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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, June 05, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1922-06-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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■Associated press
II AunP ltch '‘
I „,■ >r' published in
■ I Thf Evening Capital
„„ ■M,Krr.-.,ra,im. - THE MARYLAND GAZETTE , - =
' v<vll Xo - :; "- AXXAPOI-tS. .MD., MONDAY. .If XT 1!)32, TRICE TWO CENTS.
p AID I!!
I MSI! IN
I OTHER SPORTS
H.. ikally Complete To
H Ol Dual Cornpe
■ \.' . rvl Football, Base*
■ An 1 Basketball During)
I ~,, a lenuc Term
|
I.* j | i*T ROWING
■ a mi polo probable!
■ v,.. ; :;:wrc^ ,y AeT4 B
H I'" M llilhoritia * fair
||j • ■ f i!.. respective
HR ..i 14 -til br*n he*
Bra , . , t, \i present the
18l I ,1a !■> I t.l I'll 111 foot -
MB ■, i a tti.ill annually.
HR .■■■ Mo fa mmg ta .iin *
■ :! W IH'll t lie lllltl<|i>H
BB va. ui.l i-ng igi* form
fm t uni include tr.irk
|H )i‘ i.il iKMilll.islifs.
n| . • r 1•• I. a -all a' ** I \\ Tl Ht ■
SK n 1 Imi'.iiii;. II i prob-
H[ ■ i,• '.nous ;ii first may
BH V1.i1,1 111 A cell till l llml
BH - v. in. alternating at
H t.lm. Nil'iui Keen Rooster
m "i Si no recognized row
■ .11 ! u:!l he illi.il'le to meet
■ \l ,i i,. mi the water. On the
■ , .i ri, i N.ivy lines not InillSt a
Hi!.; |ia...i team.
m , ,r \!m. i ll Henry It Wilson, su
■ 'nil i;t ~f the Naval Academy,
■ ithe foremost in seek
■ i,n.il i nm|ie(itloMs hetween the
■c i in.l N.iw m all sports. Known
■ i k.■ n follower of athletic games,
.nlhii'iire has been felt ill the
hlh iiii* evolved.
H Ilnurs I,me Knur Men
H 1 i 'i Spike Wehh, of the boxing
■ mourning the loss of four
■ ' jerf, Mitit-rs of Ills Ht|tt.ial who
Hun i-rmliiateil They art>: Hill
■ : ini ain weigli t; Hill Sehalil, of
Contlfmr*l On V'llffr l >
* Sra
Wm l
\Jr
| An Immediate Decision
I "hv nnt maka' an Immediate
■ 'Men in start a savings ae-
H •'•:•!! To-day! Now! This
B H will mean prosper-
B '• r ■ ’ : n new on. -and your
B 'in' mi the right side of the I
H ledger
■ "Personal service to all”
I —THE—
I Annapolis Banking
I & 1 rust Co. ,
I r M-tin St & Church Circle
I notice!
B n;v,meeting will le held in
■ ,A > Hall. West street. Wed
■ 'M'tting, June 7, 1922, at S
■ r he purpose of organizing
I ' ' l.<nlge 1 O. O. E„ in An
■ M't ii r*. Sisters. Daughter*
■ " v,s of Ovid Fellow* and others
■ >’e invited to he present.
■ f the Order will be on
■ ’ address the meeting.
I JOHN A. MOODY,
N. G.
W f qi aih
H Secretary.
■ 'fopolK laidge No. 17.
B 0 F. J7
BCharles W . I ucker & Son
I tul It ork and Ronftn^
B v .‘ . *■”"•*. Hot-Air Heating
B r J‘- ad l'l|<etess Fur-
HH l .tintrtl niul UopalrtHl.
K -T.MATI's CHEERFULLY GIVEN!
I T " f MunlMpat RuUdlug.
■ St. |*Uoim* 02-J. *
Ctmtitifi Capital.
