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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, October 25, 1917, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1917-10-25/ed-1/seq-4/

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‘WHEN YOU WANT ANYTHING f
GO TO THE GLOBE”
g
Tills Is a common sajing in Annapolis homes. IV e are |j
exclusive agents for all the leading lines am! we have pretty
nearly everything you could possibly need for your home.
::
And if you want to know anything about your house
furnishing problems see us. Disinterested information will
be given you on all subjects relating to furniture. ' m
Not only are our stocks unusually complete and varied
but our prices are extremely low when quality Is considered.
And our service is out of the ordinary in ils helpfulness.
.Most any store will sell you what goods they happen to have r
I and take your money in payment. But Annapolis people have
1 learned that they may expect not only the usual routine but
many additional services and courtesies. - 8
The ( LOBE is ready and glad to render tbese services jj
to you whether you are a customer or not —because we
believe the friendship of a huge dumber of people Is one of
our best assets. H
We invite you to use our superior SERVICE in every
wuy you can.
!!| I
| Globe Furniture Company 1
-HOME-FUHNISHEBS" |
8-10 WEST STREET.
(Through to North went Strrrt) :i
IKLKPHONK NO I. ANNAI’OUH. Vl. g
I itmmmmmtmmmmmmgntmumt tmrnmmjggtmmmtammtmmttmmt
i'HONE OFFICE, 527. PHONE—RESIDENCE, 960.
B. L. HOPPING & CO.,
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
AND EMBALMERS
FIRST-CLASS ATTENTION. CHARGES REASONABLE.
AUTOMOBILES IF DESIRED.
RESIDENCE—47 Dean Street. OFFICE—IIB Cathedral Street.
TELEPHONE ANNAPOLIS *7O
Richard G. Chaney’s
SOUTHERN MAUI LAND’S LEADING
HIKING, LIVERY 'y&£ S m> AUTOMOBILES
BALEANDEX- yjsjJSSg&ljr 55 * CARRIAGES
CHANGE STABLES * A * D HOBBES
THE FIRM OF R. G. CHANEY is well-known by Us careful so
lection of experienced and reliable employees Teams of all kinds
for hire, also fine saddle horses. Baggage transferred and checked
to all points from residences of patrons.. Automobile Garage for
storage. Storage warehouse for the storage of furniture and
pianos. Furniture packed and delivered to all parts of the world
Carriages for weddings and funerals. Repairing and horseshoeing.
Automobiles for hire by day or night.
OFFICE AND STABLES. IftO WEST STREET, 4NNAPOLIS, MD
Palace Theatre
Tonight—Helen Gibson, in “The
Perilous Leap." a three-reel drama.
BOWLING" ALLEYS
ANI>
BILLIARD TABLES
Down Stairs for Gentlemen
An Entirely New Assortment
of Ladies’
Sample Suits and
Coats
Just Received from New York
These Coats and Suits are un
usual iallies, and built on
exceptionally smart lines
In this new shipment we have secured
some of the smartest, most grace
fully cut and fashioned models
for Women and Misses.
Our customers tell their
friends to buy here, as they
know our prices and quality
arc far superior than those of
big stores in Baltimore.
“THE FASHION”!
STRAUSS BROS,
55 Maryland Avenue—Phone 587.
j PERSONAL MENTION.
, Those fl ho Come And Those Who Go
—or Floating Population.
Tne Rev. Edward D. Johnson, Rec-
Itor of Si. Anne’s, is in Baltimore, at
tending the Diocesan Convention at
St. Paul’s Church.
Mrs. R. E. Fisher, wife of Major
Fisher, U. S. A , and children, are
visiting Mrs, Fisher’s brother, Mr. L.
Dorsey Gassawav, Cashier of the Far
mer's National Hank, and Mrs. Gassa
way. They have recently returned
from the Philippines. Major Fisher
is stationed at Fort Dodge, lowa.
Mrs Engs, of Washington, is visit
ing her niece, Mrs. Edward D. John
son, wife cf the Rector of St. Anne’s,
at St. Anne’s Rectory, Duke of Glou
-1 cester street.
Pound Party.
