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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, June 12, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1922-06-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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fTsSOCIATED PRESS
A Dispatches of late
otws are published in
The Evening Capital.
T H4 MAKTLANU UAZaTTH—MTAHLiSUBO mi.
V( )i. LX XVII No. 20.
IPIIiS FOR
, RECORD CLASS
, AT CITY HIGH
Commencement Ceremonies To
lie Held In Circle Playhouse
Wednesday Evening—All Day
picnic In Honor Of Seniors
J
I Tomorrow
JUNIORS AS HOSTS
AT FAREWELL BALL
7
The largest class ever graduated
Vmi the Annapolis High School la at
jrt-.nt holding its commencement
! simllex ami will receive diplomas
on Wednesday evening next at the
I'rmidciii of the County Hoard of
Education.
Ul|donittH For Buys Deferred
S,t all of Die graduates will re
ihelr coveted “sheepskins” at
ii, nnnmenceinent ceremonies Wed
v night. Hecauac of a recent
liung episode the 18 boys who be
ito the ( lass will he presented
ty ; r I'archinentH by the County!
iu>ri "f Kducation, in accordance
ii mandate of that twlv irlsi’"'*
m: : a recent episode of hazing. As
'"pmhmeiit for the affair in which
tlx boys participated, the Hoard (te- (
ir,l that they should not receive
Otrir (llploniaH with the rest of the
i , v hul that they would be award
ed tliru 10 days later. June 24. For a
tins-it looked as though the girls, out
it h mi'ithy, would enter into a pact
and |m! a damper on commencement
<Uy They went so far as to request
that they he given their diplomas
without ceremony on the closing day
<>f M'hool This movement, however,
i/trrwanls quieted down.
There are f 8 members in the class,
A of whom will receive Commercial
diploma*, while IS will get Academic
ones and there will be 1 general di
ploma given.
"lilt examinations well behind
i.'ii’m the Seniors are spending the i
It onllniii'il On I'lifte B.)
SKAT'.UN RIVER FRONT
HOMES FOR RENT
In ' new ImngiilowN, “Warlee-nn-the- *
t'-j miles from AuiuipoltM; 5
> l:,ri;p BireiMied porches; electric
• ' •!"*< nr,- liomen. not n hacks.
,KN,! V f WAItNKIt. I’, o. ltox t. An
w ! l. ~r eh,mo IMIT-W. Jl2
-
A.
©fl
] BA GS FULL OF MONEY
dior people have that much;
fall of money. Why not
Hut then other people,
10 l'ft'>perous people of Anna
all have savings accounts
ln this bank. Have you?
Personal service to all”
—the—
Annapolis Banking
& Irust Co.
r Main St & Church Circle
*
Quick Service!
I lot el Maryland
'•Cafeteria..
ow Serving Three
Meals a Day
BREAKFAST 7:30 to 8:30
‘ iNN'KR 12:00 to 2:00
81 I’PKR 6:00 to 7:00
$
UStlfcil (Enpitnl.
(STUDENTS MAKE READY
FOR CAMP AT EDGEWOOD:
St. John’s Cadets And Lads Of
Other Colleges To Pitch
Tents Thursday
’ OVER 700 ARE EXPECTED
More than 700 college students,
i 24 colleges and universities, including
Harvard, Vale, Princeton, St. John's
and Johns Hopkins, will arrive at
F.dgewood Arsenal Thursday to at
tend the camp of the Reserve Officers'
Training Corps, and receive practical
fluid instruction for six weeks from
officers and non-commissioned offi
cers of the Regular Army.
Institutions in the New England
States, New York, Pennsylvania, New
Jersey, Maryland. Virginia and the
District of Columbia, will be repre
sented. The students attending the*
camp have received military instruc
tion during the past year In Reserve
Officers' Training Corps units in their
respective colleges, and the summer
camp will finish out the theoretical
instruction with field practice. Upon
graduation from college, and the com
pletion of your years of work in mtll
. tar - v science and tactics, those found
I proficient will he given reserve com
missions as lieutenants in the United
States Army.
