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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, September 26, 1919, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1919-09-26/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE EVENING CAPITAL AND MARYLAND GAZETTE, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 96, 1913.
PROPERTY TRANSFERS
IN CITY AND COUNTY
RECORDED IN COURT
Many Deeds Of Realty Are Filed
During Last Several
Days Here
SALE AT MURRAY HILL
Deeds of the sale and transfer of
real estate in the city and county have
been recorded in the Court Clerk's of
fice the past tevj days as follows:
September IS
Deed front William P. Kline and
•wife to Francis P. McGram, lot of
ground situate in the Boulevard Park,
In the Third Election District of Anne
Arundel county, known as lot No. 24;
consideration $5.
Deed from Francis P. McGram to
Joseph F. Kelly and wife, lot of ground
situate in Boulevard Park, in the
Third Election District of Anne Arun
del county, known as lot No. 24; con
sideration $5.
Deed from the Linthicum Heights
Company of Baltimore city to John W.
Neall and wife, 2 lots of ground situ
ate at Linthicum Heights, in the Fifth
Election District of Anne Arundel
county, known as lots Nos. 141 and
142; consideration $5.
Deed from William Wolters, ct al.,
to The Linthicum Heights Company of
Baltimore city, 1 lot of ground situate
at Linthicum Heights, in the Fifth
Election District of Anne Arundel
county, known as lot No. 161; con
sideration $5.
- Deed from George H. Linthicum and
wife to Thomas A. Tydings and wife,
tract of land situate in the Fifth Elec
tion District of Anne Arundel county;
consideration $lO.
Deed from Hammond J. Dugan and
Wife to Harry O. Hollins and wife,
tract of land situate at “Point Pleas
ants,” on Marley creek, in the Fifth
Election District of Anne Arundel
county; consideration $5.
, Deed from The Workman’s Co-Op
aratlve Realty Company, Incorpor- 1
■ )
Delightful Harvest Dance
By YOUNG LADIES OF SECOND WARD
Benefit INDEPENDENT FIRE COMPANY
BLADEN STREET ARMORY
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1919
FULL ORCHESTRA OF GOOD MUSICIANS
A PRIZE WALTZ WILL BE HELD
Gmli 50c; Ladies 35c. Dancinf 8.30 to 11.30 REFRESHMENTS
. “TELL YOUR STORY WITH FLOWERS” •
There is someone to whom you wish to show affection or esteem,
to congratulate or sympathize with, hut you are
in doubt as to how to do it!
“SAY IT WITH FLOWERS”
What token will he more appropriate or appreciated than a box
of flowers. If you can't come to the store just call 400 and forget
your worry.
We have arranged to handle Dahlias grown on Vincent's Dahlia
field at White Marsh, Md. Anyone that knows flowers, knows that
Vincent is the last word in Dahlias.
Orders should l e placed at lease two days in advance so as to in
sure delivery of absolutely fresh flowers.
We can furnish any kind of flower in season so obey that impulse
uml see us.
By our telegraphic connection with other florists we are able to
deliver flowers to any part of the I T . S. or Canada on the same day as
ordered.
THE KAISER CO.
FLORISTS
Phone 400 100 COLLEGE AVE.
I‘honc 144 All Work Guaranteed
ANNAPOLIS TIRE REPAIR CO.
100 WEST STREET
Now Vndor New Management
J. T. McMAIION, l*ro|.
Vulcanizing—Tire Repairing—Retreading
Honesty Efficiency Courtesy
Free Air Service Auto Accessories
TlßES—Miller, Goodrich, Firestone, Sheridan
QUALITY OUR WATCHWORD
AUTOMOBILE OWNERS TAKE NOTE!
ECONOMY TIRE REPAIR CO.
CHAS. B. MrNEFF. Mgr.
IIS WEST STREET
Retreading Telephone 233 Free Air
A fully equipped tire shop, with practical and competent repair men, who
hare hud factory experience. Full line of accessories.
Koad service work called for and delivered. It will pay you to get our
prices first.
PHONE m-M ' 1.. A. NOWELL, Prop.
