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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, November 02, 1921, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1921-11-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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ASSOCIATED press
Ad ispatches of late
news are published in
Xhe Evening Capital.
~;K MAUTLAND GAZKTTI-ESTABLISHED 1727.
fll ITTICK TO
FEATURE lAVY AB
PEI STATE 6AME
Muldic Gridders Are Being j
O r j vf n Harder Than Ever Be
fore In This Style Of Play. Andj
Whic h Pennsylvanians Have

Shown Class
BENNY- KOEHLER
MAY HELP KICKERS
i
;in- Navy-Penn State football
j philjdelphia on November 12
| „ iok be a desperate battle!
•i nil ill oilier angles, but will also be
~ ,'uieii by a great deal of aerial of-j
vrifsive ami other open tactics, be
tlllt udetit yesterday, when “Bob”
K.jhc;; and his assistants, handling'
h,. i|,;i]d;e gridders. began to devote a !
. , deal id attention to such line of
*
-rk
S ale It., already demonstrated its|
;u > in rHis style of game, not*!
.ddv against Harvard and Georgia t
Ti n. but Navy teams for several I
.i-.l s have devoted consdierable less j
■a-..,ii in the forward and lateral
iss.ng than oilier elevens. Yesteif
,l,lV. however, the mentors started
lielr charges in a varied series of
o leslgneil especially for offensive
work in the coming struggle, and in
; lition nun h time was devoted to i
••rfeitmg a defense against the open]
n!e of the “Nittany Lions,” many of!
a plays of which Navy scouts have!
►mi unleashed in previous perform
-3 tK t*s
Work Pleases roaches
The practice was a long and hard
and the onto In s expressed much
itiefa< tinti, Thr players worked
re than half in hour under the
M*ctri arcs Tlie kicking depart
;eiii. which is the most troublesome
'imposition confronting the coaches.
■ drived sotn eencouragement when
Benin ' Koehlei veteran in the back- j
field. :r-d out his right toe; and he j
sMws much promise of development. |
He did most of the punling, and did]
well. I’he coaches also have the!
at Mining of another field-goal kicker 1
i *n their hands, now that King, the i
!, ig tackle, and whose toe won the i
\rtny game two years ago. is out with |
a hsdlv wrenched muscle and may not
flay against Penn State. This now ’
lay fall to the lot of Carney, the 205- J
■Hind guard Carney has been doing
-m! work in goal kicking after touch-j
wiis, and it is believed he will make!
us'd as a kicker from scrimmage,
iho hospital list received another'
when Quarterback Conroy!
dlro ! a painful crack on the knee.
Uoiidniifil on
MADAME STANLEY
Scientific Palmist
■ " ■ ’’ ’• insole alld consult
' " ’ '' 'ho gives you satisfae
• lea 'mg the ofheo.
', V 1 Ve. '■! W KST STREET j
v ' • *fti <■ on Siviimi floor.!
tits
Exhibit and Sale
Beginning I riday, Nov. 4
Ike Calvert Studio
5 SC! IOOL STREET
CHIXESE ART
CRAFTS
' ~ and Prizes. Kimo-
Hraperies. Hags. Hugs.
P ” ' ltu enso and Incense
’ Apliques, Coral Chains, i
farette Cases. Lamps, j
ks and Trays. Sale
■'' through November.
NOTICE!
, ABRAHAM SNYDER.
' ' ' VM < liKNTI.KMf N S
'Haiti slioi* „
~ 1 *•'<■ suit f.astj*(Trt. MU.
' ' 1 TO 29 WEST STREET.
* ~f ~|| ~|,j .nstoiueis
w 1 caning. |,reusing. r
! -i. es moderate.
CARVEL:HALL
TEA DANCES
SATURDAYS— 4 to 6 O’CLOCK
Admission •with refreshments 50c.
[ittCLVDING \\AX TAX]
Dancing in the Grill from I to 12 O'clock
(forming g|j§j&§ (ttopitnl.
RED CROSS OFFICERS
10 ATTEND REGIONAL
CONFERENCE TOMORROW
The Annapolis and Anne Arundel
chapter of the Red Cross will be well
represented tomorrow at the Regional
Conference, which will be the larges:
and most important meeting of the
organization held in Maryland since
the armistice, will be held tomorrow
at the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty
Building. Baltimore, with each of the
24 chapters of the State participating.