Uol. Townsend In Charge
Lieut.-Col. G. L. Townsend, mili
i tary commandant at St. John’s, camp
commander,'opened headquarters last
week and is perfecting the prelimin
ary organization of the camp. Mn'nr
J- W. Lang is executive officer. The
corps of Instructors have been care
fully selected. Practically all have
had battlefield experience in France.
Students will be taught how to live
in the field, in camp and bivouac.
Screened kitchens and iness halls are
being built, wuter piped in and sani
tation will be of the best, but the
students will live under canvas.
Ample provision is being made for
recreation. There will be at least one
dance and band concert each week.
Each company and battery will have
, a baseball team and a championship
series will be played. There will be
boxing and wrestling matches and
trips hy boat to Haltimore and Anna
polis. Baltimore girls and any others
whom the students desire to invite
will assist in the social activities.
DIYTOM Jll HELD
IS ROBBERY SUSPECT
(Hy Tin* Ammoi'liUiml I'rm.)
BALTIMORE, MI)., June 12.—Al
though officials and employees of
neither bank were able to identify
him. Justice Stanford in Central Po
lice Court today held, without bail,
Edward Welling, 34 years, of Dayton,
Ohio, as a suspect in connection with
the robberies of the Woodbine (Md.)
National Hank and the Monrovia
(Md.) Savings Institution.
Gladys Green Wenwick, 25, of
Wellsville, Ohio, who admitted to the
police that she had been posing as the
wife of Welling for 18 months, was
held in $2,500 bail. Both will be ar
ranged before Justice Stanford again
on June 25.
I Welling was arrested yesterday for
supposed violations of the traffic laws.
OOOOOSOOOOOSOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
| Sand and Gravel |
% — o
§ Gravel, $2.50 per yd. %
Z |
O Bulldinii and Concrete Sand at {>
* ft.7o and sl.lO in small lota. At- O
& tractive prices for quantity Jots.
o ' o
0 Yard: —City Dock. Next to o
0 M
o Ice Factory. £
O JI7 O
■OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
NOTICE! 1
During tho month of June,
July and August, this store will
close on Mondays and Wednes
i i j days at 6p. iu.
J
Maryland
Army & Navy Stores
j jl2 95 MAIN ST.
iU- * J
THIS SEASON!
THE SAME GOOD DEVIL
ED CRABS AT THE SAME
OLD PLACE, 23C> WEST
STREET.
M. A. MILLER.
. PIIONE 532-M. j. 30
DRASTIC GUT
IN TEACHERS
NOW LIKELY
Force Of 118 Civilians At Naval
Academy May Be Reduced To
80 In Line With Plan Of Ad-!
miral Wilson, Superintendent
Of Institution
LOP OFF OF SIOO,OOO
TAKEN AS INDICATION
A considerable reduction in the,
number of civilian tutors of the mid- j
shipuien in line with the ideas of
Rear-Admiral Henry B. Wilson, su- i
perlntendent of the Naval Academy, j
now seems quite likely. This is in-1
dieated in the report of the naval com
mittee of the Senate made on the na
val appropriations bill, to that Lody
Saturday afternoon. In short the
I ill, as amended in the committee,
lops ofT SIOO,OOO from the allowance
as made hy the House when the bill
was under consideration hy that
*ody, for “pay of professors and in
structors.
Admiral Wilson’s program is to
supplant many of the civilian teach
ers with officers of tho regular line
of the Navy, and since these officers
receive regular pay from the navy,
the allowance for teachers is, there
fore, cut.
Two Houses At Odds
There is disagreement at this stage
between the Senate and House over
the question of civilian instructors.
(Continued On Pace 6.)
JOHN NASON, 111
KNOWN CITIZEN, IS
CALLED BY DEATH
John Nason, 68 years old, proprie
tor of one of the oldest, and for years
one of the best known, cafes in the
city, died at 11 o’clock this morning
at the private sanitarium of I)r. Gun
dry, of Baltimore, whither he went a
week ago to undergo treatment for a
complication of ailments. Mr. Nason
had been in failing health for several
years, but only recently had he begun
to show steady decline and it was
only upon the urgent advice o 4 friends
that he finally decided to undergo
treatment. His friends realized that
his condition was extremely grave,
news of his death this morning,
therefore, did not come unexpectedly.
