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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, September 03, 1919, Image 4

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THE EVENING CAPI'XAL AND MARYLAND GAZETTE. ANNAPOLIS. MARYLAND, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1910. _____
DRUGGISTS REQUIRED TO !
CHANGE ALCOHOL LABEL
i
Hereafter persons using denatured
alcohol for beverage purposes or as
•n external application will do so in
full knowledge of the fact that it is
a deadly poison and that imbibing it I
le about the same as committing sui- ;
cide.
Numerous reports reaching the bu
reau of internal revenue of. the in
creasing use of completely denatured
alcohol for these purposes have led
the bureau to issue a regulation re
quiring that labels of wholesale and
retail containers of such alcohol shall
bear a specific warning of the deadly
character of the contents.
The present label contains the for
mula and the word “poison.” On the
new labels will be printed the word
“poison” and the following statement: j
"Completely denatured alcohol is a
violent poison. It cannot be applied
externally to animal or human tissue
without seriously injurious results.
It cannot be taken Internally * without
Platform of Candidates Below:
“That we demand of the candidates
for County Commissioner that they
give to the people u pledge, to make
it a business of being a County Com
missioner, that they obey the lawn as
they find them in spirit and letter; that
they discontinue all useless offices; that
they discontinue the practice establish
ed of levying for a salary one certain
sum, and paying an additional salary,
the additional amount to be covered up
in some other item; that they perform
their duties of Hoad Commissioners
under the law, us it now exists, until re
pealed, for which they draw an addi
tional salary; that they abandon the
iniquitious practice now prevailing, of
district courtesy, where the expense is
borne by the entire county; that they
will give to thickly settled communi
ties, such as Kastport, improvements
necessary for sanitation.
“That we demand of the candidate
for Htate Senator and members of the
House, that they pledge the people that
they will use their best endeavor to
pass nil remedial legislation for the re
duction of taxes; for the abolition of all
useless offices; for the repeal of the
present road law, under which the road
engineer is appointed; for regulation of
the treasurer’s-office so that it may be
apparent wh a t his compensation
amounts to; for such legislation as may
be recommended by a commission to be
appointed by the Mayor of the City of
Annapolis in reference to a new charter
or amendments to the present charter of
tho City of Annapolis, and the placing
of tho Annapolis Water Company di
rectly under the management of the
£ity Council of Annapolis.
we demand of the candidate
for Clerk of the Court, nu assurance to
the people of his ability to discharge
These are the Candidates to be voted for at the Primary on Monday,
September Bth, 1919, 8 A. M. to 6 P. M.
All of whom endorse the above platform.
For State Senator
JOHN H. GEIS
For House Of Delegates
JAMES O. ATWELL X
JOHN S. CHANEY X
W. MEADE HOLLADAY X
For Clerk Of Circuit Court
WILLIAM N. WOODWARD X
For Sheriff
Vote for Either
R! HARRY ARNOLD X j
JOSHUA S. LINTHICUM X
For State’s Attorney
NICHOLAS H. GREEN X
For Judges Of Orphans Court
MAYNARD CARR X
J. GRANT CALHOUN X
GEORGE W. HYDE X
For County Commissioners
Vote for, Seien
ST. GEORGE BARBER X |
C. MILTON DUVALL X |
R. WILSON CARR X j
HENRY A COOK ~X
WILLIAM E. FELDMEYER X J
J. CHESTON HALL X j
EDEN S. WATTS X
EDWARD WOODFALL X
For County Surveyor
J. CARSON BOUSH X
For State Central Committee
SAMUEL P. CHEW X
JOHN deP. DOUW X
- JAMES S. SMITH X
For Delegates To State Convention
W. FRANK CHANEY ~ X I
ARTHUR A. OWENS X
CHARLES L. TATE X
These men stand for all that is best. Be sure that you put your
X in the square opposite each name.
Published by authority of John M. Taylor, treasurer.
f!rrr - - '
• On My Eipht Tears Kecord as Deputy
Sheriff I Ask Yoar Support
WM. D. K. LEE
CANDIDATE
FOR SHERIFF
OF ANNE ARUNDEL
Subject to Democratic Primary
September Sth, 1919 1
i IL- ■— ■■— ■ - ■ 1
! steal decay, ultimately resulting In
• death.”