The meeting will begin at 9:30 a. m.
and will be open to the public.
Those going from here are .Mrs
Carry! Bryan, chairman of the local
chapter; Mrs. W. G. Dawson, execu
tive secretary; Mrs. Edward Johnson,
chairman of Nursing Service; Mrs.
; John Parkinson. Home Service Secre
tary; Mrs. Charles A. Ware, chairman
of the Junior Red Cross, and Miss
Sara Sutherland. Red Cross Nurse.
Both Mrs. Ware and Miss Suther
land have been asked to make reports
j of their work in this chapter.
I The chief topic will be the work the
J Maryland Chapter is doing for dis
abled soldiers and their families.
After luncheon at the Green Door
Tearoom the afternoon session will he
devoted to a discussion of “Produc
tion.” I nder this general heading are
included the making of hospital sup
plies and garments.
U. S. ARMY FLYER BREAKS
PARACHUTE JUMP RECORD
I
The record for high altitude para
chute jumping was broken yesterday,
according to officials, when Sergeant
Eneil Chambers, of Post Field. Fort
Sill, Lawton. Okla.. leaped approxi
mately 26,000 Peet 400 feet less than
five miles from an army plane. The
stunt was performed in connection
♦with the American Legion flying meet.
The descent took 18 minutes.
Both Chambers and his pilot, Wende
Brooklev. were equipped with oxygen
tanks and special fur-lined clothing.
The ascent, according to Lieutenant
Brookley. took an hour and a half.
MARYLAND BOY GOES
ON FOOT TO CONVENTION
Harry Ballon, of Hagerstown, made
his way in the Legion convention at
Kansas City by walking from Youngs
town. Ohio. On the way Dallen and
three companions gave concerts and
| played in vaudeville theatres.
Alfred T. Truitt, of Salisbury, Md..
State Commander of Maryland Le
gion Post, had charge of the delega
tion in the monster parade held yes
i terday.
♦♦
BRITISH SCHOONER WITH
LIQUOR ABOARD ARRIVES;
HER CAPTAIN ABSCONDED
!By The AMoiTutdl Tress.)
NEW YORK. Nov. 2.—The British
two-sticker J. B. Young was piloted
j into port today minus her captain and
with nothing to show for 1.000
of the 1.300 cases of whiskey listed on
her manifest. The schooner was sight
ed with distress signals flying off the
Jersey Coast by a pilot boat, which
went out and piloted her into port.
The mate explained today that the
skipper departed in a motorboat last
Friday for parts unknown while the
schooner was loafing off the Long
Island shore.
Buried In Washington
The remains of Mrs. Alvira Calhoun
Snyder, who died here at the home of
her daughter, Mrs. Ella S. Pratt, No.
2 Murray avenue, were buried on
Monday in Rock Creek cemetery.
Washington. The funeral services
were held at Gaw's Chapel and were
attended by many friends and rela
tives Rev. Father Buckey officiated.
: and among those present was Monsig
! nor Daugherty, an old friend of the
j family.
COLORED DANCE
• It. NATURAL mti'HKSTHA.”
qf Cambridge. Md
TOMORROW NIGHT
AT THK ASSEMBLY ROOMS
j Daui'tng—7 ::*4 to 11 ;.'iO --- Admission. TO
I
ANNAPOLIS. MJ).. W EDNESDAY. NON EMBER i. 1!D!
LEAGUE WOMEN VOTERS'
j WILL HOLD IKS
I Glenburnic. SevePna Park And
Friendship To Hear Speakers
Friday And Saturday
j |
.CANDIDATES INVITED
a
Three important meetings of the i
r League of Women Voters will be held
. ,this week in the county. The lira: I
two will be on Friday evening, one
j at Severna Park and the other at Glen
burnie.
The Severna Park meeting has been
I called by the chairman of the district,
Mrs. E. S. Samuels, and will be ad
dressed by Mrs Robert Moss, chair
man of the County League of Women!
Voters on the principles of the league,
by Mrs. George Abram Moss, secre
. tary of the Woman's Democratic Fed
eration of Anne Arundel comity, and
by Mrs. G. it. Clements of the Repub
, lican Federation. The last two will
speak for their respective parties.
