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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, January 22, 1920, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1920-01-22/ed-1/seq-4/

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PISSEN6EB STEAMER ST. LOUIS WITH
; WAR HISTORY NOW 1 BLACKENED HULL
l_i
? - f
t (By Tbe A**Ki*ted fcr **.)
New fork, Jan.ftt—'The passenger,
steamship St. Louis, with a record of
having served with distinction r
through two wars in which the United
States was a belligerant. and in the>
interval carrying passengers across
the Atlantic under the American hag.
is noW a blackened bull, the victim
of a Are started by a painters’ torch
The big ship was being recondi
tioned at a ship yard for service
after her second honorable discharge;
frcrtn the “colors” when the accident;
took place. Her owners, the Amer-;
lean Line, eay she can be repaired,
but it will mean practically rebuild
ing her and it is a task of many
months.
The St. Louis, was christened by
Mrs. Grover Cleveland Her construc
tion and launching was an epoch in
American shipbuilding in that she
was the first "ocean greyhound’’ to
be built in this country. She made'
her first voyage in June of 1895. Un-,
der a contract with the American;
government she was entrusted with
the fast mail of England and Europe.
Under command of Captain W
Goodrich. U. 8. N„ she was equipped
with heavy guns as an auxiliary
cruiser in the Spanish-Ainerican war.
Her first adventure of note was when |
BRAZIL WOULD HAVE ‘
NATIONAL PANTHEON
AT CENTENARY EVENT
(Correspondence Associated Press.)
Klo de Janeiro, Jan. I, Proposal
has been made that a national pan
theon for ali the illustrious person
ages 6f Brazil should be erected here
in connection with the celebration of
the centenary of Brazilian indepen- 1
deuce in 1922.
Plans for this 100th anniversary
which have been submitted to the
Chambef of Deputies would cost $12,-
500,000. They include an exposition
of fine arts, erection of a national
historical museum, and composition
of an historical opera and a drama.
The scheme also provides for the
organization fcf a great university.
Sports will be on feature of the cele
bration.
It' is proposed to hold the celebra
tion in September. Brazil separated
froq t the Kingdom of 4*ortugal and
was proclaimed independent by Don
Pedro I, the first emperor of Brazil,
tion' took place In Rao Paulo and It
la'.proposed to erect there one of the
4!*o*t commemorative monuments in
tfte new world.
Vacancies at w. p.
y BXAMS LESS STRINGENT
Owing to the difficulty the War De-!
pkrtinent has in getting the author
lied complement of cadets at the
West Point Military Academy, the re
quirements for admission have been
less stringent. Heretofore the
eutrance examination has been waiv
ed only for candidates who had grad- 1
hated from an accredited prepara
tory or public high school. The
change Just made provides that a can
didate who is in actual attendance
in his senior year at such accredited i
institutions may submit a certificatel
which, if satisfactory in other re
spects. will be accepted in lieu of the
mental examination, on condition that
the candidate remains in school and;
completes his course.
It is stated that while this change!
in no manner lowers the standard of
the entrance requirements for West
Point, it will make it possible for
many young tuen to enter tbe insti
tution at least one year earlier than
under the former regulation, and will
undoubtedly result in great, advan
tage not only to candidates, but also
to the Military Academy and to the
Army.
There are at present 591 vacancies
in congressional districts, and of that
number 211, or 36 per cent, have not
yet been designated
a M
A human riddle is any man or wo
man you happen to know—including
yodrself.
** BEAR’S -m
EMULSION
—FOB—
CotghaColtfaßreseklds
l Weak Üb*
Ask year drugnt for
BEAR’S. Accept o mUntats
May be ordered direct from
JOHN D. BEAR
ttktM. Va.
mmr
t
, she .Was ordered to cut the cable be
tween Santiago de Cuba and Kings
rton, Jamaica. Running up until Bhe
was under the direct fire of the guns
of Morro Castle. American gunners
sent back shot for shot and succeed
ed in silencing all but the mortar bat
teries of the fortification, while sai
lors were fishing out and cutting the
cable line.