RICHMOND EXPECTS j
5.000 raw
And It Is Estimated That Visi
tors At Reunion Will Be
Nearly 50.000
RICHMOND. VA., June s.—Between
in.tHMi and U,<MO visitors from Mary
, land to Teaaa, It i* est,mated, will be
[here for the thirty-second annual Re-
I imk n of the United Confederate Vet
jeratis, which will take place on June
t'-22 of thl* number. It is figured,
there will he present about 5,*M of
ihr 46.H*0 surviving Confederate *ol
-1 liter*.
1 Tactically >ll of the old graycoat*
■••• tiling for their annual roll-call will
! lie accompanied by one or more tnetn-
I her* of their fatnilie*. Reduced rail
road rate* of 1 cent a mile have been
granted theiu by all the transporta
tion system* Throughout the South
east. In addition, there will he spon
sors named by the three department*
The Department of Northern Vir
ginia, tin* Department of Tennessee
and the Department of Transmissis- |
slppl an.l each State division. Some
camps are expected to name spon
sors. There will also he hundreds of
maids- and matrons-of-honor.
Sons Of “Vets" Ami Olliers
This great assembly will be fur
ther increased by the presence of the
Sons of Confederate Veterans, United
Daughters of the Confederacy and
meinl ers of the Confederated South
ern Memorial Association. These nlso
will have the advantage of reduced
railroad fares, the transportation
(CnnttniiiMl *Ol rune 4.)
TRANSPORT ‘CHAUMONT’
WILL SAIL TOMORROW
The Navy transport “Chaumont"
that came in to take nearly 100 of
the newly made Ensigns of the class
of 1922 to the West Coast will leave
Annapolis Roads tomorrow morning,
other passengers on the Chaumont
who are well known locally are Cap
tain and Mrs. A. St. Clair Smith and
their two sons who are en route to
the Orient; Captain and Mrs. W. T.
Cluvcritis, their daughter, Miss Eliza
beth Cluverlus, and son, Tyler Clu
verius; Captain and Mrs. James Har
very Tomb and their three children.
Commander and Mrs. 11. 11. Wygant
and their two children, who will go
to California. Two of the recently
married bridegrooms of the class of
1922 will also take their wives out
on the transport. These are Ensign
Howard Holes Hutchinson and En
sign Robert Hishop Rothwell, whose
wife was Miss Dorothy Merle Moss,
of Annapolis.
BILL EMPOWERS”WEEKS
TO ACCEPT FORD’S
MUSSEL SHOAL OFFER
(liv The Aorliitrd Pre.l
WASHINGTON, I). C., June R.—A
hill authorising Secretary Weeks to
draw up an agreement for the sale
and lease to Henry Ford of the Mus
| sel Shoals (Ala.) property, under the
terms of the offer made and amended
| by the House Military Committee so
! as to eliminate the Gorgas steam
I plant from the properties mentioned,
will be introduced soon in the House,
probably today.
Marriage Licenses
WHKELOCK-MacLEISH Charles
D. Wheeloek. 24. IT. S. Navy; Beatrice
G. MaoLeish, 24. Denver. Col .
CONRADT-DIBERT Pierson K
Conradt. 22. U. S. Marine Corps;
, Dorothy W. Dibert. Aurora. N. Y.
DROWN - SMITH —Carl R. llrown.
t 22. U.'S Navy; Helen C. Smith, 20.
, Ilvron. 111.
: Wanted!
* TWO OR THREE ENER
GETIC YOUNG MEN OF
GOOD APPEARANCE AS
SALESMEN.
LOUIS B. MYERS,
. jt 240 West St.
* THIS SEASON/
THE SAME GOOD DEYIL
: El) CRABS AT THE SAME
OLD PLACE, 2ilG WEST
STREET.
