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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, October 31, 1921, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1921-10-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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ASSOCIATED press
A Dispatches of late
published in
The* Evening Capital.
u . % on tJA/.ETTB EBTAHLIBHKD 1727.
xßt
\ , _ No. 11:.
IS IWOIJURED WHEN
jIITOMOBILE WENT
HHlfll EMBANKMENT
„ Ar.-i Mrs J. P. Kane, Of
S; tain Broken Bones In
Near Revell Their
, IV hter. And Friend, Mrs.
: w jn. Escaped Unhurt
• RNS OVER 3 TIMES
IN 25-FOOT PLUNGE
~. ~ A , it- painfully Injured.
, . ~i;t i |e i miraculous es
.. !lt |„ ;n>; liurt when an auto
i .re through a fence.
,(„!) .i l!. r (-foot cm bank
t!„ \nna polls-Baltimore
~j |„.;ween Revel! and Jones
• i (i t lock yesterday after
t.ui, nan’ -I i 1 Kane, of the
■ IVV vi shipwright > treel, \n
rml.i rttone and J ribs
Ki n a 1 -'• suffering from shock.
vji. .1 i“ Kane, same address.
..,ii ii.si, badly cut md bruin
, hi the fact* and body; like-
Miiifiinn from shock.
Katie, daughter of Lieut.
Mr Kane md Mrs (J. Irwin.
, ir witii ii was badly damaged
i br.mghi to a local garage for re
• lit ('handler touring, be-
:.i in I driven by, Lieut. Kane.
1 i;- wife, their daughter, and
*. liw.a. were proceeding towards
j i iv .it the time. The aecident
. .insell it is stated, by another
k si to have been an Oldsmobile.
.v.ting I. ,nt Kane and bis party
ali of tin road. Lieut. Kane
vail ■ i lot back on the houle
ln iloiiiß so liis ear skidded
■k the plunge. The identy of
'Hut nil ' mild not be established
:i> ' in!.n ifii on its way to Annu
al Kane ;r turned over three
;n -s plunge down the embank
'•nr. nnl ,• s remarkable that all
siil- win a.-: killed. A number of
■ i!i:!e parties stopped
>'• la re., .Iv and lent tempo
'll Mb'- injured Meanwhile,
was ent to the Naval
' : ore .iii.l an ambulance was
f ' -■: i ami hurried l|te in
: ii-v.il institution where
(4 on(inu*il mi rake |.)
NOTICE!
\HK.\iIA.M SNYDER.
I '('lt s \N 1 1 bI'.XTI.K’MEN'S
tui.oi: sitin'
Vv .f.I IKintjuirt. Mil.
•' s M"Vi-.n TO _‘:l WEST STREET,
* ' - nt all old customers
’ 11 li'.inlun. |ll■••ssillg. re-
' r S Ulii.terHlf.
Masquerade Dance
(• rou'nsi'ille State Hospital
Monday. Oct. 31, 1921
v ' '' M- 'siatl.iii s JO p. m.
‘DWYINtT S;:',o TO 12
/, " s " tt.t. UK (ftVEX
■M‘MISSION’, 25c,
Masked dance
C I'N NIGHT
October 31 st, 1921
F, HT MEN’S HALL.
Annapolis.
wL I ■*• ’ 1 ■ - and gentlemen.
~ :
-THE...
I County Fair
Armory
•W. 2,3, 4 t J
I „ . J J
! " Ct^ccTcioOOoT^OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^OOOOOO
o
I Grand Meeting |
Tuesday, November 1, 1921, BP. M. >
IN the house of delegates
I of Annapolis Lodge No. 296. Loyl Order of Moose. |
Speaker: HON - £. /. HENNING |
t. ,1 Secretary of Labor and Mooseheart Governor. <>
I; TAv — Fieiat ives and friends of members of the Order are o
I . . it :.i this meeting to hear how the Moose are caring for
f a - Mooseheart “The School that Trains for Life. o
'
Capital.
