OCR Interpretation


Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, July 22, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1922-07-22/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

nTsSOCIATED PRESS
Aft***- of lt
wi ** published io
Xbe Evening Capital
uw —■—— l ■ ■" : ————————————————————————————————— I —■ i ...
- THE MARYLAND QAZETTE .
' —— ANNAPOLIS, MD„ SATURDAY, JULY 22, 19SS. v MICE TWO CRNTS. €
lil GUARD
' leaves early
> FOR EOGEWIOD
fj,y Members Of Company
•M," First Regiment, Eager
For Jaunt Of Intensive Mili
tary Instruction With Athletics
On Side
TWO MACHINE GUNS
WERE TAKEN ALONG
HriKtit and early this morning the
, i<jier I* 1 ) ' "f Company “M,” Anna*
niw unit of tin! First Regiment,
National Guard, marelied
Irniu Ihe llladen street armory
j, the West street terminal of
ihe Wa liington, Hnltiinore amt An
fa [Hilts Fleet rle Line, There they
icralned on a special ear of tlit)
Pennsylvania Railroad which convey
id them to Kdgewood, Md., via Oden
ton. the former place being a govern-
Bf#t arsenal where the several or
pniutlon* of the Maryland Guard
/.! <ncamp for the next two weeks.
Hit) Men Made Trip
About bo troopers, mostly youngs
nearly Up* full complement of
ftf loi.tl company, went to the camp,
in-1 all smiled eager for the Junket.
Tbt Si.• armory was the Beene of
Suirh .ictivlty hist night. The sol
diers in their full regalia had as
tnuWcfl there in response to orders,
sail (aptain Daniel J. Murphy, the
Mmpny Coiiniiander, directed (lie
* A of getting all accountrements
tefether ready for the jaunt.
h|ul|uiieiit Mined last Mg lit
Ml of the equipment, including two
si'hiiio guns, were placed aboard a
plight car bv midnight. Indicating
i> Interest shown by the Guardsmen
li thi encampment, many of them
unit the night in the armory huild
is* to make sure that they would he
i* hand for reveille, which was
funded at 4.30 a. m . instead or 3:150
unrlfitudly scheduled. Not a few of
dor engaged In a Jolly time about
the streets until along about 2 o’clock,
mi there were some tired bodies
'"•li the bugle blasted at 4:30. With
owithiug iu readiness, the troopers
,r 'l to the railway terminal
drily after 6 o'clock, and the train
HI away at 6:30.
Reckon!, 4 amp Commander
Hiilier-l'icncral Milton A. Ileck
* ordered by the Governor
'mmand the camp. His staff will
'* sl "f Major Thomas G. Me
hl,|s' adjutant; Major J. H. Wag-
<nillmirl On fuse 2.)
Uwn l ete & Dance
AT lULEHAHT SCHOOL
Saturday, July 22nd
*' At- 1 lancing, S:;so.
’ATI ItbSTlNfj _ ATTIIACTIVH
,U ‘ n 'tAt Iglehart School.
' *
Safe Deposit Boxes j
E to the great demand for Safe Deposit Boxes in
our au ft. we have doubled our capacity and can
'nmiodate anyone desiring a box for the safe keep-
their valuables while on vacation or for any
length of time.
Et nt one of our boxes for your valuable papers and
n C er ' en you will eliminate worry as to their safety.
varies as to size of boxes.
Annapolis Banking & Trust Co.
Corner Church Circle and Main Street
? • |
„ CARNIVAL! ]
LS| ANNAPOLIS FIRE DEPARTMENT
JULY 19, 20, 21 and 22
\ and Better Than Ever!
,
(Unpital.
: ; ~ - 1 ■■ - - - - —i; :
DB. BILUNGSLEA
! AGREES 10 SERVE
> ON SCHOOL BOARD
i Before the next meeting of the
(ounty Board of Education, whict
/ will he August 1, R is expected that
r j the full membership of the Board will
.| be completed. Up to this time only
s three members have taken office.—
Mrs. Edna E I’errie, Frank A. Mun
roe and ftidgedy I*. Melvin,—the other
two members, Miss Katherine Wat
kins and I)r. James S. Billingslea.
