her, and for her alone-
And so she listened on, forgetting the
big pains of her body-
When the dawn had not yet come,
but the gray of it was creeping up the
mountains, the game stopped across
the street, and Reeder and others
emerged. She did not find him at
first in the little crowd- The men
moved out and about the street un
steadily to the brief, awful sleep of the
drink-burned, who must face the hor
rid suffering of the coming day. In a
parting of the group at length, Reeder
appeared to her eyes in the light of
the doorway—gambler, forger, hus
band of her early visions. He was
all that a woman could ask, just as
she had seen him first—slender as a
cadet, steady as a man- Smallidge
was with him
“ Jim,” he said, in a quiet, humor
ous tone, which she knew as well as
she knew the house of their honey
moon. “I’m giving you back your
pile. We’ll forget the gambler end
to-night. Besides, I’ve got too much
money—half as much again as when
I left home. It’s between you and
me. The other boys would have lost
their’s to some one else, if not to me.
Another thing—l want you to do a
favor for me. There’s a spring lock
on the door of my room across the
street- Here’s the key. I have a du
plicate- There’ll be some stuff on the
table and full directions what to do
with it. I want you to follow these
directions to the letter. Come back
in an hour, but I won’t be there.
“Where you goin’?” Jim asked,
with interest.
“Just you do as I say, pal. It will
be all right for both you and me.”
“You always were a strange feller,
but I s’pose it’s all right, Nat. I’ll
be there in an hour.”
Reeder ascended the steps of the
hotel under her eyes- She was fasci
nated, but frightened. Could he have
heard from the packers that she had
come, and was going to get away ?
She thought of signaling to the man
who was to arrest him, but her heart
waß signalling to him who had made
her love and hate. The spare,
groomed figure put the thrills of a
maiden into her heart- She rebelled,
but did not call Reeder's enemy.
The gambler walked up the stairs
in a steady, weary way and his every
step added to her intensity. He
passed her own locked door, and en
tered, with a key, the next room. She
could have heard the scratch of his
match through the thin partition, but
it did not come. He sank into a chair
with a sigh.
Utterly tired he was. She knew
that from the last sound ; and, more,
that he was besieged with terrors of
loneliness, self-hate, and passion for
her.
She recalled the delights of the
man in his even days, as well as those
periods of animal emancipation—
which led him into the depths where
the scorpions are; remembered the
tales his friends had told of his cold
and absolute physical courage. All
in a moment, the understanding came
that he had something of that femi
nine element of artists which needs
the courage of another him
over his depressions of spirit. Reed
er, up here in the heart of the Cordil
leras needed the hand and broken
heart of her. She was listening and
thinking in that vague but furious
manner which seems almost to be
above physical consciousness.
At last a match was struck in the
next room ; the chimney of the lamp
lifted and put back. With an almost
psychometric faculty, she sensed the
traveling of his pen for many mo
ments.
He crossed the floor, and opened
his door for a draught of air. The
heat was intense in her own room.
The desire came for one look at her
husband in the lamplight. What
had the months done to his face which
only a wife can read ?
The boards of the floor did not
creak and the lock of her room moved
without sound. She faced the dark
hall for an instant; then saw the
faint bar on the floor from his lamp
Lest her own door swing and creak,
though there was little or no breeze,
. she held it for a second ; then moved
with consummate slowness to the rift
’ of light. Her slippered feet in the
hallway gave no sound.
; • Reeder was sitting by the open
window. Lamplight was upon his
profile. His face was darkened by
i unspeakable suffering, and his eyes
[ turned out upon the distances where
■ moved the ghastliness of a mountain
i dawning. Upon the table under the
lamp was the letter he had written;
[ beside it, a six-shooter and a big leath
r er ponch, stuffed with coins and cur
f rency. . , „,
j “I dare not even write to her, he
l j muttered. “A woman forgives much,
r but not what I have done.”
Consolidated 1900
! She saw it all. His going away, as
he had explained to him Jim Smal
lige, meant the pistol on the table-
She had hoped the letter to be for her;
still, it was better. He was squaring
the forgery, and felt too mean even to
write her!
“There is an end, eventoanangel’s
forgiveness,’’ he added, in a low way,
his eyes lost upon the castellated
peaks. “Good old Jim will get the
money to them and to her. I’m
well, I go out with the new day which
Ido not deserve. It should be night
for a deed of darkness.”