A pleasant pound party was given
recently in honor of Mrs. Margaret
Mitchell, at the home of Mrs. Helen
Collins, 21 East street.
Those who participated were the
following:
Eliza Dove, Joeanna Connell, Alia
Camler, Alipia Jones, Elizabeth Col
lins, Lillian Fisher, Catherine Fisher,
Ehzabeth Martin, Esther Ayers, Ida
Kahn.
Otto Parkinson, Rdbert Collins,
Ernest Collin?, Lawrence Freeman,
Rowland Como, Walter Scherger,
George Mitchell, Robert Mayhew, Mr.
Carvey, Mr. Harten, Mr. Collins,
Harry Beal, Arthur Jaebcs, Oliver El
liott,Raymond Crobsy, Norman Finkle,
John Finkle, Cecil Blades, Maurice
Mayhew, Preston Cantler, Preston
Tucker.
THi; EVKM.Mi CAPITAL AND MARYLAND GAZETTE, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND, OCTOBER 2*
|j.R. MURRAY’S FUNERAL
TO BE HELD TODAY j
' - I
Body of Victim Of Antom bile Acci
(lent Taken To Pittsburg
For Burial.
The body of James Ratcliffe Mur
ray. 23 years old. who was killed
Tuesday night when his automobile
crashed into a pole at Charles street
and Belvidere avenue, Baltimore, was
taken to Pittsburgh for burial. The
funeral was held at the home, 21 East
Eager street, at 5 o'clock this after
uoon. The Rev. Dr. J. P. McComas,
of Trinity Church. New York, con
ducted the services.
Young Murray, who was a leader
in the young social set of Baltimore,
was in the select draft, his number
being 1.746, but his order of call num
ber was 1*32, and as only 360 men
were called from his district, it
would have been some months before
he would have had to join the colors. ’
Coroner John T Hopkins, of Tow
son, gave a verdict of accidental death
in the case and said from what he
could learn the wet streets were re
sponsible for the accident.
Young Murray was only married
last January and his widow, Mrs.
Sarah Robinson McGill Murray, is on
the verge of a collapse and his mother
is also ill from the shock of the trage
dy. The death of the young man has
caused much sorrow among the
younger social set, where Mr. and Mrs.
Murray were popular. He resided at
21 East Eager street, Baltimore.
Mr. Murray was trying out a new
, car and it is thought that he speeded
the machines at times. When the auto
skidded and struck a pole he was
burled from the car to the side of the
road, where he was found by Dr.
Trigant Burrow, of Lake Station. Bal
timore County. The young man’s
neck was broken and several of his
ribs were fractured. It is thought
that Mr. Murray was killed instantly.
He was dead when found by the physi
cian, who happened along a few min
utes after the accident.
Mr. Murray was a grandson of the
late Pay Director James D. Murray,
U. S. Navy, and a nephew of Mrs.
Joseph P. McComas, formerly of this
city, wife of the former rector of St.
Anne’s, and Miss Charlotte Murray,
and Mr. Spencer Murray, of “Acton.”
His mother was, before her marriage,
Miss Eva Murray, who married a
cousin. Mr. Anthony Shorb Murray.
Mrs. Murray has been a widow' for
some years. Another son died about
a year ago after an operation at a
Baltirnore'Tlospital,
Mr. Murray was also a connection
of Mr. Julian Spencer, of this city.
RECEPTION FOR DRAFTEES
AT ASBURY- M. E. CHURCH
Young People’s Society To Give Fit
ting Send OH To Colored Ten Off
For Camp Meade.
Having received order to leave hero
for Camp Meade on Monday, October
29, the colored men of the select
draft will be honored tomorrow eve
ning by a reception ut Asbury Meth
odist Episcopal Church at 8.30.
The hosts are the members of the
Young People’s Society of Asbury
Church, the Rev. E. S. Williams, D.D.,
pastor. An excellent program of
music, patriotic songs, and addresses
has been arranged
The pastor, Rev. Dr. E. S. Williams,
will make an address, also Wiley H.
Bates, one of the Trustees of Asbury
Methodist Episcopal Church.