There are four generally used for
! mulae for the manufacture of com
| pletely denatured alcohol, each of
which renders the product unfit for
|use as a beverage. Its sale for such
purpose is forbidden by law.
Druggists here state that they have
: had no formal notice of the new regu
lation of the bureau regarding the
change in label, but that they are not
usually furnished with information di
jrectly. The bureau depends upon the
press and the manufacturers to give
, the necessary publicity.
Presbyterian Prayer .Meeting
After having been suspended for sev
eral weks, the usual Wednesday even
: ing prayer meeting will be held this
evening- at 8 o’clock in the lecture
room of the Presbyterian Church, con
ducted by the pastor, Rev. Maurice S.
White, who has returned from his va
cation.
The pastor's theme for the prayer
meeting address tonight will be “Faith
and the- Beauties of Nature.” All are
invited.
i the duties of tlie office and an obliga
tion to perform the duties with a
knowledge of the requirements thereof;
that he will give his personal attention
to the office by being present in person
during office hours and assisting in the
discharge of the duties thereof.
“That we demand of the candidates
for State's Attorney and Sheriff that
they discharge the duties of their re
spective offices in person jyul enforce
the law without favor, fear or affection.
“That wo demand that all the offi
cials of the county give their personal
attention to the discharge of the duties
of their offices, attending in jtorson at
their respective offices during office
i hours, and, recognize that principle of
good government that a public office is
a public trust, and not a sinecure to be
parcelled out to favorite sons who are
to receive the emoluments thereof with
out rendering service commensurate
therewith.
“We deplore the conditions of our
public roads and insist that with a bus
incss management of the affairs of our
county such condition could not exist,
with the enormous expenditures made;
and we demand that the people’s money
| be expended in such manner as to give
an appreciable return therefor.
“With these assurances from the can
didates, and a wise selection of our
standard bearers for the coming elec
tion, as the fundamental necessity lies
more in the selection of titan in the
election of candidates, we believe that
the cause of democracy can be submit
ted to the best judgment of the citizens
of tliis county in the full confidence that
the final decision will be that the in
terest. of the State and county will be
best served by placing its affairs under
the control of our party.”
CAUSED A CHANGE IN MIND
Circumstance That Made Mill Owner
Somewhat Relax His Ideas About
Strict Discipline.
“I personally began with the Idea
that people might be hired and good
work gained from them,” Julian S.
Carr, Jr., In System, writes. Mr. Carr,
who Is president of the Durham Hos
iery mills, goes on: “I thought In my
youth that rules made order and that
a certain military discipline was es
sential; that it was foolish to humor
people and all that, nor was I going
to recognize certain local traditions
about days on which no work should
be done. For Instance, I made up my
mind that quitting work to go to the
dreus was not in accord with the best
industrial practices.
“The first circus came to town about
three months after we took charge of
the mill, and I was keen for the test.
We posted positive orders that the reg
ular hours of work were to be observ
ed on that day. and that any person
who went off to the circus would be
discharged. The full force reported
as nsual on the morning of circus day,
apd I went home to dinner confident
that ’at last we had brought order.
It gave me a bit of a pang, for I
should have liked to go myself 1
“But duty Is a stern master, and
reflecting on that fact I hurried bac\j
to the mill. Noticing a crowd In a
side street, I stopped to look. It was
our whole mill force wending Its mer
ry way to the magic tent l I went
along myself, and resolved that, al
though abstract rules were well
enough, a bit of common sense and
knowledge of human nature might
profitably be blended with them. How
much of our labor trouble generally Is
due to enforcing countless rules with
military exactness?”
MANIFOLD USES OF THE OX
Animal May With Truth Be Said to
Be Moat Useful of All the
Domestic Animals.
Of all our domestic animals the ox
Is certainly the most useful, writes
Ilenri Fabre In Our Humble Helpers.
