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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, July 20, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1922-07-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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ASSOCIATED PRESS
tbT Evening C.piuL
• mam'**’ mTT-TABi.i.H> im. - THE MARYLAND OAZBTTB nunnmo „n
TWO CENTS
MTU OFF MY
IGF AROUSES
LOCAL INTEREST
Evening Capital Offers Silver
Cup As "Time Prize" For All
One Suggested Also For Best
Annc Arundel County Boat
Entering Races
TO BET GALA DAY FOR
CITY AND VICINITY
Thit Hie annual Chesapeake Hay
Champion ship Workboat Races to he
if !d off Hay Ridge <> August 12 will
| f a gala occasion and eclipse any
l!);r.g of its kind ever held In Mary
iind. I* the prediction of Andrew A.
Hathaway, of Kaston. who is chair*
sat of the Regatta Committee of the
Chesapeake Hay Yacht Club In active
charge <d the contests. Mr. Hatha*
m? was In Annapolis this week and
rtpresaed himself as being more than
ceased with Hie prospect. He is a
uitran yachtsman and Is sparing no
*fort to develop Interest in the
Chesapeake Hay craft. He is work*
sg in co-operation with P. C. Cham
hins. Work Race Editor of The Sun
, a d The Evening Sun of Baltimore,
the prime mover of the regatta.
Ktenlng I apltal Bonates Cup
As Annapolis will be the center of
Interest and activity on that day, and
m the role of host to the hundreds of
rtiitor* who will come by automobile
and also by water, some evidence of
the Interest nod appreciation of our
people Is deemed to be in order.
Therefore, the Evening Capital has
offered to the Regatta Committee a
stiver cup to he awarded In any\vay
the committee might suggest.
The suggestion they have made Is
that it In* given to the boat making
the best actual time around the
course, the time to be taken from the
starting gun of its class, whichever
that may be. to the finish. In other
*crde, the prize is to he the "time
pnte' of the whole fleet, irrespective
ft any particular craft. In pursuance
; his suggestion, therefore, the
Gening Capital is definitely offering
tk cup.
(Continued On |'n|f 4.)
IS. MOSS SECRETARY
OF HOSPITAL BOARD

The Hoard of Managers of the Enter-
Bwy Hospital held a very interesting
lf,> tig this morning and transacted!
If h business. Mrs. G. Abram Moss
leetod Secretary of the Board to
Un> unexpired term of Miss Kate
Handall
" l! * t’irryl Hrvan's resignation as
1 tular of the hoard was accepted
di much regret, as Mrs. Bryan has
’< i an extremely efficient member
' Us shown much enthusiasm in
the Hoard's activities.
Liberty Bonds!
‘ ' s ihe time to convert
w, r , '^ >crt > Komis in CASH at
UK or BETTER.
BERNARD j. wiegard,
Scc’ty.-Treas.
-THE—
Capital City Building
an d Loan Asso.
Office: 2l School St.
Li: ANNAPOLIS, MD.
i'HJS SEASON/
OjE SAME good devil-
OI n K , XHS AT THE SAME
\ SikEET LACE ' 836 WEST
PHnvr M - A. MILLER.
esm-m, jy- 30
CARNIVAL! 1
ANNAPOLIS FIRE DEPARTMENT
1 JULY 19, 20,21 and 22
Rigger and Better Than Ever!
hU ■
sSSJlillr Capitol
LOCAL SOLDIERS READY
FOR INSTRUCTION CAMP
Members Of Company “M” Will
Be Turned Out Of Beds
Early Saturday
2 WEEKS AT EDGEWOOD
You can't get ’em up, you can't get
’em up, you can’t get ’em up in the
morning!
These rollicking words that are
heard among boys of the military
service with the blare of the bugle at
reveille will ring among the members
of Company "M," the local unit of the
First Infantry, Maryland National
Guard, in the gray dawn hours of
Saturday morning when they will be
culled out to make ready for depar
ture for their annual summer camp of
instruction. The encampment will be
held at Kdgewood, Md., July 22 to
August 5, Inclusive.
