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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, November 01, 1921, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1921-11-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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ASSOCIATED press
A Dispatches of late
news are published in
The Evening CapitaL
MA .PANIC c;a/.KTT—ESTABLISHED 1727.
SITS G'iiOIERS
II EXECUTED
WITHOUT Till
Special Senate Committee Ap-
To Investigate Charges
M.rir Bv vVatson. Of Georgia
—Southerner Will Be Called
Before Body
t *
PRODUCES picture
SHOWING A HANGING
, It, Ihr V*Mriiitel I’re*.)
WASillNiiTtlN l <\ Nov. 1.—
n b> .1 special committee I
.. hv Se nator Watson. Dent
r • (~i t;.,it \iiicrican soldiers in]
Kran*•• 1 re hanged without court
r-„r oilier trial was ordered to- 1
, tin St a.ite hv unanimous vote, j
I:,. ~.rnin;• t*•*■ will lie appointed by
■ , [•;t -j.lont of tiie Senate and Sena-j
• r W.i'soit will lie invited before it
proilin e prottf.
Senator Watson produced a small;
leiofirapli "f an alleged hanging and
. v,| ilia! Ins charges were true.!
Senator Horah. Uepubliean. Idaho,!
•i h. h.ul examined the photograph
i
i had been told hv two former serv- :
. men that the charges were true. |
rej: tii.it lie was "unwilling to pro
ved mi Mich proof '
How many Senators know." Sena
r Watson asked, "that a private sol
ar was frequently shot by his offi
. r- in France for an alleged imper
t ni'in e to an orticer anti that they
! gallows (iii which men were hang
day litter day without court mar
■ ,ii. in any other form of trial? I
.1 and have the photograph of a
illnw on which twenty-one white
’vs had been executed when tile pho
• “graph w, t taken and there were
e’lnrs waning in the camp Jail to Ih
hanged at sunrise."
Kcplyaig to Senator Watson's,
narges :ii.i• twent.v-one. American
!, ". Vs were hanged on a flingJe sraf
d n France. Senator Ne,w, Kepub
-1 an, 1 ml presented an official state*
i t ' from the Judge AdCocate'‘of tlVc 1 *
’ showing that out.of a total of
v ser.teiues of death imposed in the
American Fxpeditionarv Forces only
i ne were actually carried out.
‘ o o a o y c o a a * $ c cs ex o s o o O o 0
: MOST PEOPLE |
o
ari ifr.iid i i go into those little O
* p- they re so expensive £
’! s 1 hard to gel out !’. But — o
c ■>
M01.1.V SIAKK SAYS: §
, . O
0 emit people to come in only
round; 1 want them to
a inexpensive my things J
' BIRTH A AT £
" IMMM. 1.1 FI’S and my &
BilllM. 1 ritl/KS. i have found o
ic ineker" of today is the
tomorrow at
? ' o
I Martin Street £
•V’.fr \ umber lu'o Cate £
v . o
„ yoooooo*ooooooo
NOT" !
MiUtH.W! SNYDER.
' 'M> UIMI.ItMKXS
i vii m: snot*
'' ’ini Ihistport. Md.
s VKD TO •-’!* WEST STREET.
it’- of til old ouwtomer*
I (' aning. |in>dMng. re
„ I’ri* •"* moderate.
j,
...THE...
County Fair
■ hf licit| in the
Armory
Nov. 2,3, 4
>•! Nov. l. g, a*
advertised.
*• * I
$
C> vv ~*’' ; ' i:: vv!s33O30$:i>C , <*0OOOOO30OO0OOOOOOOOOOO0O0OO0OOOOO
? 5
Grand Meeting
* uesdav, November 1, 1921, 8 P. M. |
IN THE HOUSE OF DELEGATES
r ■!< auspices of Annapolis Lodge No. 296. Loyal Order of Moose.
Speaker: HON- E. J. HENNING
Assistant Secretary of Labor and Mooseheart Governor.
•TiZKXS- Relatives and friends of members of the Order are -c
' 1 " attend this meeting to hear how the Moose are caring for <
•‘"A children at Mooseheart. 'The School that Trains for Life.’* <
A ■ 00000000000.0.0.000000000 C 0000000OO000.000jOL0$_0t
limning (Unpitnl.