Mrs. James S. Smith, chairman of j
the Fifth district, will preside at the
Gienburnie meeting and will intro
duce the speakers who will be Mrs.
T. J. Linthicuni, for the League; Mrs.
Clarence M. White. Democrat, and
Mrs. Maurice Ogle, Republican.
The various candidates for election
have been invited to be present at
these meetings and to make addresses,
as they have at the meeting to be held
at Friendship on Saturday afternoon
' at 2:30.
The chairman of the Eighth district
is Mrs. lainsdowne Bowie, but the
moeting will be under the manage
ment of Miss Sallie Hutchins, who is
neighborhood chairman. On this oc
casion the speaker for the league will
be Mrs. Robert Moss, while Mrs.
Ralph kb Root will speak for the Re
publicans and Mrs. George Abram
Moss for the Democrats.
With elections only a few days off
it is important for women to make a
point of attending these meetings to
get a line on the candidates for whom
they will vote.
GALLAUDET PREPARES
FOR ST. JOHN’S TEST
.. ■■ ■ . -
Tlte Ga Mantlet gridders started
workout yesterday in preparation for 1
their week-end engagement with St.)
John's College here on Saturday.
Coach Hughes is giving a great deal
of attention to the backs to improve
the offensive. The cripples are stead
ily recovering, but some are still un
able to don uniforms. Should any o?
them fail to get into condition for the
game. Coach Hughes will have a num
ber of second-string men who are cap
able of holding varsity jobs. The team
was idle last Saturday, while the Re
serves trounced the Catholic I’niver-
I sity freshmen 14 to 7.
COUNTY FAIR TO OPEN
; TONIGHT IN ARMORY
t
1 The second fair to be held by Anne
Arundel county will open this even
‘ ing in the Bladen Street Armory at
■ 7:30 p. m.
• All day work has been progressing
■ at fever heat in the armory, booths
; are going up. and exhibits prepared
at a great rate so everything will be
jin shape for the opening. The four
j booths down the center of the build
f ing will contain the exhibits of the
j Community Clubs of Millersville.
j Camp Parole. Davidsonville and Sft
Margarefs.
No one should. miss taking in the ,
!* I
fair which promises to be most m-
J teresting. " :
Recovered From Indisposition !
p | George A. Myers, who has been con
fined to his home for the past 10 days
j suffering from a severe cold, is out
again.
ARMISTICE DAY TO
4 BE DECLARED A
HOLIDAY
J '
rwjr Th AiTalfi! Prn.)
WASHINGTON. D C.. Nov. 2
Armistice Day. November 11. will
; i he declared a national holiday in
honor of America’s unknown sol
ij dier to be buried that day in
Arlington.
Congressional action on a reso
lution requesting the President
and all state governors to pro
j claim that day a holiday was com
pleted today by adoption by the
•j Senate. Issuance of the Procla
mation by Mr. Harding is expected
■jl within a few days.
THE MARYLAND GAZETTE
j President Calls On The Nation To
Give Thanks For Blessings
A flrorUmtatimt
the President of the United States
That season has come when, alike in pursuance of a devout
people's time-honored custom and in grateful recognition of fav
oring national fortunes, it is proper that the President should
summon the nation to a day of devotion, of thanksgiving for blessings
bestowed, and of prayer for guidance ui modes of life'that may deserve
continuance of Divine favor.
Foremost among our blessings is the return of peace, and the ap
proach to normal ways again. The year has brought us again into
relations of amity with all nations, after a long period of struggle aud
turbulence. In thankfulness therefore wc may well unite in the hope
that Providence will vouchsafe approval to the things we have done/
the aims which have guided us. the aspirations which have inspired us.
We shall be prospered as we shall deserve prosperity, seeking not
alone for the material things but for those of the spirit as well; earn
( estly trying to help jolliers; asking before all else the privilege of
service. As we render thanks ijrtiew for the exaltation which came to
ns. we may fittingly petition that moderation and wisdom shall be
granted to rest upon all who are in authority, in the tasks they must
discharge. Their hands will be steadied, their purposes strengthened,
in answer to our prayers. *
Ours has been a favored nation in the bounty which God has be
i stowed upon it. The great trial of humanity, though indeed we bore
our part as well as we were able, left us comparatively little scarred.