Captain Daniel J. Murphy, com
manding officer of Company "M.” act
ing in accordance with orders from
headquarters of the First Regiment,
has sent personal letters to members
of the local company, calling their at
tention to plans for the encampment.
Attendance of all members is com
pulsory, except in extreme casos, and
It Is expected that Company ‘‘M’’ will
have at least f>o at the camp.
Reveille At 8:30 A. M.
The local soldiers will be tumbled
out of their beds in time for assembly
at the State armory on Bladen street
at 3:30 a. m._, Saturday, and every
thing will be made ready for entrain
ing on a srecial train or the Pennsyl
vania Railroad that will pull away
from the West street terminal of the
(Cnnllnnrri nn !••# * l
K. K’s In Full
Raiment Parade
Annapolis Again
Residents of Annapolis again were
aroused last night by the appearance
about the.streets of a party of the Ku
Klux Klan. How many were in the
party could not be ascertained, as
they were whisked through several of
the principal streets in several large
automobiles.
It was along about 11:30 o’clock
that the members of the secret or
ganization put in an appearance and
attracted those persons who were
late in returning to their homes. The
Ku Kluxers were attired In their full
raiment of weird white robes and
hood-helmets of the same hue. Sev
; eral other automobiles, bearing par
ties of men in civilian attire, followed
in the wake of the conveyances bear
’ Ing members of the order. It was re
ported that the Klan was out for the
initiation of another class of candi
dates at some point in the Third dis
trict. Whether the initiation cere
mony was held has not been learned.
It is said the Klan is gaining mem
, hers in Annapolis and the county.
[ THOMAS COLBURN DIES
OF BRIGHT’S DISEASE
Death last night ended the long and
painful suffering of Thomas Colburn,
| 52 years old, stationary engineer and
fireman, for a number of years em
ployed by the former Home Laundry
and the Annapolis Ice Plant, at East
port, of which Q. Clifton Sunderland
was owner and proprietor. Bright’s
disease and other complications
caused death. Though he had been lu
ill health for the last few years, Mr.
Colburn was able to be about until
about two weeks ago when he was
[ compelled to take to his bed at the
Chesapeake House hotel. Main street,
where he lived. The funeral will take
place from that hotel tomorrow after
noon at 2 o’clock.
Mr. Colburn is survived by several
children.
DOG LICENSES
> Have your dog license ready sbsn
the collector calls In order to save
trouble. Tax ts SI.OO for males;
$2.00 for females.
SAMVEL GARNER.
) President S. P, C. A.
Important Arrests In Belle
, Grove Brawl Soon, Is Report
Police authorities of Anne Arundel t
county are working along lines that 1
1 may lead to the identity of the gun- 1
men who precipitated the'fatal shoot- (
lng affray and brawl at Belle Grove 3
Inn last Saturday night and Sunday 1
morning, resulting in the death of I
A one man, and injury to several others, <
It was reported today. (
Rumor has it that the officials have i
come upon one cr two witnesses who. 1
it is said, know a great deal about 1
the whole affair, and that arrests may 1
' be made within the next 24 hours. <
The investigation is be!ng pushed i
| quietly by Sheriff Harry T. Levely and 1
t bis deputies, it appears. Meanwhile, (
! 'he coroner's Jury impaneled by Police
, Justice William S. Welch, of Anna- t
‘ polls, is subject to call of State’s At- 1
torney James M. Munroe. The jury
f was unable to gain any tangible In- £
‘ formation from the 40-odd witnesses \
examined Monday and Tuesday, and ]
FOB BOND SALE ON 1
AUGUST SEVENTH
Council Canvasses Returns And
Decides To Advertise
For Bids
Sale of the $72,000 of bonds for
street and other improvements, auth
orized by an act of the last Legisla
ture and Issue of which was approved
by the voters of the municipality at
the bond issue election conducted on
Monday, will be made on August 7.
Fixing the date for the sale of fhe
bonds was taken at a special meeting 1
of the City Council, held last night,
and the city clerk was directed to
prepare the proper advertisement for
bids for the loan, to be received up to
that date.
