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Czas Baltimorski. (Baltimore, Md.) 1940-194?, November 07, 1940, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065178/1940-11-07/ed-1/seq-6/

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‘•'Cz.-is Tiali iniorski. “ Czwartek. 7-g<> Listopada.
PROGRAM TEATRU
BROAD WAY
ILoretta Young <Ł Melvyn Douglas
‘He Stayed for Breakfast
■ Mikey Rooney
NIEDZIELA. 10-go LISTOPADA and
PONIEDZ., 11-gc LISTOPADA J Judy Garland
WTOREK, 12-go LISTOPADA "
środa. 13-go listopada “Strike Up the Band”
CZWART.. 14-go LISTOPADA i Ritz Brothers and Andrews Sisters
PIĄTEK, 15-go LISTOPADA { m
sobota. i6-go listopada ( “Argentine Nights”
BROADWAY NEAR EASTERN AYE.
On Friday and Saturday 10 P, M. for Late Shoppers!
Sports Centre
Ice Rink
(SZTUCZNE LODOWISKO)
North Ave. & Charles St.
3 Publiczne
Sesje Dziennie
10 A.M. —12:30 P.M.
2:30 P.M. —5 P.M.
8:30 P.M.—ll P.M.
Nasz sklep sportowy* ma na
składzie pełny wybór łyżew
i ekwipunku.
EXTRA! UWAGA!
Ograniczony bilet sezonowy za
darmo z każdym kompletem u
nas kupionym!
TEN KUPON
Upoważnia posiadacza do zniżki na
każdą publiczną sesję.
DZIECI - - - -. 15<*
DOROŚLI 25c
f
Highland Tire
and Battery Service
Joiix n. KTTrm:v. w-imśc.
Korzystaj z naszego
planu budżetowego.
Obsługa drogowa 24-gocłziny.
528 S. CONKLiNG STREET
Wolfe 0027
Finał Election Return—
CALHOUN WINS!
Your USED CAR Representative
BEST BUYS IN BALTIMORE
1933 *
1 CHEVROLET
rr| 1934
§ I & J 1936 TERRAPLANE (PO7C
. / y i Be Sure to See This Car ••
|| * ch 7 ev R o LET $375
-P 1937 STUDEBAKER (PQ7C
*’ w . v f||U S A Wonderful Car ?t) i J
fi liSiP | tizzr $295
1937 PACKARD J^6s
•"" 1939 CHRYSLER $675
'S- 1939 CHEYROLET (Prnr
Drive ft Away
CHEYROLET $475
110 S. BROADWAY
Calhoun Motors, mc.
110 S. BROADWAY at Lombard St. BROADWAY 7123
Zabierz Odraza Samochód z 10-ma Galonami “Gazu” Bezpłatnego!
ll
CZY SIĘ PRZYGOTOWUJECIE 1
NA WIELKIE ZAROBKI? 1
NOWE POSADY
OTWARTE ( ODZIEŃ
Przemysł poszukuje wykwalifiko- M
wanych robotników!
Ucz Się Spawania! |
(WELDING)
A RCH—ACETYLE NE
Specjalne Ćwiczenia do Lotnictwa ||
Zapytaj o “Pay Part After Graduation” H
Plan. Napisz o bezpłatną książeczkę. Wl- =
na obsługa posadowa. Klasy dzienne i wie- ==
WELDING
CALYERTI
TEAINING SCHOOL |
8 E. Mt. Koyal A\e., Nr. Charles St. =
YErnon 1229
"IOSTI.UATES" CHĘTNIE UDZIELAMY
WYKONUJEMY WŁASNE RYSUNKI
ZADOWOLENIE OWARANTOWANE
JAN WARMlŃSKl—Kontraktor i Budowniczy
630 S. CURLEY STREET BALTIMORE, MD.
Telefon: Broadway 5902
Podczas “Shoppingu” na Broadwayu
WSTĄP DO
RESTAURACJI
MARYLAND LUNCH
251 S. BROADWAY “NAPRZECIW LEADER - '
lllllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllltil!!llllllllilllllllllll
CUSKIDN RUBBER HEELS!
STEEL SHfINKS!
LEATHER SOLES!
SM
STURDY
OXFORI)S
1.59
CZARNE LUB BIAŁE
Oxfordy dla każdej ruch
liwej kobiety! Są zgrab
ne, mocne i tak wygod
ne! Rozmiary 4 do 9 i A
dc I) i EKE.
