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Evening capital and Maryland gazette. (Annapolis, Md.) 1910-1922, July 27, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88065726/1922-07-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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sre published in
® be Evening Capital
<“• ™ ~ THE MARYLAND QAZETTE ' m.
iAXVH X.- ; AN'N'AI‘OMS, MI).. THURSDAY. JULY gr, li.2i. rRIcE TWQ CENXS
II SUES !
Ui ABSORB
HIE HOUSE
president Confers With Head Of
Railway Executives And Then i
Htpiesentative Of Strike Lead-;
tr „ Who Came From Chicagol
—General Situation Discussed;
HARDING HAS PROPOSALS
MADE AT B. & O. PARLEY:
jM’I.OMUS IN HOTTI.K OF
411 K HMMV OFF TIICMB
OF It. It. OFFICIAL
flit The A•••**!•!wl
CHICAGO, ILL., July 27.
Churl,-h I) Singer, assistant gen
fral manager of the Delaware,
Urkiiwanna and Western Kati
na,!, reported to the police today
that explosives placed in a bottle
i of nulk on bis front porch blew
if? his right thumb when he start
ed to carry the bottle into the
house
WASHINGTON. D C.. July 27.
The White Mouse again today became
■ e renter of developments In the rail
, trikes and the focus of efforts to
ards peace, President Harding hold- j
H rimferetices. first with T. DeWitt I
fayler chairman of the Association j
t.fßailway Kxncutives, and then with
*he strike leaders, headed by H. M. I
Jewell. who reached Washington f
early in the day from Chicago.
Mr Cuvier, on leaving the White!
nue s.iid that he had presented to
the President the viewpoint of the I
nllroids' management and that he !
would remain In Washington "to !
•wait the pleasure of the President,” 1
but that there had been no new de- !
nlopntents in the situation.
Vr Jewell, acting ns spokesman for 1
thr labor group, said the morning
ranteretire was contlnod to a general
isrusston of th,. strike situation. The
lb.>r leaders endeavored to give the
President their views of the strike,
Mr Jewel I said, declining to he drawn
•■at to- ((iiestions as to details of the
reference discussion.
ff ontlntM'if On I'tiirp 4 >
CLEAN SWEEP
White Oxfords and Pumps
S* WHITE CANVAS OXFORDS y|P
\A'l) PI’Ml’S. Were $2,501 Now
AHIKS* Win H-; CANVAS PUMPS AND QET
'XI'ORDS. Were $ll.OO to $3.50. Now.
Ladies* white reighuskin oxfords and
>nd PUMPS. Were $4,00 to $5.00. <£OQP>
ssl s ' \M) CHILDREN'S WHITE CANVAS OX
* ‘ 'K!)S AND PUMPS. Sizes B*4 to 2. QP^
l 'ro si.so to 2.00. Now
NI) ( HILDREN’S PLAY OXFORDS AND
>ARKFOOT SANDALS. Brown leather. Qf*
.to 2. Were $1.50 to $2.00. Now.. Util
•' atui low heels; up-to-date styles; all perfect; all
■ leather innersoles. counters and heels. Most near
■* Have rubber heels. Sizes 3*4 to 8.
NONE CHARGED ALL SIZES. BUT
vONK EXCHANGED NOT IN EVERY STYLE
frank SLAMA & SON
55 W EST STREET
Getting Capital♦
; “RADIO BUG" IN S. W.
AFRICA WANTS TO KNOW
I' OPtRATOR IN AMERICA
In far-off Southwest Africa (Portu
guese Congo), there is a radio oper
ator who wishes to become acquaint
;ed with any radio operator In the
I'nited States.
This rather unusual request for an
i introduction to a fellow "at the key"
| comes in a letter which has just been
i received by Kev. James L. Smiley, of
Annapolis. The letter is dated June
J, 1922, Clainda-Kadio (name of the
station), and the writer is T. James
I' reitas, who says he speaks several
languages. Including Esperanto, the
latter of which the Rev. Smiley is a
strong exponent.