*! having failed to qualify during the
•>0 days period following their ap
pointment, as required by law. Miss
Watkins has been ill for several
weeks, hut id now convalescent and
, Will probably qualify within a few
I days under re-appointment by Gover
r nor Ritchie.
fj Another development of special in
.1 1 crest and gratillcation to the people
'i of the counb’ is the announcement
• that Dr. BillTngslea has reconsidered
j Ills decision about serving on the
School Board. After he had received
Ills commission, de declined it on the
ground that it would be too much of
I a tax on his time, and so notified the
Governor. Later on, however, he con
sented to undertake the ofllce and his
new commission has now been made
out and is awaiting Governor Ritchie’s
signature upon his return from New
York early next week.
A. A. C. TOSSERS TO
PLAY CATHOLIC CLUB
i The baseball team of Annapolis
i ■Athletic Club will lock horns with
toe nine of St. John’s Catholic Club,
of Baltimore, tomorrow afternoon on
the West Annapolis diamond. Hos
tilities are scheduled to get under
way at 2:30 o’clock.
AD FORMS
MARYLAND RAILROAD
The Washington, Brandywine and
Point Lookout Railroad Company has
granted authority by the Interstate
Commerce Commission to issue up to
8,628 shares of capital stock, at a par
value of SSO, for the purpose of con
tinuing the construction of its rail
road.
This carrier was organized in
Washington in 1918 with an author
ized capital stock of SIO,OOO, for the
purpose of constructing a railroad
from Point Lookout, St. Mary’s coun
ty, Md., to Washington, D. C. In June,
1918, the authorized capital stock was
increased to SIOO,OOO.
IwfsEASONT
THE SAME GOOD DEVIL
ED CRABS AT THE SAME
OLD PLACE, 230 WEST
STREET.
M. A. MILLER.
PHONE 832-M. jy-30
"CIMP FIRE CIS
VISIT ANNAPOLIS
“Hiked” To City Today From
"Wawanaissa,” Their Retreat
16 On Severn River
h
A large division of the Camp Fire
II Girls, who this year have an entirely
y new camp, hiked Into Annapolis to
- day and visited various spots of in
terest about town.
Their new camp, “Wawanaissa, ’’ Is
r located on the Severn opposite Indian
Landing. It is a bungalow and con
1, tains dining room, craft room, rccrca
e tion haH, a large porch and office and
i. kitchen. In addition to the bungalow,
h there ar e several tents in which the
j girls live.
j The charms of the camp arc con
v siderably enhanced by the fact that it
. is located on a bathing beach, en
thusiastically described by the girls
- as “lovely,” and that there are
b canoes and rowboats in plenty for
t their use.
j Camp Wawanaissa opened on June
e -6 a,, -d will close on August 28. Forty-
I five girls attend each week. Mrs.
u William J. Butler is director; Miss
f l-ola Tebbs, assistant director, and
} Miss Ada Benjamin is swimming in
structor.
i Schedule Of Activities
Each day the activities of the camp
s are conducted on regular schedule.
' The program for the day follows:
Rising whistle. 7 a. m.; dip, 7:15;
setting up exercises, 7:45; breakfast,
8; morning sing, 8:45; tent inspec
tion, 10; craft work, 10-11; swim, 11-
12; dinner, 1 p. m.; rest hour, 2-3;
boating and hiking, 3-4; swim, 4-5;
i sapper, 6; stunts, entertainments and
i games, 7-9:30; taps. 10.
, The craft work has been quite ex
, tensive this year. The girls have
. woodblockod collar and cuff sets,
• pongee handkerchiefs, and stencilled
trinket boxes.
Each day has its special program.
One morning is devoted to Nature
Lore, when a walk is taken through
the woods to Identify 20 wild Powers,
birds and trees, and blue prints are
I made of leaves and flowers.
I Then there is the morning for in
valid bed making. Each week there
is a stunt night, when each group—
-1 with its talent presents a stunt for
* the entertainment of the other camp
‘ ers. Each week there is a mock trial,
* when certain young ladies are tried
for ridiculous things, and in most In*
- stances, found guilty, and pay the
penalty much to the amusement of
rlie court.
