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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, November 07, 1919, Image 2

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. innming Capital
AND MARYLAND GAZETTE
Established M*7.
ANKAPULIN, MO.
Published Daily Except Sunday by
THR CAPITAL PUBLMHING COMPANY
THE EVENING CAPITAL
!• on sale at the following placet:
George W. Jones 104 Main St.
William Scbultze M Went St.
Geo. J. lavl* 74 Maryland Atc.
Cha*. G. Feldineyer 50 Maryland Ave.
H/irtln Itaiia<-b.. .(’or. Itaudnll £c King Geo.
Wltllaui Baker West nud Catbe<lral
Delivered In Anuapoll*. Egatport. Ger
tnautowu and West Annapolis by carrier
for :m) cents per month.
You coil have the EVENING CAPITAL
mailed to you when away from the city
by leaving your name and address at the
office. f>>r :W' ee#t per month; $2.50 per
year, payable in advance, to any Poatomce
lp ('lilted States or Canada.
Bntered at Annapolis Postotfire a a
Second Class Matter.
Member of Tbe Associated Press
The Associated Press Is exclu
sively entitled to the use for re- .
publication of all news credited to
it or not otherwise credited in tills
pa|ier and also the local news pub
lished herein. All rights of re
puldlcntlon of special dispatches
herein are also reserved.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7. 1919.
RATIFY THE TREATY
Many newspapers in the West
are uniting in an appeal to the
Senate of the United States for a
speedy ratification of the Peace
Treaty and Covenant. The ap
peal is as follows:
The Senate has had ample time
for debate. It is not anticipated
that the Treaty and Covenant are
to be defeated in the end. There
fore, further delay simply serves
to disturb and agitate the coun
' try. Further delay stands in the
. way of real progress toward a
genuine resumption of pre-war
conditions.
The senate should take such
action as shall not weaken the or
ganization as the League of Na
tions. The League of Nations is
a move in the right direction, en
titled to a fair and earnest trial.
We believe such a league honest
ly entered upon and sincerely ad
hered to would promote the peace
of the world.. It is an effort to
do what all sane peoples should
desire and do desire.
Our allies are awaiting our ac
tion. Further delay accom
plishes nothing for good hut is
a constant invitation to disorder
and lawlessness in many other
countries. Patriotism requires
an immediate adjustment of the
differences at Washington, re
sulting in the final ratification of
the treaty and covenant.
THE GREAT VIRTFES
Paganism was insistent on jus
tice; it taught courage of a high
order; it extolled and often ex
emplified private honesty and
morality; it set great store on
loyalty and patriotism. All of
these virtues it argued to con
form with reason and its philos
ophers based their doctrine on a
rational premise and method.
And paganism lived in a hopeless
world until it gave place to a
new doctrine.
The Christian religion put its
great stamp of approval on three
cardinal virtues, faith, hope and
charity. Not any of these is so
easily supported by reason as are
the pagan’s virtues. Faith and
hope make belief transcend fact.
Charity is best when it is not a
reasoned process.
Just now it is the three great;
virtues we need in particular in
fluence. We need faith that the
great majority of men are at the !
last fair-minded and desirous ofj
ordered life. We need hope that |
this spirit will become active!
soon to meet the self, group, and
cJqjAjf efforts .that are making a j
turmoil of an ordered world. \\ e
need charity toward the many j
who are following the thought of
others and not thinking for
themselves. Without these vir-j
tues itf operation we are in dan- j
ger of adhering again to the doc
trine that might makes right and
such adherence brings havoc.
WHAT THE STRIKE MEANS
Here is what the coal strike
means to the public. The con
sumption of bituminous coal in
public utilities and in domestic
uses at the wage scale demanded
by the miners would add to the!
*HE EVENING CAPITAL AND MARYLAND GAZETTE, ANN A HOLTS, MARYLAND, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, m.
cost of its production annually a
jsum of approximately $731,983,-
1776; the added cost to produc
tion of coal for the railroads
would be in approximate figures
$.'500,000,000. The total increase
of cost production under the de
jmanded wage scale thus becomes
i 51,031,983,776. And the public is
'most vitally interested because
this money w ill in one way or j
j another come out of its pockets.
'•Vet the public in the person of its
' ■ President is defied and told that
. it “complicates the situation.”