During Its lifetime It draws the cart
In mountainous regions and works at
the plow In the tillage of the fields;
furthermore, the cow furnishes milk
in abundance. Given over to the
butcher, the animal becomes a source
of manifold products, each part of Its
body having a value of its own. The
flesh Is highly nutritious; the skin Is
made Into leather for harness and
shoes; the hair furnishes stuffing for
saddles; the tallow serves for making
candles and soap; the bones, half cal
cined, give a kind of charcoal or bone
black used especially for refining
sugar and making It perfectly white;
this charcoal, after thus being used;
Is a very rich agricultural fertilizer;
heated In water to a high temperature,
the same bone yields the blue used by
carpenters; the largest and thickest
bones go to the turner’s shop, where
they are manufactured Into buttons
and other small objects, the horns are
fashioned by the maker of small wares
Into snuff boxes and powder boxes; the
blood is used concurrently with the
bone of black In refining sugar; the
Intestines cured, twisted, and dried,
are made Into strings for musical in
struments ; finally, the gall Is fre
quently turned to account by dyers and
cleaners In cleaning fabrics and
tially restoring their original luster.
Curious Clubs.
The recent announcement that an
English “Bald-Headed Men’s club” had
just met —the first time since 1010,
owing to the war—serves to recall one
or two odd clubs.
“The Fat Man’s club,” for instance,
was known to exist In Paris In 1897.
Its heaviest member turned the scale
at 330 pounds and the chief qualifica
tion for membership was to weigh at
least 220 pounds.
About tills time there also met In
New York the “Society of the Pointed
Beards” —a most exclusive club. No
one was eligible unless he had a care
fully cultivated beard of natural
growth and terminating In one sym
metrical point half an Inch from the
apex of the chin.
At two club dinners in ISOS even the
celery was teerved with its leaves
trimmed-to a point.
Thomas a Kempis.
‘Here in the service of the Lord
Thomas a Kempis lived and wrote
•The Imitation of Christ,’” are the
words that appear on the foot of
the monument to the author recently
erected at Zwolle. In a gentle spot,
surrounded by ancient oaks and firs,
and with shrubbery around, this mon
ument stands on a hill which was
presented for the purpose by tlie van
Royen family. The monument Is In
the shape of a cross with the mono
gram of Christ and the symbols of the
four evangelists. The inscription on
the main part is “In Cruee Calus.”
Many subscriptions were received for
the monument as soon as the plan was
suggested in 1916. Queen Wilhelmlna
was among those who gave.
Coating Iron With Lead.
Lead as a substitute for tin as a
coating for sheet Iron, iron wire and
wire gauze was strangly advocated at
the Buffalo meeting of the American
Chemical society by Charles Basker
vllle, who exhibited some specimens
of a process worked out by him.
Iron shingles, so treated, have been
exposed to the weather tn a roof test
for two years and eleven months and
show no signs of rust. They may be
bent without cracking the coating and
exposing the Iron. Chicken wire so
treated Is quite as good as the galvan
ised and cheaper to produce.
Gold coin is "peppered” with the
mineral iridium to keep it from being
melted down.
FROTHY TRANSFERS
; IN CITY AND COUNTY
RECORDED IN COURTi
I
Many Deeds Of Realty Are Filed
During Last Several
Days Here
BUYS SPA VIEW LOT
1 . ——
During the dosing days of the month
iof August, just ended, real estate aeti-
I vities were marked in a::d about the!
I town and county, and deeds were re-j
i corded in court for the following proper
;ties:
August 28
Deed from the Workman's Co-Opera-j
tive Company, I lie., to Mary F. and j
Susan F. Sehumau, 2 lots of ground sit - j
I uate in the Third Election District <>f!
Anne Arundel county, known as lots]
; Nos. 42 and 43. in Section “GO,” con-1
! sideration #I.OO.
i Deed from Andrew J. Stineheouib and I
I wife to Moses Kecof, lot of ground sit-'
| uate on Northwest street in tho city j
of Annapolis, Md., consideration #3,100.;
Deed from William G.‘ Brown, Wil
liam G. Hokemeyer and Adolph F. Bom-
Itoff, trustee, to Frederick C. E. I’oeock,
lot of ground situate at Outing l’ark, in
the Fifth Election District of Anne
Arundel comity, consideration $3.
Deed from James Thompson and wife
to Bt. George Barber, lot of ground sit
uate at Rutland, in the Eighth Election
District of Anne Arundel county, con
taining 5 3 4 acres of land, more or less,
consideration S4OO.
Deed from <’. Wilbur MeNomar and
wife to Marvin W. Anderson and wife,
2 lots of ground situate in the Fourth
Election l>ist. of Anno Arundel County,
first lot containing 17 5-100 acres of
land, more or less; second containing 1
52-100 acres of land, more or less. Con
sideration $550.