CALL CALYERT 4444 or
MAIL YOUR ORDER
ECONOMY SHOE SHOP
FIFTH FLOOR—THE HUB

6
% SPEAKING OF I
I SPORTS |
| By ROBERT McSHANE S
Rdecced by Western Newspaper Union '>
\\T HEN Ogden U. Milter, new
’ ’ chairman of the athletic coun
cil at Yale, put commercialized big
time football on the pan ho merely
added fuel to an argument which
has been waging for the past 15
years.
Fresh from witnessing Old Eli’s
recent 50 to 7 defeat by Penn. Miller
told the New > ork Football Writers
association that “college athletics
and even school athletics in my
opinion are at a critical stage . . .
football is now reach
ing a peak of emphasis in many col
leges which it reached elsewhere
many years ago.”
The opinion expressed by Miller is
receiving much serious thought from
a majority of those individuals in the
gridiron business. Most of them ad
mit that there is entirely too much
proselyting, recruiting and paying
for good players. Miller's ideas
aren’t new. Robert Hutchins, presi
dent of the University of Chicago—
one of the nation's outstanding edu
cational mills—gave voice to the
same thoughts last year when he
announced that his institution was
withdrawing from football competi
tion in the Big Ten conference.
Two-Sided Question
To be sure, the paying of football
players is not condemned unani
mously. Many ask, “Why shouldn’t
a poor boy w’ho can play football
have his way paid through college—
especially when gate receipts may
total more than $200,000 per game?”
Perhaps the big-time football play
er should be paid, especially if the
college feels that way about it. But
those colleges should play among
themselves. The play-for-pay ath
lete is one of the top-notchers in
his line. Otherwise he wouldn’t be
drawing a salary. But obviously
it is unfair to match a semi-pro
team against a team selected from
a simon-pure student body. That
kind of competition is beneficial to
neither party.
The kind and amount of help giv
en players varies tremendously. The
player may be granted an alumni
“loan” or he may be given a block
of tickets to sell for each game. A
wealthy and influential grad may
get him a summer job at a salary
sufficient to care for expenses dur
ing the academic year.
Tangled Deals
It is no exaggeration to state that
at least two-thirds of the better play
ers belong to the proselyted group,
one way or another. The coach or
the college itself may have had noth
ing to do with the financial deal
ings. Indeed, in many cases they
might be in complete ignorance of
the transactions. The deal may have
been made with the boy or with his
father, neither of whom would be
likely to talk about it.
College football is big time. In
two months it draws far more spec
tators than big league baseball does
in a season three times as long.
Baseball teams can lose dozens of
games and still draw customers.
College teams must w-in consistent
ly to keep the turnstiles clicking.
With so many enormous stadia dot
ting the nation's landscape, it is ob
vious that there are bills to be paid.
Winning football teams can pay
those bills. Hired football players
help insure winning teams.
No college wants to pay its play
ers. And because of that the solu
tion may come automatically. Part
of the answer is in conference sched
ules. The Ivy league stays close to
its own boundaries. The Big Ten
gets around considerably more, but
manages to play colleges with the
same scholastic ranking and a simi
lar code of ethics.
Retaliation
Some colleges have seen fit to re
taliate against the Southeastern con
ference for its realistic attitude on
the problems of recruiting and sub
sidization. Notre Dame, for instance,
is dropping its game with Georgia
Tech next year. Dartmouth can
celed a game with Georgia on the
ground that it could provide no suit
able place to play in late season.
There would be little soiled linen
washed publicly if teams with about
the same scholastic ranking and eth
ics played among themselves. Then,
if one conference believed in the
open subsidization of players, there
would be no one to shriek “unfair.”
By the same token, those schools
completely free from professional
ism would be matched more evenly.
There is little doubt but that con
ference supervisors will exert more
authority in the future. It will be
up to them to see that schools within
their circuit obey both the spirit and
letter of regulations. When that sit
uation arrives, collegiate football no
longer w r ill be subject to the numer
ous attacks now directed against it.
Sport Shorts
Alt' Bauman, Northwestern univer
sity tackle, who played 56 minutes
against Ohio State, came out of the
game weighing 13 pounds less than
when he started . . . The Mar
quette university Hilltoppers, in Mil
waukee, named schafskopf as theii
favorite card game ... A football
record book credits the longest kick
to Al Braga of the University ol
San Francisco —89 yards, in 1937
. . . Bob Friedlund, Michigar
State’s right cud, is a talented pian
ist.
The Sport
Spotlight
l Goniell's Bed Terrors tlalleiied
C.olunihia 27-0 last Saturday. As
nsiial Wall Malnszezak. the Ithiea
quarterback, directed the Suavely
steam miter.