LEGISLATION FOR SOLDIERS
Soldiers are waiting more or
less patiently to find what Con
gress is going to do te redeem
Republican promises of compen
satory legislation. Republican
[ leaders reply that they are wait
ing to ascertain what the soldiers
desire. Hut these same leaders
didn’t consult the soldiers last
Spring before making their
pledges of immediate action,
111 II I'f'W'Wl" I
MUCH MOOTED GAS
QUESTION BEFORE
THE CIVIC LEAGUE
l (Continued From Page One)
*
' man's section, who, Mrs. Linthicum
■ said, had won encomiums of the State
said, had won ecomiums of the men all
over the State as well as of the wo
man, for her splendid work duriug the
I war and since.
Mr. Slioeiii.tker's, Address
Airs. Shoemaker, to whom public
speaking is not unfamiliar, spoke in
> conversational style, and at once gain
. ed and held the close attention of her
audience. She said the question of
women today is “How am 1 to do the
■ work of my country in peace time as
• in war time?’’ Women’s work, she
Haiti, is of paramount importance. She
'.s glad to do what work she is called
1 upon to do without thought of self
During the war work, Mrs. Shoemaker
said, woman had been unfamiliar with
it and had sometimes stumbled and
had fallen, but she had always picked
herself up again, and had gone on.
The women must give their service
in this time of a merciful peace, Mrs.
Shoemaker said, as they had done sc
efficiently and faithfully in war time
Patriotism is a necessity in time of
oeace as in time of war. She reviewed,
at length, the work done by the Balti
more Civic League, which is an 8-vear
old organization. She told of its
board of trustees, its executive board,
ind various committees through which
the work is systematized. She told of
'he home garden work, the cultivation
of back lots, the work of looking after
the collection of city refuse, the Balti
more piggery, for which that city’s
league had fought. She outlined the
educational work, the milk containers,
the covered garbage can, all of which
had been accomplished by Baltimore’s
women banded together, but who were
still wrestling with the smoke situa
tion.
Mrs. Shoemaker gave a brief outline
if the present campaign for meniber
ihip. and the vital question of raising
the teachers’ salaries in Baltimore and
the effort of rousing the people to this
natter. She said the government ii
only as good as we. the people demand
hat it shall be. and the people must
be insistent, consistent and persistent
n demanding good government. The
work, therefore of the Civic League is
never done. It is a work of construc
tion, which brings its own recompense
ind we should see to it that its grow 7 :
nto a nearly perfect organization.
Mrs. Wood’s Address
In introducing the next speaker, the
presiding officer said she had been
pleased to hear the Governor in his ad
dress to the women at Cambridge a
day or two ago say that he was sur
prised to find the women of Maryland
so well organized and he paid high
tribute to their war work. Mrs. Wood
was next introduced as the only wo
man of tV.e Food Commission appoint
ed on that board by the Governor. Mrs
Wood told interestingly of the work of
the commission, which is an extension
i of the work in line with the Govern
ment Food Commission of war time
With the signing of the armistice, the
Federal Food Commission ceased func
tioning. she said, and it became neces
sary for Governors of several States to
appoint commissions to take up the
work of looking after profiteering, rea
i sons for high cost of living .etc. Gov
j ernor Harrington had appointed such
, a commission for Maryland, of which
she had the honor to be the only wO
j man chosen. The object of the com
j mission is to safeguard the public. She
gave an epitome of the work being
! done.
Upon investigation. Mrs. Wood said.
: *.he commission found much of the H
i C. L. to be caused by lack of produc
j lion It is necessary to consume just
as little as possible, but to produce just
jas much as possible. She spoke of
some unfair dealers, but said there are
but few. aud the act is punishable by
fine of $5,000 and imprisonment.
Baltimore Milk 16 Cents
Mrs. Wood gave some in her audi
fence a shock when she said Baltimore ;
milk is but 16 cents per quart, while :
most housekeepers in Annapolis are 1
paying 20. and some 23 cents per 1
quart. A few said they are paying 18, <
and one said he was paying 15, but it <
was affirmed that the lower price !
• dairymen have a limited number of pa- •
trons, and no others need apply. Mrs.
"Wood said Baltimore's milk price had
been regulated by Dr. King, the State's
milk arbitrator, and he will come to
Annapolis and look into tbe 20 cents
per quart milk, if asked to. Baltimore
milk has never been more than 19
cents per quart, Mrs. Wood said, but
Dr. King, has had it reduced to 16
cents, while Annapolis pays 4 cents
more, on an average.