M. A. MILLER.
PHONE 532-M. j. 30
MIDDIES SAIL AWAY
AT CRACK OF DAY FOR
CRUISE QN BRINY DEEP
W’< ighing anchors at fi:ls o’clock
thl* morning, the four warships bear
ing the undergraduate classes of mid
shipmen headed down Chesapeake
Bay, bound for the open sea on the
annual summer practice cruise of the
embryo officers. Nearly 1.700 students
are taking the cruise, and for the next
three months they will live the life of I
real sailorp. as the vessel* have only'
skeleton crews of bluejackets.
The squadron will first vfslt south
ern waters, where the first six weeks
will be spent, one of the principal
stotis being at Colon. Panama Canal i
Zone. Guantanamo Bay will lie the
base of operations, and upon leaving
that section, the ships will steam
north and will go as far as Halifax.
Nova Scotia.
The ships in the squadron are the
dreadnoughts North Dakota (flag
ship), Florida and Delaware of the
patrol force of the Atlantic fleet, and
the cruiser Olympia. Dewey’s flagship
at Manila. The cruise will end at
Annapolis the latter part of August,
aft< r which the midshipmen will he
allowed a month's vacation to visit
their homes.
MANHATTANS BEATEN
BY MARINES 13 TO 2
The baseball team of Marines came
through on the long end of a 13 to 2 j
score in their game against the Man-I
hattan Athletic Club of Baltimore yes
terday afternoon. The game was play
ed on the diamond of the Navy Post
Graduate School. Jones pitched a
steady game all the way for the
Marines. Dapple, of the visitors, was
also effective except in the sixth when
the soldier-sailors got to him and
there was a merry-go-round that re
sulted in 9 runs being chalked up.
The batteries were; Marines—
Jones and Zittel and Astin; Manhat
tans —Rupple and Bayer.
LOCAL EMMIBER
DEPARTED BROTHERS
Pursuant to long established cus
tom of paying tribute to their de
parted brothers, members of Annapo
lis Lodge of Klks yesterday visited
"Elks’ Rest,” in Cedar 131 tiff cemetery
and flowers were strewn on the
graves of deceased lodgemen.
Like ceremonies were held by
lodges of the Order throughout -the
State, it being the custom to visit
the cemeteries on the lirst Sunday in
June. Baltimore Lodge held memor
ial ceremonies at which Governor
Ritchie, who is a member of the or
der. delivered an address on the ideals
of the organization.
FOR DEFENSE OF TARIFF
RILL IN THE SENATE
(By Th* Aimm'lntrd PrruO
WASHINGTON, I). C„ June s.—Re
publican Senate leaders have deter
mined to explain and defend the Ad
ministration tarifT bill in general de
bate in the Senate, Senator Watson.
Republican, Indiana, announced today
in opening the first of a series of ad
dresses. which is planned for the next
few weeks.
ALLIESREDUESfSDME
U. Q WPS ON RHINE
(By Th AwMM-latrrf -* >
WASHINGTON. D. C.. June 5.
In compliance with requests from
Germany and some of the Allied pow
er*. a small force of American troops
is to he retained at Coblenz on the
Rhine beyond July 1. the date set
originally for completion of American
evacuation of German territory.
The length of time the troops will
be kept on the Rhine. Mr. Weeks said,
has not been determined.
STEAMER FROM NEW YORK.
REPORTED LOADED WITH
AMMUNITION. HELD IT
cßy The AuMM-latrcl Prfs.)
LONDON. June 5. A steamer
hound from New York for Fenit.
County Kerry, with corn and a mixed
cargo, has been held up in Tralee Bay
bv a British sloop, says a dispatch
from Tralee.
A large quantity of ammunition in
! barrels was seized, the dispatch
states.
A Central News message says the
• steamer mentioned is the Seattle
1 1 Spirit.
lIENKY FORD WOULD RUN
FOR PRESIDENCY IF
PEOPLE W ANT 11IM
(By The .t,kiiatnl l*rr*n.)