1 Camp life is outdoor life, so there
are the meals to be cooked out oi
! doors—one of the favorite dishes be-
I ing beans cooked in a deep hole in
' the ground.
• Then another nice supper Is pre
’ pared as follows: Build a big fir'),
and put in it smooth stones after they
are hot; put a piece of bacon on it,
(Contlnutil On I'kd 4.)
: Probe Of Inn
Fight Fails To
| Turn Up Clues
Although county authorities with
the aid of Commissioner Charles D.
Gaither and police officials of Balti
more city, still are pursuing an in
vestigation into the fight among gun
men at Belle Grove Inn, in the upper
county, a week ago. nothing in the
way of a clue as to the perpetrators
of the tragedy has been obtained.
State’s Attorney Janies M. Munroe
stated this morning that he is nowj
awaiting word from Col. Gaither, who)
consented to take up the probe-there |
by questioning members of the police
force who assisted in raiding the inn,
and also the few- witnesses, injured
during the shpoting and who are un
der treatment at Baltimore hospitals, j
Mr. Munroe does not appear hopeful
ihat the tragedy will be solved. The
coroner’s jury will be re-assembled
after Col. Gaither is heard from, but
apparently' its only duty will be to
prepare a formal!verdict which, it is
indicated, will be that Michael Ca
dora. who was killed in the fight,
“came to his death from pistol .shot
wounds inflicted by parties unknown
q io the jury.”
BASEBALL!
ANNAPOLIS ATHLETIC CLUB,
INCORPORATED
VB.
ST. JOHN'S CATHOLIC CLUB,
OF BALTIMORE.
At fVest Jlnnapolis Field
Sunday, July 23rd
Game called at 2:30 P. M.
■; —..
LOCAL BOATS
ENTERED FOR
BIGREGATTA
Two From Eastport, Like Num
ber From Lower County And
More Expected To Come For
ward Within Next Few Days
—Much Interest Shown
SEVENTY ENTRIES
RECEIVED TO DATE
Captains of workboaty from all sec
tions of the bay are (locking to enter
their bugeyes, skipjackfc, canoes and
work motorboats in the Second An
nual Chesapeake Bay Races, to be
held off Bay Ridge, Anne Arundel
county, August 12.
With a total of 70 craft already en
tered to contest for the,prizes offered
by The Six and The Evkmxo Srx\
the silver cups to be given by the
Chesapeake Bay Yacht Club, and Thk
Evkni.no Capital and others, and the
honor of having the fastest boats of
their class on the Chesapeake, last
year’s entry list of 66 boats has al
ready been surpassed.
Capital Cup Stirs Interest
The recent announcement that the
Evening Capital is offering a silver
cup to the boat entered in the various
races, making the best time over the
race couise, coupled with the sugges
tion that another cup or eoiiic form of
prize to the entry from Annapolis,
Eastport, or any other section of Anne
Arundel county, making the best rec
ord for the day’s sport, has served to
stimulate much Interest among local
boat owners, and it is not unlikely
that Anne Arundel will have a credit
able representation of craft in the
races.
Two Eastport Entries
Two boat owners of Eastport today
signitied their intention of entering
the events. There a*-e Elmer Murphy,
who owns the motorboat Resolute, a
40-foot “deadrise,” and “Duck” Evans,
who will enter an unnamed boat. In
the list given below-, it will be noted
that tw-o county beats already arc
enteied.
Ferdinand Eat robe Makes Offer
Ferdinand C. Latrobe, of Latrobe
and Company, marine engineers, is
among a number of Annapolitans
taking a keen Interest in the coming
regatta. Mr. Latrobe came forward
today with the offer of 10 gallons of
gasoline to any boat owners of Ahna
(ContlntiMl on Pave 4.)
Mffimiiuti
MD. COUNTIES RICHER
THIS Mill mi
Tax rates for 1922 in the counties of
Maryland average 13 cents higher
than in 1921, according to a list is
sued yesterday by the State Tax Com
mission. The jump was regarded as
due to a general increase in "expendi
tures of county governments.
All but eight of the counties will
have a higher rate. The greatest in
crease is in Calvert, from $1.90 7-8 to
$2.65. Montgomery recorded the
largest decrease, 10 cents. The aver-
I age rate last year was $1.53. This
i year it is $1.66.