Deed from John F. Stojdmey and wife
and Ernest S. Williams and wife to
liob Combs, lot of ground situate on
Second street in the city of Annapolis,
known as lot Xo. 3, consideration S6OO.
Deed from George Griner and wife to
Claude Wilde, lot of ground situate in
the Eighth Election District of Anne
Arundel county, containing 77 3-4 acres
of land, more or less, consideration $lO.
Deed from Abraham Snyder and wife
to Benjamin F. Wood, lot of ground
situate on Sixth street, in the village
of Kastport, in the Second Election Dis
trict of Anne Arundel county, consid
eration $lO.
Deed from Walter C. Martin, single,
to Noil Blay and wife, lot of ground
situate on Holland street in the city of
Annapolis, Md., consideration $lO.
August 29
Deed from Joshua 8. Lintliicum, et al.,
to Wallace Morris, lot of ground situate
in the Fifth Electing District of Anne
Arundel county, containing 1 and 22-100
acres of land, more or l<Rfcs, considera
tion $5.
Deed from Wallace Morris to Frank
IT. Clarke and Caroline Hi Clarke, min
ors, lot of ground situate in the Fifth
Election District of Anne Arundel coun
ty, known as lot No. 4, of Plat of
“Kinslock Farms,” eonsii-erntion $5.
Deed from John K. Sajue am* wife
and Surah O. Drake to Isaac Levin and
others, tract of land situate at Outing
Fark, in the Fifth Election District of
Anne Arundel county, consideration $lO.
Deed from Anna M. Heed to J. How
ard Keagle and wife, tract of land sit
uate at Outing Park, in the Fifth Elec
tion District of Anne Arundel county,
consideration $5.
Deed from John K. Sague and wife
and Sarah O. Drake to J. Howard Kea
gle and others, tract of land situate at
Outing Pagk, in tho Fifth Election Dis
trict of Anne Arundel county, consid
eration $lO.
Deed from the Securities Company, of
Baltimore, to Agel J. Petty and wife,
lots of ground situate in Anno Arundel
county, known as lots Nos. 28 and 20,
consideration $5.
Deed from Ernest W. Clark, et al.,
to William Duncan, 2 lots of ground sit
uate in the Fifth Election District of
Anne Arundel county, consideration $5.
Deed from Sarah M. J llartshorne.
widow, to Harry W. Elliott, lot of
ground situate on the southwest side of
West street, Annapolis, M<l., considera
tion $lO.
Deed from William H. Jacobs to Chas.
S. H. Jacobs, ct al., tract of land sit
uate in the Second Election District of
Anne Arundel county, consideration #5.
Deed from Harry L. Kllinghausen and
wife to the, Mayor, Counselor and Al
dermen of the city of Annapolis, tract
of land situate in the city of Annapolis,
as laid down on the street beds of Sec
ond and Fifth streets of a .Plat of Spa
View Heights, consideration $3.
Deed from Anna V. Taylor to The
Circle Play House, Inc., ltd of ground
situate on East street in tin* city of An
napolis, Md., consideration #lO.
Deed from Charles C. Elly and wife to
Ida Kla wans, lot of ground situate at
Germantown in the Second Election Dis
trict of Anne Arundel county. consul-
f==- —
THE ||l
A MOTOR BELL OF QUALITY Ilf
SINCE 1914 f
Built for every-day u*e. Stardineni, and fashion combined It all ron !
would expect In an automobile. *** you
Price, 5-Passenger Car $1,270 Delivered. Immediate Delivery
: Agent and Service Station
47 Randall Street BEARDMORE’S GARAGE Annapolis, Md. IJ 11
acto and machinery repairing
eration $2,775.
Deed from Robert Moss, trustee, to
Frank Cromwell and wife, tract of land
situate in the Third Election District j
of Anne Arundel county, consideration j
$lO.
August 30
Deed from Henry R. Myers and wife J
! to Robert B. Wayson and wife, 3 lots of
J ground situate in the Second Election j
! District of Anne Arundel county, known ,
!ns lots Nos. 21, 22 and 23, considera
It ion $lO.
j l>eod from William J. Glover and wife j
to Henry C. Bierman, S lots of ground j
situate at Outing Park, in the Fifth |
Election District of Anne Arundel
county, known as lots Nos. 1.2, 3,4, 5,
6,7 and 8, consideration s.>.