DETROIT, MICH. June a.—
Henry Ford has intimated priv
ately that he would run for
President “if the people of the
country desire him to do bo.” but
he would “refuse to spend any
money to secure his nomination
or election.” according to William
T. Kronberg. editor of a Dearborn
newspaper and one of the leaders
in the Dearborn "Henry Ford for
President” Club.
St. John's Boys
Honor Guard At
Key Memorial
Thirty cadets of St. John'* College,
under command of Lieut.-Colonel
Grosvenor L. Townsend, will be the
escort at the unveiling of the Francis
Scott Key Memorial at Fort McHenry.
June 14. As a tribute to Key the
cadets will stand at attention as the
statute is unveiled. Key was a
graduate of St. John's College.
Final plans for the ceremonies are |
gradually being formed. The pro
gram prepared by the committee ap
pointed by Mayor Broening. of Balti
moie. has been submitted to President
Harding and it is expected that it will
he approved by him today. Confer
ence hetween Washington officials,
Police Department heads. Maryland
Automobile Club representatives and
members of the Mayor's committee
| will be held early this week to perfect
final arrangements.
Luncheon To Harding
The President, prior to his address
at the ceremonies, will he the guest at
luncheon of Mayor Broening and
about 25 invited guests. An automo
bile ride will follow.
Among the many descendants of
Key, who expect to attend the unveil
ing ceremonies is Miss Ellen Haber
sham, of Annapolis, a great-grand
daughter.
Powder Explosion Kills Five
(By Tin* .\**Ko-i:itp<| I‘rosH.)
OAKLAND, CAL., June 5. Five
men are dead, three badly injured,
and a dryer wrecked as a result of an
explosion at the Trojan Powder Com
pany plant at San Lorenzo, 11 miles
front this city, today.
VALENTINOJJELEASED
(By Th ASMMinlcd I’rm.)
LOS ANGELES. CAL., June 5.
Itodolph Valentino, screen actor,
whose principal roles have been those
of love heroes, was liberated of a
charge of bigamy today after a pre
liminary hearing before Justice of the
Peace Handy.
The justice ruled there was insuf
ficient evidence presented to support
the complaint.
FRIENDS PAY TRIBUTE •
TO LATE BERTIN CLOW,
BURIED IN ST. ANNE’S
Many relatives and friends as
sembled yesterday afternoon and paid
last tribute to the memory of Benin
Clow, popular conductor on the Short
Line Division of the Washington.
Baltimore and Annapolis Electric
, Railways, who was fatally injured
I when he was crushed by a car in the
, Bladen street yards of the line on
Tuesday night of last* week.
The funeral took place from Mr
. Clow’s late residence. 345 West street.
, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. Rev. H.
. Wilson Burgan, pastor of Calvary
; Methodist Church, conducting the
, services. Fellow conductors and
t other employees on both divisions of
, the railway line attended the services
at the house and also at the cemetery.
I Practically the entire membership of
the Men's Bible Chass of Calvary
Church, of which Mr. Clow was a
member, walked to the cemetery.
Many and beautiful were the floral
designs sent to the residence and
which were later placed over the
* grave monnd. These included designs
and sprays from the Brotherhood of
| Railroad Conductors, conductors and
r j employees of the Short Line Division
and also the W., B. & A. branch, the
I Men’s Bible Class, the official board of
'' Calvary Church, and others from ad
-1 miring friends.
Funeral Directors James S. Taylor
1 and Sons had charge of th<? obsequies.
1 The pal Hearers were; Lee Kalmev,
William P. Barber. John J. Flynn.
B John W. McGinnis. Elliott Steven*
B and Henry Oaksmith. Interment was
Jn St. Anne's cemetery.
CHILDREN OF MM
M. E. CHURCH IN
ANNUAL EXERCISES
The annual Children's Day service
was hold yesterday afternoon in
Salem M. E. Church. South, near An
napolis. by the Sunday School pupils.