Rates probably will be reduced in
1923, it was said, by the re-assess
ment of real property now under way
in all counties. There has been no
re-assessment for five years and offi
; cials expressed the belief that all rea l
property is under-assessed.
The comparative rates are as fol
lows:
Counties 1921. 1922.
Allegany $1.37 $1.45
Anne Arundel 1.51 1.48
Baltimore city 2.97 2.97
Baltimore county. 1.78 ,1.91
Calvert 1.90 7-8 2.65
Caroline 1.35 1.50
Carroll. 1.40 1.40
Cecil I.SC! Lso
Charles 1.50 1.58
Dorchester 1.60 1.80
Frederick. 1.41 1.40
Garrett 1.66 1.66
Harford 1.58 1.58
Howard. 1.25 1.40
Kent 1.48 1.54
Montgomery 1.40 1.30
Prince George’s.. 1.28 1.44
Queen Anne’s 1.41 1.42
St. Mary’s 1.46 1.68
Somerset 1.47 2.15
Talbot 1.39 1.53
Washington LlO 1.50
Wicomico 1.64 2-3 1.65
Worcester 1.40 1.40
V
MILE OF CONCRETE ~
HMD FOB EASTPOHT
[State Commission To Provide
For Stretch Leading To
ward Bay Ridge
That a mile of new concrete road
i will he built by the State Roads Com
mission from Eastport toward Bay
Ridge is indicated by unofficial, but
s reliable, information that has just
come from the State Roads Commis
sion. Bids for this piece of road will
be called for in a few days, and it is
expected that the actual work of con
; struction will begin early this fall.
Owing to the rapid development of
Eastport and vicinity and of the en
- tire peninsula toward Bay Ridge and
r at that place, the building of this new
1 stretch of concrete road is looked
- upon as an encouraging sign of still
? further progress, and also answers o.n
1 urgent need of road improvement in
that section.
It is understood to be likely that if
1 the county will have in acceptable
• condition the present stretch of road
; beyond the Spa Creek bridge to the
■ new link about to be built, this entire
' stretch will, upon completion, be
j taken over by the State Roads Com
mission and maintained as part of the
State System, thus relieving the coun
ty of a considerable expense in that
line.
! ANOTHER COUNTY FIRE;
i DAMAGES OF SIO,OOO
' Six buildings were destroyed and
’ damage estimated at SIO,OOO was
■ caused by a fire which broke out late
last night on the property of H. R.
Mayo Thom, Rocky Beach, this coun
’ ty. The barn, granary, stable, engine,
1 water and electric plants, cow barn
and paint shop were destroyed.
Two men were overcome by smoke
while fighting the fire on the engine
plant and fell from a ladder, receiv
ing minor bruises.
; ODD FELLOWS’ NINE
MEETS BLUEJACKETS
i - ■' 1 -
, Baseball teams picked from mem
-1 bers of the local lodge of Odd Fellows
I and bluejackets aboard the station
- ship Reina Mercedes at the Navul
Academy will be the contestants in a
game to be staged on the diamond at
St. John’s College this afternoon.
Play will be called at 3 o’clock, and
' as there is no other athletic attraction
’ on the card for the afternoon, it is ex
’ pected a good crowd of *fans will
rather on the grounds to witness tho
fracas.
MRS. HAMBROCK LAID TO
REST IN CEDAR BLUFF
The last rites for Mrs. Lena Ham
brock. wife of William Hambrock,
who died Wednesday at her residence
on West street were said yesterday
afternoon in St.. Martin’s Lutheran
Church, of which Mrs. Hambrock was
a member. The funeral services
were conducted by Rev. F. H.
f Graeper, pastor of the church, and
r interment was made in Cedar Bluff
. cemetery.
Arrangements for the funeral were
5 made by funeral director B. L. H&p
. ping and the pallbearers were: John
M. Brown, Charles Brown, Jacob
I Weaver, Theodore Ecterhoff, Godfrey
Deininger and Henry Heller.
J INTERESTING PROGRAM
- FOR DODON FAIR, AUG. 2
s
The Dodon Fair will be held on the
1 grounds at Dodon on Wednesday,
• August 2. There will be two games
’’ of baseball. In the morning the
5 school nine will play and at 3 p. m.