The letter reads:
Dear Radio Bug:
I will he very much obliged to
he acquainted with any U. S
Radio Operator or amateur.
am 22 years old, Portuguese*
(European) wireless opr. at Cal-
Inda station, call C.R.G, (3 kir
English Marconi).
I speak english, french. Span
ish, llallan. and little german, be
sides Portuguese and esperanto.
.VS S., and some other I'ncle Sam
stations I copied at C.R.1,. (Lo
anda station).
The note is written on a small sheet
o f paper and the reverse side hears a
short note, written in Esperanto, to
Rev. Smiley.
TOMORROW’S LAWN
FETE AT WATERBURY
D> addition to a play, given by local
talent, the lawn fete to he held on the
[lawn of the home of Mrs. A. (J. Cooke,
at Waterbary, on Friday, July 28,
numbers dancing and bridge among
. its attractions. The affair is for the
benefit of the Babies' Milk and Ice
Fund, and ice cream, cake, candy and
fancy articles will be on sale.
As Waterbary is only a nine-mile
drive from Annapolis—and excellent
roads at that - or a fifteen-minute ride
on the W., B. & A. Electric Railroad,
a large crowd from this city is an
ticipated by the patrons of the fete.
Government Tug Returns
The government tug Chemung re
turned to her berth at the local naval
station today from Norfolk, Va., after
delivering a barge to the navy yard
there.
PYTHIANS OF STATE TO
CAMPAIGN FOR MEMBERS
1 Delegation Of Local Lodge
Hears Plans Outlined At
Baltimore Meeting
• FOR FINE NEW CASTLE
i
. A delegation from the local lodge of
, Knights of Pythias, headed by A. El
wood Martak, Grand Prelate of the
’ Domain of Maryland, motored to Bal
, timore last night and attended a
, gathering of prominent Pythians of
and various sections of the
State. The meeting was held In
Pythian Castle and the hall was
crow'ded with members of the order.
The object of the meeting was to
generally discuss the plans formu
lated by the executive committee, ap
pointed by the Grand Chancellor, to
carry into effect the Pythian survey
and campaign for new members,
which will be instituted this fall. The
Annapolis lanlge of Knights of
Pythias has been invited to join the
Baltimore city district in the survey
and it is expected they will accept.
Addressed By Mayor Krnening
Among the prominent Pythians who
spoke during the evening was Mayor
William F. Broening, of Baltimore. It
is expected that the movement which
is on foot to erect a new Pythian Cas
-1 tie In Baltimore will soon realize how
successful the efforts have been In
this direction, as it was stated that:
the City of Baltimore plans to take
■ in part of the present Pythian Castle
in order to straighten the lines of:
Lexington street which passes by the
War Memorial being erected from the
City Hall to the Fallsway at that
point. Tho new Pythian building is
; to be a magnificent structure and will
probably cost one-half million dol
lars.
Other members of the local delegation
consisted of Henry T. Boettcher, God
frey Deininger. Charles H. Evans and
Harry F. King.
DROWNINGW
BORED YESTERDAY
Funeral services for George J. Hil
binger, who was drowned Sunday
while bathing In Selby Bay. near
South River, this county, were held
yesterday afternoon from his late
home, 441 East Twenty-eighth street,
Baltimore. Rev. W. E. Saltzgiver.
pastor of St. John’s Lutheran Church.
Parkville, read .the service. Burial
was in Woodlawn cemetery. Mr. Hil
binger, who was 31 years old, is sur
vived by his parents (Mr. and Mrs.
George J. Hilbinger), by his wife
(Mrs. Florence Virginia Hilbinger).
and three brothers (Charles. William
and Herman Hilbinger), and by a sis
ter (Mrs. Charles Deckert). Under
taker B. L. Hopping had charge of
funeral arrangements.