As there are a number of young
colored men here on duty at the Na
val Academy, who are also invited to
this reception tomorrow' night in
honor of the colored draftees for
whom it will be a fitting sendoff prior
to their leaving for Camp Meade on
Monday.
Y. M. C. A WOULD BUY
LIBERTY L>AN BONDS
Members Of Local Association Plan To
Place Small Fund In Bank
To Purpose.
Members of the Young Men’s Chris
tian Association of Annapolis have
been requested to attend a meeting of
importance to he held in the office of
the Chief Clerk to the State Comptrol
ler in the Court of Appeals building
tomorrow night at 7.15 o’clock.
The meeting is called primarily for
the purpose of considering the ques
tion of investing the money now held
by the Association in Liberty Bonds.
The treasury, i is utulerstood, has a
fund of about S3OO, and while not
much activity has been manifest in
the Y. M. C. A. work here in recent
years, yet it is felt by those who still
have the interests of the local or
ganization at heart, that the hour has
been struck when every man and as
sociation should “do their utmost,” as
was so ably expressed by Captain Ed
ward W. Eberle in his address at the
Liberty Loan meeting at the State
House last night.
Cold Wave On Way.
The thermometer soon will be regis
tering in the neighborhood of the
freezing mark, and overcoats, heavy
coat sweaters and other cold weather
clothes will be strictly in style. The
cold wave expected reached this part
of the country this morning and is due
to the presence of a severe storm 1
which originated in Virginia and \
which, after sweeping -the length of
Chesapeake Bay, created great havoc
in the waters of New York and other
cities on the Northern Atlantic Coast.
Reading The CapUal
Down At Camp McClellan
A snap shot picture of three mem
bers of the Machine Gun Company cf
the 112th Battalion, has been received
at this office.
The picture shows the three Anrap*
olis boys—Frazier,(of Eastport),Harry
Tongue and Mike Fournara, reading a
copy of the Evening Capital. All
seem engrossed in the news from (
home.
MAIL SERVICE CRIPPLED
OTHERPLACESIOO
“Closed Pouches” Left At Stations
Or Carried Beyond Destinations
ROADS BLAME GOVERNMENT
Says Too Many l ars Are Commaadef r
ed—Also Allege Inability To
Secure Enough Labor.
Recently this paper has been com
pelled to make complaint about the
tardiness of mails The mail service,
however, is crippled at other places
besides Annapolis.
Curtailment of railway postal serv
ice by the government and substitu
tion of ‘“closed pouch” service, which
makes of mail ordinary baggage, has
resulted in a number of instances in
'long delayed delivery of all classes of
mail going out of Baltimore and com
plaints are beginning to be heard.
In addition, an inadequate number
of railroad employes at local terminals
has fitrther hampered the postal sys
tem in Baltimore, mail pouches, deliv
ered to station platforms in time fre
quently being left, on the platforms
for severaJ hours. Lack of space for
"closed pouch” service, due to an in
adequate number of baggage cars, is
further aggravating the situation.
Col. Sherlock Swann, postmaster at
Baltimore, said that the curtailment
of the railway postal service hav prob
ably become general all over tho coun
try, and he can only follow here the
orders which he has received from
Washington relative to the curtail
ment.
The “closed pouch’’ service of the
government leaves the Aall pouches
in the hands of the train baggage mas
ter, and he is supposed to sort them
out and drop them off at the stations
to which they are destined. How
ever. ft often happens that the train
baggage master looks after the rail
road baggage first, and then goes to
the mail, and by that time several
stations for which mail pouches are
destined have been passed. For in
stance. if the railroad baggage be
tween Baltimore and Philadelphia on
Pennsylvania tra'n NoT 442, which
leaves Baltimore at 11.52 o’clock each
night, were particularly heavy, the
pouches for Aberdeen, Edgewood.
Havre de Grace and other points
might not be reached by the train
baggage man until after these sta
tions were passed. Then they would
have to go to Philadelphia and be
brought back. The recently instituted
"closed pouch” service on No. 442 has
already resulted in the non-delivery of
newspapers and other mail in the
vicinity of Belair and Havre de Grace.