On June 13, 1898, she capture! the
British freighter Twickenham which
was taking a cargo of coal Into San
jtiago presumably to be used for the
Spanish fleet. She was off that port
when Admiral Cervera made his dash
for the open sea, and she brought to
Portsmouth. N. H., the captured
Spanish Admiral and 746 members of
1 lie crew of his defeated fleet.
In 1917 when the United Slates
joined the war against Germany, the
St. Louis was one of the first Amer-!
'lean passenger ships to be armed and
to defy the German submarine and |
mines. -She had many narrow es
capes, and once was actually hit by
a torpedo but without serious dam
age. She carried to and from France
thousands of American soldiers and
she was one of the last ships to be
released from duty to return to pur
j suits of peace.
GOVERNOR’S PLAN
ON ROAD BUILDING
IS CALLED SOUND
(Continued From Page One)
j for the counties. Under the Governor’s
! plan, there would be a bond issue of
fifteen million dollars, or an expendi
ture of $1,500,000 each year for a period
of tell years. It also means that roads
conetting with the main State arteries
will jte constructed.
Sebator Mclntosh, of Baltimore
county, presided over the conference,
and among the first speakers was
! Senator Brady, of Anne Arundel. In
stancing the value of gqod roads to a
community, Senator Brady referred to
the Annapolis-Baltimore boulevard,
the bill providing for the construction
of which was introduced by him ten
years ago. He also made reference to
the fact that the Severn river bridge is
part of his highway, and the South
river bridge, a part of the Southern
Maryland roadway, the two links forfii
ing one of the most important of the
State arteries of roads.
Senator Brady said that on the
basis of division as suggested, by
which 100 miles of roads would be
built each year, only between 3% and
4 m4les would be built each year in
Ann* Arundel. “Suppose,” asked
Sonfrtor Bradv. “Anne Arundel should
desire to build 15 miles each year?”
To this. Governor Ritchie replied:
“The mileage in each county is a ques
. tion of detail. If Anne Arundel goes
beyond the fund allotted, of course,
i that is Anne Arundel’s business.”
Senator Brady also asked whether the
< main arteries agreed upon fen years
ago would be built. Chairman Zouck.
iof the Roads Commission, answered
i this by saying they would be connect
ed if provision is made for such con
; struction.
It was pointed out, in the course of
the discussions, that the cost of high
grade road construction now is $30,000
>t>r more per mile, and a large major
ity of the Senators and Delegates pres
ent took the view that the high cost
would be better economy in the long
| run. „
* Zouck Outlines Plans
j TH$ first speaker called upon by the
Governor was Chairman Frank 11.
Zouck, of the State Roads Commission,
I who was asked to explain the proposi
| tion. The Governor later said that The
program of road building in his in
augural address had been suggested
chiefly by Mr. Zouck.
As has been previously stated, the
program is in effect as follows: That
the State should match the Federal ap
propriation of $850,000, making $1,700,-
000 a year for ten years, for building
trunk lines and post rouds, and should
further provide a fund of $750,000 a
year, with which lateral roads would
be built, provided the counties, should
match this sum fifty-fifty. The State
would provide the money by a bond
issue of $1,500,000 a year for ten years,
furnishing the extra SIOO,OOO neces
sary -to make up the $1,600,000 from
the general taxation fund.
AUTOS DISPLACE HORSES ;!
30,000,000 FEWER ANIMALS
Passenger cars or trucks, or both.!
are made in thirty-two States. Build-1
ing them engages 1,101,402 persons.
This does not include accessory man-;
ufacture, garages, repair shops or sales I
establishments. There are 550 build
ers of finished cars and trucks, repre
senting an investment of more than
$1,500,000,000, and some 7.000 concerns
making parts. Forty-four percent of
the motor vehicles in operation today
are owned and used by farmers. 'Che
total number of cars registered in the
United States at the end of Hll was
about 6.500.000. These motor venules
will have displaced some 30.000.000
horse*, a saving of grain ami time in
calculable.
014 IVopel Who Are Feeble and Chil
dren Who Are Pale Aa4 Weak
Would be greatly benefited by the
General Strengthening Tonic Effect Of)
GROVE’S TASTELESS chill TONIC.