THOMAS ROBERTSON
BURIED IN CEDAR BLUFF
The funeral of Thomas Robertson,
who died Sunday at the residence of
his daughter, Mrs. Addie Robertson
Tongue. 121 Cathedral street, took
place on Tuesday afternoon at 4
o'clock from the above residence. Rev.
S. E. Persons, pastor of the Presby
terian Church, conducted the funeral
services. The pallbearers were Wal
ter Robeck, W. F. Flood. Walter
Myers, Bernard Hoff, T. W. Alex
ander and Harry Tongue.
The body was interred in Cedar
Bluff cemetery. Funeral director B.
L. Hopping had charge of arrange
ments.
TO fkWllie
AT TONIGHT’S SESSBN
For the primary purpose of levying
the municipal tax rate for the fiscal
year, a special meeting of the Mayor
and City Council will be held in the
Municipal Building tonight, beginning
at S o'clock. It is expected that the
rate will remain at the full limit of
SI. as in the year now closing. The
finance commission of the Council |
has already prepared the tax budget
for the year, and will be ready to
make its report to the Council. That |
the report of the commission will be j
approved is regarded as certain.
■■ ■ ■
Club To Meet Aug. 9
Because of the Dodon Fair the
Woman's Club of Davidsonville will
not meet until the second Wednes
day in August, in the Hall at David
souviiie, at the usual hour.
i
“Maryland Gazette”
To Be New Name Of
1 “Weekly Advertiser”
Announcement is made
today of the change in
name of The Weekly Ad- j
vertiser to The Maryland
Gazette, which will become
effective upon publication
of next week’s issue, Aug
ust 3, of the county weekly.
Further particulars con
cerning the change will be
found on Page 2, this issue,
of The Evening Capital.
PARENTS INVIIED IN
CLOSING OF VACATION
BIBLE SCH. TOMORROW
The Inter-denominational Vacation
Bible School will close tomorrow.
This school has been conducted for
three weeks at the Calvary Methodist
Episcopal Church, State Circle, with
all the Protestant churches of the city
co-operating. It has been most suc
cessful in every respect. The attend
ance has been surprisingly large, and i
has averaged over one hundred boys
and girls daily.
Twenty-nine teachers have con
ducted the activities of the school
under the leadership of Miss Mary G.
Burch. On account of the illness of
Miss Burch, the exercises for the clos
ing day will be somewhat modified.
However, adults, especially the par
ents of the scholars, are Invited to at
tend the school tomorrow and see it
in operation.
The day’s program will consist of
devotional exercises, special music,
Bible contest, athletic contests, and
the school will close with a treat of
ice cream and cake for the children.
An exhibit of the best work that has
been done by the school will be shown
in one ot fhe store windows in Anna
polis, beginning next Monday. The
exhibit will remain for about a week.
The various activities of the school
have been religious exercises, patriot
ism, Bible memory work, Bible
stories, music, Hawthorne’s Tales,
physical training, army signalling,
knot tieing. hammock and crab net
making, bead making, weaving, sew
ing, kindergarten work, basketry,
missionary talks, health and habit
talks, hikes, camp cooking, swim
ming, post card work. etc.
Benny Leonard
And Tendler In
Titular Battle
(By The A.MO<lutect Press.)
JERSEY CITY, N. J., July 27-
Benny Leonard and Lew Tendler both
weighed in under 135 pounds this af
ternoon for their titular bout tonight.
Leonard weighed 134 pounds, 15
ounces, while Tendler weighed 134
pounds. 12 ounces. A slight drizzle
was falling when they stepped upon
the scales. Showers were forecast for
tonight.