INAUGURATE CANCER
WEEK IN ANNAPOLIS
[
| Surgeon Carpenter Of Navy Read
Letter To Congregation In
( St. Anne’s Yesterday
i
r POINTS FOR PROTECTION
"Yesterday marked the begiuning of
Cancer Week" in Maryland, a period
set apart to acquaint the public with
the symptoms of this dread malady, j
. a i |( l Hie extreme caution that should
be taken for protection against its de
velopment. In this connection Capt.
Dudley N. Carpenter, of the Medical
. Corps of the Navy, on duty at the
i Naval Academy, read the following
! letter before the congregation of St.
. Anne's Protestant Episcopal Church at
, the 11 o’clock service yesterday morn -
, ing:
"The object of Cancer Week is not
! to spread alarm about cancer, but to
! bring hope. The causes and nature of
j this terrible disease are still obscure,
and once it is fully developed, its cure
is almost impossible. But one thing.
I at least, has been demonstrated by the
, surgical experience of the past ten or
i twenty years: It can be cured IF IT
IS TAKEN IN TIME. A cancer, it has
been found, never starts as a cancer.
It always starts as something that is
not. in itself, dangerous; a lump, a
mole, a wart, a bruise, a small ulcer,
a burn. Such tilings often go away
I themselves and then no harm is done.
But if they remain a long time, and
sometimes even a relatively short time,
they may turn into cancers, and then
I they are very dangerous, indeed. The
safest plan isjo have all such things
| attended to at once. A good doctor
.! can determine whether they are likely
to turn into cancers or not. If not.
. simple remedies will usually suffice to
(('onllnnril on l*neo 4.1
j BLINDED WAR VETERANS
r TO SELL AT COUNTY FAIR
i
The two blind ex-service men who
are now in town taking orders for
stockings will be at the (County Fair
in the Bladen Street Armory tomor
row and next day. They wish to
1 • thank the pbople of Annapolis for
I their patronage. They wish also to
, say. that if any of their customers
’ | have .mV complaints to make that they
*j should not hesitate to come directly
' t to either one of them and flip com
plaint will lie taken up Immediately
with the company and righted.
ARMY RAN RIOT OVER
SUSQUEHANNA ELEVEN
I Army defeated Susquehanna, 53 to
|O. Saturday. The Cadets, with a sub
■ j stitute line-up, ran wild in a game
s during which the periods were short
i ened by agreement. Susquehanna
. presented no attack worthy of the
. | name and a defense which was little
better than soft scrimmaging for the
Army. Gilmore’s work in the back
field was a feature of Army’s play.
NOTICE!
Eastern Star members arc
invited to visit Robert M. ; i
; Coombs Chapter Tuesday,
-* November* Ist, at S I’,- M.„
Hall corner Preston and
Cathedral streets. Baltimore.
(Signed).
nl WORTHY MATRON.
I Costumes!
i
j For Hire—l rom /sc. to
WIGS and MASKS
1;jl . A Full Line of
NOVELTIES for
HALLOWE’EN
1x,,,-.! l 194 GREEN
C. Droll, street i
SPEAKER 10 TELL OF .
I “MOOSEHEART" SCHOOL
THAI TRAINS FOR LIFE
The meeting to be held in the House
of Delegates tomorrow evening, under
! the auspices of Annapolis Lodge No.
236. Loyal Order of Moose, promises
to be well attended by our citizens.
The speaker will be Hon. E. J. Hen
ning, Assistant Secretary of Labor and
Mooseheart Governor. His subject will
be "Mooseheart. the School That
i Trains for Life.” ,
The educational features of this
school are highly vocational and prac
tical. about 25 of the most useful
craft, including agriculture, are being
operated as a part of the educational
work. In order to perpetuate this
great humanitarian work, and to in
sur<* the future welfare and longevity
of this great institution tlie member
of this great Home and School, the
members of the order an* creating a
Ten Million Dollar Endowment.
Director-General James J. Davis has
said "Every child is entitled to at least
a high school education and a trade.”
David Starr Jordan, president of.Le
land Stanford University, of Califor
nia. has said: "If ever you wish to
go in for philanthropy, if over you
wish to be of any use In the world,
do something for the little children, if
ever you yearn to be truly wise. Study
children. We can dress the sore,
bandage the wound, imprison the
criminal, heal the sick, and bury the
dead, but there is always a chance to
save the child. If the great army of
the philanthropists ever exterminates
sin and pestilence, ever works out the
: race’s salvation, it will be because a
little child has led them.”