It purifies and enriches the blood and
builds up the whole eystem. A Gen- i
ertrt Strengthening Tonic for Adults
and Children. 60c. —(Adv.)
THE EVENING CAPITAL AND MARYLAND GAZETTE, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND, THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1900.
'TOT' DRIVER !|
INACE AND PEST
That the so-called “expert” driver
is one of the most exasperating pests
of motordom and is chiefly re.spon- j
sible for the pedestrian's animosity j
toward the motorist, is the editorialj,
belief of American Motorist, official I
journal of the A. A. A., which pub
lishes some warnings on the subject
in the current issue.
This is how the American Motorist'
views the “expert” dricer:
“Speaking of the ‘expert,’ we do i
not think of the painstaking mechanic;
who, by dint of study and experience 1
gained in actual practice, fauiilarizes
I himself with motor cars until he is
j able to obtain from them the uiaxi
mum service with a minimum neces
sity for repair and adjustment. Him
we would call the ‘expert motorist.’
But we have in mind the fellow who
is an expert ’driver,’ nothing else.
“Expert*’ Rarely Owns Car
“It is almost needless to say that
since the exhibition in stunts in driv-!
| ing is apt to be an expensive habit.!
1 the expert driver is found
1 among the owners. Usually he has
graduated from the washstand in a
garage, while sometimes he is a spe- j
cimen of the so-called natural-born,
mechanic—a species that neither me
chanical progress nor scientific train
ing seems to have been able to ex
terminte. It is the expert driver who
is chiefly responsible for the animos
ity of the pedestrian against the mo
torist. It is he who scares old ladies
1 into hysterics while bearing down
upon them with a rush, only to clap
on his brakes with a bang and bring
his car to a stop half an inch from
the pedestrian’s shin.
“If you want to watch him, stand
in front of a busy garage for awhile
and you will have ample opportunity
to observe his doings. He will come
out of the garage at full ,tilt, clear
the opposite curb by ripping the steer
ing gear around with all his might,
and disappear around the next cor
ner in similar fashion.
“When he returns he will rush
down the block at 'a speed of fifty
1 miles an hour, throw on his brakes
■ some eight or tpn feet from the stop
ping point, and bring his car to a
halt almost within its own length;
1 all of which, of course, looks very
clever to the expert driver and costs
1 money for repairs and excessive de
terioration to the owners. This sort
of driver is the one to whom an open
muffler is music in the ears; who
imagines himself a minature Oldfield.
1 “if you do not drive your car your
self. beware of the expert driver, or
‘ at least nip his ambitions early in the
1 proceedings.”
i
I AT THE PALACE TONIGHT
I “The Habit of Happiness,” a new
Triangle Fine Arts Feature film, once
again affords a demonstration of the
athletic prowess of Douglas Fair
i banks’""" H. B. Warner may take his
L carefully calculated exercises for the
preservation of his waistline, but
Fairbanks takes his for sheer love of
it. Probably that is why he is, per
. haps, second only to George M. Cohan
as an expression of the American
spirit.
As chief smile producer in the
gloomy house of Jonathan Pepper.
’ millionaire grouch, in “The Habit of
Happiness.” he has occasion to meet
1 a Land of thugs who have been sent
to keep Pepper from the telephone
while stocks are manipulated; and
the way he messes up the baronial
hall of Pepper Is spice the like of
which never before has seasoned the
home plate. He mixes the features
of one gangster until another gets
him from the rear. Then he slides
out of his coat, leaving that in the
hands of his assailant while he scoots
up the stairs and pulls another bad
man clear over the banisters by his
leathery neck and deals hint his
quietus on the floor. Then he handles
two at ondfe, with ease and dispatch.
All this comes before anyone has a
chance to draw a gun; and it is said
.hat the vim or it made everyone not
directly concerned in the taking of
the picture stop work to look on.
AT TIIE REPUBLIC TONIGHT
"Snares of Paris” is the alluring
title of a new William Fox release that
has been making a big hit and is an
nounced at the Republic theatre to
night. This photoplay is saidvto show
the beautiful star, Madlaine Traverse
: —who is a favorite here—at her very
best; and that means very, very fine.