1 The Council sat last night as a 1
■ board of canvasserrs and canvassed L
the official vote cast In Monday’s elec- t
1 tion, which showed that the “Improve- ]
, ment Bonds" were carried by a ma- £
1 lority of 156 votes. This was a mere i
, formality. Mayor Jones appointed t
, Cunselor Riley and Alderman Parkin- j
> son and Smith as tellers to conduct 1
, the canvass. The tabulation showed 1
the official canvass to be as follows:
First Ward —For, 50; against. 37. j
Second Ward —For, 91; against, 40. 1
I Third Ward —For. 101; against, 25. j
, Fourth Ward —For, 44; against, 28. t
, Total—For, 286; against, 130.
I With the canvass completed, Alder- t
I man Smith made a motion that one j
. cent on the SIOO of taxable property 1
. of the city be provided in the next ]
I levy to cover the interest and pay off t
. part of the principal on the loan, as <
. the several series fall due. The bonds ]
, will bear interest at the rate of 4% 1
. per cent, per annum. 3
i GOVERNOR RELUCTANT :
TO CALL OUT TROOPS:
- i
14 Governor Ritchie does not take 1
kindly to the suggestion of President 1
1 Harding that he stand ready to pro- 1
, vide State troops as an aid to the re
-1 opening of the bituminous coal mines '
- closed by the nation-wide coal strike.
f He so stated in a telegram he sent \
- the President late yesterday afternoon
1 in reply to the message of the Chief 1
s Executive.
s In the first place, the Governor says
1 he has not found that the Maryland
mine owners want to re-open the
1 mines at this time. He has been in- 1
s quifing about the situation since he
e received the President’s message sent
to the Governors of all the coal min
e ing States. He finds, in substance,
- that the coa! mine owners see no good
reason for trying to operate their
1 mines so long as there is a railroad
strike, which prevents their getting
" cars for the hauling of the coal.
The Governor urges that the Presi
dent renew his efforts to settle the
strikes railroad and mining —by
peaceful means, and concludes with
the statement that he has no sympa
thy with lawlessness.
The full text of the Governor's
statement appears elsewhere in the
Capital today.
ALL-DAY EXCURSION
FOR COLORED FOLKS
An all-day excursion for the colored
folks of this community is being plan-!
ned for tomorrow, Friday, July 21. j
The 6teamer Starlight will leave Mar- |
tin's wharf, foot of Dock street, at 10
j o'clock, and it is hoped that the af
fair will be well patronized. The An-
I napolitan band will furnish music for
i/ ' the trip.
all of the numler who had been held
as prisoners in the county jail were
released.
State's Attorney Munroe today re
ceived the report of Dr. Howard J.
Maldeis, of Baltimore, who conducted
the post mortem examination of the
body of Michael Cadora, who was kill
ed at the inn. That Cadora was fully
dressed at the time of the shooting
is shown by this report, as it states
that bullets penetrated both his coat
and shirt. The number of bullet
wounds is not stated. Other injuries
disclosed by the autopsy were a 1-
inch laceration in the left occipital
region; laceration of the upper part
of the left eye, and eye slightly black
ened, and lacerated left cheek, and
the scalp showed a suffusion of
blood.
The report describes the dead man
as of normal health; 35 years old;
weight, 180 pounds, and height, 5 feet
10 inches.
SENATE SCORES
FORD’S MUSCLE
SHOALPROJECT
Agricultural Committee Con
demns It In Strong Language,
At Same Time Calling Govern
ment Controlled Corporation
Plan ‘‘Most Wonderful’’
UNABLE TO HARMONIZE
IDEAS OF AUTO KING
(By The Associated Press.)
WASHINGTON, July 20.—1 n a com
prehensive report submitted to the
Senate today by Chairman Norris of
the Senate Agricultural Committee,
Henry Ford’s offer for the purchase
and lease of the government’s war
initiated projects at Muscle Shoals,
Alabama, is condemned in unusually
strong language, while the Nebras
ka Senator's bill, proposing develop
ment of the properties under a gov
ernment owned and controlled cor
poration, is described as "the most
wonderful plan” that has ever been
proposed in the history of the coun
try.