A line program of recitations and i
songs was rendered as follows:
Opening chorus. “Bells of June- I
tide’; scripture reading; prayer by j
the pastor? singing. "Of His Great
Love We Are Singing"; recitation.
"Summertime,” by Elsie Wells; reci
tation. ‘‘A Problem Solved,” by James
Harrison; singing. “Out of the Verd
ant Meadows”; recitation. "Happy as
Can Be." by Nellie Cook; recitation.
"This is Children’s Day.” by Elizabeth
Harrison: solo and chorus, "The
Robin’s Song.” by the school; recita
tion. "The Little Bird's Song, by
Dorothy Brovn; recitation. ‘‘Kind
Words and Smiles.” by Miss Thelma
Wells; Primary exercise. "Smiling
June-tide Roses.” by James Harrison,
John Buser. Oscar Buser, Nellie 1
Cook. William Harrison. Elizabeth
Harrison, Doris Wells; duet. “In the '
Upper Garden.” by Mrs. A. E. Owens 1
and Miss Mildred Duvall; recitation. 1
“Nancy May.” by Grace Wells; reci
tation, “Discontent;,” by Edna Smith;
singing, “Glad Hosannas Singing”;
recitation, “Smile Whene'er You 1
Can,” by Josephine Wells; recitation,
“Doing Your Part,” by John Buser;
duet. “God’s Dear Love.” by Grace
Wells and James Harrison; recita
tion, "Basket of Roses,” by Cawood
Smith; recitation, “Come l T nto Me,"
by William Buser; recitation, "Little
Folks,” hv Oscar Buser and Doris
Wells; singing. “While the Sun
beams Fall”; exercise. “A Floral
Wreath,” by Thelma Wells, Gertrude
Buser. Josephine Wells. Edna Smith.
Elsie Wells, Cawood Smith; recita
tion. “If,” by Gertrude Buser; address
by pastor; recitation, “Give With
Cheerful Heart,” by William Har
rison; collection; closing chorus,
‘‘Extol His Name.”
A. A. CTIS I DOUBLE
HR FROM CRIMSONS
The Annapolis Athletic Club base
ball team came through with flying
colors in the double-header with the
Crimson Athletic Club, of Baltimore,
staged yesterday afternoon on the
diamond at West Annapolis, winning
the first game by a score of 7 to 5,
and the second. 2 to 1. Both games
were well contested and stirred a
large crowd of fans. Some snappy
individual playing was shown by the
Baltimoreans, but the better team
work, coupled with the steady pitch
ing of “Bobbie” Jones, and Sweeney
were the telling factors in the re
sults. J. Williams, backstop of An
napolis. also was in good form.
PENNSY G. O. P. CONFEREES IN
“FRI EMILY BI SAG RE E M E N T”
(B.v The Aniwinl*'. I’rOHU.)
WASHINGTON, I). C.. June 5.
The conference here today betwreen
Senator Pepper, of Pennsylvania;
Major David A. Reed, Republican
nominee to succeed Senator
and Gifford Pinchot. Republican nom
inee for Governor of Pennsylvania, to
select a new Chairman of the Re
pul lican State Central Committee,
was declared l y one of the conferees
to have ended in a "friendly disa
greement” and the matter will be
taken to the meeting of the State
Committee Saturday in Philadelphia.
LOCAL ARTIST WILL
PLAY IN RADIO CONCERT
Adolf Torovskv will play tomorrow
night for the radiophone concert that
will be broadcast by the White and
Boyer Electric Company, of Wash
ington, D. C., at 8 p. m. (standard
time). The National string quartet
will also play for the concert and
there will be a few other artists. Mr.
Torovskv hop9s that local radio fans
will listen in and let him know if they
receive his music plainly.
I RE-OPEN BECK MURDER
i
I r*T T**e Aamlaffil Prm.)