I The plot Indicates a brilliant picture
j of social and political Paris, with a
view of the underworld; the latter set.
it is said, being an exact replica of a
Latin Quarter resort.
Her role being that of a social lead- ;
ei% Miss Traverse promises views of
I some stunning Paris gowns.
| Tomorrow and Saturday the attrac
tion will be “Soldiers of Fortune.”
MRS. JOHN F**MEIGS t
DIED IN PHILADELPHIA *
The death in Philadelphia Janu- {
ary 20 of Mrs. J. Forsythe Meigs, is ,
sad news to her many devoted t
friends. Mrs. Meigs was a grand- r
daughter of Commodore John Rodg- c
ers, fatuous in the War of 1812. Herj g
husband was on duty some years ago j
it the Naval Academy here. She isj.
survived by a daughter. Mrs. Jop
iing. of New York, and two sons,
Robert Meigs, lately returned from
France, and Lieut.-Comdr. J. P.
Meigs.
She was a woman of great charm
and nobility of character. She was
a cousin of Mrs. Philip R. Alger, of
this city.
NAVY METERS TRIM
UNIVERSITY OF VA. BY
A SfRE OF 34 TOl5
In of Home loose shooting in
the earlyypart of the game, the super
ior speed' and team play of the Naval
Academy enabled them to win
handily from the University of Vir
ginia yesterday afternoon. The score
was 34 to 1 15.
Burkholder and Byerly led in the
scoring, each making some clever
shots in the final period. Hatchers
goal for Virginia in the second half
was the longest shot of the contest.
The first session, in which both
teams shot badly, ended 13 to 8 in
favor of the Navy. About fbe middle
of the s<#ond period the Navy swung
clear atu up points rapidly.
TjWO n fnutes before the close com
plete new teams were put on the floor.
Line-up:
ftavy Position Uni. of Va.
Byerly L. F Pettway
Burkholder R. F. Hatcher
Greber C . Schneider
W’atters L. Gf v Hankins
McLaury R. G Jennings
Referee—Peering, Manhattan Col
i lege. Field goals—Naval Academy,
Burkholder (5), Byprly (4), Greber
(2), Watters (2); Virginia, Hatcher
(2), Schneider (2). Pettway. Foul
goals—Naval Academy. Watters (6 in
9), Butler (2 in 2); Virginia, Pettway
(5 in 13U Time of halves—2o minutes.
Substitutions —Naval Academy, Butler
for McLaury, Blue for Byerly, Olsen
for Burkholder, Lenhart fox Greber,
Parr for Watters; Virginia, Newman
for Pettway, Stanley for Hatcher.
Reinhardt for Schneider, Via for Han
kins, Sc&tt for Jennings.
ST. MSUr
DEFEATS BLUE RIDGE
ON BASKETBALL FLOOR
4
Shaking off the lead of her oppon
ent in the last minutes of the game.
St. John’s tied the Blue Ridge quintet
in a game played here yesterday aft
ernoon and then proceeded to victory
byway of a basket shot by Ridgely
during the extra five minutds that
were allowed to fight out the tie. The
score was 17 to 15.
Although the game was not partic
ularly well played, it was interest
ing in its close score. At first the
favor seemed tow r ard the Cadets, but
in the second half Blue Ridge got go
ing and kept a good lead until the last
momept* when Speelman. the only
regular with whom St. John's started,
managed to make it a tie. Bonsaek
was the visitors’ star and Speelman
was the Cadet luminary. The line
up: <
St. John's Position Blue Ridge
Speelman RF John
Brown ...: L.F Bonsaek
Totterdaje C. W. Duntbar
Ridgelyy R.G Slifer
Johnson L.G R. Dumbar
Substi \utions —St. John's, Knighton
for TotiPrdale, Totterdale for Brown.
Brewer for Johnson; Blue Ridge,
Kriaball for Bonsaek. Scoring: St.
John’s—Goals—Speelman (3), Totter
dale (2), Ridgely (2). Knighton. Blue
Ridge-John (3), R. Dunbar (2).