Sugar Hoarding
Mrs. Wood told of sugar hoarding,
| and said one dealer in Baltimore was
l found to have 18.000 pounds, and this
had been discovered by Governor
Harrington’s Food Commission, who
had distributed to the orphan asylums
and aged men’s and women’s homes
and those who needed sugar most. In
closing she said the Food Commission
has proved Hself a benefit to Mary
land. and it has appointed a fair price
committee that is doing good work.
Major Dtj Speiks
Mayor J. J. Levy made an ad
dress in which he said he would
be glad to co-operate with the
Civic League in its work, and urged
them to call upon him and the City
Council. He, said he realized the citv’s
untidy condition at the present time
and for some months past, but it was
due to low state of finances, that the
city was almost bankrupt and had not
j sufficient money in the treasury to
clean the streets properly. The finan
ces, he said, are fII.OOO behind, due to
loss of certain revenues, and yet the
city proposes to improve the citv dock
at a cost of SII,OOO with bulkhead and
dredge before the end of the fiscal
year making the city’s debt some $20.-
000.
Opposes Outside Fish Market
Nlayor Levy urged upon the Civic.
League to take up the matter of the
outside fish market, which he said
was wholly unnecessary and could be
placed under cover with the market
proper, in which he said only 15 stalls
were under rental. He was strong in
his argument against maintaining the
fish market on the city dock for the
benefit of three or four fishermen who
pay but a small rental. It costs twice
as much to maintain two buildings, he
said, as it does one, and ,this is what
the city is doing unnecessarily with
its two markets, which could easily be
placed under one roof. He touched
upon the gas question and dwelt at
length upon the water question and
the filtration plant, which he said he
strenuously opposed because he said
he believes there should be a greater
water supply first. He spoke praise
worthily of the Senator-elect and said
he would make an endeavor at the
coming Legislature to place the con
trol of the water in the city's hands.
He urged the Civic League to devise
ways and means of helping the city in
these troublesome matters of market,
gas and water.
Mr. Connolly On Gas
For five or six years, Mr. Connolly
said, gas had been a troublesome ques
tion in Annapolis, although since its \
Installation at Germantown and East- \
port there had been but five com- j
plaints. After outlining the method
of manufacture, he told of the difficul
ty in procuring the right kind of coal,
and sufficient labor. He placed much
of the blame on tbe installation of gas
ranges and gas water- heaters in the
houses about town that drew their gas
supply from the old gas pipes, far too
small to supply the gas sufficient for
the increased demand of service. He
said all meters are sent by the Public
Service Commission sealed and per
fectly tested before being installed.
Some of these of late have failed to
register at all because of bad pipes,
corrosion and other conditions. A new
main has recently been placed down
Calvert and Cathedral streets, which 1
is much larger and. will later be ex- j
tended down Gloucester street to the
bridge. This should improve gas con
ditions, although Mr. Connolly admit
ted there was need of a larger plant.
Springs A Surprise
That there will probably be a much
larger plant, and that very soon, was a
surprise sprung by Mr. Connolly, who
said the Public Utilities is considering
the installation of such a plant in or
der to furnish gas to the Naval Acad
emy. with whom at present, negotia
tions are underway. The enlarged plant
will greatly help conditions in Anna
polis, he said. The Public Utilities
urges the Civic League to examine in
to conditions, and the League, he said
“can do a world of good by insisting
that large gas pipes be installed in
houses in Annapolis and regulations
be complied with.”
Annapolis, Mr. Connolly said, is the
only city that is not governed by such
regulations, concerning size, etc., of
pipes. He said the company is en
deavoring to satisfy consumers to the
best ol its ability.
Open Discussion Of Members
Open discussion on the much-moot
:ed gas question followed. Mrs. Cresap
brought out several matters of import
ance, as did Miss Riordan, and Mrs
Weems Ridout, who is on the line of
the new main, told of bad conditions
at her home, lack of proper supply,
etc., with new pipes recently installed.
Miss Katherine Walton, a former
president of the Annapolis Civic
League, spoke of the work done by the
organization.
A rising vote of thanks was given
the visiting speakers, the Mayor and
Mr. Connolly, of the Gas Company.