* the regular Davidsonville nine will
have a game. The names of the op
posing nines will be announced
* ’ater. There will also be good music
and dancing. A new oil cooking stove
will be given as a “gate prize.” Sand
wiches, ice cream and other refresh
ments will be sold.
MRS. A. S. GATES BURIED
IN ST. ANNE’S CEMETERY
Many relatives and friends attend
ed the funeral services for Mrs. Anna
Ss- Gates, widow of Basil S. Gates,
who died Wednesday, which were
held in St. Anne’s Church at 5:30
o’clock yesterday. Mrs. Gates was
long a member of the church. The
services were conducted by Rev. Ed
ward D. Johnson, rector of the
church and intermont was in St.
Anne's cemetery. The choir of St.
Cecilia’s Guild sang during the ob
sequies.
The pallbearers were: Frank Basil,
Charles Brady, Samuel Garner, Frank
Stevens, Wiliam Curry and Percy
Garner. Funeral director B. L. Hop
ping had charge of arrangements.
MARKET WELL STOCKED j
BY CANTALOUPES AND
OTHER A. A. PRODUCTS
Cantaloupes, peaches and tomatoes,
grown on Anne Arundel county
farms, reached the local market in
full blast this morning, and all
brought good prices. There is also
a prolific yield of blackberries this
year, and they too aro plentiful on
the market today.
Cantaloupes were sold in the mar
ket and on store stands at prices
ranging from 8 to 15 cents Hpicce,
based upon the size, and by the has
kel they brought from $1 to $1.50.
Peaches and tomatoes were retailing
at. $1.50 per basket. Blackberries
were sold generally at 12 and 15 cents
per quart.
PUN cSio TO
MARK BEGINNING WORK
SOUTHERN MD. ROAD
Plans for opening of construction
on the new million-dollar highway
which will connect Southern Mary
land with Baltimore now include a
large reception at Upper Marlboro
September 30, at which State and Fed
eral ollicials will speak.
Among the ollicials who have al
ready accepted an invitation to ad
dress the assembly are Governor Al
bert C. Ritchie. Mayor William F
Urccning, Baltimore; Chairman Johi
N. Mackall, of the State Roads Com
mission; Robert Crain, two not as ye'
named United States Senators anr
State Senators from each of tic
southern counties.
In recognition of the value of tho
road to their trade the people ot
Southern Mai viand are erecting i
monument which will be placed at the
head of the highway in Upper Marl
Doro.
A feature of the entertainment wil
be the presentation of a Marylant
flag to Governor Ritchie by a girl rep
resenting each of the following coun
tkr: St. Mary’s, Charles, Ano
Arundel and Prince George’s. Eac’
of the flags will have attached a pen
nant on which will be written thei
respective counties.
Mayor Broening will then preset!
to the Governor four Baltimore flags
The latter will hand over to tin
Mayor the four county flags, whicl
will he placed on exhibition in th
City Hall as a symbol of the closet
union between the city and Southeri
Maryland as a result of this new road
A procession will be formed, headei
by the United States Marine Band
and the crowd will march to th
monument which will be dedicated b}
Mr. Mackall. Governor Ritchie wil
tell “What It Means to Maryland t<
Wisely Expand Her Good Roads Sys
tern,” Mayor Broening will voice tin
sertinient, “Baltimore and Southeri
Maryland All One Family.” and Rob
ert Crain will tell “What This Roar
Really Means to Maryland."
CRABS PLENTIFUL, OF
GOOD SIZE AND MUCH
SPORT IS AFFORDED
Crabs, hard and soft, are more
plentiful this year than they havt
been for several seasons, and personF
who like to catch, as well as eat, the
crustaceans are having the time ol
their lives. The waters about the city
are alive daily by parties in smal 1
boats engaged in crab-catching, prin
clpally the hard-shelled variety, and
many good catches have been made
The crabs are now reaching good size
and becoming much fatter, too. The
bridge across South river is one ofthe
popular retreats for crabbers, many
, parties from Baltimore and elsewhere
visiting there.