. OKLAHOMA CiTY. OKLA.. June 5
[ —The killing of Lieut.-Colonel Paul
. Ward Beck, ranking officer at Post
Field (Okla ) Flying Station, who was
• killed by Pean P. Day. wealthy oil
man and barrister in the latter’s home
here on April 4. was re-opened today
when a number of ranking officers
from Washington went into executive
I session in the Federal Court room
| here to review all the proceedings.
W CREW"PREPS"
FOR POUGHKEEPSIE
Oarsmen To Hold Daily Work
outs Here Until Fifteenth,
Then To Hudson
The Naval Academy varsity crew 1
has started special preparations for ’
ithe Poughkeepsie race. Saturday the!
[oarsmen took a spin up the Severn)
under Richard Glendon. Practice |
will continue daily until the tif- |
teenth. when the start for the Hud- !
son will be made, and will be car
ried on there until the twenty-sixth. ’
the date of the race. e
The rowing party will consist of
the following: Bow. Gallagher; 2.
Higgins; 3. King; 4. Holies; 5. San
born; 6, Johnston; 7, Lee; stroke, 1
Frawley; coxswain, Gwan; substi-lj
lutes. Dahlgren. Stroheckor Wanse- I
lon and Walsh. Of these, Gallagher, ,
Higgins, King, Sanborn. Johnston. ! (
Lee. Frawley and Wanselon gradu- *
ated Friday, and Gallagher has re- ,
signed from the service. The rest i
are underclassmen and have been ex- t
cused from the first part of the prae- ! i
tiee cruise. The others have volun- I |
tarily given up their leave in order ,
to take part at Poughkeepsie.
The oarsmen are in splendid condi-J,
tion and spirits, and are confident of j j
success on the Hudson. However, <
they anticipate a fine race, Syracuse (
and Pennsylvania* having alreadj
given them excellent competition ,
while Cornell and Washington com* |
with clean records. The oarsmen wili ,
be turned over al solutely to Glendon t
and he will be unrestricted as t< j
his methods of preparation.
“MOVES" OF MARYLAND!
SOLDIERS UNGER TENTS
“Movie” goers attending the show
at the Republic Theatre tonight an*
tomorrow night, will have the oppor
tunlty of seeing camp life as enjoyec
by the several organizations of th<
Maryland National Guard last sum
tncr. A special 1,000-foot reel pic
turing various scenes at the cam;
from the mess tent to Rogimenta*
headquarters and drills, will l *
shown on the screen in course of pro
gram at the Republic each evening
No doubt some of the boys of Com
pany “M,” the local unit of the Firs
Regiment, will see themselves as
“others saw them” in their khak
duds or whatnot, while they were in
field training and becoming hardened
to the life of a real soldier boy as they
are trained for the army of Uncle
Sam.
“CROSrffiMPHANT”
READING ON THURSDAY
Much interest centers in the read
ing of the “Cross Triumphant” to be
given on Thursday evening of this
week at 8 o'clock at St. Anne’s Church
by its author, Mrs. Marietta Minneg
erode Andrews.
The pageant which was dedicated to
the Right Rev. Alfred Harding, I). I).,
Bishop of Washington, and to the
Building Fund of the National Cathe
dral. was given in Washington recent
ly in the Cathedral Close with great
success. It was divided into groups
and pictures, each group being spon
sored by some representative person.
The first picture which depicted the
traditional visit of Joseph of Ari
niathea to the British Isles was un
der the sponsorship of Geddes.
the wife of the British Ambassador.
The interludes between the four
groups show the influence of poetry,
music, art. and' the drama upon the
religious thought of the world.
Colored Picnic Tomorrow
The moonlight picnic for colored
people under the management of John
King which has been postponed for
several nights on account of bad wea
( ther, will take place tomorrow, wea
■ ther permitting, on the steamer Har
rington which will leave the foot of
King George street at 9 o’clock
(standard time). The Annapolitan
band will supply the music for the
evening.
PORTUGUESE NAYAL AYIATORS
END TRANS-ATLANTIC FLIGHT
1
t (By The .Ukdrialfd Press.)