* * *
A gallant Army team battled a
heavily favored Notre Dame ele
ven until the lasi whistle, the
highly touted Irish were in
“Dutch” all afternoon. Steve Juz
wik snared a pass that I lank Ma
zur sent in the general direction
of Seilb, the Gadel end. and am
bled 8.7 yards toa touchdown. Ou
tside ot this fatal slip. Mazur bore
away what honors the West Point
lads salvaged. Ted Lullv.ykowski
played at lull tor pari ot the game.
* * *
Sieve Wozniak, crack swimmer
from Buffalo has been selected
tor the All-American swimming
learn. This is 1 lie second lime the
honor lias been bestowed on him.
Social Security Board
Issuing Statements
of Earnings
Workers making Social Securi
ty payments .can secure state
ments of wage earnings tor 1937.
1938. an (11939. So-called “request
cards” arc ready al all field and
regional offices. By sending in
.this card the worker can secure
complete data regarding his earn
ings tor the above years and 1 1 is
i Social Security benefits.
'l’he Marylands District Office
lot the Social Security Board is
located at add Park Avenue. Ap
plication can also he made al the
Information Office in the Candler
Building, 711 E. Lombard St.
ftuytsweomMtoknow
■MB BI f INOWICM DRAWINGS Of MIIVWtKI
TaBUISKI p /m/:
piANist /L.
CONOUCTOR. composes (U/) jSW ■
: BE-15- THE HEAD OF THE* tJr'
PIANO* DEPARTMENT-iN'TH£* /
CONSERVATORY-OF HG'SIOOr 4 J VYVty/ 1,
KANSAS-CITY* £•■
_ HE HAS VEKH CLOSE- •
\ RELATIONSHIPS- WUH*
/ jj *
When Ignace Jan Paderewski marks
his 80th Anniversary on November 6, 1940.
the occasion will have a special significance
for this Polish pianist, composer, and
conductor, Wiktor Labunski. - Mr. Labun
ski has had the privilege of being per
sonally associated with his eminent fellow
countryman. Labunski said of Paderewski;
“He is as Polish as Chopin or Moniuszko
and, like theirs, his melodic invention
seems inexhaustible.”... With the coming
of the 80th anniversary of Paderewski’s
birthday. Labunski’s message to the music
world is “It is to be hoped that this 8(J!h
birthday of Paderewski will point to an
increased interest in his compositions and
that they will be played more and more
through the year sto come . . . Labun.,Kj is
widely known in the United States as
pianist and soloist, having appeared with
the Minneapolis. Cleveland. Kansas City,
Tulsa and Toronto Symphony orchestras, in
Local Youth Lands With
Naval Reserves in. Cuba
Seumun P. L. Km*, ol 001 S. Pat
terson Park Avenue, is now on
iclivc duly in Cuba. A member ot
he Thin! Division ot the Mary
land Naval Reserves, he arrived at
iiiatonomo Bay, Cuba, on Satur
lay. November 2nd.
Son of Michael Kue, wet! known
business man in East Baltimore,
le was an active member ot Nest
10 ot Ihe Polish Falcons and ot
V.M.C.A.
Leopold Julian Hoick, founder
t the New York Polytechnic In
dilnte. was professor of malhe
nalies at the Fniversilies of \ "u -
4inia and Pennsylvania.
Football Predictions
Cornell Over Yale
Alabama “ Tulane
Army “ Brown
Boston College “ Boston Unlv.
Catholic U “ .'. Tulsa
Ciemson “ Alabama
Colorado “ Missouri
Duke “ Davidson
Fordham . “ Purdue
F. & M “ N. Y. U.
Georgia “ Florida
Georgetown . “ Maryland
Geo. Washington “ Furman
Holy Cross “ Mississippi
Kentucky “ Georgia Tech
L. S. U “ Miss. St.
Lafayette “ Rutgers
Mich. St “ Indiana
Michigan “ Minnesota
Marquette “ Manhattan
Notre Dame “ Navy
Nebraska “ lowa
Northwestern “ Illinois
Oregon “ U. C. L. A.
Pennsylvania “ Harvard
Pitt “ Carnegie Tech
Princeton “ Dartmouth
Richmond “ N. Carolina
Penn St “ Syracuse
S. Carolina ** Kansas St.
So. California * 4 California
Stanford “ Washington
Texas “ Baylor
Texas A. & M “ So. Methodist
Villanova “ Temple
Vanderbilt . “ Sewanee
Virginia “ W. & L.