NOWELL’S GARAGE
Automobile Repair Work
Accessories of All Kinds
277 WEST STREET
AGENT FOR STANDARD 8; COLUMBIA 6 AND MAXWELL
l-,° 13 , , ; ■ 1
ated, to Mrs. Anna J. Gregory. 2 lots
of ground situate in the Third Election
District of Anne Arundel county,
known as lots Nos. 13 and 14, in sec
tion “X"; consideration sl.
Deed from John K. Sague and wife
and barah O. Drake to Mrs. M. F. S
; Ochse, tract of land situate at Outing
; Park, in the Fifth Election District of
Anne Arundel county; consideration
J $lO.
Deed from Oscar Haelzel and wife
| to H. Clinton Carr, tract of land situ
ate in the Second Election District of
Anne Arundel county, containing one
hundred and sixty acres, two rods and
ten perches of land, more or less; con
i sideration $2,000.
Deed from John C. Fleming and wife
to Albert A. O'Neale, tract of land
I situate in the Fourth Election District
of Anne Arundel county; considera
tion $lO.
Deed from Margaret Kendall and
husband to James N. Galloway and
wife, property situate on 206 Prince
George street, in the city of Annapo
lis. Mary land; consideration $lO.
Deed from James M. Munroe, attor
ney, to Winson G. Gott, two tracts of
land situate in the Third Election Dis
trict of Anne Arundel county, con
taining 10.41 acres of land, more or
less; consideration $6,500.
September 19
Deed from Arthur B. Carter and
wife to Samuel W. Hardesty and wife.
' lot of ground situate on Third street,
in the village of Eastport, in the Sec
ond Election District of Anne Arun
del county; consideration $lO.
Deed from Carey L. Meredith and
wife to Guy R. Clements and wife,
property situate on Murray Hill, in
the city of Annapolis Maryland.known
as N 0.4 Murray avenue; consideration
$lO.
Deed from John F. Kirhy and wife
to William G. Gischel, tract of land
situate in the Fifth Election District
of Anne Arundel county, containing
one acre of land, more or less; con
sideration $5.
Deed from George W. Wolf and wife
to Charles M. Christian and wife, two
tracts of land situate in Anne Arun
del county; consideration SBOO.
<llir (Hirrlr JllatjhmtßP, 3nr.
BE PART OWNER
Buy Stock ol
Platform As Adopted By
G. O. P. State Convention
The plat from adopted yesterday by
the Republican State Convention fob
’ows:
We, the representative of the Re
publican party of Maryland assem
bled in State convention, this 25th
day of September, 1919, in offering
our platform to the voters of the
State, believe that the State and
the nation, as evidenced bv elec- .
tions throughout the country in the
past two years, are looking to the
Republican party to correct the
abuses from which the country is
suffering from reckless extrava
gance, the neglect of proper recon
structive measures, and the tenden
cy to depart from the principles
which have produced the security
and prosperity of our people.
We congratulate our State and
nation on the patriotism of our
people and the unexcelled heroism
of out soldiers and sailors whose
sacrifices and bravery at home and
abroad brought the great war to a
victorious close.
Treaty of Peace.
We believe that a treaty of peace
based on this victory should permit
no surrender of our independent
national sovereignty. We stand
firmly against provisions which
would take from Congress the con
stitutional right to declare wqr and
to determine when our armed forces
should be sent to foreign countries;
which would interfere with the
absolute control over our domestic
affairs, such as iuiigration and the
tariff laws, which would in any
way abridge the policy of the Uni
ted States as laid down in the
Monroe Doctrine; which would im
pose upon this country any obliga
tion to meddle in the disputes
among foreign nations. We favor
reservations that will preserve
American rights and sovereignty to
the American people.
Burdensome Taxes.
The waste, extravagance and in- 1
competence of the Democratic Ad
ministration in nation and State
are directly responsible foF- the
present excessive, discriminating
and unnecessarily burdensome
taxes, and have largely contributed
to the present high cost of living.