On the question of the Ford bid.
the report says, Senators Page, Mc-
Nary, Keyes, Gooding, Norbeck, Har
reld, and McKinley, Republicans and
Kendrick, Democrat, concur with the
Chairman. With reference to the gov
ernment ownership proposal, the re
port gives the names of five Senators,
Norris, McNary, Gooding, Norbeck and
McKinley, favor its passage by the
Senate for the solution of the Mus
cle Shoals problem.
Difference Of Opinions
Because of this line-up of the Com
mitteemen, the report is characteriz
ed as a minority opinion insofar as
it expresses approval of the govern
ment ownership bill but, is present
ed as a majority opinion insofar as it
deals with the rejection by the com
mittee of all proposals for Muscle
Shoals development.
The Ford offer is dealt with in un
sparing terms. Its adoption, the re
port says, would put "the govern
ment of the United States into busi
ness with a vengeance,” adding that
"those who ask Congress to accept
the Ford offer ask us, in effect, to
lease this property to this Corpora
tion without any real consideration,
(Continued On Pace !.)
MENACE TO DELIVERY
OF MAILS PASSED,
SAYS WORK
fWy The A—printed Preen.)
WASHINGTON, D. C., July 20.
—Announcement was made by
Postmaster-General Work today
that "any menace endangering
the delivery of mail arising out of
the railroad strike had passed.”
The announcement was mfffe in
the face of reports from divisional
officials of the mail service that
additional cars were being laid off
all the time, but Postoffice De
partment officials explained that
the situation now was so in hand
that in practically all instances
where the railroads were unable
to carry out their mail contracts,
other means of moving the mail
were found, either through the at
taching of mail cars to other
trains or through mail trucks de
livery.
SEVERN BRIDGE
SPAN IS ABOUT
FIFTHCOMPLETE
Chairman Mackall Makes Report
Of Work Started Three
Months Ago And Says Struc
ture Should Be Ready For
Traffic By September, 1923
FIRST STAGES MOST
DIFFICULT OF WORK
r
Before the end of the week the steel
arches for the superstructure of the
Severn river bridge will begin to
rise along the Annapolis side and the
first section of the concrete, in which
the steel arches will be imbedded, will
be completed within 30 days.
This was the ussurance given John
X. Mackall, chairman and chief engi
neer of the State Roads Commission,
when, in company with Edwin Friese,
resident engineer, he made his weekly
inspection of the bridge yesterday.
The work has been progressing sat
isfactorily, according to Mr. Mackall,
and the reports show that the bridge
is 20 per cent, completed, and this 20
per cent, has been the most difficult
part of the work, being all under wa
ter.
Started Work Three Months Ago
The first pile was driven April 4.
The equipment which has been as
sembled by the contractor, L. T. Eyre,
for the construction of the bridge, Mr.
Mackall said, was the most complete
and efficient he had ever seen at work
on such a structure.
As soon as the first of the steel
arches is in place all the various
operations necessary in the construc
tion of the bridge will be carried on
at once. Dredging at the pier sites
will be done, the piles for the piers
driven and cut off at the bottom of the
river by submarine saws, the coffer
dams of steel-sheet piling built
around the pier bases, the concrete
piers poured, to be followed by the
erection of the steel arches, which
(Continued On Pas* i.)
io siimficE
DOG LICENSE LAW
Residents of Annapolia who own
dogs,,be ware! The Dog License Law
will be strictly enforced to the let
ter.
On Tuesday the Board of County
Commissioners renewed their contract
with the Society for Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals for the adminis
tration of the State Dog Law in the
corporate limits of Annapolis for the
current year. They also appointed J.
C. Blaisdell and Walter Rogers as col
lectors.
The administration will consist In
collecting the licenses, distributing
tags and license tickets and dispos
ing of all homeless dogs in the city.
The collectors will call at all homes,
and it is desirable that all dog own
ers should have their money ready
when they call. The license fee is
$1 for male, and $2 for female
canines. Those who fail to pay at
once will be required to call at the
county treasurer’s office in the Court
House and comply with the law or
subject themselves to a fine of SSOO
i for not doing so. The collectors will
not call a second time as they did last
, year.