Benny Leonard, world’s lightweight
boxing champion, will defend his title
tonight against Lew Tendler. Phila
delphia's pride in the ring of the huge
pine bowl erected on Boyle’s Thirty
Acres. Jersey City—the identical bat
tle platform on which Jack Dempsey
dashed in the fistic mire the world’s
heavyweight championship aspira
tions of Georges Carpentier. Leonard
and Tendler will clash in a bout
scheduled for twelve rounds. It will
be a no-decision contest. Referee’s
decisions are prohibited under the
provisions of the Hurley law govern
ing boxing in New Jersey. The light
weight championship, therefore will
not be affected if both boxers are on
their feet when the bell clangs at the
end of the twelfth round. Only a
knockout by Tendler or the commis
sion of a foul by Leonard can produce
a change in the ownership of the title.
J. Harry Ertle. of Jersey City, has
been selected to referee the title
struggle. The bout is scheduled to
I start about 9:45 o'clock this evening,
daylight-saving time. In the conduct
of this championship match Promoter
Tex Rickard will follow a similar pro
; cedure to that which prevailed on the
occasion of the memorable heavy
weight championship bout in the same
arena a year ago. The important
bout will be put on in advance of the
semi-final.
"I will win inside seven rounds,”
says Leonard. To which Fendler re
torts: ~**l will knock Benny Leonard
out.”
TOUCHED HIGH VOLTAGE
WIRE; ELECTROCUTED
H. Allen Leitch, Formerly Of
Annapolis, Victim Of Tragic
Accident In Baltimore
NATIVE OF FRIENDSHIP
Touching an electric wire carrying
a voltage of 2,200 while working atop
i of a 40-foot telegraph pole at Clinton
i street and Poster avenue, Baltimore,
j 11. Allen Leitch, son of Joseph l>eitch,
lf*7 Prince George street, this city, was
I electrocuted Tuesday afternoon.
Leitch was a lineman employed by
the Consolidated Gas Electric Light
(and Power Company, of
His Baltimore address was 12\2 Ed
monson avenue. He is surviyed by a
widow who was formerly Miss Ethel
Dashiell, of Baltimore.
Has Native Of Friendship
Leitch was well known in Annapo
lis. lie was 36 years old and a na
tive of Friendship, this county. For
a number of years he was employed
in the shops of the Annapolis Short
ine Railroad, before it was electrified.
Besides his widow, and father, Leitch
is survived by a sister. Miss Mattie
| Leitch, of this city, and a brother,
! Clifton Leitch, of New York City. The
: funeral will be held from the Edtnond-
Ison avenue address at 11 o’clock to
j morrow morning.
W. F. Kersehner. 2815 East Monu
ment street, Baltimore, who was
working with Leitch at the time of
| the fatal accident, said the latter was
I not wearing rubber gloves. He touch
ed the wire accidently and his body
fell across the mass of wires around
the transformer box.
A rope was handed to Kersehner,
who with the aid of Eugene Walters,
3r„ foreman of the gang, and Joseph
Dennis, 1620 Hentalou street, lowered
tht tody to the ground.
Resuscitating apparatus was
i brought by police, and Dr. J. J. Mc-
I Garrell worked over the body. His
efforts were in vain.
ODD FELLOWSTOSE TO
BALTIMORE BROTHERS
baseball team of Metropolis
Lodge of Odd Fellows of Annapoliß
returned home late yesterday after
noon losers of the bastball game stag
ed as the feature of the ninety-fifth
anniversary of Encampment of Odd
Fellowship, celebration of which took !
place at Gwynn Oak Park, Baltimore.
The victors were the team of North
Point lodge, Baltimore county, and
he score was 3 to 0. Various other
ontests and amusements made up the
program of the celebration, which
was attended by several thousand Odd
Fellows and Rcbekahs from all parts
if the State. Dancing at night end
ed the festivities.
LAWN PARTY TONIGHT
BY STANDARD BEARERS
The lawn party to be given by the
Standard Bearers of Calvary Metho
dist Episcopal Church will take place
tonight on the lawn of the residence
of Miss Elizabeth Davis. West street
extended. Contrary to the usual cus
tom, there will be no articles offered
for sale, but everyone is asked to
bring a quarter and those who wish
may bring their knitting. A musical
program will provide amusement for
the guests and refreshments will be
served.