We condemn the indefensible ac
tion of the Democratic National
Administration in deliberately
withholding from the people for
eight months after the armistice
was signed vast quantities of food
stuffs and other necessaries of life.
RESUME TRAFFIC
OVER BRIDGE AFTER
i DELAY OF 3 HOURS
(Continued From Page One.)
As told in yesterday's issue of the
Capital, the bridge is the connecting
! link of the boulevard to Annapolis, and
therefore the trouble caused wide
spread inconvenience to hundreds of
automobilists, moving to and from the
city. Naturally, a good deal of adverse
criticism was expressed, especially in
view of the report that the attention
j of officials of the State Roads Commis
j sion has frequently been called to be
unstifle condition of the structure,
i The bridge, as Annapoiitans and the
! public generally will recall, was the
subject of much controversy several
years ago. and was only taken over by
the State Roads Commission after the
! county authorities had pressed the
j mattjer vigorously for several months,
I finally resorting to mandamus pro
! ceedings to gain the desired result.
In the meantime, however, the State
I Roads Commission yielded, and made
i the bridge a part of the State boule
vard from Annapolis to Hanover street
j bridge, which was what the county
authorities claimed all along was their
obligation to do under the provisions
of the act of Legislature.
NOT due to sex alone
Annapolis Wompn Have Learned The
Cause Of Many Mysterious Pains
And Aches
Many women have 'come to know
that sex isn't the reason for all back-'
aches, dizzy headaches and urinary!
disorders. Men have these troubles, j
too, and often they come from kidney
weakness. To live simply, eat spar- j
ingly, take better care of one's self and
to use Doans’ Kidney Pills, is bound to
;help bad kidneys get better. There is
no other remedy so well recommended
by Annapolis people. Read this case:
Mrs. Daisy Como, 16 Holland St.,
Annapolis, says: “For six years I had
; kidney trouble. Whenever I stooped I
suffered from pains in the small of
my back which were as severe as a
toothache. Mornings I felt more tired
than when I went to bed and often j
my feet swelled. I got Doan’s Kidney
Pills at the R. R. Smith Pharmacy and .
the first box brought great relief. 1 1
still use Doan’s whenever I feel in
need of them. Doan's are very effec
tive for kidney trouble and I gladly
recommend them to other kidney suf
ferers.”
Price 60c, at all dealers. Don’t
simply ask for a kidney remedy—get
Doan’s Kidney Pills —the same that
Mrs. Como had. Foster-Milburn Co.,
.Mfgrs., Buffalo. N. Y.
Worth Knowing
Cut steel buttons may be polished j
with powdered pumice stone, slightly l
moistened and applied with a soft:
j brush or cloth. . j
Mismanagement of Railroads.
Wo hold the present Democratic
National Administration responsi
ble for the inefficient political man
agement of the railroads, the mail
service, the telephone nud telo
gmidis, which ha* resulted in an
undue increase of charges, in poor
service and in intolerable incon
venience to the public.
The Harrington Administration.
We condemn in unsparing inefti
cieney, procrastination and ex
travagance of the Harrington ad
ministration. The State govern
ment has ceased to be for the peo
ple and has become of, by and for
a notorious State political machine
in league with that wing of the
city machine dominated by “The”
Kelly. The recent Democratic pri
maries in the city reveal only one
of the resulting debaucheries of a
free government as seen in the
pernicious activities of unworthy
police magistrates and other State
officials, appointed not with the
idea of service to the people but
solely to import and perpetuate the
political machine.
The Democratic convention in its
recent convention made, just ns it
did in 1915, fair promises and
pledges of reform, but the influ
ences which have controlled that
party for the last four years, which
control it now. and which have, in
deed. been confirmed and strength
ened in power in the recent pri
maries of the city organizations,
cannot be counted upon to treat the
pledged of 1919 other than they did
those of 1915.
In pleasing contrast to this rec
ord of broken faith, of pledges dis
regarded once their purpose of
gaining votes had been served, is
the history of the Republicans in
the General Assembly.of 1918. They
treated each plank in their pint
form as a covenant with the peo
p’o and scrupulously performed it.