Tbe Strong Withstand Tbe Heat of
Summer Better Than The Weak
Old people who are feeble and
younger people who are weak, will be
strengthened and enabled to go
through the depressing heat of sum
mer by taking GROVE’S
chill TONIC. It purifies and enriches
the blood and builds up the whole
system. Yon can feels its Streng
thening, Invigorating Effect. bOc.
f
COROSH JEWELRY STORE \
OPEN AT NEW STAND
Main street’s enlarged jewelry store,
to be conducted by F. Corosh. who
has b?ea in nj ".nsir.es • here for a
number of yea-s, is r.ow open full
fledge.
The store is located at No. 180 Main
street, occupied for many years by
the late M. Boessel. and later con- 1
ducted by the heirs of the estate, and j
was purchased by Mr. Corosh a few '
months ago. Mr. Corosh has been
conducting the jewelry and watch re
! pairing business at 192 Main street.
' The deal for the new establishment
also included the three-story brick
dwelling which, with the members of !
his family Mr. Corosh is now occu- j
j pying.
RESULTS THAT REMAIN
I Are Appreciated By Annapolis People
Thousands who suffer from back
ache and kidney comj laint have tried
one remedy after another, finding
only temporary benefit. This is dis
couraging, but there is one kidney
medicine that has earned a reputation
i for lasting results and there is plenty
jof proof of its merit right here in
! Annapolis.
Here is the testimony of one who
’: used Doan's Kidney Pills years ago. ;
; and now makes her testimony even
'; stronger..
j Mrs Charles Ziehlke, 96 West street
! Annapolis, says: “I had a great deal;
! of trouble from my back and kidneys.: i
j My back pained almost constantly and j
l often I was dizzy and nervous. Sec
mg Doan's Kidney Pills advertised, 1 ]
got some and they helped me at once
• l have had no kidney trouble since.” j
THE RESULTS LASTED.
More than two years later Mrs i
i Ziehlke said.: “I gladly confirm my ,
j former statement in praise of Doan's ;
Kidney Pills They cured me and 1
| have had no return of kidney trouble.”
Price 60c, at all dealers Don’t aim
j ply ask for a kidney remedy—get :
Doan’s Kidney Pills —the same that
Mrs. Ziehlke had. Foster-Milburn Co.,
Mfgrs.. Buffalo. N. Y.
The Annapolis Jobbing Co.
Phone 449-W 49 SECOND ST.
! COLD WEATHER IS COMING.
BE PREPARED. ,
Heaters, Ranges and Roofing put
i In first-class condition.
Promptness and Satisfaction
Guaranteed
i nltl ;
'r— - ~ >
I *
SIGN PAINTING
j SAMI ELW. BROOKS & CO.
CHAS. NELSON BROOKS
Painters, Decorators
and Paper - Hangers
Relief Decorations for Parlors,
Halls and Bathrooms
Church Decoration a Specialty
Fresco Fainting
No. 13% DEAN STREET
Estimates Cheerfully Furnished
Telephone 544-W
V ■rr.^rrrr-^ rr"" /
Fur Work
Fur Coats, Collars And Muffs Rellned.
Repaired And Made Over.
Children’s Sewing A Specialty
MRS. HUNT
197 MAIN ST. n2(*
i •
ANNAPOLIS
ACETLENE WELDING CO.
ALL KINDS OF
Welding and Brazing
Radiator Repairing
Flrt St., Near West. St. :: Annapolis, Md
TELEPHONE 270 *2S-t>
FOR SALE
1 Winchester Pump Gun, 12-gauge,
1 H. C, Fox Double-Barrel, Hammer
less, 12-gauge. Gqn Shells, any gauge,
at the best price. See us first and savi
money.
JOS. LEVY,
73 West St.
Telephone 409-M. sll-tt
• ■— ...
John C. Boessel & Co.
Expert Watch Repairing
• A Specialty
tl MARYLAND AYE.
Formerly with Firm of M. Boots*
• *
ORDER NOW
CORDWOOD
IN CORD OR STOVE LENGTHS
.DELIVERED DIRECT
FROM THE WOODS
A. S. McMULLEN
BOX #9. BOITK .V ANNAPQLIS, Ml>.
Telephone 4934, or Leave Order At
, Annapolis Restaurant n4-tf
! ■
AUTOMOBILE
for Rsart
AUTOMOBILE FOR RENT
New Baby Grand touring car
for rent; $2.50 per hour.
Phone 64-R. nlO
i *—! —r!