Deed from Oregon R. Benson and wife
to George M. Wvant and wife, James
i Kearns and wife, tract of land situate
jin Anne Arundel county, consideration
:$5.
j Deed from Frances Diggs, widow, to
, Melvin Chase and Mamie Chase, his
j mother, property known as No. 38 Corn*
• Hill street in the city of Annapolis, Md.,
! consideration $lO.
j Deed from John K. Culver and wife
| to Theodore B. Craig and wife. 2 lots
j of ground situate at Brooklyn Park, iu
the Fifth Election District of Anne
J Arundel county, known lots Nos. 30
; and 31 in Section “AA,” consideration
• $lO.
I Deed from Xaee Murray, widower,
to Blanche M. Cromwell, tract of land
situate in the Third Election District
of Anne Arundel county, consideration
love and affection.
I Deed from Oregon R. Benson, Jr., and
I wife to Rodney Brown and wife, tract
of land situate in Anne Arundel domit.v.
containing five acres of land, more ov
less, consideration $5.
MANY AUTOsiLEFT
AT CAMP HOLABIRD
M'.v The A ssiK-Inted Press.)
Washington, Sept. 3.—Hundreds of
automobiles many of them uncrated,
have been held in the field at Camp
Hblabird, Baltimore, since last Febru
ary, it was told today by Major R. S.
T. Evan ,s of the Baltimore camp.
Asked by General Reavis how many
automobiles were still at the camp.
Major Evans said 4.000 were uncrated
and 7.000 others were in pine crates.
Delivery of the trucks and pleasure
cars from the factories continued un
til 5 months ago, Major Evans said.
AT TIIE REPUBLIC TONIGHT
“Almost Married,” from the pen of
E. V. Durling. is the latest comedy
drama in which the clever Metro star.
May Allison, will be seen. This play,
which will be shown at the Republic
theatre tonight, is filled with breezy
and unexpected situations.
The young star enacts the role of
a girl of the Swiss Alps who meets
the son of a millionaire. A romance
ensues which, however, is rudely shat
tered. The rare beauty of her voice
and face attracts the attention of a
> musical director and he transplants
her from her mountain home to the
heart of New York where she shines
1 in the front ranks of a popular re
view.
Here she meets the boy’s father and
the situations which result are amaz
ing and amusing and cause untold
complications. It is a play which will
win popular favor.
Miss Allison is surrounded by a
cast of distinguished players among
whom are Walter I. Percival, Frank
Currier, Harry Ratenbury, James
- Warton,. James and Hugh Fay. The
adaptation was made by Luther Reed
and tlifc production was directed by
Charles Swickard and made under the
personal supervision of Maxwell Lar
ger, director general.
AT THE PALAC E TONIGHT
Wherever one finds an enthusiastic
film patron, one generally finds also
ja lover of literature. Therefore, it
j will be a pleasant surprise to many to
learn that Vivian Martin’s new Paru
' mount starring vehicle, “Louisiana”
I will be presented at the Palace thea
tre tonight, inasmuch as this picture
is an adaptation of the popular novel
i: of the same name, written by Frances
I Hodgson Burnett.
To those who are unfamiliar with
this delightful story, it may be said
that it concerns the adventures of a
little girl who lived on a mountain
top and whose father, desiring that
she should see something of the world
j instead of living the secluded life as
her mother before her had done, sends
| her to a popular summer resort in the
:South.
Carnival |
Will be run under the Auspices of H
ASBURY M. E. CHURCH §
AND S
MOUNT MORIAH M. E. CURCH 1
Thursday, Friday 1
and SaturdayJ
auuuuummiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinra;
p - 7- - " 1
Flowers
(or the Home Beautiful
What every woman knows who
owns the secret of making home
happiest is that flowers all about
the house do more than any
other one thing to beautify each
nook and corner and radiate
cheer.
And in the September days
flowers of gayest colors are at
their best blooming. We have
Dahlias in profusion in their
many delightful forms and in a
variety of colors, also many oth
er pretty flowers as well as fol
iage, so much desired for that
touch of decoration which makes
home beautiful.