The greater Baltimore Annexation
bill, the repeal of the Wilson Bal
lot law, are examples of how the
Republicans kept the faith.
Merit System.
The declaration in the Demo
cratic platfrom favoring the adop
tion of the merit system is indefi
nite. That party’B record on this
important question will not con
vince the people of the sincerity of
this pledge. During the many
years of its complete legislative
(Continued On Page Three)
AT THE REPUBLIC TONIGHT
While comedy is Albert Ray’s forti
on the screen, is not because he i;
' really funny or because he tries to lie
funny. It is his very seriousness that
causes laughter in his William Fox pie
turcs. Ray says:
“If von try to be funny in broar
comedy you’ll fail to hit the mark yoi
are aiming at. In such comedy, laugh;
depend on the situations. In ‘Be a Lit
tie Sport,’ for instance, take the scene;
in which the preacher is shown. In tin
early part of the story I call up a regu
lar preacher and tell him to be at my
house at a certain time. When every
thing goes wrong and the girl I expeel
to marry disappears, I forget all about
.that regular preacher and in trying t(
get the SIOO,OOO my uncle has promised
me if I marry on that day I frame uj
with a girl, who is practically a strange;
to me, to go through a fake marriage
ceremony, and I hire an actor to tak*
the part of the preacher. Now, when wi
are allready for the fake marriage, am
tiie regular minister shows up, the situa
tion is naturally laughable. The audi
ence knows that neither I nor the gir
wants a regular marriage, and the audi
ence knows that we are in a tight fix
This is the art in broad comedy. It i
also the art in writing scenarios. Giv<
people the unexpected in all seriousness
and I believe you are bound to make
them laugh. I am pleased that Mr. Fox
has chosen this kind of stories for me
because I believe the happy, fim-eroat
ing stories are the ones that people nr.
looking for at the pre'sont time.”
“Be a Little Sport” will be shown at
the Republic Theater tonight and to
morrow.
AT THE PALACE TONIGHT
During a wait between scenes at th<
; Biograph studio where “The Under
| current,” Select Pictures’ Special at
traction starring Guv Empev was film
ed, the telephone rang and Sergeant
Empey picked up the receiver. Tin
person on the other end of tlie wire wa;
a young woman who wanted to speak
; to the Sergeant.
“I’m his secretary,” said the pep
perv little fighter. “What do you
want ?”
“Where can I see Mr. Empey per
jsonally?” the voice inquired.
“Treat ’Em Rough,” answered the
: Sergeant, meaning the office of the
: magazine he publishes,
j “Don’t get fresh,’ said the girl. “I
shall report you to Mr. Empey.”
Then she hung up the receiver.
S “The Undercurrent,” a photodrama
of today revolving about the home of
the average American working man,
can be seen at the Palace Theater to
night and tomorrow with a wonderful
cast in support of Guy Empey, including
Florence Evelyn Martin, Marguerite
; Courtot, Betty Blythe, Sally Crute and
Charles A. Stevenson.
j— ■ ,
ebr CCirrlr fUaybmtSf, Jur.
BE PART OWNER
Buy Stock ol
BASEBALL FANS \
ON TIPTOES FOR j ;
WORLD'S SERIES
From All Parts Of Country They
Will Flock To Cincinnati For
Games
EXPECT GREAT CROWD
Cincinnati, 0., Sept. 26. — Baseball
enthusiasts from all parts of the conn
fry will comom to Cincinnati to see the j
Cincinnati Nationals and the Chicago
White Sox clash in the world seriesj
games, if letters requesting seat rrser
vations and hotel accommodations can
he relied upon.
President “Carry Herrmann, of
:he Cincinnati Nationals, was besieged
weeks in advance of the closing of the
National League season for tickets for
the games by Cincinnati followers of j
'he “lteds” and by “fans’’ from every i
ection of the country, who desired to
witness the games to be played in this
• ity. Hotels also reported that him !
lreds of requests for rooms had been j
eceived. To give every attention andj
'onvenience to visitors during the j
vorld’s series games the Cincinnati I
'handier of Commerce planned to eo
iperate with the Cincinnati Club man
igement.