CLASSIFIED ADS. |
LOST AND FOUND. WANT*®;
rOX BALK AND FOR KKN*
t 1
10111 TO LOAN
MONEY TO LOAN—Money to loan on
mottgure- Apply to Wluson G djtt
Anuupol's. Md. jylß-H
MONEY TO LOAN —On mortpage in sums j
i to suit on reasonable terms. Partial j
payment allowed. Jaute* M. Munroe. At-,
| torney. Iris-tf
WANTED
- i
WANTED—DeII boy. Apply t<> Htel
Maryland. nlu •
WANTED —R.-ibv carriage in rood condt
i tii m. Apply ’-‘UP Duke ->f Glom-eau'r
street. nlu
WANTED —First-class laundress; refer
ences desired. Apply -’C I pslutr Row.
nlo-tf
WANTED —t’olored girl to make herself
generally useful. A ppty !C Conduit
street.
\\ \nted—To rent furnished apartment.
:: adults. Apply No. 230. Capital urti.e.
lilt)
WANTED Three unfurnished room a lot ,
Mght housekeeping. Address - _’4T Capital i
Ottl.v. I
WANTED Au experiem-cd clerk for retail!
I meat store for Saturday only. Apply ;
• Jreenwald s Community Market. :t4 Mar :
! ket Space.
i W ANTED Two women as cook and lioiisa>_
maid. Apply IKS Prince i leorite at, N.
W ANTED Experienced colored scourer I
and premier; will pay a week to ri!it j
party. Apply to Annapolis Tailoring * o._
1 Main street. ID j
,W t N TED Salesladies Apply t is. .n j
Shacks. :!7 West str<st. n” j
WANTED —Young married couple desire
two or tliris- rooms, furvished or tin
furnished, by January tirst, or room and
board in private family; beat of refer
' ernes. Address Kox 24ft, Capital OtN*
nl:*> I
; W ANTED—Double-barreled. 12-tillage shot ‘
gun. Apply 231. Capital OHU-e stating i
I condition .type and prii-e. nlO j
I WANTED VoURg man requires roiMU COO -
: fortaldy heated, electrically lighted: no j
I candidates boarding bouses. November i
13th. State name, address, amount |
monthly rental. No. 232, Capital office, j
tilt) i
WANTED—Carpenters, 4 first-class: KV I
j hour for inside work. Levering & (Jarr!
! trues. Naval Academy. o'J.Vtf j
POSITION "WANTED
POSITION W ANTED—Young man wants i
position as stenographer or bookkeeper. ]
:*. years experience, references. 47 Mary- |
land avenue, or phone 33-W. n7 i
FOR SALE
EOK SALE—lftlft l-’ord touring car for sale j
cheap; in excellent condition. Winter
sons Garage. nlu
FOR SALE—A square piano. Apply HU*
Duke of Gloucester street. nil)
EOK SALK—One brown caracul fur coat,
size :tO, brocade lined. 27 inches long;
perfect condition. Also. 14 all-wool gray
blankets, four feet, six inches wide. Ap
ply 24,5, Capital Office. nlu
EOK SALE —Delivery of my new Ford
having been promised in few days w!!'
sell inv 11K Ford, in excellent running
c-'er fo- !>v K. ID (WAT, Alin.lP
oils R. F. 1). Phone 1824 F-0. NS
for BALK—Most desirable waterfrbnit
in West Annapolis, cor. Monterey ave.
and Annup-di* st.: about one acre, 7-
rootn house, slecpiug porch, electricity,
well water, garage, chicken yard, all
kinds fruit and shrubbery, wharf and
soring mi shore. Apply on premises or
C. F. Lee. NS
EOK SALE —tine 23-ft, hnttenu. 7-ft. beam,
t! 11. P, engine: good condition; 1 pait
••o.font rakes, cheap. W. ROGERS, cor.
Monterey ave. and Annapolis st.. West
Annapolis. N>
EOK SAL*:—Small Metz delivery autumn
bile cheap. Apply 11 West st. Xi
FOR SALE:—One L. C. Smith 12-gauge. 1
Fulton Pi-gauge, I Stevens 12-gauge
hnmmerless. t Winchester six-shot shot
gun hnmmerless. Ten per cent, discount
on all hunting goods: shot gun shells
nil gauges; 40ft-M. JOS LEVY, 7‘. Wes'
Nti-tf
E’OK KALE—One square piano. Apply
West, street. nil
E’OK SALE—Fresh cows with calves; also
buy cows nnd calves. Apply 8 Jefferson
street:‘also pays highest price for poul
try. Tel. 550-M. nls
FOR SALE
Lot and dwelling known ns No. 37 Cal
vert street. s3-tf
One-half acre with six room bnngalow,
bath, elec, lights, well water. Price
SIBOO.