The dull pearl of morning light was
behind him, when Reeder sat sudden
ly erect —the hot lamp between him
and the fascinated eyes in the hall.
“I go out like an outlaw horse,” he
said, “like an outlaw horse that has
dared to pit his strength against the
craft of men. Whipped and lonely, I
take the last trail—but with a prayer
for the lady who loved me once.”
He arose quickly, his face more
calm. The woman’s tongue cleaved
like a reptile to the roof of her mouth.
His hands were steady, as he tightly
fastened, with a thong, the leather
bag containing the money. The
lamplight showed his face ashen, but
there was not a quiver of his lips or
fingers.
The woman, swaying in the hall
way, had never seen Nathan Reeder
with a finer face than was his now.
He was restoring the money of the
forgery and sending her what was left
—“half as much again.’’ He was
taking his life with a bullet and a
prayer for her.
She had come to cause his arrest
and remained to feel the old love
swing back to her heart like a tired
homing to its cote after a long flight.
“God, who loves me not, love that
lady of mine,” he said, with a last
look at the dawn and the mountains,
picking up the six-shooter with a light,
swift hand, and leaning forward to
blow out the lamp.
She fell against the panels with a
quick, wordless cry. His breath had
touched the flame, and the room was
dark, save for the gray in the window,
thegray that wasupon the mountains.
“Nat —I have come!”
His arm, with pistol half raised,
was clear against the outer light. She
caught from his hand the cold metal,
filled with concentrated death. Reeder
stepped, back from her in the thick
dawn dusk, no sound from his lips,
as she sent the pistol flying out of the
window.
“I thought it was all over, Jessie,”
he muttered at laßt, not daring yet to
reach for her hand, “and that you
had met me beyond the pale. ”
She sat by the window in full day
light, and the man was bending down
to her. The great glories of the morn
ing were radiant upon the terrible
peaks. Nineveh was stirring—tired,
poisoned matter stirring from sleep.
Her hands touched the full, fine head.
“Yes, I can love you again, boy o’
mine,” she whispered. “And, when
the express office is open, I will go
and repair with money the error of
that one bad day of yours. A good
name again for my—”
“A good name never, Jessie. Mon
ey will not give that back, but love
from you again—that is all I need.
Love and your sweet, glad face.’’
“All I ask,” she answered, “is a
chance to love on—and on I”
There was a heavy, hurried step in
the hall. Jim Smallidge appeared at
the door- Reeder had arisen and
barred the passage.
“I found I didn t have to go away,
after all, Jim,” he said.
“Then there’s nothin’for me to do,”
said Smallidge. “By the wav, I
picked up this six-shooter down on
the sand by the door. It looks like
yours.” <4
“Thank you,” said Reeder. ‘lt is
mine. I must have dropped it walk
ing across.”
From the far sea the sun came up
brilliantly new, lit the Andes, those
highest mounds of the western world,
as the rays had lit the Himalayas
when it was night here. Returning
from the express office, while Nat
Reeder was giving away his faro lay
out across the street, the woman en
countered the agent who was to ar
rest her man.
“Our criminal does not seem to be
in Nineveh,” she said, in answer to
his expectant look, “and I am giving
up the chase ”
Terrors of the Sea.
A Towsonman and his wife recently
returned from their first trip to Florida
by sea, and on the way down had a
rather rough passage, in which both
suffered greatly from seasickness.
They experienced the same trouble
on their return passage, and in relat
ing their tale of woe to their friends,
the gentleman issued the fiat that
“once was enough for him.” The
wife stated that one day the stewardess
| asked her what she would like to
have in the way of something to
. tempt her appetite, and she replied
that soup would about Buit her, as
| it was the easiest thing to come up.”
This reminds one of the story of
the man who was returning from a
i trip abroad and when the vessel was
; entering New York harbor at night
’ the gentleman was hanging in a limp
! fashion over the rail, when he was
* asked by a friend if he had seen the
’ lights. “No,” groaned the sufferer,
I “but I guess they’ll come next!”
J It Can Do All This.
(From the New York Observer,
i “I am not much of a mathema
-3 tician,” said the cigarette, “but I can
j add to a youth’s nervous troubles, I
B can subtract from his physical energy,
e I can multiply his aches and pains,' I
i can divide his mental powers, I can
B take interest from his work, and dis
. count his chances for success.”
L Sitting around the store stove dis
puting the question of who found the
e North Pole will not contribute a single
i, chunk toward the filling of the ice
house.—Farm Journal.

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