It is for us to recognize that we have been thus favored, and when
we gather at our altars to offer up thanks we will do well to pledge,
in humility and all sincerity, our purpose to prove deserving. We have
been raised up and preserved in national power and consequence as
part of a plan whose wisdom we cannot question. Thus believing, we
can do no less than hold our nation the willing instrument of the
Providence which has so wonderfully favored us. Opportunity for very
great service awaits us if we shall prove equal to it. Let our prayers
be raised for direction in the right paths. Under God. our responsibil
ity is great; to our own first, to ail men afterward; to all mankind in
God’s own justice.
Now, therefore. I. Warren G. Harding. President of the United
States, hereby designate Thursday the twenty-fourth day of November,
to In* observed by the people as a day of thanksgiving, devotion and
prayer; urging that at their hearthsides and their altars they will give
thanks for all that has been rendered unto them, and will pray for a
continuance of the Divine fortune which has been showered so gener
ously upon this nation.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused to be
affixed the seal-of the United States of America.
Done at the capital of the United States, this 31st day of October,
in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and twenty-one and of the
independence of the United States the one hundred and forty-sixth.
(Signed), WARREN G. HARDING,
By the President.
CHARLES E. HUGHES.
Secretary of State.
DEMURRER FILED BY !
COUNTY TO ROAD
INJUNCTION CASE

Byway of answer to the injunction
proceedings recently brought against
the County Commissioners by Isaac S.
Nutwell, John Shepherd, and others,
|to restrain further work on certain
roads in the Eighth district, the Com
missioners. through their counsel, j
have tiled a demurrer, challenging the |
! legal sufficiency of the proceedings.
The demurrer states, in effect, that un
' der the statutes governing the matter.!
the Commissioners are vested with full j
discretion as to making whatever ex
penditures are necessary and proper,
in their judgment, for road work and*
that they, therefore, cannot be en-|
joined from exercising this discretion*
and performing their duties.
Judge Moss has invited counsel for
the respective parties to submit writ-j
ten briefs in support of their conten-j
tions, and a decision on the demurrer ;
will likely be forthcoming in a few
days. ..
REPUBLICAN WOMEN j
; WILL MEET TOMORROW
The Republican Woman’s Federa
tion of Anne Arundel county will hold
a meeting tomorrow afternoon at 3: So
in the building at 227 Prince George
street, near Maryland avenue. At the
conclusion of the business meeting
which will last a half hour there will
be an address by W. Hallam Claude,
chairman of the Republican State Cen
tral Committee for the county.
AH the Republican candidates for
the coming election have been invited
to attend the meeting and it is hoped
:to have a speech from Oliver Metz
erott, the Republican nominee for
State Comptroller.
Clock On The Job Again
The Naval Academy clock, which
has been silent for some time, has re
sumed “telling the time.” The old
custom of ringing the hours has been
returned to after 31 years of striking
(according to the watches on ship
board. It was in 1S&0 that this custom
was first inaugurated.
VARIED PROGRAM FOR
UNIVERSITY CLUB’S
MEETING THURSDAY
The University Club of Annapolis
will hold its next meeting at McDowell
Hail. St. John’s College, Thursday eve
ning. at 8 o’clock. The following in
teresting program has been prepared
| for that occasion:
"What Is Mathematips?” by Prof.
Ralph E. Root, of the Post Graduate
School; “Arkansas Razorbacks.” by
jA. J. Barrett, of the Department of
! Mathematics. I T . S. Naval Academy;
(“Some Astronomical Antiquities,”-by
I Prof. L. S. Dederick, Department of
j Mathematics. Naval Academy; “The
j Strategic Situation in the Pacific," by
! Prof. W. O. Stevens. Department of
' English. Naval Academy.
( This will be the second meeting of
the Club this season. The first meet
* ing was unusually well attended, but
lit is hoped that even a larger number
of college men in dhe city will identify
themselves with the organization.
Graduates of the Naval Academy and
the Military Academy as well as grad
| nates of colleges, technical schools,
(professional schools, and universities
! are eligible for membership. Thej
! membership fee is a nominal one and j
the club urges men of the city andj
community to join with them.