GOVERNOR APPEALS TO
INDEPENDENT VOTERS
. IN SPEECH AT BELAIR
_i An appeal to the large body of in
dependent voters and of that section
i of the affiliated electorate in which
! definite measures are given prece
dence over partisan considerations
was sotinded by Governor Ritchie at
; a Democratic rally at Belair last
night. A large crowd turned out for
the meeting, which opened the final
! week of the State campaign.
r To those men and women who had
! deferred judgment upon party merits
| until given an opportunity to study
the issues of the campaign, the Gov
ernor declared, next week's election
offered as clear-cut a choice as had
| ever been presented in .Maryland.
There is no need for weighing prom
! ises one against the other, he said.
| for on the one vital issue the Repub
j lira ns had made no promises. They
had failed. Instead, to offer even sug
' gestions or criticisms.
“.More and more as the character
1 of politics has changed,” the Governor
declared, “there has grown up among
Hie voters a spirit of independence,
a willingness to assume the grave re
sponsibility of political judgment,
i This is a healthy change, marking the
subordination of prejudice and blind
adherence to tradition and enlightened
thought and reason.
“While 1 am tnyself a strong party
mail, believing as I do that the State
! of Maryland will always be more effi
ciently governed, more economically
governed, by the Democratic party
than by its opponents, there are many
whose votes will be bestowed upon a
program rather titan upon a party or
even upon men.”
ULKVKS USHKRMIN LOST
LIVEN IN SEVERE STORM
(By Tic* .Vmoc-intpcl I'rrse*.)
ANGLE SEA. X. J.. Nov. I.—Eleven
fishermen are believed to have been
drowned by the upsetting of a small
open motorboat, in the,Southeast storm
yesterday. One fishing boat is miss
ing. Tite sea . IrakedyAWiuK, not dis
covered until rjl J>odic# wpce washed
ashore near the Cold Springs Life
Saving Station.
The two fishing boats lift Anglesea
in the teeth of the rising Storm for the
fish pounds about ten miles off shore.
Typos To Meet Tonight
The regular monthly meeting of
Annapolis Typographical Union No.
114 will bo held tonight in the office
► of the Evening Capital. All members
j arc urged to be present as business of
r importance to the union will be con
l sidered. The meeting will get under
► way at 7:30 o’clock.
REWARD
r
£ One Hundred Dollars will be paid
r for information leading to apprehen
[ sion of person or persons who claim
t to have bought butter front Steward of
l ! Officers’ Mess, Naval Academy.
►! W. WHITE.
\ nl Officers’ Mess.
[ MADAMESTANLEY
Scientific Palmist
Step on tin* inside mid consult
with tier. She gives you satisfac
tion before leaving the office.
> ! LOCATED AT ML i'd WEST STREET
> Cor. Cathedral St.—Office on Second Floor.
| Millinery Sale
To be Sob/ at a Sacrifice
. | Flowers. Feathers. Ribbons. Etc-. Quail
• | tity of all shades of wools, rrnc-b4
■* j ’cotton, and embroidery cotton.
14S PRINCE GEORGE ST.
NOTICE! -
Eastern Star members are
invited to visit Robert M.
Coombs Chapter Tuesday,
November Ist. at 8 P. M.,
Hall corner Preston and
Cathedral streets. Baltimore,
(Signed i.
n l WORTHY MATRON.^
HULL, OF TENNESSEE, TO
BE NEW CHIEF OF
DEMOCRATS
ill) The Associated I'rcss.)
ST. LOI’IS. MO.. Nov. I—Cor- |
M dell Hull, of Tennessee, will lie
11 chosen chairman of the Democratic
; National Committee this afternoon
to succeed George White, of
Marietta, 0.. following refusal of
; Edward Goltra, committeeman
from Missouri, to resign to make
i way for Hrecken ridge Long, of St.
j Louis and Washington. D. C. Mr.
Long and Mr. Hull were the only
two all factions agreed upon.
STRENUOUS TIMES _
AHEAD OFMiDDIES
All Attention Now Centers In
Game With Penn. State —
Bucknell Here Saturday
With the season more than half
over, the Navy football squad yester
day afternoon settled down to a pro-j
gram that will carry them through
four weeks of strenuous work, the
climax of which will be the annual
setto with the West Point Cadets on
the Polo Grounds. New York. Novem
ber 2(5. Light practice was the order
of things, however, most of the regu
lars having a lay-off following the
Bethany game Saturday, although all
were in togs and did some limbering
up stunts.