Fouls —Jst. John's, Speelman (1 in 4);
Blue Ridge. Bonsaek (2 in 2; Dun
bar (3 in 4). Time of halves —2O
minutes extra plat- Referee—Holly.
Navy Timekeeper—Davis, St. John's.
SHOOTS FATHER
DEFENDING SELF
i AND HER MOTHER
(Continued From Page One)
• ~ w
respectively, were aroused by the
commotion, and everything was tur
moil because of the affair. Dr. John
T. Russell, the family physician, was
hurriedl-y summoned and arrange
ments were made to have Jefferson
removed to the hospital.
Jefferson, as above stated, was a
painter ;by occupation but had been
out of work for the last two months,
according to the members of his
family, .and it is thought, brooding
oVer this, led up to his raving condi
tion of Tuesday night.
Jefferson is the father of 10 chil
dren. as follows:
Paul Jefferson, of Berwyn, Md.;
Mrs. George Marquard, of New York
city; Mrs. William Elliott, of Wash
ington and Annapolis; Miss Ruth. Ar
thur, Brooklyn, N. Y.), Charles,
Alice, Ggorge, Edna and Bernice.
The American Madonna
Washington—“ Thine is the Glory,”
the Inasstve painting to be presented
to the American Red- Cross by the
War Department as the tribute of the
to the organization
for its work during the war. soon
will take its place among the art
treasures of the capital. The face of
the dominant figure is a remarkable
composite-of tfie features of a thou
sand woidfen who did Red Cross work
in the conflict.
WARNING
mmm j
TO TOM NAIM I
MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION
Formation of a national organization g
to be known as the National Memorial H
Association, for the purpose of erect- g
iug a national memorial in the city of |
Washington in memory of the dead of |
the American Army. Navy and Marine |
Corps, and affiliated civilian welfare |
services, in the world war, is announc- |
ed from Washington today.
According to the present plans tbiS 1
organization will be made up of re- |
presentatives from the Army, Navy |
and Marine Corps, as well as repre- 1
sentatives from the American Legion, I
National Guard Association, Naval I
Militia Association. American Library I
Association, Americin Red Cross, Sal- I
vation Array, Knights of Columbus, Y. I
M. C. A., Y. W. C. A., Jewish Welfare I
Board. War Camp Community Service, I
and the Training Camp Association. I
Funds for the erection of this mentor- I
ial will be raised by popular subscrip- j
tion. • I
Major-General William G. Hian. As- I
. sistant Chief of Staff of the Army,
.(heads the movement. The army is
| represented by the commanders of I
,; corps and divisions who fought in
i Prance, and delegates from other or
ganizations will be added to the com
mittee.
The Secret try of War has been re
quested also to assign plots of ground
in Arlington cemetery or other nation
al burial grounds for the erection of
suitable mounments dedicated to the
dead of individual organizations who
fought in the world war.
CENSUS TAKING
PROCEEDING RAPIDLY
Such rapid progress is being made
in the fourteenth decennial census
enumeration. Director Sam L. Rogers
announced yesterday at Washington,
that completed returns from 1,15 dis
tricts in the larger cities had been
received, and that returns from prac
tically all districts were expected to
| be in the Census Bureau by Febru
ary ,15.,
For ('olds Or Influenza
. and as a Preventive, take LAXA
TIVE BROMO QUININE Tablets. Look
for E. W. GROVE’S signature on the
. box. 30c. —(Adv.)
! INFLUErIZA'm,
starts wall a CoJd^SJ*'
Kill tho Cold. At tha
sneeze take
CASCASIA^QUINiNt
1 Standard cold rvr.cdy for 20 year*
vift, —la tablet form—asie, sure, no %
xaßw cpiatea—-broal.* v? a cob* in 1+
'’SraJK hours—-relieves grip in 3 days.
Money back if it fails. The
croulne box has a lied
I Im I i iBk 6 ' 1 with Mr. Hill'*
/1 All brae S tor mm
P d
MODELS OF BOATS
WANTED
I I
■ * j
’ Anyone having models of vessels
. of any kind, steam or sail, and wish
■ ing to dispose of same, please com
municate with GEORGE FORBES, 10
E. Fayette St., Baltimore, Md. ;
NOTICE
WILL PAY HIGHEST CASH PRTCE
FOR POTATOES ON FARMS
ANYWHERE.