ADM. WILSON HONORARY
PALLBEARER AT BURIAL
OF UNKNOWN SOLDIER

Rear-Admiral Henry B. Wilson,’
Sup< rintendent of the Naval Academy.’
; will he one of the honorary pall-*
bearers at the Armistice Day cere-’
monies in Washington, when the body;
of America's “unknown soldier” will j
■be buried in Arlington National cente-j
tery. it was announced here today, i
, | Many other high ranking officers ofj
! the military and naval arms of the
I United States service have also been!
i designated to act in a like capacity.
Rehearsal Date Changed
I There has been a change of date for!
the rehearsal of “Wfh-Wah-Noab,”(
; which will be held tonight at 7:45 in'
the Assembly Rooms, * instead of to-j
I I morrow as scheduled.. A full attend
ance is desired at the!rehearsal.
ji.
VICE-ADMIRAL SAITO
| AND JAP MIDSHIPMEN
VISIT ACADEMY TODAY
Vice-Admiral Saito, commanding
the Japanese training squadron, now
at New York, ami a party of 7." mid
shipmen of the I pipe rial Naval Acad
emy. out on a cruise of instruction,
were visitots lo the Naval Academy
today.
Admiral Saito was received with all
official courtesies due his rank. A
salute of lo guns was fired from the
battery of the station ship Reina Mer
cedes. and a company of marines was
paraded in front of the main gate to
the government reservation. Rear-
Admiral Henry 13 Wilson. Superin
tendent, and the ranking officers at
tached to the station, received the
visitors and escorted them on a tour
of inspection of the several academic
departments. Admiral Wilson gave a
stag luncheon in their honor, after
which they returned to Washington.'
From there they will return North,
will make a visit to Niagara Falls, and
within a few days the training squad
ron will sail for England.
RED CROSS ELECTS
TWO VICE-CHAIRMEN
A meeting of the Executive Com
mittee of the Red Cross was held at
Red Cross headquarters on Saturday
last for tlie purpose of electing offi
cers for the coming year. The new
chairman. Mrs. Carryl Uryan, pre
sided, and the following officers were
elected: Second vice-chairman. Com
modore T. D Griffin; third vice-chair
man, Mrs. Samuel Rrooke.
The two appointments made to the
financial and advisory hoard were:
Major J. I)e Peyster Douw and Philip
Miller.
Mrs. Edward Johnson was reap
pointed chairman of the nursing serv
ice, and Mrs. St. George Barber
chairman ot' the home service. Mrs.
W. G. Dawson was also reappointed
executive secretary.
The treasurer's report for the year
will be found in another part of the
paper.
>
Visitor’s Day At Germantown
Tomorrow will he visiting day at i
the Germantown school from ft to 3
The regular monthly meeting of the
Patrons' Club of Germantown will be i
held in the school building at 3 o’clock '
HALLOWE’EN PARTY
AT CROWNSVILLE j

The Hallowe'en masquerade ball'
held by the Hospital Social Club at j
(Townsville, was a success despite the I
inclement weather. There were a j
number of original and interesting cos- i
tumes in evidence which made it rath- j
j er difficult to select the winner of the |
j promised prize.
Mr. Mcßae, chairman of the Social i
Club, acted as judge and announced
Miss Rose DeSantis, of Annapolis, as
winner of the prize for the best dress
ed person, while Miss Catherine
Fisher, also of Annapolis, was a close
competitor for the honor. Joseph
Muhlmeister, of Annapolis, in his Sa
tanic costume was the winner of the
prize to lie given to the ‘ tackiest” cos
tume.
Arrangements will be made for a
j Thanksgiving entertainment.
MARSHAL FOCH TO SEE
BALL GAME ON SATURDAY
! Marshal Focb. who will be in Chic
ago next Saturday, will witness his
first football game in America when
be attends the Ohio State-Chicago
contest as the guest of President
Harry Pratt Judson. of the University
of Chicago. Several boxes have been
reserved for the Foch party, which
will be escorted to the game by the
ex-service men of the university.
DEBATE TO BE HELD AT
GLENBURNIE NEXT WEEK
The Christian Men’s Club, of Glen
htirnie. will meet in the Hall on Mon
day. November 7. at 8 p. m. A de
bate is planned for the social part of
the program, the question being: "Re
solved. That Women have a Greater
Influence Over Men Than Money."