The railroads, questioned by post
office authorities relative to trains
“running away from" mail at local
terminals, blame insufficient labor and
lack of space, both due to war. Told
that their contracts call for sufficient
labor, they tell the government offici
als they will employ the people if the
government finds them. There is no
help of the proper kind to be ob
tained. The lack of space, say rail
road officials, is due solely to the im
pressment of so many cars into gov
ernment service.
Postal officials say they are power
less to correct the situation, as they
are compelled to accommodate their
service to the conditions prescribed
by the postal officials in Washington
So far, incoming mail has not been
'seriously affected, as the “closed
pouch” service has not yet been sub
stituted on any important trains from
New York and Philadelphia to Balti
more.
UP-STATERS PREPARING
FOR ST. JOHN’S GAME.
Western Maryland Working With De
termination to Win Annual Loot
ball Struggle.
The Western Maryl nd College foot
ball team will tackle St. John’s Satur
day on college grounds at Westminster
and nothing is being left undone by
the men in charge of the upstaters to
make the game a success The stu
dent body has been hard at work in
preparation of yells and songs and
mass meetings have been held to stir
up enthusiasm.
While St, John’s was defeated last
week by P. M. C., the team was up
against a strong and well-balanced
eleven, and their shoeing* has put
more energy in the Westminster boys,
who will go into the game with the de
termination to win.
The all-around work of the up
staters’ line last week against Dela
ware was very eno uraging to the fol
lowers of the tearr., inasmuch as the
line is composed of practically all new
men.
As there were no serious injuries in
the Delaware game, there will probab
ly be no change in tne lineup.
PRIVATE DROLL AT ANNISTON
Appreciates Home Paper- Writes Of
Ruth Law’s Flight.
The following letter has been re
ceived at this offie from Camp McClel
lan, Anniston, Ala. :
Dear Editor:
Received your paper from Monday
until Wednesday and I thank you very
much. Yoq don’t realize how much I
1 miss'it when it doesn’t come, because
|it gives ‘me the news from the
dear old heme town, and an idea of
what is going on.
It continues to be very cold here.
Miss Ruth Lew, the woman aviator,
flew over this camp and looped the
loop six times. It was wocderfnl not
to say thrilling.
ihere is a rumor of us boys geiting
a furlough, but I don’t know how
much truth there is in it. There are
so many rumors floating around we do
not know which to accept and what to
reject. Sometimes we dare act be
lieve any
thanking you again for the C*pitah
and asking you please to continue
sending them, I am
JOSEPH F. DROLL.
MANY CALLERS YESTERDAY
AT THE SUPERINTENDENT’S
Mr* Eberle Receives, Assisted By
House Guest From California.
With that characteristic grace and
! charming personality that distin
guishes the wife of the Superintend
ent of the Naval Academy. Mrs.
Eberle welcomed her callers yester
day afternoon at the third of the
series of Wednesday receptions.
Cap: Eberle introduced the guests
to his wife, who in turn, introduced
them to her house guest, Mrs. Benja
min P. Brodie. wife of Dr. Brodie, of
Santa Barbara, California, a charm
ing woman whose magnetic personal
ity impressed all who met her. Mrs.
Brodie seems to exhale the sunshine |
and" cheeriness of her native clime, j
Mrs. Eberle was fortunate in having
so charming a friend with her at yes
terday’s reception.
Mrs. Edward Randolph Eberle also
played an important part at the recep
tion, conducting the guests into the
dining-room and looking after their
service there. Mrs. Cluverius, wife of
Commander Wat T. Cluverius, poured
chocolate, and Mrs. Moody, wife of
Commander R. C. Moody, poured tea.
A number of the younger set assisted
in the dining-room.
The flowers breathed the autumn
fragrance of chrysanthemums. Every
where large vases were filled with
yellow' and w’hite chrysanthemums,
with a touch of autumn leaves for a
setting. Pink cosmos were used for
the fioral centre-piece, and shaded
candles shed a soft roseate glow over
a most attractive table.
Ail orchestra from the Naval Acad
emy band, under the directorship of
Prof. Adolph Torovsky, bandmaster,
played a selected program of beautiful
music.