WRITE OR PHONE
RAYMOND JUNGERS
Phone 1503-F-4 P. O. Annapolis, Md.
J27
herFacmn ~
Thlid Olive soap, 10c bar; 11 bars for I
$1.00; good briar pipes. 35c; ladies’ and I
gphtletueu's waterproof hand bags, special I
at $2.25; Ice and roller skates, all sizes; I
men's leather gauntlet gloves, 40e. j
JOS. LEVY 73 West Street I
Phone 409-M tf I
FORSAKE
TI.KMS TO RKSrOXMIBLE PAKTIEM
One Ford touring car, 1017 tyie, *
nearly new tires; in lirst class con- 1
dltlon ss*s.oo I
One more of those good IMP model 8
Chevrolet: new tires: spot light; in |
•11 condition; a bargain at.. $6*5.00 I
BE ARDMORE’S GARAGE
<7 RAX PALL STREET f I
REPUBLIC!
. TODAY
Madlaine Traverse
“Snares of Paris”
A brilliant pieture of the best
social and political society
•f Paris
TOMORROW
“SOLDIERS OF
FORTUNE”
_ ' mil
| I am now selling the balance of
j Hotpoint Headlite Heaters I
I for S9OO each I
6{ PRICE $11.50. 1
| They are a great comfort for emen.<
I dally during this cold weather. BU"V NOV. ,
| warmth that is at your command, by the t.
11l or the push of a switch.
jj| \
I W. B. CHILDS
Electrical Contfaclcr
U| Phone—76o. Office—i::i fn- .
/■" .
, TIIE
Palfiuttft & iwfito
Established 1773
1 THE DAILY AMERICAN
Payable In Advance
Daily, one month f
Daily and Sunduy, one monlL
Daily, three months
Daily and Sunday, throe months
Daily, six months •
Daily and Sunday, six months i
Daily, one year..... • • 1
Daily, with Sunday Edition, one year
Sunday Edition, one year
CHAS. C. FULTON & CO. .
FELIX AG.NFN, Manager and Publisher
AMERICAN OFFICE HAI.iIMORI, Ik
I PALACE THEATRf
TODAY TOMORROW
Douglas Fairbanks “The 13 th Chair"
,N STARRING
“The Habit of YOONNE DEI.VA
Happiness 9 creighton hale
Added Attraction Added Atlr.idlou
NEWS REEL PATHE NEWS
I Clothing and Shoe
SALE!
This sale coming at this time in the face of ever r;s:n;
| prices, will mean a great saving to the people of Ar.nspw*
1 1 and vicinity.
I LOT No. 1. LOT No. 2.
A Special lot of Young A special lot of
Men’s Suits, size most- Knee ai. -
b 33-34-35; to close
I iV.... $11.75 m
k _ Our regular stock of Bop
I ’ Knee Pants, Suit: and Ovtf-
I * Our regular stock of Men’s coats; at
f and Young Men’s Suits and 20 Per Cent Reduction
I Overcoats; at ;
Boys' Mackinaw,: at
20 Per Cent Redaction 10 Per Cent Reduction
Shoes for Men and Beys
| , * / jj
To introduce our shoe department we will a]k> w
per cent, reduction. We carry Stetsons, Flor-he:T* 2-
Excelsior and several other makes. (Stetsons; are cxiuip
I from this reduction.
Terms of sale CASH. Alterations at cost.
I Strange & White Co.
I 153-155*157 Main Street, Annapolis, Maryl*^
Phone 144 All Work
ANNAPOLIS TIRE REPAIR CO
100 WEST STREET
* - •
. *ow Under Heir Rtwfiaul
' *• T. MdULUOM, Prop.
Viilainiying' ■'lire Repairing— Retreading
Free Air Berries -•*•*••* - cm—mr Anto
TlßES—Miller, Goodrich, Firestone, Sheridafl
r QUALITY OCR WATCHWORD

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