FAMILY WIPED OOtTn
TRAIN AUTOjGOLLISION
(By The AMMitted Press.)
BUFFALO, N. Y., July 20.—Six per
sons were killed and one seriously
injured today at Stevensvllle, Ont.,
when a railroad train struck an au
tomobile at a grade crossing. The
automobile bore a Colorado license.
The dead are reported to be Daniel
Fritz, his wife, two sons and one
daughter, and the ten-year-old son of
Mrs. James Baker, of Stevensvllle.
The Fritz family come from Colorado,
but their home town has not been
learned.
ANOTHER SURVIVOR
OF MRS. HAMBROCK
Due to failure to send in a complete
list the name of Mrs. George Krebs, of
Coupland, Texas, was omitted from
the list of the surviving sisters of the
late Mrs. Lena Hambrock, published
in last night’s Capital.
SPA CLUB MARKSMEN [
DEfEAT TEAM OF ELKS
Win Friendly Match At 500
“Birds” By Margin Of
Twenty-Three
CLARK IN FINE FORM
George Clark and Edward Ford
showed class in bringing down the
elusive clay targets yesterday after
noon when ten members of the An
napolis Lodge No. 622, Benovelent,
Protective Order Elks, shot a friendly '
500-bird match with a team represent
ing the Spa Gun Club. The shooting
was over traps of the Spa Gun Club
at East port.
The team match was won by the
Spa Gun Club by the narrow margin
of 23 targets.
Breaking 49 out of 50 “birds.”
George Clark led the marksmen in
individual scoring, while Edward Ford
was a close runner-up for the indi- ;
vidual honors with 48 out of 50 clay
birds to his credit.
Summary Of Scores
Teams and individual scores:
H. P. O. E. Spa Gun Club
Taylcr 44 Clark 49
Carlson 42 Ford 48
Levy 40 I). Cantler.. 45
Bosley 39 F. Cantler.. 43
C. Feldmeyer 38 Donaldson .38
Strange 37 Dove 35
Heintz 34 Herold 34
Healey 34 H. L. Smith. 34
Tydings 34 A. Adams... 34
Davis 27 J. Thomas.. 32
369 392
New Device For
Planes To Land
On Ship’s Deck
(By The AtiHoelated Press.)
WASHINGTON, D. C., July 20.
Perfection of a device to enable an
airplane going 60 miles an hour to
land on the deck of a ship was an
nounced today by the Navy Depart
ment. The device, which it is claimed
will permit the landing of any type
of airplane used in the navy, is equip
ped with landing gear which works
on a number of wires placed across
the deck of the ship and held down
with weights. Hooks descending from
the bottom of the plane engage the
wires.
The increasing amount of weight as
serts a breaking effect on the speed
of the plane. In one of the experi
ments a small plane was brought to
a stop within a range of 38 feet.
GODFREY DEININGER
WON ELKS’ RING AT
DRAWING TUESDAY
It not infrequently happens in con
nection with drawings for a prize ar
ticle that the last, or one among the
last persons, to try their luck, comes
out winner. Such was the case with
the drawing conducted by Annapolis
Lodge of Elks Tuesday night for a
handsome ring of a design emblem
atic of the order. Godfrey Deininger,
a member of the lodge, was among
the last tp try his fortune. He was
the holder of ticket No. 78 and that
was the lucky combination of nura
' erals drawn.
MRS. GATES’ FUNERAL
1 TO BE HELD TOMORROW
Mrs. Anna S. Gates, wife of Basil L.
Gates, died this morning at 6:30 from
a complication of diseases. Mrs.
Gates was 78 years old.
Surviving her are nine children, as
follows: Samuel Gates, of Washing
ton; William Gates, of Philadelphia;
Mrs. A. C. Brady, of Berwyn, and Mrs
John Stevens, Mrs. John Phillips. Mrs
John Gessner, Mrs. Dean Russell,
r Mrs. Zack Merriken, and Charles
Gates, all of Annapolis.