The citizens of this city are cordially
welcomed to this meeting, and hear
Hon. E. J. Henning as he is one of the
Governors of this great institution,
i also I*. S. D. of the order and he is
prepared to tell you how the Moose
are caring for their children at Moose
heart.'
swansoFpleadsfor
SUCCESS OF ARMAMENT
LIMITATION CONCLAVE
V;4* y '
i , ',, , d \
(By The Aftwochited I’reaii.)
WASHINGTON. 1). (\. Oct. 31.—A
plea for sucess of the armament limi
tat ion conference was made by Sena
tor Swanson, Democrat. Virginia, in
addressing the Senate today. Senator
Swanson, who is a minority member
of the Foreign Relations Committee
and a former member of the Navy
Board, suggested an agreement which
President Harding’s enterprise should
reach.
’ “We should recognize.” said the
Virginia senator, “the dependence of
England upon access to the sea alike
in time of peace or of war for the sus
tenance of her position and the con
tinuance of her industries, but we
should insist that although her posi
tion depends upon her access to the
sea. it does not give her the right to
maintain a navy that places the com
merce of the world under her control
and dictation. The freedom of the
seds would also give protection to the
island empire of Japan.”
NIGHT COURSE SCHEDULE
AT ST. JOHN’S COLLEGE
The extension night courses at St.
John’s Colege are now proceeding
regularly and nicely. Tonight the Eng
lish Class meets, taking up Shake
speare's famous sylvan comedy “Love's
Labours Lost.” The "Comedy of Er
i ros.” Shakespeare's only farce, is next
! in line.
' tis not yet too late to enter these
. courses. The regular schedule is as
jfolows: English, Monday night;
| French. History and Mathematics.
I Tuesday night; Spanish. Wednesday
night: Advanced French. Thursday
night.
NEW W., B. A. TERMINAL
COST NEARLY MILLION
q
> 1 Congested conditions in the old
>! Washington. Baltimore and Annapolis
l terminal. Park avenue and Liberty
> street. Baltimore, became a thing ol
>jthe past yesterday with the opening
>! jf the new $575,000 station at Howard
> j and Lombard streets. The first train
j . left at 5 a. m.
> Officials of the company claim tha
l the terminal is the finest in America
> for any single interurban electrk
i line. Within the new structure track
* age is provided for 4S cars. Th
> waiting rooms, ticket and general of
> i fices are housed, in a four-at on
3 * building of steel and concrete.
THE MARYLAND GAZETTE
WNABOLPS. MD.. MONDAY. OCTOBER 31, 1921
iGREfIT CONCOURSE
OF DELEGATES IT
:! LEGION CONCLAVE
i i
Representatives From All Over
World Attend Convention
-
Opening At Kansas City To
day— To Wage Determined
Fight On Compensation
SILENT TRIBUTE TO
LATE COM. GALBRAITH 11
• t
(By Tin* Associated Press.)
KANSAS CITY. MO., Oct. 31.—Con-
I 1
vention hall where the national con-;
vention of the American Legion!
opened its session today was early J
astir with delegates. Bands and drum !
corps were pleasing the crowds with
their stirring music, and a haze of to
bacco smoke lent an Indian summer
atmosphere to the brillijntlv colored
decorations.
j A great many of tin* delegates and
■ visitors wore uniforms, apparently
having put them on for the duration (
of the convention. Thousands of
spectators came early and occupied
the galleries, while the floor of the
hall was given over to the delegates.
Representatives from Alaska, the
Canal Zone, Hawaii, the Philippines,
Porto Rico. Turkey, Africa France.;
Spanish Honduras, and the British,
Isles, raised their standards on the j
floor in addition to those of all the
States.
Madame lleinek liaises Flag
Lifting the American flag high!
above her head, Madaiue Ernestine j
Sehumann-Heinck opened the conven
tion by singing the Star-Spangled!
Banner.