Desirable lot on cor. mil and Jefferson
Street.
Large lot on Madison street.
C-rooni semi-bungalow nt West Annap
olis, lot 100x130 ft. Price $2,800; fe-ms
08 tf.
8- room bouse at No. 8 Itevell street, with
large lot and all conveniences.
New 7-ronni bungalow, with eonvett!
ences, lot 30x200 feet. oi:;-tf
CHAS. F. LEE
te:l. nos
FOR SALE
Modern bungalow tm the Severn River,
four acres: fruit and shade trees.
Seven-room dwelling on Severn Avenue.
Eastport; water in kitchen; gas light.
Dwelling—No. 5 Cathedral Street.
Completely furnished cottage at Arundel
ou-tbe-15ay.
Dwelling—Seven rooms on East Street.
Modern bungalow, near Annapolis; elec
tric lights: heating system; all modern
conveniences.
B. J. IV I EGA RI)
PHONE 439-J.
n*-
FOR RENT
E’OR KENT—One, live-room house, near
lglehart station, with water in house;
tire wood free. Apply N. Sahllrt, lgle
hart. u io
FOR KENT—Small furnished flat for
housekeeping. *4 week. Inquire 122 D( v
street. f N 8 i
FOR RENT—Furnished room, with use of j
bath: electric light. Apply ftO Charles
street. tf;
E'OR RENT—Warm front room,, well fur
nished. including desk and telephone; for
gentleman only. Apply No. 24b, Capita’
FOR KENT —Store on West Street with ea- I
tabllahed and profitable grocery business.
Cbas. F. Lee. TeL 60J.
FOK KENT— 27S-acre stock and grain
farm on Chesapeake Bay, near Church
ton, Anne Arnndel county. Applicant
must have stock and equipment. Eugene
P. Childs. 524-tf
FOB KENT—Upright piano; $5.00 per
month. Apply B. Q. Chaney, 15® West
street. __ slTtf
Keeping the home fires burning is
now a first-line Job.—-Philadelphia
'North American.
V v
To peel ripe tomatoes without put
ting in hot water, press the back
edge of the blade of the knife gently
all over the surface of the tomato,
then make an incision in the skin
with the sharp edge of the knife with
the sharp edge of the knife and it can
be peeled off and the tomato served
| immediately.
NOTICE
Have your auto repaired in your
own garage under your own super
vision.
We are prepared to make minor
adjustments or major repairs to Auto
mobiles. Trucks, or Gas Engines, on
your own premises by competent
workmen. We will repair your truck
over night, thus avoiding loss of time
for repairs.
All work guaranteed. Price reason
able.
CALL 107-M n 27
DR. C. C. RIPLEY
Osteopathic Physician
9 MARYLAND AVENUE
Tuesday Friday from 9a. m.to sp. m.
tblkpiioni: S4I-.I
toll
i
NEOLIN SOLES
Shoes half soled and heeled
Sewed or Nailed. Heasoable Prices
S. SCHIFF
33 y 2 West St.
ESTABLISHED W*
The Annapolis Savings Institution
WEST STREET
Total Assets. . . . s9oii,(Mii>.jio
Number of Depositors, . . ijoti
Pays 4 per cent interest on Deposits. Pnyabjo J.m*. n k- ;i , , ■ .
Ist. Compound interest paid on di-po.-i; , i :: ~'
Depository of CDy and County Sinking Funds i> |
Funds. 9
All Its Investments and entire Management subj. • • annual , > ru
ination by State Bank Examiners.
Loans money on first mortgage cf Ileal Estate up r,< v p ir
tial payments allowed Also on note with aj.r- v. i.r r,i
FRANK H. STOCKETT, . . I'r. :
WM. N. WOODWARD, . . Vico-Pn „|, , lt
D. ALLEIN WELCH ( ,ish , r
SAMUEL BROOKE. . Assistant ( a in. r
JAMES M. MUN HOE Solicitor
Banking Hours: 9A.M.t03 P. M. Saturday: !\. ij. to >|,
~ ----- -- ,
THOMAS F.jSTEVENS
CONTRACTOR and BUILDER
_____
Plans and EKtlnmlr* (liven Promptly
Job \\ urk A .Specialty
Phone 707-J
FIRE INSURANCE
REAL ESTATE
FTBIfISHED HOCBEB FOB BENT
NOTAKY PCBUO
ARTHUR bTwHEATLEY
No. 17 School Street
CHARLES M. CARLSON
160 LLOI’CKHTKB BT.
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
PHONE 37
Estimate* and Plane Fnrnlehed
W. B. CHILDS
Electrical Contractor
Office and Shop—l 79 Conduit Street
Phone 760
GEO. W. JONES
Circulating Library
The following hooka bare been added U
the Library: ,
‘‘The Dwelling Place of Light,” by Win
aton Churchill.