Chairman Harrison W. Vickers, of
- the State Conservation Commission
1 reports heavy catches of crabs in all
. sections of the bay, so much so that
2 prices received by the crabber have
J been practically halved during the
3 last two weeks. So far packers have
8 been paying 4 cents per pound for the
shellfish of average grade. In some
e lower sections of the bay. the market
'' has reached a glut stage, according to
Mr. Vickers. There, Mr. Vickers said.
h packers cut their prices considerable.
u ~ T "*
k Marliage License
y JESSUP-BARNES—Charles S. Jes
y sup. Jr., 27, Towson, Md.; Pearl
Adele Barnes. 26, Baltimore city.
[THE WEATHER:!
* Sunday partly cloudy, |
probably local thunder- ;
showers.
x imuc. ia, w
COV. RITCHIE '
SWINE PUT*
ON SMMENT
Satisfied With Reports Reaching
Him To Effect That Disorder
In Strike Situation Is Sporadic
—His Position Is Made Plain
And Emphatic
’* *. 1
LITTLE EFFECT OF
ORDERING TROOPS NOW
Governor Ritchie, who has his
finger constantly on the pulse of the
•.trike situation in this State, issued
the following additional statement:
So far as I am advised, the
strike situation this morning is
unchanged. I am receiving daily
reports from all sides and from
sources of my own. These show *
quite clearly that instances of ’
disorder are sporadic, and that *
both strikes are being conducted
in Maryland with quite a re
markable degree of order and
compliance with law.
When the operators will decide
to undertake to resume mining,
and under what conditions, is not
yet known, and in the meanwhile
the pledge of a whole regiment
of soldiers would not result in
producing more coal than is now
mined.
There is no question that free
men have the right to work in
safety and to be protected in that
right by the proper public author
ities. There is grave doubt whe
ther a pledge should be giveu
which would mean filling the mine
districts with armed troops. That
can only be correctly determined
when the operators are ready to
resume mining and in the light ot
conditions as tlrt?y exist then. It
is Impossible to tell now what
these conditions will be, and,
therefore, any decision now about
the militia would be premature.
Until then my duty is to keep
in close touch with the situation,
which I am doing, and to try my
best to avert the possibility of
trouble in this State, which I am
also doing, and to make no decis
ion until the time comes and the
facts are known.
Ills Position Made Plain
It will be noted that the Governor
gain made it plain that he consid
;red that the “pledge of a whole
egiment of troops would not result
n producing more coal than is now
nined.” He admitted that “free men”
lave a right to work and to be pro
ected in that right, but he makes it
•lain that there “is grave doubt as
o whether a pledge should be given
vhich would mean the filling of the
nine district with armed troops.”
Encouraged By Information
The Governor has received a num
er of reports, both from persons In
lie mining section intrusted with the
ask of keeping him informed, from
he union leaders and from the rail
vay officials and mine operators. Jle
s encouraged by all of them.
One lengthy telegram from the min
ng section said that there was no
lisorder and that everything was
working out well. The Governor said
:hat he thought that from this tele
gram that the “mining section is as
luiet as Greenmount Cemetery.” The
report from the Baltimore and Ohio
Railroad officials was also encourag
ng to the Governor.
FUNERAL SERVICES
FOR THOMAS COLBURN
Funeral services for Thomaa Col
burn, who died Wednesday night fol
lowing an illness of Bright’s disease
and complications, were held yester
day afternoon at the Chesapeake
House hotel, Main street. The serv
ices were conducted by Rev. James L.
Smiley, of Annapolis, and interment
was in Cedar Bluff cemetery. The
pallbearers were: Charles Russell,
I George A. Basil, Andrew Johnson,
t James T. Small, Charles Martin and
5 Frmk Krammer. Funeral Directors
i James S. Taylor and Sons had chirge
i of arrangements. *
i 1 " ™*■——mm
* “No One Hurt” Cablet Denby
5 “Airplane made forced landing. No
i one hurt.”
That was the reply of the Secretary
of the Navy Denby to the dispatch of
Acting Secretary of the Navy Roose
velt, inquiring for details of the ac
i- cident over the great wall in China,
>1 in which Denby was reported to have
barely escaped serious injury*

xml | txt