Giving the invocation, the Rev. John |
W. Inzer, of Chattanooga. Nation’ll!
Chaplain, asked Divine guidance for 1
the Legion in “bearing on the torch
of service and patriotism dropped by.
those who fell in the war ”
Mayor James S. Cowgili, of Kansas!
City, welcomed the Legion in the]
name of the city and Dr Harry F.
Parker. State Commander of the Le
gion in Missouri, made an address of j
welcome.
The convention got quickly down to
business. The'report of the commit-j
tee cm permanent organization. re<-->
otn mend ing., that ten national com-,
mittees with representation from each
Slate be maintained, was adopted.
Tribute To Head Commander
At the request of Commander
/Coni imil'll on Pii** ?.>
ALL SAINTS DAY
SERVICES AT ST. ANNE’S
Services in St.. Anne's Church to
morrow. All Saints Day. will be as |
; follows:
Holy Communion. 7:0®; Morning'
Prayer. 10:00; Holy Communion,'
10:30. At the ten-thirty Service, St.
, Cecelia’s Guild will sing.
At four o'clock there will be a brief
, Service in the church at which the |
, boys of the Choir will sing. An offer
ing will he made for the work of St.
I Anne's Cemetery Association. In this
, connection it should be understood,
, j that the Cemetery is not under the;
control of any one Church, and that
; the work of the Association is not de-;
> j nominational in character. Ordinarily.)
this Service for the Association has
' been held in the Cemetery when wea
ther has permitted.
j j CITY TROLLEY TRAFFIC
-i BLOCKED FOR HOUR
Trolley traffic, through the city was
, interrupted for more than an hour
this morning when the rear wheels of
, * one of the passenger cars of the Wash-.
ingtoti. Baltimore and Annapolis Elec-)
trie Line, jumped the “switch-frog" on
’ ! West street at the intersection of
’ | Church Circle
i The car was that due ftom Balti
more at 7:35, and to comply with an
j emergency train regulation, the train
crew started to turn West street at
the left corner instead of the right.
I The front wheels got around all right.
hut those in the rear slipped into the
jj tracks turning the corner to the right.
9 ; As a result the car stood directly
yj’across the street and there remained
if j only a narrow passage for vehicular
g traffic. /
ij A work train that had been dis
,, patched to the scene, released the car
from its position at 9 o'clock, anil
traffic was then resumed under normal
a i conditions.
Service At N. A. Chapel
e I Tomorrow being AH Saint's Day
f- there will be a celebration of the Holy
v Communion at the Naval Academy
Chapel at 10 a. m.
ROSE BEARING NAME
OF GOVERNOR’S MOTHER
ON OREGON’S “ROSEWAY"
PORTLAND, ORE., Oct. 31,—0n
Portland. Oregon’s, “Roseway” grows
*
a rose which hears the name of Mrs.
Albert Ritchie, mother of Governor
Ritchie, of Maryland, planted there >n
honor of that groat State
Portland’s Roseway. which will line
Sandy Boulevard, the gateway to the
Columbia Highway, the world's great
est scenic drive, with six miles of rose
hushes stretching for three m it.: on
either side from East Sixtee?.th to
East Seventy-second street, was offi
cially dedicated on Sunday. October
23. Participating in the picturesque
ceremony, which was held under the*i
auspices of the Portland Ad Club,
were Governor and Mrs. Ben W. Ol
cott. of Oregon; Governor Davis, of
Idaho; Mayor and Mrs. George L.
Baker, of Portland; little girls in na
tive costume representing those na
tions having consular connection with
Portland, forty-eight school girls rep
tesenting each State in the Union, and
officials from all civic organizations
in the city.
“Have a vision, look ahead, and
you’ll be proud of your achievement.”
said Mayor Baker in the parting
words of his dedication speech,
“Which leads beyond the Roseway to j
the thoroughfare in 1925 when as part;
of the Columbia Highway, it w*ll lie}
the mecca of the millions of tourists j
attracted to the Northwest by the
world’s exposition.”
ELKS ARE REHEARSING
NEW MUSICAL COMEDY!