“The Inevitable Balance Sheet," by Ka
rlna Trash.
“A Circuit Blder’a Wife,” by Cora Har- i
rla.
“Kenny,” by Leonora Dalrymple.
“My Four Years In Germany,” by J.
W. Gerard.
Your Treasurer la,” by Holman 1
i ‘‘The Clue In The Air,” by Isabel Oi
trander.
TEBMB:—New Books, te per day.
Old Books, lc. per day.
r="" : '
“The Bank That Brought 4% To Annapolis’
The Annapolis Bank
OF THE EASTERN SHORE TRt ST CO.
Church Circle and Gloucester Street
Bonking Hours : 9A.M.103 P. M. Daily
4 Per Cent Paid on Savings Accounts
Checking Account* Solicited
W. MEADE IIOIXADAV v 'to!SK
(MAKERS F. LEE * “ V .-hiT
DENNIS J. THOMPSON ,
JOHN M. ORKEN j
DlrtrtM’it
W. Meade Holla.lay. Charles F. I". ™
Safe Deposit Boxes
W. B. & A. Electric
Railroad.
MID-mv TFUIIMiH
Hs!f n.mr’.t S. rv . <■ . . .
Bela veil ■ A- * .*• ' rt,,..,
" mhlngton • ,
.\V:,S> M V
pass-:-i:. . , , •• •
Aca.a-.u) .1 ~ ,
■ IF\\ K\\\x| ~,
\\ r.l t rr.-| ~ il()
MO. vV.%O . - - .
1“ *. n \ v V ' ■
M St.
11.If* AM .x
■ Leavi N.
I earlier: n. -i
St. ..! . K , \x. , ' ,
enriu r.
t ‘‘oniiectii.g :ii i. s ,
‘ ■ H.
I> \> I It \ | ; IM.i’ti
6.3. V S "St u
r::,:.. t j --i. ' . ' . vj.
• r *•'. j- , 1 k ' o’
A. M. • ' - s
• All t rat. sre ,-tx,. r
1 st •.! |, : “ •••
Naval \ xJ ; t; , • V
r H'U .1 ■ ; a .
1 I \\ V " V-tll \ |
ti.oo, v i imi i ,
1 .Nt. * •J.Ud <.* s \ , ' V V • V
7.00. M \
i ll>a:- .*\.'i ,-t v vs.
oLiviil Aliliii].. !
. V"' (Irk'-t m |
our < lt\ ti k, • , il. . u * it
State 11..u5, S. !•;. '
Bladeu Sin-etw ( , <
-'Hotel. " v
j NOTICE! "
Charts Houston. K,an- t > Jst
Champion Sh.ic Artist
Ladies’ Shoes T'-;p t ciallv
Shoes Dyed s„ | y... rl .'
' ’i.irkii S|.*c
“Ye Ferry Inn”
Be sure and visit the "INN”
At Claiborne, situated beside the
Perry Pier. Special attention to
automobile and picnic, parties.
Everybody welcome.
WALTER C.MUNROE
CIVIL I.M.INMfI
Surveying. Pint*. M-i?-H|*l
and Suburban Wat. r Sjui.-u,* utiU r+via^i)
Dlaposal.
Savings Bank Building
AnnapolU, Vt.l.
! WILLIAM. MOSS (
HART BUILDING
t Annapolis, Maryland |
IFire Insurance Auctioneer |
Money Loaned on jj
Houses Rented Rent Collected g
n 3
E. O LEAGUE
ROOFING :tnr) M‘<l ll'C
Sheet Iron, Stov*-. I urnace
work arid repair ..g.
Phone Tin - w rcy
C. M. BASSFORD
CONTRACTOR and BUILDEB
PLAKTKBINt. <*• 'l hlNl,,<
Fourth Street. Lastport. 'l'l*
I'*}

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