Better known among his friends as
“Jack,” Mr. Nason for many years con
ducted a saloon and light lunch eating
establishment on Market Space. His
place was noted for fieu deviled crabs.
And with the wave of prohibition Mr.
Nason continued in busihess converting
his place into an emporium where
soft drinks were dispensed, together
with edibles, and cigars, cigarettes
and tobacco were also sold.
Surviving Mr. Nason is one daugh
ter. Mrs. A. F. Fenton, of Annapolis,
his wife having died a number of
years ago. He was one of the oldest
members of Annapolis Lodge of Elks.
_ • •
DON STORCK TO LEAD
WEST POINT TOSSERS
WEST POINT. June 11.—Donald G.
j Storck, of New Jersey, was yesterday
elected captain of the Army baseball
team for next season. He is a cadet
in the class of 1924 and has played
two seasons with the varsity. He is
also star of the Army’s basketball and
\ football teams.
MRS. G.T. BASIE DEAD;
WIFE OF FIRE MARSHAL
Mrs. Basil, 47 years old, wife of
I George T. Basil, fire marshal of An
napolis. and daughter of the late
Oliver Gregory, of Annapolis, died at
her residence, 227 West street, Satur
jday afternoon, following an illness of
a complication of diseases. Besides
her husband, she is survived by one
daughter. Miss Emma May Basil, and
j three sons. Thomas G., William
: Hurst, and Howard C. Basil, all of
Annapolis.
The funeral will be held from St.
! Anne’s Church tomorrow afternoon at
3 o'clock and burial will be in St.
Anne's cemetery. Funeral Director
B. L. Hopping has charge of arrange
ijments.
THE MARYLAND GAZETTE
ANNAPOLIS, MD., MONDAY, JUNE 12. 1U22.
Death Toll In Hurricane That
Swept New York Over Sixty
(By The Associated Preea.)
NEW YORK. June 12.—The death)
: toll of the brief but terrific hurricane
that swept down upon New York late;
! yesterday passed the sixty mark to
day with indications that the total
number of dead might go much
higher.
The death list leaped ahead when
an incoming tide returned 18 more
I bodies that had been swept out to sea
last night. Four more bodies were re- j
covered at Hunter’s Island and two
were reported to have been picked up
at Traver’s Island.
City Island haven for Sunday
pleasure seekers and amateur fisher
men—was the hardest hit point in the
Metropolitan area, but casualties,
mostly by drowning, were reported
I ti>mi many other points.
The beach at City Island presented
a desolate spectacle this morning.
. Several hundred persons—relatives of
ELKS IN TRIBUTE
TOLDGLOir
Officers Of Baltimore Lodge
Joined Local Brothers In
Ceremonies Yesterday
Ceremonies in commemofation of
the birth cf the National Banner
were held yesterday afternoon on
State House hill in front of the main
portico of the Capitol building, offi
cers and members of the Baltimore
lodge of Elks, acting in conjunction
with Annapolis lodge of the order, the
program having been arranged under
the auspices of the Annapolis lodge
men. June 14 is Flag Day. hut it is
custom with the Elks to observe the
occasion on the Sunday nearest the
anniversary, and no more fitting pro
gram of exercises perhaps, could have
been arranged for the occasion than
; that which was carried out yesterday.
Oration By Robert K. Lee
The program was judical and re
citational, and the particular cere
monies touching upon the occasion
were according to the Ritual of the
Elks. Rol ert E. Lee, of Baltimore
city, a native of Anne Arumlel county,
delivered a splendid oration in course
of which he told his audienco a good
deal about Elkdom. Despite the in
tensely hot weather of the afternoon,
many residents of the city gathered
on “tho hill” for the ceremonies.
The program was as follows:
March et Cortege “La Reine de
Saba," (Gounod), U. S. Naval Acad
emy Band; opening ceremonies, Ex
alted Ruler; invocation, I)r. David
Gencsc; “America,” Band; History of
the Flag. Bro. Jos. S. Mitnick; “Colum
bia, the Gem of the Ocean,” Band;
Ritual, Exalted Ruler and Officers;
“Auld Lang Syne,” Band; Tribute to
the Flag, Bro. Geo. Joeckel; “Grand
American Fantasia," Band; recitation
—Elks American Creed, Marion Sher
man; oration. Bro. Robert E. Lee,
Baltimore Lodge No. 7; “The Star
Spangled Banner,” the lodge and
audience.