Acting on the request of President
Vngust Herrmann, the Convention and
Public Department of the Chamber of
’ommerce named a special committee
if five to devise means for best meet
ng the desires of Mr, Herrmann.
The committee arranged to establish
i hotel bureau, in charge of a compe
tent staff to look after all requests for
lecornmodations. It was decided to list
'very available hotel Fount. ami to add j
‘o these accommodations a survey of
•very room in hoarding houses and pri- j
■ ate residences, where visitors could lie
odged. All these rooms were to be in
spected in advance so there could lie no j
piestion concerning their desirability. !
Word was sent to Washington, I>.
requesting the co-operation of the Rail- j
"oad Administration in the matter of j
ibtaining desirable parking places fori
special Pullman ears carrying large pri
vate parties to the games. It was ox j
>ected that many visitors would utilize I
their cars for sleeping purposes, while!
n the city, providing they had parking
places.
Arrangements also were in prepara
tion for suitable parking places for the
automobiles of out-of-town visitors and !
"or parking places in the vicinity of
Hie baseball park during the games.
For the protection of the patrons
visiting Cincinnati and Chicago during
the playing of the series, detectives
who are specialists in dealing with
•lickpcekets and auto thieves will be!
very active in both cities. A largi !
lumber of Chicago plain clothes men J
will be on duty here while the teams are
n Cincinnati, and in tarn the local ex
nerts will mingle with the crowds when
the scene shifts to Chicago.
Time was when the pickpocket clans
gathered from the four quarters of the
country to follow the pennant-winning
baseball teams to the fields of world’s
series combats. Hut times have cluing
ed, say the police, and now it is easier
‘o steal automobiles than to extract a
fat purse from the pocket of an excited
fan.
The professional “dip” still attends
world’s championship battles, but his
Profession has fallen into decay. The
ine-tirne adept at sniping a sparkler
from a searfpin whose artful methods
combined courage and a sort of leger
demain, is as scarce as radium, accord
ing to detectives.
Picking pockets always was hazard
•his and stealing automobiles has be
come profitable with even less element
of risk. So the pickpocket fraternity
has lost many members to the easier
means of unlawful profit, say the plain
clothes men.
Besides, of late years the police have
'•atalogued the pickpockets pretty
thoroughly. As a world series or otherj
national gathering takes the stage, de
fectives go on watch at the railway
stations. The light fingered gentry arc
met bv the reception committee and os j
•orted to rooms at detective hoadquar- j
ters. where they remain, as guests us- ]
•tally, until those with whom they hoped !
to brush shoulders have gone away. I
Rome “dips’’ escape the* net, how
ever, and practice their art with more !
•>r less success. A world series game i
invariably is the scene of operations
for a number of them, ther thieves are !
here, too. The automobile thieves pre- i
lomiirate.
In three day’s of world series con
( tests between the Chicago Cubs and
Boston Red Rox in Chicago last year,
the police arrested 85 suspected pick
pockets and auto thieves. Nearly 100
motor cars were driven away from the
vicinity of the baseball park by per
sons not their owners. The majority
were recovered but many were not.
If only Senator lodge could read the
things that history is going to say
about him!—Charleston News and
Courier.
The Federal raiders find no strike
among the New York bartenders
New York Sun.
The difference between a buccaneer
and a profiteer is that the buccaneer
is dead.—Los Angeles Times.
NOTICE
! I-ard
j Large cans of milk
: Pork and Beans
Karo syrup *
Pink salmon
Picnic bains and Breakfast* bacon"'.!*!Se
R. E. PERRY, 418 West St,
NOTICE
If you have any ladies’ or sent*' clothe*,
or shoes. of any Lind. Ih.it xu don't need t
please call u up and we will pay you the
highest prices aud remove same at once
riIUNK 501-W
/ 1 ' ” '
SIGN PAINTING
SAMUELW. BR00KS&C0.
CHAS. NELSON H KOOKS
Painters, Decorators
and Paper-Hangers
! Belief Decorations for Parlors.