PROBEOFSCiINER’S
MING CONTINUED
The board of naval officers detailed
to conduct an investigation of the
sinking of the, coal-laden schooner
John T. Bradley in Annapolis harbor |
Tuesday night, alleged to have been j
the result of a naval steam cutter I
striking her, continued its sessions
today. It is expected a report and
findings will be placed before Rear-
Admiral Henry B. Wilson, superin
tendent of the Naval Academy, tomor
row. Meanwhile, no effort has been
made to float the schooner, which
rests on the bottom of mid-harbor in
about 14-feet of water.
W. B. A. OF MACCABEES
TO MEET FRIDAY NIGHT
The W. B. A. of the Maccabees will
hold its meeting Friday evening at 8
p. m„ in the Odd Fellows Hall. Mem
bers who were written up last week
will please report.
ANOTHER APPEAE TO
RITCHE AS TO STRIKE;
POSITION UNCHANGED
An appeal to Maryland for help in
the pending coal and railroad crisis
was received last night by Governor
Ritchie from Secretary of Commerce
Hoover, and a similar appeal was
made to the Maryland Public Service
Commission by the Interstate Com
merce Commission.
Before he had seen Secretary
Hoover's telegram, but shortly after
he learned it had been sent, Governor
Ritchie said:
"I want to do everything I can to
assure the distribution of coal in
Maryland to points provided for in
the priority regulations. Not having
all phases of the situation before me.
particularly Secretary Hoover's tele
gram. I do not want to try to outline
a policy for Maryland just now but
will take up the mutter of a State or
ganization which will help to see that
coal is sold at fair prices and under
the priority regulations laid down by
the Interstate Commerce Commis
sion.”
The appeal to the Public Service
Commission declared “the emergency
is most acute,” and asked William
Milnes Maloy, chairman, to be ready
to furnish active assistance.
Chairman Maloy replied by wire
pledging the commission’s “available
facilities” in an effort to do every
thing possible to co-operate with the
Federal authorities.
CAKED WMlf
FORCED TO SORRENDER
FOR A DRINK OF WATER
(Hr The Ahihm'liiiml Press.)
HINTON, W. VA.. July 27. —John
Fredeking, the insane man who bar
ricaded himself in his house, and for
( 13 days resisted the efforts of deputy
sheriffs and state police to arrest him.
after he had killed one man and
wounded four others, this morning
appeared at the front door, threw up
his hands and asked for a drink of
( water.
Two troopers, who with others
h have been doing everything in their
power, with the exception of firing the
house, to dislodge Fredeking, got him
1 the water he craved, and then led
him to the county jail. He refused
to answer their questions and appear
ed to Le dazed. Physicians dressed
a bullet wound in his right arm.
LONE BANDIT GETS $20.04)0
IN DIAMONDS ON STREET
%
(B.v The Assorinteil Press.)
NEWARK, N. J.. July 27.—Held up
by a lone bandit on Chestnut street
today, Lorenz Collins, son of a New
York diamond importer, was robbed
of unset diamonds valued at $20,000.
QALESVULE TO HONOR
MEMORY OF WAR HERO
On Sunday evening, July 30, at
Galesville, at 8, there will be an un
veiling of a memorial tablet in honor
of Vernon Jerome W’ayson, who lost
his life during the World War. Ap
propriate exercises will be held in the
Galesville Methodist Episcopal,Church
and Rev. Robert Mayo and Benjamin
Michaelson will be among the speak
ers of the evening. A cordial invi
tation is extended to every one to at
tend.
The Anchorage
COOLEST PLACE IN TOWN.
HOME COOKING.
Jy-Hl 38 MAKYLAND AVENUE.
f
If .
LOOK? LOOK! LOOK!