The funeral of Mrs. Gates will take
, place tomorrow afternoon at 5:30
from St. Anne’s Church and the body
I will be interred in St. Anne’s ceme
, tery. _
1 TO BE PALLBEARER
AT GOUCHER FUNERAL
i
Rev. H. Wilson Burgan, pastor of
Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church,
this city, has been selected as one of
r the pallbearers for the funeral of Dr.
L John F. Goucher. founder of Goucher
College. Baltimore, who died yester
i day. The funeral will be conducted
f tomorrow afternoon at 5 o’clock at
1 Alto Dale, the late home of Dr.
* Goucher, and burial will be beside the
1 body of his wife in Druid Ridge ceme
tery.
THE WEATHER:
* Generally fair tonight
and Friday. Showers.
" 1 . - i ■ j
ATTITUDE OF i
MINE WORKER!)
IS UNCHANGED
President Lewis Of Miners’ Or
ganization, Says His “People
Are Determined To Continue
The Strike Until Principles Are
Recognized”
TROOPS ARE ORDERED
OUT IN SOME STATES
WASHINGTON, D. C., July
20.—John L. Lewis, chief of the
United Mine Workers, and leader
in the strike, was preparing to
leave Washington today after hav
ing been here continuously for
more than a month, in conference
with administration officials.
"The mine workers’ attitude is
unchanged,” said Mr. Lewis.
“Our people are determined to
continue the strike until the prin
ciples of collective bargaining and
past procedure in the industry are
recognized.
“Our ranks are unbroken and
will continue so. The threat of
military operation will not alter the
principles at stake, nor bring any
satisfactory results to the suffering
public.”
Rioting At Worcester, Mass.
WORCESTER, MASS., July 20
Rioting and violence in the railroad
yards in Worcester reached such a
state last night that extra guards
were called out and stationed In the
various railroad yards about the city.
Men hired to take the places of
striking shopmen, stationary engi
neers and freight handlers were mis
treated and freight trains held up for
hours by the slashing of air brako
hose.
Four On Patrol Duty Shot
MONONGAHELA, PA., July 20-
Two Pennsylvania Railroad patrol
men, a car Inspector and a constable,
were shot early today after their
gasoline speedster had been wrecked
on the Ellsworth branch south of
Bentleyvllle, Pa. Three of the men
were seriously wounded, while the
other was hit by a number of buck
shot. The officers were on railroad
strike patrol duty.
CLERKS AXD OTHERS ON
C. & O. WALKED OUT TODAY
(By The Ainorlitrd Preaa.)
CINCINNATI, 0., July 20.—Five
hundred clerks in the Chesapeake and
Ohio offices at Richmond, Va., walked
out today at 10 a. m., when the strike
order of the clerks and freight
handlers went into effect, officials of
the roads announced. Reports reach
ing the company’s offices here also
said that 75 freight handlers at Chic
ago had walked out.
E. H. Fitzgerald, president of the
Brotherhood of Railway Clerks,
Freight Handlers, Station and Ex
press Employees, said that unofficial
reports reaching his office indicated
that the strike was 100 per cent, at
many points.
Approximately 4,000 clerks and
freight handlers are members of the
Brotherhood on the Chesapeake and
Ohio, he said.
President Fitzgerald announced, af
ter a personal canvass of the shops,
that 327 freight handlers had walked
out.
(ConUnuedOn Page *.)
BODIES OF HUSBRNO
RND WIFE, TWIOITS
CUT, FOUND IN GREER
(By The Associated Press.)
WILLIAMSPORT, PA., July 20
The bodies of a man and woman
found last night in Lycoming Creek,
near Bodines, 18 miles north of Wil
liamsport, with their throats slashed
were today identified as those of Mr.
' and Mrs. Henry M. Shearer, of At
tica, New York, who left their home
on Tuesday for a motor trip to Har
risburg, Pa., to visit relatives.
No bloodstains were discovered on
the bank and no weapon with which
the pair could have been slain was
found. The bodies were discovered
i by motorists, who were stopped by &
; three-year-old child standing in an
automobile calling “Mamma" and
, pointing toward the creek. Shearer
. was employed as a switchman on tha
Erie railroad. _ „

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