Those on the affirmative side are:
jJ. -Muhley. Lee Stone and John
1 Schmidt. Arguers for the negative
will >be Edward Bradley. A. Stumpf
and B. Morgan. All members are in
vited to attend.
THE WEATHER:
* Cloudy and colder to
night. Thursday fair.
THE EVENING CAPITAL ESTABLISHED 18M,
PRICE TWO CENTS.
nun m ikes
I PRESENTMENT I
LOCAL LIQUOR LAWS
: ! Also Files Charges Against Store
keepers At Odenton And Jes
sups For Slot Machines—Mur
der Case Set Up For Monday
ALBERT MONDAY
ACQUITTED BY COURT
Among the indictments tiled in Court
so far this week are four charging
violation of the local liquor laws, two
being against Waters Howes, of
Market Space, and two against Samuel
Lonev. a Greek restaurant keeper of
Annapolis. In the Howes cases it is
alleged that intoxicating liquors were
sold to Thomas McNabb and Jiihn El
liott. the dates given being October
'i and July •’* of this year, the clturge
also including unlawfully having
liquor in the defendant’s possession
and referring to the fact that at the
April Term of Court this defendant,
pleaded guilty to a similar charge.
In Loney’a cases Ihe charges are
practically the saute, Beatty Johnson
and Sarah Johnson being named os the
ones the liquor was sold to. Loney,
however, was not one of those Indicted
last spring.
(•rand Jury After Slot Machines
Indictments for unlawfully having
and operating slot mac hines’were filed
against Murray Brothers, cf Odenton,
and Ridgely Bond, of Jeksups. Judge
Moss in his charge to the Grand Jury
called special attention to violations
of the law as to such machines and
the present indictments show the
jury's activity in following mp tho
Court’s charge.
Albert Monday Acquitted
At the conclusion of yesterday's ses
sion of the Court Judge Moss rendered
his opinion and judgment of the Court
in the case of State vs. Albert .Monday,
being an appeal front the action of tho
State Automobile Commissioner In re
voking Monday’s license for alleged
driving a car while tinder the influence)
of iiqttor.
This ease wag heard last Friday
and judgment withheld, pending furth
‘er consideration. Judge-Moss reached
\ the conclusion that the defendant was
not guilty of the offense charged and
j the Court's action therefore reverses
j the Automobile Commissioner.
Palmer Murder Trial Monday
Hershel Palmer, a young Whiteman,
' Indicted by the county grand jury for
j the murder of Ira .Bradburn. was ar
! raigned in the Circuit Court this aft
; ernoon. He entered a plea of “not
guilty,” and elected to be tried'before
a jury. The case was set for trial
today, but because of the absence of
several witnesses for both the] prose
cution and defense, postponement was
found necessary, and the case will he
brought to trial on Monday byi agree
-1 ment. ;
j The crime was committed on Sep
tember 8 last at Grover, in thoTnorth-
of the county and is Jsaid to
have, been the result of a quarrel la
which Palmer and the dead man en
gaged. Bradburn was mortally wound
|ed In the breast. Palmer claims self
defense. • ' ',
COUNTY OFFICIALS TO
MEET NEXT THURSDAY
Because Tuesday of next week is
election day the regular meeting of
the Board of County Commissioners
will be deferred until Thursday, Like
wise the meeting of the Orphans’-Court
will be held on Thursday instead of
Tuesday. ' * ~ 1
Aside from the passage of a large
number of bills, the County Commis
sioners were comparatively idle at yes
-1 terday’s meeting, no other business of
importance coming up dor their con
sideration. Peter Gross, colored, re
cently picked up by patrolman Sam
-1 uel Jones, of Eastport, was ordered
committed to the State Hospital for
Colored Insane at Crownsville, this
county, upon certificates of insanity
furnished by Dr. J. J. Murphy, and
; Dr. William S. Welch. ,
Marine Guard Notes
The Marines of the Naval Academy
■ Guard are preparing for a game of
’ football on Sunday afternooh to ba
- played on the Navy Post Graduatei
■ School parade. The opponents will
be from Batlimore, but the name of
the team has-not yet been passed on
i to the marines..
The members of the Guard are malM
ing arrangements to have a dance a|[
their quarters on the evening at Fri*
day, November 11. _ *

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