LAWN FETE
! * . •; I
For Babies Milk and Ice Fund!
i
To be held on the lawn of the home of Mrs. A. G. Cooke,
1 at Waterbury, Maryland.
FRIDAY, JULY 28th, 1922
\
NINE MILE DRIVE from Annapolta over excellent roads, or fifteen
minute ride on W., B. & A. Electric Road to
I Waterbury Station.
j PLAY given by local talent. Dancing, Bridge, Ice Cream,
Cake, Candy and fancy articles for sale.
11
THE WEATHER:
* Unsettled tonight and
Friday; probably show
ers. Slightly warmer.
COUNTY FOLKS .;
COMMENDED BY
GOII. RITCHIE
l “
Chief Executive Delivered Charge
, To Knights At Tracy’s Land
ing Tournament And Bestowed
Special Praise Upon Mrs. Edna
Perrie For Community Work
FRIENDLY FEELING
' FOR SO. MARYLANDERS
l
I
: Governor Ritchie mingled with the
, | folks of lower Anne Arundel county
* .and Southern Maryland for a couple
..of hours yesterday afternoon when he
delivered the charge to the kulghts ut
.j a tournament held at Tracy’s Land
ing. 18 miles from here.
' [ The tournament was given as a
- benefit of St. James’ Protestant Epls
. I copal Parish of Weßt River. Fully
j 800 persons gathered about the
, grounds and w itnessed the riding and
jousting for the honor of crowning
i 'h<* queen and her maids, of the latter
of whom there were seven, and the af
fair, which was pronounced a big suc
cess from every angle, was brought to
a close by a big ball held In Claggett’s
Hall, starting at 9 o'clock standard
s time- Preceding the dancing, the
coronation address was delivered by
State Senator Walter J. Mitchell, of
- Charles county.
Likes Southern Murjlanders
Charging the knights, Governor
Ritchie referred to the friendly feel
ing and relations he had always fos-
I ( tered for Southern Marylanders, and
I commended the people of the West
River community in particular for
* bringing about such a successful old
-1 fashioned tournament. He waß given
a big ovation. The Governor spoke
very hreifly, and In passing, byway of
political touch, expressed pleasure
’! that the electorate once in a while
j sends a Western Shore man to the
: Executive chair, instead of most of
* fhe Governors coming from the East
ern Shore. Governor Ritchie made
special reference to the fact that, In
* selecting the membership of the new
County Board of Education for Anne
Arundel, he chose Mrs. Edna E. Per
-1 rie, widow of the late Dr. Alfred If.
' Perrie, a woman, who, he said, had
taken a prominent part in affairs of
the parish, and along educational and
1 general lines.
knights Win Honors
R. A. Hungerford, of Marshall Hall.
, Charles county, won first honors in
the tilting, and the seven who cap
tured honors of crowning the maids,
, in the order named, follow:
J. F. Blandford, of Washington; J.
, W. Herron, Calvert ‘county; Mr. Mc-
I Clusky, of Washington; J. Cox, Wash
ington; Benjamin Watkins, 3rd., Anne
Arundel county; Dorothy Gray, Prince
Frederick, and Benjamin Parran, Jr.,
Calvert county.
The Judges were: Fernando Weems,
Shady Side; Benjamin Parran and
Charles Chaney, Calvert county.
SKETCH TO BE GIVEN
AT ST. STEPHEN’S HALL
On Friday evening, August 4, a
comic sketch will be given in St.
. Stephens’ parish hall near Gambrilla.
, The performance will begin at Bp.
i m., and will be given by two young
, gentlemen from the Maryland AgricuJ
. tural College assisted by others. An
. admission fee of thirty-five cents will
te charged, the proceeds to be used
to the hall.
, THIS SEASON!
THE SAME GOOD DEVIL
ED CRABS AT THE SAME
OLD PLACE, 236 WEST
STREET.
M. A. MILLER.
PHONE 832-M. jy-30
—— -- ■ - \

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