There were many callers through
out the evening, many of whom w T ere
Midshipmen and the young officers in
training at the Naval Reserve Officers’
School at the Naval Academy. The
usual contingent of townpeople, as
well as officers and families attached
to duty at the Naval Academy, left
cards and enjoyed the delightful hos
pitality of Captain and Mrs. Eberle.
HOOVFR HIMSELF
WILL REVIEW HOUSEWIVES
At Lyric 1 heatre. Baltimore, Next Sat
urday The Pledge Card
Campaign.
’ Herbert C. Hoover himself will re- *
view the housewives enrolled in
Maryland’s Food Conservation Army
at the Lyric, in Baltimore, at a great
meeting on October 27, preliminary to
the opening of the pledge-card sign
ing campaign beginning October 28.
The meeting will begin at 3 o’clock
and promises to be of nation-wide in
terest owing to the fact that this is
the only occasion in connection with
the National Food Conservation Cam
paign at which the National Food Ad
ministrator will speak.
Dr. Anne Howard Shaw, head of
the Women’s Section of the National
Council of Defense, has also been
asked to speak at this meeting. Ed
win G. Baetjer, Food Administrator
for Maryland, will preside, and Fran
cis King Carey, Chairman of the Cam
paign Committee will introduce Mr.
Hoover to the army. Cardinal Gib
bons will make the invocation, and
the Rt Rev. John Gardner Murray,
Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal
Church in Maryland, will pronounce
the benediction.
It is hoped that by the eve of the
campaign week in Maryland, nearly
4000 women will be enrolled as cap
tains, lieutenants and recruiting offi
cers in Maryland’s Conservation
Army. These women will be admit
ted to the Hoover meeting by special
badges. All of them will be asked to
wear white shirtwaists and skirts.
Mrs. Edward Shoemaker, commanding
the Maryland Army, and the members
of her staff, will wear Bashes of pur
ple indicating their rank. Seated on
the stage will be the city and county
captains, and the city precinct and
county election district lieutenants.
The former will wear badges of blue,
and the latter ribbons of yellow, pin
ned with the Hoorer button.
Recruiting officers —that is women
who enroll to aid in the house-to
house canvas§ of housewives during
the week of October 28th—will wear
red. badges and will have seats reserv
ed for thim in the body of the theatre.
Each woman who gives her services
for the canvass will receive from the
Food Administration of the United
States a commission, which will make
her an official representative of the
United States Government, and which
will be a valuable souvenir of the oc
casion. Only a limited number of
these commissions will be given tn
each county and women who are will
ing to volunteer their services to aid
the government in the emergency re
sulting from the food shortages are
asked to enroll. Full information in
regard to the work required may be
had upon application to National Food
’ Conservation Campaign, Maryland
Headquarters, 518 North Charles St.,
Baltimore. All enrollments should be
made early in order that instructions
may be sent each officer.
Most Maryland housewives are in
formed as to what the campaign is
and what it alms to accomplish. The
United States Government has appeal
ed to the women of the nation to meet
the food shortage emergency. They
are asked to. conserve the food sup
ply of the nation, especially by sub
stituting for the staple foods—wheat, I
meats, dairy products and sugar— |
other articles of diet which are abund
ant. Every housewife who signs the
little Hoover pledge card, promising
to co-operate with the government in
the conservation of food “insofar as
her circumstances permit” is doing a
vital service for the nation.
The situation is serious. Unless <
this plans of conservation is carried ! <
out by the women and men of the i
United States, both our soldiers i
j abroad and our families at home will
find themselves without an adequate
~ ♦♦wiwiMWJiwujHun. i ttttmjtj lV, :* **** j
j Colonial Theatre, j
I TUESDAY, November 6th
__ H
I Grand Patrio ic Concer
1 ' fok the benefit of
g ANNAPOLIS cn "§8 AMERICAS ID CESS ]
1 AND FRATERNAL ORDER OF EAGLES I
I - I
| Excellent Programme of Local Tak
ASSISTED BY NAVAL ACADEMY BAND
|j Prices—sl.oo, /5c., 50c., 25c.
% Tickets on sale at McCready & Co. t Main & Franc. . .
Tickets order by telephone will be deli\erec!
n u
j tstsxxuxutxtstimi ".mu. m mu .