AU Kjes On Penn Slate
Bucknell comes hero Saturday.’ and
■ while it is expected they will furnish
'worthy opposition, the Penn State
Dottle* at Philadelphia, November 12.
and the Army argument, will hold the
center of the board. The coaches will
devote much time to perfecting a de
fense against Penn State’s corking
good aerial attack, which is a big cog
in the wonderful machine of the Belle
Fonte aggregation. Though King, the
stalwart tackle, injured a Itjg,muscle
in Saturday’s game* mid/may not* be <
able to face thu “Ntuaniy LiluW,'' ami
Taylor, end. ajjd- Hamilton,, baijk. are
among the casque Is. tlje middies.' have
not been bot heiecllu- d great extent by
injuries this season. Yesterday’s
* practice, was kn ! iiloggy st*jf(jt (<ue]tA
tlw ruins of|Pl\elfJoirnifgJ j . j j/'
Should Win From Bucknell
Bucknell and then Penn State now
' is the slogan in the Navy camp. The
Bucknell game will be staged on Far
‘ ragut Field, but the battle against
; Penn State will be fought on Franklin
’. Field. Philadelphia.
(Continued on Titice 4.)
To Test Burch’s Sanity
(Bv The AcMcoeiiited Prime.)
LOS ANGELES. CAL.. Nov. I.
When the case of Arthur C. Burch, in
-1 dieted jointly with Mrs. Madelaine
Obenchain for the alleged murder of
1 J. Belton Kennedy, was called foi
r trial in the Supreme Court here today,
counsel for Burch presented affidavits
to the court asking that Burch’s
sanitv be tested.
THIS LIITLE GIRL'
HAD “MANY FRIENDS”
i : AT HALLOWE’EN PARTY
Young Amelia Parkinson, of Chesa
peake avenue, Eastport. gave a Hal
lowe'en party last night to her school
chums. Amelia was told to invite her
friends, and reported to her mother
‘ that she had invited about twenty ofj
her schoolmates. Mrs. John Parkin- j
son. Amelia’s mother, took precaution i
to make ready for a score and a half j
of guests. When the invited little
folks assembled there were just sixty-;
five, but there was plenty to serve all ,
At ten o’clock, when the entertain-1
ment was over, the rain was pouring
The host went to her door and by;
happy chance a great touring truck
was passing. The driver was hailed
and asked to take the little ones to
Annapolis. Without giving his name.
! he consented, and carried the Annapo
lis folks home. Miss May Linthieum.
! sister of Mrs. Parkinson, assisted in
s ' entertaining the gues’s. When Amelia
£ was asked her method of inviting her
t> friends, she said I asked my school-
j mates and told them “if they had a
5 ! brother to bring him along.” So the
o list grexv.
t>
Oyster Supper In The County
o There will be an oyster supper on
g Thursday and Friday of this week at
o Asbury Church, at Arnold's Station.
£ on the Short Line. Supper will be
o j served from o’clock on. and the pro
o ceeds will be for the benefit of the
£ I church.
THE MARYLAND GAZETTE
XX.N'AI’OLIS. Ml).. TUESDAY. XO\ KM HER I. I'KM
NOVEMBER 13 RED CROSS
SUNDA Y IN THE CHURCHES
■ Commodore T I). Griffin. U. S. N.,|
(retired*. Chairman of the Ahnapolis
and Anne Arundel County Chapter.
■ American Red Cross. Fifth Annua!
Roll Call, has sent out a letter, of
which the following is a copy, to each '
of the local clergymen, and those in
the county, as well, for the observance j
of Red Cross Sunday. November 13; j
“On behalf of the Annapolis and
Anne Arundel County Chapter of the i
American Red Cross. 1 am enclosing
herewith copy of a pamphlet contain-;
ing suggestions for the observance of
RED CROSS SUNDAY. This, in ac
cordance with the proclamation of the
President of the United States, falls
upon November 13th.
“On Armistice Day- November 11th j
—Die American Red Cross begins its
Fifth Annual Membership Roll Call. \
This Roll (’all is primarily the enter-!
prise of tlie Red Cross chapter in this
community, and all of the funds raised
by the chapter during the Roll Call
are retained in the community for
local work, except one-half of the an- i
nual membership dues which are de-}
voted to the national and international,
phases of Red Cross work.
“it is our desire that, if it com-,
mends itself to you. you will, at your
service on RED CROSS SUNDAY, ex- 1
plain the object and aims of this or- j
ganization to your congregation; give i
them so much of the content of this!
pamphlet as may seem good to you byj
way of information and appeal; and;
urge them to re-enroll themselves as j
members of the Red Cross for the year
1922
“No word of ours is necessary. I j
am sure, to convince you of the value,
of this appeal and the necessity for
the perpetuation in strong and effi- j
cient condition of the American Red !