Marriage License
ENGELHAUGPT - BLOODWORTH— ]
John J. Engelhaugpt, 23, New York j
City; Fannie C. Bloodworth, 19, Ross
ville, Md.
PURELY PRIVATE MATTER
SAYS DR. WADE, OF
AUTO DEAL
(By The Associated Press.)
BALTIMORE. MD., June 12.
Governor Ritchie today made
public a letter he had received
from Dr. J. Hubert Wade, Chair
man of the Democratic State Cen
tral Committee, explaining the
transactions leading up to the ac
quirement of an automobile by
Dr. Wade, in which transactions
the name of Samuel Leibowitz,
former head of a grocery concern
that had done business with the
House of Correction, figured.
Dr. Wade declared that he had
bought the car from the automo
- bile agency, Leibowitz engineer
ing the purchase for him in order
that he might get better terms.
I Dr. Wade said the transaction
1 had nothing whatsoever to do
with himself in the performance
of his duties as a member of the
board of the House of Correction
or as chairman of the Demo
. oratic State Central Committee.
“It was purely a private mat
ter,” he salo.
j the missing—worn by hysteria, wait
j ed in little groups among the wreck-'
age on the sands for some word of
the fate of their loved ones.
Next to the tragedy at City Island,
the most serious result of the storm
was the wrecking of a ferris wheel at
Classen Point Park in the Bronx.
Seven merry-makers were killed and
numbers of others injured when the
i gale seized the ferris wheel and hurl
ed it, a twisted mass of wreckage,
on the Long Island coast.
Paul Simon, owner of the wheel,
was arrested on a charge of homicide
and two investigations have been got
ten under way to find out where rests
the responsibility for the accident.
The Hudson and Harlem rivers j
claimed their toll of canoe and small i
boat victims also, while six persons
were killed by the fall of trees, up
rooted by the gale. i
■ ■ —. i
BACCALAUREATE TO
A. H. S. GRADUATES
Dr. Johnson, Rector Of St. 1
Anne’s Urges Counsel In
Spirit Of Reverence
Before an audience composed of
relatives and friends, Rev. Edward D. 1
Johnson, rector of St. Anne’s Protest- 1
ant Episcopal Church, preached the 1
baccalaureate sermon to the graduat- 1
ing class of the Annapolis High
School at the 11 o’clock morning serv-
Ive of yesterday.
Tho rector welcomed the graduat
ing class, the faculty and others to
St. Anne's. As to beginning the ex
ercises of the different institutions
with religious services, he stated that
it was no merely conventional thing.
It is a part of the deeply rooted re
ligious instinct that was shown in the
establishment of Annapolis as a city.
The order was given to lay out one
hundred acres in lots, reserving the
necessary spaces for a church, a State
House and other public buildings.
The order that resulted in making
this church site the very hub of the
city’s system of streets is a stand
ing reminder of the central place that
religion should have in human life.
The text was taken from the fable
of Jottam, in the ninth chapter of
Judges. The trees held a convention
in order to choose a king. The olive,
the tig and the vine declined in turn.
(Continued On I’anr 0.)
City Council Meets Tonight
The regular monthly meeting of the
Mayor and City Council will be held
tonight in the Council Chamber, Mu
nicipal Building. Much business of a
routine nature is slated to come be
fore the meeting.
Guards Sleep As
6 Prisoners Get
Out Of “Cut”
While the guards were quietly
sleeping on duty, it was declared at
the Maryland House of Correction, at
! Jessup, early this morning, six long-
I term prisoners escaped. It was learn
ed that one of the prisoners had
utilized an old teaspoon as a key to
unlock the door of his cell.
He released the other five and they
went to the attic by means of a back
stairway. An old, unused ventilator
was forced open and the men climbed
out on the roof.