— ——————— -
~ nxmirntmaammmuummmtmmum cmmnmnTxr .
j Colonial Theats
flKv %i 11 -
; ; r
IMOMD/iV, Oct. Jin-
First Time Here. Same Cast and Production Kovv Playing
Auditorium Theatre, Baltimore. World s Greatest Fun "how
I POPULAR PRICES: MATINEE 25c TO 75; NIGHT 25c 10 SI j
Seats on sale at K. E. Strange, 1.9 Main Street. IMione
supply of these important articles of
diet before the next twelve months
have elapsed. The government has
chosen this method of securing food
conservation, and calls upon every
loyal woman to join in the work just
as it has called upon every man of
proper age for service in the field.
The war cannot he won without sol
diers, and soldiers cannot win with
out food .The woman are asked to
help make and keep this country and
the world “safe against the devasting
wastefulness of war.’’
SEVERNA PARK SCHOOL
Subscribes S3OO For Liberty Bonds
Yesterday
Subscriptions for S3OO worth of
Liberty Bonds wa3 the substantial re
sult of Liberty Day Celebration at
Public School No. 7 of the Third Dis
trict. Severna Park, yesterday. The
bonds were taken by pupils of the
school.
Dr. Bernard C. Steiner, Librarian of
the Pratt Library, Baltimore, made a
patriotic address.
DIED
WILSON.—On Oct. 24, at *3O West
St., ANNIE L. WILSON, age 22
year*, wife of Nathaniel C. Wilson.
Funeral Saturday afternoon at one
o’clock from her late residence. In
terment in Loudon Park, Baltimore,
Saturday afternoon at 3 o’clock.
WANTED—Settled colored woman for
and downstair* work. No washing:.
rr,V s 5. best of reference. Apply
l'U (.loiicester Street, oJS-2t.
SIGN PAINTING t
J SAMUEL W. BROOKS & CO.!
A CHAB. NELSON BKOOKS. Mgr. 2
$ Painters, Decorators I '
iand Paper-Hangers *
Relief Decorations for Parlors, t
Halls and Bathrooms.
Church Decoration a Specialty f
Fresco Painting a
mCHAluls STREET 1
Telephone 431-W.
Estimates Cheerfully Furnished. ▼
_ in23tf #
Subscribe to THE CAPITAL.
ROARING
GOOD BARGAIIfo!
THIS WEEK.
A large assortment of Boy i *■*
Serges, Worsteds, and <
in Pinch Back Model. ;>
and Patch Pockets, in '-’.'"G
$3.75, $5.00, $7.00 and s*.<><>.
Boys’ Mackinaws, double l>i‘
Coat with Shawl Collar 1
Pockets, and Belt all ar< : :
$7.00, Special SI2H.
A large assortment of Boy Giver
coats, worth SO.OO to SIO.OO.
$3.50 and SO.OO.
Men! Buy your Suits and o.< r" ’’
now, all wool Suits, worth -KM 1
$25.00, Special $12.00 to -KM.
Overcoats of the newest a
15.00 to $20.00, Special $1" ' * |: '-
Mens' Khaki Pants, worth •-!.' '• S P , ' < ’
il sl.lO.
A large selection of Lads
Serge and Poplins Skirt
latest in Satin Skirts.
Sheered Waists and Gath
els. Price sl.9* to SO.OO
Just received a large as r
Ladies’ Coats in Plush. V
Velvets, with Shawl Col!:
sorted colors, prices $6.00.
SIO.OO and $15.00.. The •
tionally good values.
Children’s Coats —Velvets, i' • •
Cloth, in very nobby patt: •
$2 to SO.OO.
Ladies’ Shirt Waists, in Si>'.-• ''
and Crepes de Chine, in !h n
designs, prices from sl-o>'' 1“
Bath Robes for Ladies and
SSMO to SSJM).
Come and be convinced.
OSCAR “SHACKS’
DEPARTMENT STOFJ
37 and West St.
I hone 52L Anuap
Let the CAPITAL do your Jon Vr t
ag—Billheads, Letterheads, L:.
and Cards, a r^eclalty

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