Halls and Bathrooms
Church Decoration a Specialty
Fresco Painting
No. 13i/£ DEAN STREET
Estimate* Cheerfully Furnished
Telephone 544-AV t
_ _ ?
1N I SE FOR 35 YEARS
BABEK
The Quick And Sure < tire fur
MALARIA
( HILLS, FEVER and
Li grippe
It is a Powerful Tonic and
Appetizer
Will cure that tired feeling, pains in
back, limbs and head. Contain;- no
quinine, arsenic or habit-forming in
gredient. At All Stores.
“BABEK" was used with great suc
cess during tin*
INFLUENZA
epidemic. Take BABEK now .is i pv.
ventlve. 9-25-1 m
Family Washing
Having Just Installed two new I NIVKK
SAL FKKSSFS. with al! MOIIKHN FIJI ll*-
MKNT, designed tor lianilling FAMILY
WASHING. finished in every detail, wo are
now prepared to take rare of this kind of
work at a price as reasonable as that of
the Family Washerwoman. Guarantee of
Complete Satisfaction. No Scorching. AU
Ironing done by steatn process.
Home Laundry Co.
TELEPHONE 131 CAI.VKKT ST.
ol
PALACE THEATRE^
TODAY AND TOMORROW
MATINEE AND NIGHT
”C3vy iipev
“The VKroßafs/ppnr:
“The rn.lereurrent” Is one of the most tifal. lim* h ;nnl <bril
pictures ever wen,
Gny Empey, actor and lighter, who made a Ireim-ii 1 !••<* <•'' 1111
super-prod net ion, “Over the Top,” I* the star in ilii- ),.< ••
Florenee Evelyn Martin co-stars vvlth Sergeant I'm
One of the most wonderful casts ever seen in nti> ) >“'in i- in
I pdcreurrent.” It Includes Marguerite tonrb>t. Sallic * * 1 * •
the, Vera Boehm, William Dunn, Charles \. Slctcn*nii. i*' ; ''
son, Eugene Strong, Frederick R. Ruckl< \, Arthur l,k
Noreross and Harry Lee.
The original story from which the picture was
hy Guy Fmphey, author of “Over the Top.” 1 ir>-f ( .ill” and ” > r 11
a Dugout.”
P-J-0,, Adults 25 Cents, Including War la*
1 llGCS.““children 17 Cer.tf, Including War i i
Republic Theatre
TODAY
i raia:
Albert Ray
WITH
Elinor Fair
i
IN
“Be A Little Sport”
GOOD COMEDY
i-OlTsALii 1
MEW HOME.t|u>
■ sauerkraut
Mbs. .tpi;\ ,
NEOI.IM SOI '
Shoes half s • .. .
Sewed or \ j
S. SCHIFF
t\ * , A;t}l ! o
ACETLEN K \vki * ~
*‘ ° co.
{ \i i KI MU J
Weluine a:
u •
I ir-t K t „ \,.. ir \\ ... v .
Mil M, '
SPECIAL 1-ux IGDAV
10 OFl
on everythin , iv.
J \ y
Telephone H ' M
; ’ Jolm C. ihc- 1 1 x( .
’|'i Ex P crt Watch Repairing
A Specialty
fit M u;\ i \mi \\|
Formerly with i h,,, ..f M .*
THOMAS F. STEVENS
i COVER \t i oi: aiul Hi ({|q t;
PliiiiH and I vtii u, , , r|J | 1(
Jl W ..i I, \ ,
. t
; A. W. PHILLIPS
[ Contractor arc! Builder
* rhitnihfrtiiin's iih liil w . ( t}., r s|| ~f c in .
fil on wiiitltiu s iitul th.t.rs %i\,a .
I’Oiil; out (it,* iMi j ti
riann mill Ml itnm {.irni-lj, ,j f„.
f<t> li* liuihiinjg. .!<! U~i |, kll ), . ,
'• 1’IIONi; Hill .1. I Ml\likl|*i
TOMORROW
JACK PICKFORD j
IN '
“BURGLAR
BY PROXY”
Al*o GOOD (OMf I*

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