A long rope of knotted pieces of bed
quilting hanging from the roof show
ed how the men had made their es
cape.
lightnWltTres
MILL CREEK DWELLING
During the electrical storm that
swept over Anne Arundel county last
night, a bolt of lightning struck the
cottage of Tilghman Marden, situated
on a promontory of Mill Creek, Third
district, and it was burned to the
ground. Occupants of the house
saved only same of their belongings
and furnishings, being compelled to
flee by the rapid spread of the flames.
The loss is estimated at $3,000, partly
covered by insurance.
Assistance of the volunteer firemen
of Annapolis was asked and a truck
of the Rescue Hose Company re
sponded to the alarm, but the fire lad
dies were powerless to give aid, as
the flames spread through the cottage
like so much tinder.
MOSQUITOES ATTACK
MINSTRELPERFORMERS
But West Annapolis Firemen
Played To “Big House” At
St. Margaret’s
A T “CIRCLE” THURSDAY
Members of the West Annapolis
volunteer fire department staged
their minstrel show Friday night be
fore an audience that taxed the ca
pacity of the hall at St. Margarets
In the Third district.
Except for the fact that a “flock"
of mosquitoes invaded the hall and
attacked performers and those in the
audience, as well, the production
went off in fine shape and was a suc
cess in every way. It was given as
a joint benefit of the St. Margaret’s ,
Community, and the West Annapolis
firemen. The mosquitoes, by the way, '
must have been of the New Jersey
species, for the way they prodded
their bills into the flesh of their vic
j tims was tortuous, and the black- '
faced comedians were kept constant
ly waving their hands to keep them
away. It was hot, too, and it was
difficult for the performers to restrain
themselves from mopping their faces, 1
lest their true identity would te dis- 1
closed.
For City Folks Thursday
Residents of Annapolis will have
the opportunity to witness this splen
did performance of amateur min
strelsy, as seats have been placed on
sale for a production to be staged at
the Circle Playhouse on Thursday
night of this week. With the per
formance at St. Margaret's and two
at West Annapolis, the various parts
are now run off with greater smooth
ness, and, on the whole, the show is
the best of amateur minstrels that
has been staged about Annapolis.
For Thursday night's show, tickets
are now on sale at Strange and
White Company’s store, Main street.
Indications point to a big house as
many reservations have already been
made.
MRS. SULLIVAN LAID
TO REST IN ST. ANNE’S
Many relatives and friends attended
the funeral services for Mrs. Mary
Jane Sullivan, which were held at 4
o’clock yesterday afternoon from her
late residence, 125 Conduit street.
Services both at the home and St.
Anne’s cemetery, where interment |
was made, were conducted by Rev. H. \
Wilson Burgan, pastor of Calvary
Methodist Ep’scopal Church. The
pallbearers were: Lee Colbert, Frank
Jewell, Arthur D. Moss, Bernice Glad
den, Albert Dlhiman, and H. Popham.
Funeral Directors James S. Taylor
and Sons bad charge of arrange
ments.
- ♦ • ——
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR
MISS HOWES TOMORROW
Miss Jane Howes, daughter of the
late McCeney and Susan Duvall
Howes of this county, died yesterday
morning at St. Agnes’ Hospital Bal
timore. The funeral will be held to
morrow morning at 9 o’clock from St.
Mary’s Church. Burial will be in St.
Mary’s cemetery.
Miss Howes, who was 67 years old,
made her home with her brother-in
, law and sister Mr. and Mrs. A. B.
Suit, 441 West street. She is also
survived by a brother, John Howes, of
Annapolis. Funeral arrangements
. are in charge of James S. Taylor and
[ Sons.
[ FORMER SURGEON-GEN’L.
DIES IN WASHINGTON
Rear-Admiral Francis M. Gunnell,
retired, a former Surgeon-General of
the Navy, died a this home in Wash
ington Satnrdya night. He was born
I in Washington, November 27, 1827,
and entered the Navy as an assistant
I surgeon in 1849. During the Civil
War he served with both the North
and South Atlantic blockading squad-
I rons. He was appointed Surgeon-
I I General in 1884, and retired in 1889.