Cross. Perhaps the best definition that j
has been made of the Red Cross is |
that which designates it as—
“ ’The Union of those who love.
“* I n the Service of those who 1
suffer.'
“Whether it be the continuing and*
SON, MISSING FROM
HOME 20 YEARS, STILL.
SOUGHT BY MOTHER
From far away Clinton. la.. came a
letter today to police chief Charles
Oberrv. from a sister of one Frank
R. Stewart, seeking information as to
the whereabouts of Stewart, who. it is
stated, left his home there 20 years
ago. and had not since been heard
from. *
The letter, among other things,
states that the aged mother of Stew
art wishes to see him once more.
Stewart is described as 5 feet, 9 inches
in height, brown hair and eyes, and
had a scar behind his ear. Though
gone from his home for a score of
years, the mother still holds out hope
that she may yet hear from him, or
that he will return. The letter gave
no details concerning the man's dis
appearance from home.
MILiERSVItLE FARMERS’
CLUB COMMUNITY FAIR
]
On Thursday. October 27, the Mil
lersville Farmers’ Association held Its
first community fair at St. Stephen’s
Parish Hall. In spite of the very
poor growing season and the almost
total failure of fruit crops, there was
a very good showing of all farm aud
! garden products.
The women's exhibit of canned
fruit and vegetables, bread, cake, ptes,
1 etc., was splendid. Outside were pens
of many different breeds of chickens.
I ducks and rabbits; also some regis
tered Guernsey cattle was shown,
j .What perhaps was of most interest
, to the children, many of whom at
tended. were the goats from the farm
!of John Gertz.
j Doctor Oldenberg. of the Federal
t Department of Agriculture, was judge
of fruit, grain and vegetable?, while
Miss Jones, from the University of
i Maryland, came dbwn with Mrs.
Georgianna Linthieum to judge the
women’s work.
> The ladies of the club served delici
, i ous and substantial refreshments.
Much interest was displayed in this.
1 the first affair of the kind to be held
in the neighborhood, and it was the
unanimous opinion of members tli2t it
should become an annual event.
St. Anne’s Ch. School Reception
The teachers of St. Anne’s Church
School will give a reception to the
- parents of the scholars at 8 o'clock
Friday evening in the Parish House.
! constantly expanding work that must
he done for our disabled service men
over and above the uniform service ]
rendered by the Government, that
makes it possible to seek out and
[render individual aid in cases of in
-1 dividual necessity; whether it be the
work that is being carried on over-,
seas for the distressed millions of
children left as a pitiful result of the,
1 Titanic'conflict of the World's War;
whether it be an attempt to improve!
conditions at home so that preventable
! diseases and needless . death may be j
eliminated from our present life —all
of these things are certainly germane j
to the teaching of that religion that ,
strives, by the elimination of evil and j
its consequent suffering, to set tire a i
; better and happier world.
"No two things could possibly stand
closer upon the common foundation of j
a belief in 'The Fatherhood of God
and the Brotherhood of Man.’ than I
the Church and the American Bed
Cross.
i “You will recall that when, without
warning, the flood came sweeping j
j down upon Pueblo'. Colorado. Presi- j
dent Harding‘was able to say in his!
proclamation next morning—'The Red
I Cross has quickly organized to deal
1 with the first great need and will
stand by until homes and home life
j can be re-established.’
| “Certainly the knowledge that the
; American Red Cross is organized,
i equipped and ready for the first call
i of necessity, is alone sufficient to jus
! tify the existence of the organization
; and to call for the support and co
] operation of the people everywhere.
| In asking for co-operation at this time
, the American Red Cross feels that it
lis but claiming a comradeship for
common service for the common good.
“.May we hope that you will see t'
it that vour congregation is fully in
| formed, earnestly urged and thorough
ly persuaded concerning the Fifth Red
! Cross Roll Call which begins on Ar
( mistics Day—November 11th and
1 continues through until the 24th.”
BOMB EXPLODES ON
AMERICAN CONSULATE.
r AT LISBON TODAY
(!■■■;.■ h •' , (> it
<l*.v The Associated Press.)
LISBON. Nov. I.—A bomb exploded
this morning on the staircase at the
American Consulate here. No damage
was done, however. The police at
tribute the outbreak to the agitation
in connection with the case of Sacco
and Ganzetti, Italians under convic
tion of murder in Massachusetts.