Williams “ Wesleyan
Polish Violinist to Be
Featured on St. John’s
College Program
Roman Tolenherg, distinguish
ed young violinist, lias been en
gaged to play in a recital pre
sented by the St. John's College
Music Club. This recital will he
one ot ihe series featuring noted
musicians and musical groups.
. .The dale tor the Tolenherg re
cital has not been announced yet,
but it will be one ot the regular
Sunday Four O’clock Concerts
held on I lie college campus.
The talented Polish artist has
appeared on several Town Hall
programs, and as a guest soloist
with many leading symphonies.
numerous recitals and radio programs...
Barn of Polisi parentage, he received much
of his training in Russia, at the St. Peters
burg Imperial Conservatory.
At 17 he made his professional detnit in
St. Petersburg as soloist, playing Beetho
ven’s Emperor Concerto. He toured Po
land, France, England, Scotland. Austria,
Roumania, Russia and United Slates... He
has added numerous compositions for piano,
orchestra, as well as transcriptions to
musical literature. His best known works
are his Symphony in G minor and his
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in C
major. The latter had its premiere Febru
ary 16. 1939 with the Kansas City Philhar
monic Orchestra... Mr. Labunski. who met
Paderewski in the early twenties, said of
that meeting with him: ”To me since early
childhood Paderewski had been a symbol:
A symbol of the Great Artist and Symbol
of the undying spirit of Poland.”
Art Exhibit Presented in
Connection With Polish
Folk Art Evening
The second Polish Folk Art
Evening sponsored by the Inter
national Center of the Y. W. C. A.,
and directed by Miss Frances Li
pa, was* honored by an exhibition
of art work. 'I he artist is a native
Baltimorean, Mrs. Anne Adamski,
who studied in Poland tor several
years.
Exhibiting some sixteen works
in a variety ot forms, her work
drew many interested admirers.
Mrs. Adamska used a variety ot
media for the expression of her
| artistic abilities. Paintings in both
oil and water colors were shown
as well as pencil and charcoal
sketches.
The water colors were rather
weak. Some need of more training
in the handling of perspective is
needed by the artist.
Versality was evidenced by
| the artist’s choice of subjects.
! Scenes*!rom Norway and 1 Hal
lmark; two heads of “gdrale,” old
| Polish churches and scenes from
| Baltimore’s industrial areas were
on display.
(Thursday. November it If). 1940
Phillip Depsky
Continues Drive Against
Canton Market Space
Working patiently an steadily,
Phillip Depsky is seeming more
and more support tor bis drive to
convert the Canton Market space
into a park.
Outmoded as the rest of the once
famous “markets” ot the city, on
ly one of [lie buildings remains.
The western section is still
standing, though only a very
smal percentage ot the stalls are
haing utilized.
The eastern building was razed
several years ago. The empty lot
has been, roughly paved.
Depsky is circulating a petition
among the residents ot the lower
Canton district, urging the stah
lishmcnl ot a public park or
square in the two city blocks
occupied by the market building
and the barren space between
Potomac Street and Curley Street.
Interviewed at his home, 2824
Dilon Street, Depsky emphati
cally expressed himself on the
subject. “The great majority of
properl yowners and residents ot
the neighborhood are overwhel
mingly in favor ot Ihe plan,” he
declared. “Tin* useless building is
an eye sore and serves no practi
cal purpose. The creation of a
public square, with shade trees,
benches, and flower gardens
would greatly improve the ap
pearance of O’Donnel Street. Pro
perly values would also he in
creased.”
All those living in Ihe neigh
borhood ot the Canton Market
arc asked to support this move to
belter the community.
1 hrough the efforts ol Dr. Marie
Zakrzewska, who came to Ameri
ca in 183.. is credited with open
ing the New York Infirmary tor
Indigent Women and Children.
Former Residents Play |'
Important Part in
Wisconsin Benefit Show |
The Polish colony of Stevens 1
Point, Wisconsin presented a con- 1
ceil program with Polish folk 1
dances on October 29th. It was ||
heki in the auditorium ot the Gen- g
IraJ Stales Teachers College. Ar- j
lerday, the proceeds are to he 1
used tor the benefit ot Polish War g
refugees. g
A group ot Polish dances was M
presented by a group of young =
men and women in Polish cos- m
lumcs. The dances were directed M
by Mrs. Adam Bartosz, who form- g
erly lived in (iraceland Park.
't he program was closed by 1
singing “(lot Bless America” in a
Polish version, translated by Mr. g
Adam Barlos/. g

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