■: -BIG MINSTREL SHOW
” FOR BENEFIT WEST ANNAPOLIS FIRE COMPANY
At The CIRCLE PLA YHOUSE JUNE 15, At 8 P.M.
y THE SHOW THAT MADE WEST ANNAPOLIS FAMOUS, WILL
n MAKE ALL ANNAPOLIS LAUGH.
k Make your reservations for seats now at Strange & White Co. Store,
Main Street.
I- HELP THE WEST ANNAPOLIS FIRE COMPANY!
'■ TICKETS:—I'pper Balcony. XV; Lowor Balcony. 50c.; Back Balcony, Soc.;
e Front Orchcatra, or Box Scats, 75c.
, -
THE WEATHER:
* Fair tonight and
Tuesday; cooler tonight.
nil ■▼■NINO CAPITAL ■STABLIIHID IMA
PRICE TWO CENTS.
COMMENCEMENT;
CEREMONIES AT 1
OLDSTJHN’S
Exercises To Be Held In Gym
nasium Tomorrow Morning
Beginning At 10:30—Major-
General Bailey, Of Army, To
Deliver Address
• ft
‘ I
ORATORICAL CONTEST
FOR JUNIORS TONIGHT
The Rev. John S. Conning, of New
York City, Commissioner for the
Evangelisation of the Jews, delivered
the Baccalaureate sermon to the
Senior class of St. John’s College,
yesterday morning in the First Pres
byterian Church.
Taking for his text a verse from
Genesis: “Take off thy shoes for the
place whereon thou standest is Holy
Ground." The preacher said that the
presence of God did not necessarily
make a place holy, for He pervades
the universe—it was the recognition
and acceptance of His providential
care that consecruted people and
places to him. Taking the life of
Moses as an example, and the mighty
things done by him for his people
through God's help, the preacher
pointed out to the students that their
aim in life must primarily be to find
themselves—that is, to recognize
clearly what they wanted and intend
ed to do in life, and then with God’s
good grace to help them, to go ahead
and do It.
Commencement ceremonies will be
held in the gymnasium at the college
tomorrow morning, beginning at
10:80 o’clock. The address to the
graduates, which will be delivered by
Major-General Charleß J. Bailey, of
the Third Corps Area, United State*
Army, will be a feature of the exer
cises. The college will confer a num
ber of honorary degrees, in addition
to the graduate degrees, and degrees
in course. Governor Ritchie, who ia
ex-ofllclo president of the Board of
Governors and Visitors expects to at
tend the ceremonies.
Raising Of Shield
At 11 o’clock this morning in Mc-
Dowell Hall the raising of the Senior
Class Bhield took place in the pres
ence of a large crowd of friends and
; relatives of the graduates. The cero
\ monies opened with a brief history of
the class given by F. M. Hell. The
shield was then presented by R. P.
Brown, and a brief valedictory ad
dress made to the class by President
Fell who wished them God-speed and
success in life.
Memorial tablets to G. K. Metzger
and J. Burton Mustin, Jr., were un
veilod during the course of the cere
monies. E. E. Hargest, Jr., of Bal
timore, class of T 9, unveiled the first
of these and It. P. Brown the second.
The music which included the sing
ing of the national anthem and ap
propriate hymns, was in charge of
George A. Webster, organist and
choirmaster of St. Anne’s Church,
who played the college organ.
Oratorical Contest
The feature of this evening at the
College will be the Junior Oratorical
’ Contest which will start at 8:15 and
be presided over by Prof. Bydney 8.
Handy, head of the Department of
| English at St John's.
The judges who will determine the
1 prize-winners will be Percy Houston,
1 Ward Browning and William A. Dar
den, all of the English Department at
the Naval Academy.
An unusually interesting musical
I program has been arranged to be
given tonight, in which Mrs. L. Berle
Dederick and W. R. Sima will be the
f BO I 0 ! 8ts - _ _ _ _
\ Charles W. Tucker & Son
, Sheet Metal JVork and Rotfirtg
Roofing and Spouting. Hot-Air Heating,
1 Stove Repair*. Pipe and Pipeles* Fur
-1 times. Roofs Painted and Repaired.
- ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN!,
Shop in rear of Municipal Building.
Gloucester St. Phone S2-J.

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