The bomb had been placed before
the door of the quarters of the Ameri
can Consulate. It appears that it ex
ploded aTter the consul, in leaving
the quarters, had given the grenade a
push with his foot, but the interval
intervening was sufficient to give him
time to escape.
Officials reported that a note found
neSrbv said the bomb was meant us a
protest in the case.
NAVY “PLEBES” TO
PLAY TWO GAMES

*
| With the regular midshipmen’s
football team in Philadelphia on
November 12. battling against Penn
State, local fans will have something
to appease their appetites on that day
as the eleven of “Plebes,* or fourth
i classmen, wil meet the team of Staun
i ton Military Academy, of Staunton.
! Va., on Farragut Field. The game
i will start at 2:30 o'clock, and in
i | course of play returns from the Navy
-1 Penn State game will be received.
I The “Plebes” also will have a game
.; on Thanksgiving Day. when the op
i * posing force will he Williamson
.! School, of Pennsylvania.
TO SHOW “4 HORSEMAN
OF APOCALYPSE” HERE
The screen version of the “Four
I Horsemen of the Apocalypse.” Ibanez’
, famous novel of the war. will be
' shown at the Republic. Theatre on
j November 21. 22 and 23. The story
had wonderful screen possibilities
' and a noteworthy picture has been
made.
FOl'R AMERICANS KILLED
BY’MEXIC AN BANDITS
(Br The Associated Prr>n.)
WASHINGTON. D. C.. Nov. 1—
1 State Department advices from Chi
huahua. Mexico, received today, re
! ported the capture yesterday of four
1 Americans by Mexican bandits. Pay
ilntent of 25,000 pesos was demanded
e!for their release, which was Anally
i j brought about, by payment of only
j 5,000 pesos. .
FOCH AND PERSHING
LOUDLY ACCLAIMED
BY LEGIONNAIRES
<lt> Tfu
KANSAS CITY, MO. Nov. 1 The
American Legion received its wartime’
commanders. Marshall Ferdinand
. Fooh. of France, and General John J
J Pershing with the enthusiasm „due‘ to
j the greatest military figures of the
! World War
The thousands of delegates and visi-
I Y
tors to the national convention of the
j American veterans gave the great ,
! military leaders a tumultuous greot-
J ing that spoke the affection of the
American soldiers and people for the
I I wo men.
After hearing the visitors the con- j
j x’ention adjourned until tomorrow
I morning to permit the delegates and
! visitors to attend the dedication of
! Kansas City's memorial to those who
fell in the war and to participate in j
the big parade this afternoon.
Marshall Koch brought to the
Legionnaires a personal declaration
of comradeship and from his govern- 1
ment a testimonial of its lasting ’
friendship and esteem.
Just t!e appearance of the Marshall
was enough to throw the huge hail
into frenzy of applause and acclaim, j
and 'General Pershing received an
equal ovation from the soldiers who
fought under him in France.
*
MINFR.S AT \TUF\S. 0..
(at 01 T ON STBI hi
/ . ;
(By Tim .tMirililrcl lTc<o
ATHENS, <)., Nov. I.—Between 27.7,
and 300 union miners employed at
Mine No. 2i of Die New York Coal
Company at Flood wood, this county,
w'ent on su*ikc> today as a protest
against the check-off injunction issued 1
yesterday by Judge Anderson in Fed-,
era I Court in Indianapolis
The strike, as far as it could be j
learned here, was not authorized by
any officials of the United Mine I
Workers of America, but was Organ-'
ized bv the miners independently.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT 1
ABLE TO RETURN HOME
J
Friends of Franklin D. Roosevelt,
former Assistant Secretary of the.
Navy, have recently heard that his
, is sufficiently improved to
permit of his being, moved from the
Presbyterian Hospital, in New York,
to his home.
it will remembered that Mr
Roosevelt was stricken with poliom
yelitis wljile at his country home at
Campobellq during the summer. Both
1 his legs were paralyzed as a result,
but he has made such marked im
provement that hopes are held out for
his ultimate recovery.
Lumber Company Expands
The Meredith Lumber Company,
which has been engaged for some time
levelling and clearing the ground on
West street for their new lumber
yard, have now begun the erection of
an office and a lumber shed on the
west-end premises.
-
Marriage Licenses
I SHIPLEY-HI’LLETT Eugene L.
Shipley. 24; Gladys R. Hullett, 21:
both of Baltimore city.