SOON TO BE PRODUCED
The Elks’ Theatrical Committee,
composed of W. U. MeCrea4>- Gharlos
Shearman and Paymaster R. H. Whit
aker. enthusiastically acclaim thpt-jitf
forthcoming production, fef' ftYah-wab-
Noah, the Sunflower," composed aitd
directed by J-. W,. Crosipy, orjmnint
and clioinnasteij’hr tlie! Naval ‘Acad
emy. will greatly kfTfiUJfc the show of
last April when “Singbad” was pro
duced and will be far ahead of that
production in musical, comedy and
spectacular effects. The opera is full
of tuneful melodies, rich ensembles
and heavy choruses while throughout
runs a delicious comedy strain.
The city has been searched for the
best voices and no trouble has been
encountered in securing volunteer
singers. Not only has all the old cast
of “Singbad” responded but a score
of oilier trained singers have offered
their assistance. The results are that
i a larger and much better chorus has
been secured for the more difficult
music and the principals are "singers
who have participated in many such
productions. While yet too early to
i announce the full cast the public may
j he assured of seeing most of the prin
cipals of "Singbad” assuming parts ini
the new show. Mrs. Philip .Miller will
sing the leading role of the Princessi
| Wah-wah-noah and Paymaster Whit-j
' aker will sing the principal comedy!
part. Charles Shearman will carry,
j the leading male lead and William
M. Feldmeyer the heavy Indian chiefs'
role. Fifty well-known ladies anil gen-!
tlemen of the city and academy are
! assisting.
Rehearsals are being held Tuesday.
and Thursday nights at the Assembly
Rooms on Duke of Gloucester street
and. under the direction of Mr. Crosley 1
and are proceeding in a business-like!
manner which is already showing re- ]
suits. More male voices are required
and anyone wishing to get the good
training in singing and acting as well
' as the enjoyment concerned is invited
to come up to rehearsals without fur
ther invitation.
No efforts will be spared to make
this absolutely the finest production
ever given in Annapolis. Announce
ment will be made in the near future
of the principals selected and the dates
of the entertainment which will be
early in December. No Jong dragged
out rehearsals will be held.
Woman’s Meeting Tomorrow
The Woman's Democratic Federa
tion meeting called by Mrs. Clarence
M. White for tomorrow morning a’
10:30 will be held in the Maryland
Hotel. There will be two local speak
ers present to address the meeting.

Hallowe’en Party Tonight
The members of the Presbyterian
Sabbath School are having a party at
the church this evening at 7:30. All
r i have been invited to come, whether
they “dress up” or not.
CUSTOMARY RITES FOR
OBSERVING HALLOWE'EN
. i .. •
Only Time In The Year When
The Witches Are Per
mitted To Fly
EVE OF ALL SAINT’S DAY
This is the witching time o’ the year, i
and unless you are very, very cartful
you may run afoul of all sorts of
strange and supernatural adventures.!
after nightfall, for there's no telling
what Hallowe'en will bring forth in
this line.
All kinds of things are apt to hap-]
pen tonight, particularly to gates.
From time immemorial, the garden j
gate has offered a temptation too
great for any youugster to withstand
at Hallowe'en, and it is a wise man
who heeds the warnings of experience
and either lifts his entrance portals
from their hinges himself or else tem
porarily fixes them in an immovable
position with a spike or two.
It is strange that, year after year,
the date of Hallowe'en should he a
subject of inquiry, despite the fact
that the festival proclaims its date in ]
its name.
"All Hallows" was formerly a cur-;
rent synonym for “All Saints." ant!
as the first day of November has fort
ages been observed as the feast of "All ,
Hallows,” or "AH Saints." the las: ;
day of October came very natural!)
to be called "All Hallows’ Five," "All
Hallow Eve," "All Hallow Even" or
"All Hallowe’en.”
The oldest portion of its ritual it
that which is probably the least com '<
inonly carried out nowadays, viz., the,
old-time bonfire which no household
failed to light at nightfall; and this
would seem to connect Hallow'en with ;
,
(Oftllf I tlllftl on PHfff f.l
CURLEY, FORMER CHEER
LEADER. GETS OVATION
F'nsign "Mike" Curley, *f the Navy J
famous.aa T “ - .heer-!ea<lr" of the regi-i
ment of midshipmen during athleth
campaigns in 1911*. was among tbef
naval j folk a who witnessed the foot- 1
ball game between the midshipmen
and Bethany College on Saturday. Be-!
tween the halves. “Mike" made his j
way over to the cheering section in j
the big stand and led the middies in a ,
mighty cheer. He was given a big
ovation.