Telephone <>r /liuill order* re
ceive the same careful attention
:is if you came ia and made
your own selection.
THE KAISER CO.
101 CUIXKIiK AVE.
Phone 400
Meet Me At The
Delightful
DANCE
Benefit Independent
Fire Company
ST. JOHN’S GYMNASIUM
Wednesday, Sept. 3
8.30 P. M.
Gentlemen, 50c. Ladies, 25c.
REFRESHMENTS
FOR SHERIFF
Of Anne Arundel County
H
THOMAS S. DOVE
Of the Second District
I announce my candidacy for the office
'•f sheriff of Anne Arundel County, sub
te,;t to the Democratic Primary ' to he
held in September.
I will appreciate anything that my
friends <an do to assist me in my csim-
I'nign. by talking tip my candidacy when
ever the opportunity presents itself
If nominated ami elected sheriff i will
execute the work of the office in the in
terest of aii of the citizens of the County.
Respectfully,
THOMAS S. DOVE,
septß of the Second District.
ANNAPOLIS
ACETLENE WELDING CO.
ALL KINDS OF
Welding and Brazing
Kadiator ltcpairinjf
First St., Near West. St. :: Annapolis, Aid.
TKI.KI-HONK *7O u'tH t f
HEN-E-TA
BONE GRITS
ONLY $3.00 Per 100 lb. SACK
No, I—( iiicks No. 3—Turkeys
No. 2— Fowl No. 4—Mash
Oyster Shells, other bone, grit ami
charcoal not necessary when feeding
“IIKN-K-TA.”
Ise of beef scraps optional.
WILL MAKE HENS LAV
WILL MAKE CHICKS GROW
For Sale By
GRIFFITH & TURNER
Baltimore, Md.
jy23-au6,20-sep3,l7
A=- - - '
Republic Theatre
TODAY TOMORROW
MAY ALLISON -> une E,vid f '
w Montagu Love
“ALMOST 0 ; ckening
MARRIED” Flame” I
Added Attraction
GOOD COMEDY kisoGBAM
j NOTICK ' I
| HATS TRIMMED A Mr
made to your v^ r
j ,ss ® ess ' f King . 194 West St
IDENTIFY YOURSELF
tliltifr i:..it ,
lu*i wit 1 11 v
fv
c
p
orili't- hi.w ti •
kr> *. i!.._- - ' -
rinir. Xi■ * k •
mum- Mini ,iii;
it In . .
the key tag CO.
j llo\ HI, Vniuj, ,|iv \j j
A. W. PHILLIPS
Contractor ard Builder
riuiiN mill hiitlH< Him,. , ,
< bM
•Foil l\ hi k 1,.,|
H.iJ .1 , '! VIiKF'T l
ATTENTION
Just a few W. -k- and ~,, s ,
the first day of >ranii - jjo
' slop und think what y, i ~i n sm ,
We buy and sell Sh. m
\ Pistols of till description.
Slo J. LEVY, lal West St.
NOTICE
; If you have ati> I ..In•*• ~r ,i„ t |,„
j • ho?. of nj Un,l. ti..,i
| I>lhm rail tin u |i mi.l .■ Hill , hf
lilkliokl (trier* an.l rnoinr m W ~i „ u<r
rnoM ;>i iv
■*>
John C. Boessel & Co.
Expert Watch Repairing
A Specialty——
01 MARYLAND AYE.
Formerly with Firm of M. Iluri4
- ■ —-
SIGN PAINTING
'I SAMUEL W. BROOKS & CO.
CHAN. NEI.SON lIUOOKH
Painters, Decorators J
and Paper-Hangers j j
Relief Decorations for I'arlorv I
Halls and Hath room*
Cburcb IJmirudon a S|ililtf
Frewro I'ainting
No. U l / 2 DEAN STREET j
£timutea Cheerfully FuruUbtd
Telephone 341 -\V
\.„„v,= ■ ■—'
PALACE
THEATRE
“PHOTO PLAYS IK LITE
; TODAY
i .
VIVIAN MARTIN
in
“Louisiana'’
(1001) (OMIDY
.-■ —-— —-—
; tomorrow
i
ALICE BHADY
IN
, “At The Mercy
Of Men”
Also GOOD (O'H DY

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