5 PERNAMBUCO. BRAZIL, June 5.
I The Portuguese naval aviators, Cap
i tains Sacadura and Coutinho, arrived
v here shortly after noon today, having
? .flown in their hydro-airplanes from
e Fernando Noronha, thus completing
II their trans-Atlantic flight from Lis
bon.
I w
THE WEATHER:
* Unsettled tonight,
Tuesday partly cloudy, 1
mild temperature.
HIGH SCHOOL *
FINALS NEXT
ON PROGRAM
Commencement Ceremonies I n
Circle Playhouse June Four
teenth-Senator Brady To De
liver Address To Graduates
Who Will Number 50
■ ■
PARTY BY PRINCIPAL
AMONG SOCIAL EVENTS
#
Graduation exercises at Annapolis
High School now are near at hand.
Scholastic work for the school term
is practically over; next thing in or
der will be the final examinations to
determine the merit roll of the clnss,
and June 14 has been fixed as Com
mencement Day, the ceremonies will
be held in the Circle Playhouse. The
address to the graduates will be de
livered by State Senator A. Theodore
Brady. The graduating class will
number about r>o.
Thursday of this week the Seniors
will have their examinations in lutin.
French, geometry, trigonomerty and
commercial subjects. With the tests
over, social events and outings lead
ing up to the commencement will got
under way. Thursday evening. Miss
Louise W. Linthtcum. principal of the
school, will give a party to the gradu
ates and members of the high school
faculty.
The baccalaureate sermon to the
graduates will he delivered in St.
Anne’s Church at the morning service
by the rector, Rev. Edward I). John
son. Relatives and friends of the
graduates, and alumni of the school,
are invited. Monday evening the
Seniors will hold a promenade and
dance in the ballroom of Carvel Hall,
and on Monday the graduates will go
on an all-day picnic at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Kyle on Severn river.
With the commencement exercises
over, Thursday and Friday of next
week the other classes will have their
examinations. On Monday, June 19,
reports will be given to the pupils.
T he school, in all departments, will
-lose on the following day.
PAYS $25 FINE FOR
BEATING NEGRESS
Arrested on a charge of assault and
battery, preferred by Hortense Dixon,
a colored woman, George Merrill, also
colored, was assessed a fine of $25
and costs following a hearing before
Police Justice J. Roland Brady Sat
urday afternoon. Merrill paid.
SUSPECT IN WARD CASE
ATTEMPTS TO ESCAPE
(B.v The .UMirUtrd Premi.)
PHILADELPHIA, PA, June 6—*
John Cienzo, held by the police here
as a possible suspect in connection
with the killing of Clarence Peters by
Walter S. Ward, millionaire baker's
son. made three attempts to leap from
a patrol wagon that conveyed him
from an uptown station to the central
station in City Hall. He was shack
led hand and foot and waa safely
lodged in the central station.
While local police are inclined to
believe that Cienzo may not be con
nected with the Ward case, they feel
sure he has been involved in some
thing serious, else he would talk and
not make desperate attempts to es
cape.
SEN. WATSON ASSAILS
FOREIGN AMBASSADORS
(By The A****x*tated Press.)
WASHINGTON, D. C., June s.—The
British and Italian ambassadors and
an accredited representative of other
foreign nations were assailed today
in the Senate by Senator Watson, Re
publican, Indiana, because of speeches
and statements made by them relating
to American tariff.
Senator Watson asserted that Sir
Auckland Geddes, in his speech its
; California favoring the use of British
ships for carrying American com
merce as one means of aiding trade
between the United States and Great
’ Britain, had “gone entirely outside
the bounds of propriety.”
The Indiana Senator, one of the
- Administration leaders in the Senate*
■ declared there was much foreign pro
-1 paganda against the present tariff bill
; and asserted that he denied the right
l of any foreign representative to come
! to this county and “instruct us with
- reference to the policy of our gov*
eminent.” |

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