_
SPECIAL MEETING
AT LUTHERAN CHURCH
;
There will be a special service on |
Sunday morning next at the Lutheran j
Church, as announced by the pastor.
Rev. F\ H. Graeper. yesterday. This
service will be particularly directed
to invocations for blessings upon the
disarmament parley of the nations.
Thp pastor said we may have our dif- j
ferenr views of this matter, hut. cer
tainly. we could all Join with other
Christians and pray that good may
come out of the parley.
if—
i
i..
On
■jj Hallowe'en
j|| Two Centuries Ago
And Today
Halloween, two centuries ago,
country folk set bowls of cream
outside their windows as an offering to
keep witches away. Empty bowls in
the morning—the witches had come
and gone away satisfied! Meanwhile
Pussy blinked knowingly on the hearth.
, j -t j • | r
Today, as in those days, the real goblins and
witches are the petty doubts and worries that
crowd the joy 3 from life. A bank account is
the protecting charm that chases them from
the minds of men. Like October sunshine, it
puts joy into life—the joy that comes from the
assurance that the future is provided for.
...THE...
Annapolis Banking & Trust Co.
Corner Main Street and Church Circle
■‘i! '
t. /
1 :
r | • r

-
THE WEATHER:
A-Rain tonight and
Tuesday. Little change
in temperature.
TUB KVKMNO CAPITAL ESTABLISHED ISM,
PRICE TWO CENTS.
GW. RITCHIE ID ,
CANDIDATE OORDY i
SPEAK 111 COUNTY
Local Candidates Also Made
Most Of Opportunity At All
Day Picnic On Ellzey Farm,
Near Galesville—Happy Day
For Young And Old
BOTH DEMOCRATS AND
REPUBLICANS THERE
i The home farm of Mr. ami .Mrs. M.
t Graham Kllzey. beautifully located on
> West River, was the scene Suturday
of one of the most interesting public
gatherings ever held in that section.
The occasion was an all-day picnic
under the auspices of the Sunday
School of Christ Protestant Episcopal
Church, of Oweusville. Rev. Robert A.
Mayo, rector, and the festivities were
brought to a close with an oyster
roast on the picturesque point near
| the river landing.
it was distinctly a family outing,
for the women and children were as
much, if not more, in evidence than
the men. and everybody had a happy
1 time. All agreed that it could not
] have been otherwise, with such a
hostess and moving spirit as Mrs. KU
zey, who*, with her co-workers of the
I church, spared no efforts to make tho
occasion the success that it was.
The affair was given a decided poli
tical aspect bv the presence of a num
ber of candidates of both the Demo
-1 cratic and Republican parties. The
feature of the afternoon's program
was the appearance and the addresses
, of Governor Ritchie and of WillUfni 9.
< Gordy. Jr., of Salisbury, the Detno
j cratic candidate for Comptroller. .Fla*
t corted bv a number of prominent /
, Democrats, they arrived in firfie for
1 the bountiful dinner that was served
I in the grove, after which the crowd
assembled to listen to their speeches.
They were both well received and *
made an excellent impression They
were introduced to the audience by
• Major John deP. Dquw, of the Statu
i Central Committee.
Reviews I’urlv Record
| lt If 1
i In his address Governor Riichle re
j viewed the record of his party, em
phasizing its many ventures into now
; fields of service to the people of the
State. As in his other addresses dur
ing the campaign, the Governor term
ed gretaer represelintation for Halfi
; more one of the questions involved in
■ the campaign, but not the issue vital
i to the people.
j He sketched briefly the process of
rapid governmental growth which led
i to the need for reorganization of the
State government, and the steps by
which a plan for this reorganization
had been developed. He asked the
support of voters of bath parlies, and
jof those without party ties, who
: should satisfy themselves that the
oh Hue* 4 I

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