1 EDWARDS - HlLLEß—William Ed
-1 wards. 29, widower: Vlelvina Hiller.
1 24, divorced; both of Baltimore city.
Clearing Bay Ridge Property
A force of twenty-five hands is at
work clearing up the grounds of Bay
. Ridge. Surveyors are also engaged in
, laying oft lots preparatory to develop
. ing the settlement.
CARVEL:HALL)
I: / TEA DANCES
SATURDAYS—4 to 6 O’CLOCK
Admission with refreshments 50c.
fIXCLCDIKQ WAR TAX)
; _ ,
* Dancing in the Grill from 7to 12 O’clock
1 COOOOOOOOOOOS ooOOO*OO*OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOoOOOOOOOO^
! ARMISTICE DAY PARADE
.% • All Service and Ex-Service men and women, whether they are. or
i g are not. members of the American Legion, who desire to participate *j
| c in the proposed Armistice Day Parade and dance, evening of November
! o nth. please clip the coupon and send to undersigned. £ . <n
I will i°i n in parade and dance. t *Jj
£ (Signed) £
r £ In uniform
- £ In civilian clothes - • £
, £ ARMISTICE DAY COMMITTEE. £
J o E. L. Colbert. oj
r O , 192 Gloucester St. * £
f c 0000000000000.0000000000.00 0O0000.0 C O 0.00.00 i 00*0.0-o AAftOOfj
THE WEATHER;
* Rain this afternoon
and tonight. Wednesday
fair and colder.
THE EVENING CAPITAL ESTABLISHED ISM.
PRICE TWO CENTS.
COUNTY ELECTION
: BOARD PRESENTED
BY GRAND INQUEST
Charge Of Malfeasance In Office
Basis Of Action Upon Com
plaint As To Naming Demo
crats To Serve As Republican
Officials For Coming Election
ASSAULT CASE TAKES
COURT’S TIME TODAY
! For alleged malfeasance in office,
the grand jury of Anne Arundel coun
i ty, now in session, has returned a
' presentment against the Hoard of
Supervisors of Klecitons of the
county. N * K '
The action is based upon alleged
ap|M)intment of Democrats to serve ns
Republican election officials at the
general election to hi held on Tues
day next. Complaints along this line
j were made several days ago by W.
' Hallam Claude, chairman of the Re
j publican Central Committee for the
county.
The specific instances cited wherein
such appointments were made are 11,
out of a total of fit). The position of
the Flection Supervisors in the
premises is. thaf they were compelled
to name Democrats in some instances
in order to complete the lists, owing
j to the fact that the number of Rc
i publican white voters in some sec
i liotis is insufficient from which to
i make selections. Also it develops
like action was taken on former
1 occasions, especially the election of
lust fall, and furthermore, some Re
publicans have expressed opinion that
' that election was one of the most snt
■ isfactory ever conducted in the
j county.
j The Flection Supervisors against
whom the presentment has been rc-
I turned are James F. Strange, presi
dent, and James S. Smith, (Demo
crats). and William H. Meade. (Re
; publican). The latter. It is said, as
sen'ed to the recommendations for ap
pointments. despite the fact that the
matter before'the grrfttd jury was pre
cipitated by a member of his party.
i itu. ir
Assault Last* To Jury
i Almost iht* entire session of theOir
| cuit CJourt today was given over to the
trial of Vincent and Joseph Ouggllnz
z r, Italians, of Baltimore, indicted on
the charge of assaulting Joseph Ben-
I son. also of Baltimore. The trial was
! before Judge Moss and a jury, and ibe
1 case was given to the jury shortly be
fore 3 o’clock, following much testi-
I mony.
Had lieen Out Fishing
The alleged assault was the cul
mination of a brawl between a num
ber of Baltimoreans who visited the
shores of Severn river on August 7
last and went out on fishing expedi
tions. Henson was accompanied by a
party of four friends, and there were
! four in another party in addition to
' j the two Gugglinzzers. There was
| much conflict in the testimony ad
duced at the trial. It seems that some
j hot words were exchanged between
• {the men when Henson raided objec
tion to the Gugglinzzers’ drawing
1 their fishing boat too close to his uf
■ I ter he (Benson) had met with some
luck at fishing. The trouble started
,in the early morning hours. Brnsoh,
•it was shown, went ashore to get
some breakfast. His assailants vent
' ashore also. There a fight easoed
during which Henson was struck by a
, boat oar, and also by another instru
ment, as a result of which he was
(fontlnanl nn I*M

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